Crostata

“What’s in a name? That which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet.” (Shakespeare, “Romeo and Juliet”)

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About 3 years ago, I shared a recipe for the Apple Thingamajig, the name resulting from the inability of Zia and myself to remember the dessert’s correct name. In the Comments, some suggested calling it a “galette”, still others called it a “crostata.”, and I’ve even heard it called an “open-faced” or “rustic” pie. We would never have called it a crostata, however, for reasons I had intended to reveal shortly thereafter. You see, I had planned to share today’s recipe that Christmas (2011). Having missed that opportunity, crostata was to be featured the following December (2012), and, having failed that, last December (2013) would most certainly see a crostata recipe published.  And, so, here it is 2014 and the crostata recipe is finally making it to the big time. Even so, and to get back to my original point, say “crostata” to my family and we think of a jam-covered tart very much like the ones pictured throughout today’s post.

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Mom's Crostata 1

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So why share the recipe now? Well, recently a good friend of the Bartolini Kitchens, Stefan of Stefan’s Gourmet Blog, shared his crostata recipe. (If you’ve not visited Stefan’s site, this is your chance. His is a fantastic blog filled with many wonderful recipes and you’ll find his Italian dishes as well-researched as they are delicious.) Seeing his crostata recipe lit a fire under me and I decided this would be the year to finally share the recipe for the benefit of the rest of the Clan. This time, though, I’d publish it ASAP, so, that there would be little chance of it being forgotten again in the rush towards Christmas.

We could always count on Mom preparing several treats for the Christmas holiday. Though she started making chocolate candies in her retirement, she always made sure that there were plenty of biscotti and a crostata for Christmas Day. For me, it wouldn’t have been Christmas without either being present, no matter what else she had prepared — the platter of ravioli notwithstanding.

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Crostata 1

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Not having any tart pans, Mom prepared her crostata on a small baking sheet. (In professional kitchens, it would be called a “quarter baking sheet”.) She would use 2 types of jam, with half of her crostata being coated with either strawberry or, very rarely, cherry, and, the other half peach. Mom didn’t start making jam and preserves until her retirement, so, she used store-bought jams for her crostata. She served it in little pieces, like those I’ve shown, presumably because the last thing we kids needed was more sugar on Christmas Day. Using a three-tiered serving dish, she was able to control how much we kids ate. When it was empty, there’d be no re-filling it for hours. Of course, when company was expected, the contents of that serving dish were strictly off-limits. Don’t worry. We still had our fill — just not from that tray.

With regards to this post, I didn’t feel right calling it “Mom’s Crostata”, for it really isn’t. Mom didn’t leave us a true cookbook. Yes, she gave us kids our own cookbooks but none were a complete listing of all of her recipes. I do have a couple of her notebooks but the recipes listed are in varying stages of completion. Some are fully written, while others are nothing more than a few notes. Today’s recipe falls into the latter category, though I remember watching her spread the jam over the pastry crust, my mouth-watering the entire time. The only real question that remained was what recipe to use for the shortbread crust — and Mom’s notes did specify a “shortbread crust”. The answer came from a surprising source.

Good Cooking CookbookDuring my last visit with Zia, she mentioned that she possessed a “Five Roses Flour” cookbook from 1938 that once belonged to her Mother-in-Law — the woman I’ve referred to as “Nonna” in earlier posts. While paging through it, I came across a shortbread recipe. Now, this is no ordinary shortbread. The recipe’s name is listed as “Prize Shortbread” and it’s noted that the recipe “has won many prizes at Fall Fairs and Exhibitions.” There was certainly no need to look any further for a shortbread recipe. Here, I’ve shared the recipe as it was originally written, although when I prepared the shortbread, I used my food processor and the resulting crust was quite good. (See below for a possible use for extra shortbread dough.)

Unlike Mom, I used my own jams for today’s crostate. In the first photo, strawberry jam with balsamic and black pepper, and, peach jam with white balsamic were used. The addition of balsamic vinegar is why both jams appear unusually dark in the photos. The 2nd crostata was made with tart cherry jam, to which a little bit of almond extract was added. Feel free to use whatever jam(s) you prefer.

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Crostata Recipe

Ingredients

for the pastry

  • 2 cups all-purpose (AP) flour
  • 1/2 cup confectioner’s (powdered) sugar
  • 1 cup unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1 egg yolk
  • an egg yolk and water wash

for the filling

  • jam/preserves, amount depending upon the crostata’s size and whether 2 flavors are to be used.

Directions

  1. Pre-heat oven to 350˚ F (175˚ C).
  2. In a mixing bowl, use a spoon to mix the sugar, butter, salt, and egg yolk. Slowly add the flour and continue to mix until the spoon can no longer be used.
  3. Turn on to a lightly floured board and begin kneading, adding more flour until the dough begins to crack.
  4. Reserve a small portion of dough to be used for the lattice.
  5. Roll the dough between 2 sheets of wax paper until about 1/8 inch thick and slightly larger than the tart pan or baking sheet.
  6. Carefully remove one sheet of wax paper and place the dough on to the tart pan, dough-side down. Remove the remaining sheet of wax paper. Gently press the dough to fit the contours of the pan. Trim the excess dough and add to the reserve.
  7. Use an offset spatula to spread the jam, evenly covering the pastry dough.
  8. Roll out the reserved pastry dough as you did for the crust. Cut the dough into strips.
  9. Starting at one end, diagonally place the strips across the tart. Once completed, work from the other side placing strips diagonally in the opposite direction, creating a lattice in the process.
  10. Use the egg wash to lightly coat the lattice and any of the exposed crust.
  11. Bake in the lower third of a pre-heated oven for 30 minutes or until crust and lattice are lightly browned.
  12. Allow to cool before cutting. Serve at room temperature.

Shortbread pastry dough recipe found in “A Guide to Good Cooking” by the Five Rose Flour Co. (1938)

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Cherry Crostata 5

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Notes

The first time I prepared this crostata, I “blind baked” the tart shell for 8 minutes before filling it. This was a mistake, as you can see when looking at the first photo. The lattice is considerably lighter in color than the crust. After that attempt, I’ve no longer blind baked the crust and the finished tart’s shortbread appears more evenly baked.

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So, you’ve made a crostata and still have a little extra dough to burn …

I just couldn’t bring myself to discard the excess shortbread dough, nor was there enough to make another crostata. I was going to make a few shortbread cookies, a personal Shortbread Sandwichesfavorite, when I had an epiphany. Using a very small ice cream scoop, make equally sized balls of dough, placing them on a small baking sheet. Once the sheet was covered with evenly spaced dough balls, use the bottom of a glass to press each ball into a flat cookie. Bake in a pre-heated 350˚ F (175˚ C) oven until the edges just start to turn brown, about 15 minutes. Once cooled, use 2 cookies with a bit of Nutella in-between to make a single sandwich cookie. (You could just as easily use jam for the filling.) Like the crostate, these cookies were well-received by the taste testers that live above me. So well-received, in fact, that now I’m considering making a Nutella crostata.

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It’s déjà vu all over again …

lumache-con-farfalle-1

This past Saturday is known as All Soul’s Day and in Marche, the Bartolini ancestral home, snails, lumache, are traditionally served.  I won’t say much more, for fear of stealing the post’s thunder, other than to mention that you can learn all about preparing this delicacy by clicking HERE.

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Coming soon to a monitor near you …

Osso Buco Preview

Osso Buco

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155 thoughts on “Crostata

  1. Great post, John. I’d love to have a piece of your crostata right now. Thanks so much for the shout out. Interesting that your shortcrust pastry has more butter and less sugar than mine. It seems to look slightly more brittle (which is a good thing). Also interesting technique without resting and adding the egg before the flour. Nice gesture to tua mamma to make it square rather than the more usual round. Your ossobuco also looks great 🙂

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    • Thank you so much, Stefan. Had you not posted your recipe, I most probably would have forgotten about this one until far too late for the holidays, just as I’ve done every year. I really do believe that Mom kept the pieces small because she knew us so well. We would have devoured them. Instead, she doled out small pieces which we appreciated much more. I must admit, though, that making one now, as an adult, meant I didn’t have to share with my (greedy) siblings. 😀

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  2. I make jam crostatas all the time – and usually have parcels of sweet shortcrust dough in the freezer just to be handy. I generally use stone fruit jams – that is apricot, plum and cherry – but hadn’t thought to use two at once… Hmmm, something to think about. I’ve also never made them in tart pans before (preferring your mother’s more rustic method of a cookie sheet) and I can see how beautiful and professional it looks. I think I might get one of those packets of dough out of the freezer… Great post!

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    • Thanks. I’d no idea that the shortbread dough could be frozen. I did refrigerate mine until I was ready to make the sandwich cookies but didn’t think to take the idea to the next step. I’m so glad you mentioned this. Next time, I’ll make a double recipe of dough and freeze half for another day. I really did consider using a cookie sheet but, fact is, that’s a whole lot of crostata. The tart pan isn’t very large at all, allowing me to have enough crostata and still share some with the family that lives above me.

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    • Thanks, Ronit. Yes, this crostata hits all the right buttons for me — just like when I was 8 years old. 🙂
      I bet you make a great Osso Buco and look forward to seeing your recipe.

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  3. Do you know what I have just realised…
    I would be fat if I lived with you – far too much good food all of the time. Well now, isn’t that a strange way of complimenting someone. You know what I mean!
    Have a beautiful day John.
    🙂 Mandy xo

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  4. As soon as I saw the top photo, I said, “Oh, look! Sidewalks!” No reflection on your baking capabilities, it’s the English translation for the word used in Quebec. The French word is “trottoir”. I did make some balsamic strawberry jam earlier this year (I called it “strawbs with teeth”) and it’s fab and could replace a Superball it’s so thick. Nuked a moment to soften it, that would be just the thing, wouldn’t it?

    (PS Speaking of recipes, did you not see my “Bartolini Challenge” October 29 post, or shrink from it in fear and loathing?)

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    • Doesn’t balsamic go well with strawberries? Love that jam. Even so, I had to make a second crostata using cherry jam just to remain true to Mom’s original dish. My tasters lover all three so it really is up to you which one to make.
      Yes, i saw “The Challenge” and had a good laugh. I will share that post with Zia next week. She’ll get a kick out of it. I sure did. 😀

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    • Thanks. It’s funny. I never though about her use of 2 jams until I made Moms’s crostata. It was then that I realized what a great idea that was. As for her osso buco recipe, it’s coming on Wednesday. Stay tuned …

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    • Thank you so much, Maureen. Truly. I consider these recipes to be her legacy. Knowing that she’ll be remembered by others when a recipe is prepared means a great deal to me. I’m touched.

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  5. Hi John…when I come by to “see” you I always get the warmest feelings that bring me right back to my mom’s kitchen. Whatever it was that my mom called it, I so recall seeing this type of dessert over the holidays. You know, our moms didn’t fuss over cookbooks and details, what they made was with love and passed down handwritten notes from their mothers. Like your mom left, I too just have my mom’s notes and while I don’t think she put this one in, I know for sure she made something similar. This will be a part of my holiday baking this year. Thank you so much for FINALLY sharing!!

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    • I continue to be amazed at just how similar our family experiences were, Linda, right down the recipe notebooks. At one time, much of her notes made little sense to me but now, having done quite a bit of cooking, I’m finally able to decipher them. Zia’s been a big help, too.
      I do hope that you’ll prepare a crostata for your family this Christmas. I hope it brings to mid some wonderful memories, just as it did for me when I was preparing them for this post. 🙂

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  6. Well, it sure looks like this might have to make it to our Christmas table as well. In fact, once it’s cut into it’s bite size pieces, I’m thinking the leftovers (if there are any) will be great as little treats in the car for our trip down to see Mike’s parents. I love making crusts, so this one will be a joy to make. It will bring me that calm feeling I love, and at the holidays that’s paramount. Fabulous idea with the leftover dough too. You’ve got a winner here John. 🙂

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    • Thanks, Kristy. These would be perfect for a car ride but, if Mr N and Miss A are anything like us, you’ll have to make a 2nd crostata for the trip. We gobbled these down as soon as Mom brought them out. Those cookies were a pleasant surprise. I’ll definitely make them again but with a jam filling. They taste just like a crostata but without having to fiddle with a lattice. Unlike you, I’m not crust person. 🙂

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  7. The absence of this crostata in Christmas posts of past can certainly now be forgotten, John! As far as I’m concerned…you’ve got it done early (after all, Christmas is still weeks away!). It sounds and looks so delicious…from the shortbread crust to your wonderful jam fillings! I’m partial to peach, and that is what I’ll probably use (at least in half). Thanks for providing a “non-toast” use of my homemade jams. 🙂 Surprisingly, I don’t own a tart pan…but that won’t stop me from making this…I’ll use a quarter sheet pan just like your mom did!

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    • Thank you, Nancy. I didn’t have a tart pan either, until I decided to write this recipe. Making a crostata large enough to fill a cookie sheet, even a small one, is just too much for me. Like pasta, I’ve very little discipline when crostata are concerned and would have devoured much of it within 24 hours. This little tart pan was perfect. I was able to share with the family above and still have enough for myself without be piggish about it. 🙂
      As for those cookies. hope you have some leftover dough. They’re a real treat.=, good enough to make on their own. You’ll see.

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  8. Awesome crostata! It looks gorgeous, and that shortbread sounds awesome. And with your own jam? Winner! Those little Nutella cookies look awfully good, too. A Nutella crostata just has to happen, don’t you think? Can’t wait to see that!

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    • Thanks, John. Once I tasted one of those cookies, I knew that I’d be making a Nutella crostata. I’m also going to make a batch of jam-filled cookies, too. They’ll taste just like the crostata but with no lattice to fiddle with. For someone ham-fisted like me, that little detail was a real pain. 🙂

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    • Thank you so much. I love shortbread, though this is the first time I’ve tried to make it. Well, what better recipe to be your first than a prize-winner, even if those prizes were won over 75 years ago? 🙂

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    • Thanks for the vote of confidence. 🙂 When you’re dealing with shortbread and jam, it’s going to taste good, with or without leaks. A little thing like a leak would not have slowed us kids down one bit.

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  9. caro amico, it’s not only a yummy post, but a more intellectual one with Shakespeare’s famous quote… 🙂
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    @Osso Buco… I did prepare one 2 days ago, but the French way: with rice, wild mushrooms sauce and parsley… look forward to “eating” yours, grazie in advance! 🙂

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  10. I love making shortbread cookies, CJ, so your Crostata really appeals to me. Now, about the leftovers and the Nutella filling. You’ve finally succumbed to Nutella. You’re a good man, CJ!

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    • Hello, Kathleen, and thank you. Yes, I did succumb to Nutella’s allure. That jar has been on the counter, taunting me for weeks. I finally put it to good use. Very good use. I hope you’ll find out for yourself.

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  11. What an interesting dough! The whole thing seems absolutely perfect, and it so happens that a couple of weeks ago I made a batch of shortbread choc chip cookies, and was surprised by how much I enjoyed it.

    I think I need to get one of these rectangular baking dishes…. they make this crostata shine!

    (glad you did not let go another year without sharing this beauty!)

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    • Thanks, Sally. Seeing how good shortbread was with Nutrella, I can imagine how goo your choc chip cookies were. Sounds like a winner, to me. I really have wanted to share this in years past. Really. Every year, though, it was January when I realized I’d missed the window again and this is one recipe that I wanted to post before, and not after, the holiday. Now, one might say that by posting it this early, I’ve gone to the other extreme but, who knows? You may want to make it a part of your Thanksgiving tradition. 🙂

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        • I really do believe that Thanksgiving is more about who’s seated at the table rather than what’s on it, Sally. You’ll be with your family and that’s the important thing. I’ll probably be gone when you leave so I hope you have a safe trip and wonderful visit. Buon viaggio!

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  12. They look amazing! I have all this jam and I was trying to remember this lattice topped cake that my dad used to make and there was your post in my inbox. Crostata! Now I don’t have to call my dad, lol, who’s too hard of hearing to have a proper phone call with. So, not to early, but right on time for me.

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  13. Ahhh the recipe I have been looking for- Crostata!
    John, wordpress is not sending me your posts. I missed your fun Halloween decorations until today and I say BOO on WP for not letting me know you posted. I will try to resubscribe.
    The photographs are just wonderful.
    Bet it makes the kitchen smell delightful, too.

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    • Thank you so much, Ruth. I was awash in memories of Christmas for much of the writing of this post. These were such a part of our Christmas Day treats.
      So sorry about your WP troubles. I’m having some, too, and like you, I just keep unsubscribing and subscribing. I wish WP would do something about it for us. Thanks for your visits and kindly comments, Ruth, even under the most trying of circumstances.

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  14. The last time I ate jam tart was 1997, in Italy. I’ve never tried to replicate it because it was so dam good I didn’t want to spoil the memory. Your crostata recipe has been tempting me for weeks, I just love the look of it and the recipe looks just right so I think it’s time. Thanks John,

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    • Your comment made me try to remember when I last tasted Mom’s crostata and that had to be about 1998 or ’99. Like you, it’s been far too long. I hope you do give this a try and that it doesn’t disappoint. Nothing would have pleased Mom more than to hear that one of her recipes compared favorably with “the real thing” in Italy. 🙂

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  15. This is the perfect dessert! Seriously wonderful. It would satisfy everyone in my family, and I would assume travels really well, which is often important to me. I have an abundance of persimmons right now and was just looking at recipes for a persimmon butter made in a slow-cooker, and I’m thinking that although not quite as pretty as the jams and preserves I might try persimmons in this Crostata while I have more than I know what do with, and save the preserves for the holidays. I love baked goods with great eye appeal and a finished appearance that looks like it was lovingly crafted! This was worth waitng for, John. And about your little cookies, my grandmother had a child-favorite recipe she called “Empire Biscuits,” very simply Scotch shortbread (she was from Scotland) shaped into two cookies and in between the filling was high quality raspberry jam. She always made several of them at the same time as she made the shortbread rounds. Your cookies reminded me of them. I’ve gained five pounds just thinking about all of this. 🙂

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    • Persimmons? How fitting! Mom absolutely loved them and Dad would surprise her with a few when they were in season. Using them to make her crostata is just perfect. I bet your Grandmother’s Empire Biscuits would taste quite similar to this crostata, though her raspberry jam is probably far superior to mine. Even so, both treats are shortbread with jam and, in my book, that’s a winning combination. I will say, though, that the Nutella worked so well that there is definitely a Nutella crostata in my future. Now, if I could only think of a way to spread both raspberry jam and Nutella over the same crostata …. 😉

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    • Thank you, SIlva. I wish I had Mom’s recipe for the crust. I wonder if it was more like the Pasta Frolla that you mentioned. I guess I’ll never know. I do remember it, though. 🙂

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  16. I love the double jam crostata John – two flavours for the price of one! Everything about this recipe sounds wonderful… I’ll be baking this sometime soon for sure – just as soon as I’ve made a couple of batches of summer fruit jam! Hmmm, or the Nutella option sounds equally as tempting! Decisions, decisions!!! 🙂

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    • I know! That Nutella worked far better than I had imagined. Those little cookies sure were tasty! Since making them, I’ve been debating whether to just make them next time instead of the crostata. They certainly are easy enough to make; there’s no dough to roll out; and, best of all, there’s no lattice work to fiddle with. When you’re as ham-fisted as I am, the less fiddling the better. 🙂

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  17. I am THRILLED that you solved the shortbread crust mystery.. I have been searching for this FOREVER! .. and now it is makig its way to my own Notes in my own note book.. this is a beautiful post John, gorgeous dish and great shots.. really good

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    • Thank you so much, Celi. This was one of those times when I could feel Mom in the kitchen with me. This was her Christmas treat and no one else in the family made a crostata, at least that I know of. I’m sure she was with me, making sure I made it just right. 🙂

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  18. YUM. Great-looking crostata John. You can’t go wrong with a recipe with ‘prize’ in the title, and that crust looks perfect! What a bonus that you had some left over; the bickies are a great idea! I’m always too scared to use shortcrust without blind baking first, but I’m game to give it a try. I can see that it makes sense for a more evenly-colored crust. I’m suddenly ravenous with all this talk of crust and biscuits…

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    • Thanks, Saskia. This was a real treat to make, bringing back all kinds of Christmas memories and Mom. And what a bouns those “bickies” turned out to be!!! Like you, I was leery of coating the crust with jam without blind-baking it first. Well, once I did it, I saw that it was a mistake. Placing the uncooked crostata in the lower third of the oven will make sure that the bottom crust cooks and that the lattice matches it — and nothing gets burned. Well, maybe the roof of your mouth if you don’t let it cool before sampling a piece. A lesson I learned the hard way. 🙂

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  19. This post is full of wonderfulness! Firstly, the shortbread dough crust! Secondly, the jam mixed with balsamic vinegar! (My favourite husband and I have recently started sampling different types of balsamic, so this recipe is very timely.) Thirdly, shortbread with nutella!

    This is going on my Baking List. I’ll be a hero.

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    • I remember Mom’s crostata being a favorite part of the holidays, Ruth, but I’d forgotten just how good these were. Suddenly, after one taste, I was Mom, putting them away, out of my sight. They wouldn’t have lasted that first night if I hadn’t. Wish I could say the same about the Nutella cookies. I age a few to the boys upstairs and the rest were gone shortly after that photo was taken. ((sigh))
      I bet you and your “favorite husband” would like that strawberry jam with balsamic and black pepper. The balsamic gives counters the sweetness and it finishes with a bit of a bite from the pepper. It’s probably the favorite jam that I make.

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  20. Love the story to go with the crostata . . . . OK: love the lumache even more – can’t think of any time this would not draw all my attention . . . BUT osso buco and am ‘all yours’ if you know what I mean . . . .hmpph: I guess we’ll have to wait till you have spent fascinating autumnal foodie hours with Zia ere we hear of that!! Guess Max is snoring by now .. . .a long quiet rub from me please . . .

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    • Hello, Eha! Running a little behind here but, what else is new?
      I wish you could have seen Zia’s face when I showed her the can of lumache and announced we were going to have it for dinner. I’ve surprised her a few times but this one really got her. 🙂
      The osso buco is coming and then there I’ll be on hiatus. This will be my last trip home for the year and last chance to run a couple recipe by Zia. There’s a couple surprises for her but none to rival the lumache. 🙂

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  21. Your pictures are gorgeous and have me wanting to jump up and go make one of these crostatas. Definitely will be using homemade jam, but wish I had a jar of your strawberry jam with balsamic and pepper. My MIL gave me some of her 1930’s cookbooks. They are a hoot and it seems that most were developed for promotional reasons. Great post John!

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    • Thanks for the compliments, MJ. This crostata was perhaps my favorite treat that Mom made every Christmas. That strawberry jam is my favorite, too. I love the bite the pepper gives it. You’re right about the cookbooks. This one has many great recipes but all mention the benefits of using “Five Roses Flour”.

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  22. I see you finally managed to bake it and quite early in the year, before Christmas. John if you could bake and decorate that Crostata the way you did, then you’re not allowed to have any more excuses regarding “lack of baking skills” You are a certified pro. Please send me a virtual slice!!!

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    • Oh, Liz,. I wish I had filmed the making of that lattice atop the crostata. You all would have had a good laugh. Now that I see how much easier it is to make the sandwich cookies, however, I know I’l be making them again and leave the lattice behind. 🙂

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  23. Mmmm shortbread pastry and jam or nutella…. even a not particularly sweet tooth like me would make a pig of herself… I know good when I see it and taste it. I love that the jam and criss-crosses look like stained glass 🙂

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    • I know exactly what you mean, EllaDee. I gave away a good portion of each crostata because I knew that I’d inhale them if I didn’t. And those cookies didn’t stand a chance. They were gone a few minutes after the photo was taken. Stained glass? I honestly never noticed that, though you’re right. I guess my eyes were somewhat glazed seeing a crostata, whether now or at one of the Christmases of my youth. 🙂

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  24. Beautiful! You always manage to bring back memories with your recipes. Since I know you’re not a fan of baking and neither am I, it must be an easy recipe to put together (especially if you have a food processor 😉 – I’ll definitely try this for my next dinner party!

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    • Thank you. I find it amazing how many of us share similar experiences, even though are families are in no way related nor did they know each other in any way. Yes, use a food processor to make the dough. It will come together very quickly and easily. There was no way I would have attempted this recipe if I had to mix the dough by hand, like the original recipe stated. No way at all. 🙂

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    • I’ve been unable to comment on your posts for at least 2 weeks now. The page says I must log in to comment, even though I am already signed into WordPress. When I supply my username and password, it rejects them. I wonder if others have mentioned this problem to you. It wasn’t always this way and when you post a recipe as tasty as your burrata and tomato toasts, I’d like to tell you so. 🙂

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      • Thanks you John, indeed you’re not the first one to tell me. I have made some changes on Sunday and I hope it’s fine now. I tested it and finally managed to post a comment. Thanks a lot for your indirect comment though. I’m keeping my fingers crossed it will work from now on.

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        • I’m really sorry to say that I tried again and my username still wasn’t being accepted. I’ll be heading to Zia’s shortly and will try again when I return home in a couple of weeks. Good luck! I know you must be frustrated.

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          • It is getting frustrating… I would appreciate if you could let me know if the comments finally work. Thanks. Meanwhile I hope you’ll have a nice stay at Zia’s.

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          • I just tried to comment on your latest post — thanks for the mention, by the way — it asked me to log in and then rejected my attempt, saying my user name wasn’t valid. Sorry to be the bearer of bad news and to do it here but I didn’t know of any other way to contact you. Good luck and I hope you sort out the problem with a minimum of cursing. 🙂

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  25. Funny how our memories dictate what we call things. I made the apple pie type crostata over the weekend and it was gone in seconds!! It went quite well with Bailey’s cinnamon ice cream. This version looks fabulous. I have the same shape tart pan so this may have to happen soon!

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    • An apple crostata would be wonderful, especially this time of year. Your adding cinnamon ice cream puts it over the top! I will definitely give it a try. How could I not? I bought the tart pan just for this crostata. I knew that if I followed Mom’s example and used a cookie sheet, I’d have eaten most of it by nightfall. I still ate most of these but I started with a much smaller amount. When it comes to a crostata, know thyself.. 🙂

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  26. You mentioned the C word John, and I’m not talking pies I’m talking Christmas! Grump, grump, grump. OK that fruit pie or tart of yours looks totally enticing. My mum always use dto make jam tarts with left over pieces of pastry, nothing as smart as this, but the basics are there. Thank you for the reminder.
    and lovely to be catching up with my blogging friends too x

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    • Claire!!! So good to “see” you! I hope all’s well with you and yours. You sure are looking good in your new avatar photo. 🙂
      You’re so right. I really didn’t want to mention the C word but had little choice. This crostata will forever be a holiday treat, like Mom’s biscotti or Zuppa inglese. Even so, I’ll try to refrain from using the word until far later in the year, from now on. With that in mind, I do hope to see you again before too long. 😉

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    • As a child, you sound like one of the boys that lives above me. He doesn’t like these at all. Too sweet. His brother, however, gobbles them up. If his tastes change, he’ll regret all the sweets he’s passed up during his youth.
      As good a cook and baker that you are, Michelle, you’d find this recipe a breeze to make and would probably create something far better than I could ship. No doubt about it. 🙂

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  27. Well, now I’ve never made a crostata and I’m going to have to do something about that! I made jam bars (a very distant cousin) when I discovered I had far too much jam to ever use up. I think these pretty crostata tarts would just do the trick for the snow we are expecting on Sunday. A hot cup of tea and a slice of crostata would be heavenly. *sigh* it’s so nice to have time to blog read and visit my favs.. I hope all is well with you and Max, from the baking coming out of your kitchen I think it must be. Did Max get to sample your Nutella cookies… or are those too much chocolate for him?

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    • Glad that you’ve more time for us in the blogging world, Barb. I feel I must warn you. Once you make these and serve them to your family, they are going to want you to bake them again … and again. We all loved them — and still do. Like you, I plan on using up last season’s jam on them. Sure beats a piece of toast.
      All is well here, tho a little frantic. I spent the week away form WP with a variety of workers here, getting a few things done before Winter sets in. By now, the predicted snowstorm has probably hit your area. I hope it’s not too bad. A cold spell is heading our way but it won’t be too bad nor or we expected to get any snow. I hope they don’t change the forecast. I know I’m asking a lot but it would be nice for the snow to hold off until December. As for Max, he’s fine and snoring and snoring right behind me. He’s not the food thief he once was or maybe I’m just better at keeping an eye on him. No matter the reason, he didn’t get one cookie or piece of crostata, though I did have to caution him a couple times when his nose got precariously close to the platter. You cannot teach an old dog new tricks. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • I can stand to do a little more baking around here. I made a batch of simple biscuits after going weeks without baking.. and burnt the bottoms! I was so distressed, telling my family it was because I am out of “practice”.. that they ate them and pretended they were great. Haha.. every.single.burnt.biscuit lol. So.. baking crostata over and over again would be heaven in my books! We did get hit with snow and howling wind so a little baking while staying warm inside is a great idea. I’ve tried to keep people food away from Bella, but it seems she and I need to have some scrambled eggs every morning:) Perhaps Max would like some eggs? They are good for you:D

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        • Now that’s love, eating every last burnt-on-the-bottom biscuit. I bet they weren’t nearly as bad as you think they were. We’re all our worst critics in the kitchen. If you’re good with crusts, then you should have little problem with this crostata. I really cannot use a rolling pin — if the rolling pin company watched me, they’d probably prosecute — so crusts give me trouble. That’s one of the (many) reasons that I don’t bake very often. As for Max eating eggs, trust m. Max eats just about everything. He even cleared a serving dish of Brussels sprouts while I was in the next room taking pics for a future blog post. To be fair, there was bacon in the dish, too. So, yes, Max would love some eggs and don’t worry if there’s a little eggshell in the mix, too. 🙂

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  28. I love that quote from Shakespeare; has there ever been a more brilliant writer. I did visit the house he lived in with his wife and when I was there I practically bowed down in front of it. This just looks like such a yummy gorgeous dish xx

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    • Shakespeare was such a gifted author and what a legacy he left us.I can hardly imagine what today’s theater would be like without his works to lead the way. I’ve not been to his home but wold love to see it. Like you, it would feel like I was walking on hallowed ground. 🙂

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  29. Beautifully presented no matter what you call it; but crostata it is. I have a fear of making pies or anything requiring making dough (I have no idea why). This sounds not too difficult, so maybe this is what will get me over that fear.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Angeline, and I’m with you. I have no crust making skills. You should see me use a rolling pn. It’s really pathetic! Even so, this wasn’t too bad. The worst was making the lattice. Trying to make the thin ribbons was a real pain. I may just forget about them the next time. I’m sure Mom wouldn’t mind. 🙂

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  30. I love that these are made with a shortbread dough crust and not a regular pastry – delicious! And it’s great that they are made in the long tins – I can’t be doing with making jam tarts becuase of all the rolling, cutting out circles, rolling out again and repeating….this is perfect! Looking forward to the ossobuco 🙂

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  31. Like your Mom’s method of making the crostata on a baking sheet. Also like your 2 jams idea. I would make ice cream sandwiches with the shortbread cookies, wouldn’t mind having one at this very moment. Looking forward to your Osso Buco recipe, this is one of my favorite Italian dishes.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Than you, Norma. I didn’t think of ice cream sandwiches. What a fantastic idea! I definitely have to remember that for next Summer. The osso buco recipe is on its way. Stay tuned. 🙂

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    • Thank you. Our families are similar, Dedy. I’m really the first person to gather up all of the recipes and record them. Now I need to find time to put them into a book. One day …

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  32. Isn’t it funny how some holidays just aren’t ‘right’ without certain traditions? I remember one Thanksgiving deciding to skip my sweet potato casserole – my husband and daughter were horrified!
    These look like very special treats and I love how you’ve used two different jams. That would make it hard to decide so I guess you have to have at least 2 pieces right?

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    • I know what you mean about Thanksgiving dinner, Diane. When I hosted the dinner, I tried introducing a new side dish for a few years. No matter how well received, I wasn’t “allowed” to retire one of the old standards. So, more and more food was being prepared. I gave up trying to add something new. It was exhausting!
      Oh, go ahead and have more than 2. Why pressure your palate into making a decision after only one of each? 🙂

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  33. Hey John, I just found your blog from EllaDee’s link. I’m a third-gen Italian from Chicago who goes through cooking spurts (and noncooking spurts). This crostata looks delicious, and what you did with the left over dough, OMG. Nutella! I want to make those.

    I wrote a short memoir about how I learned to cook. I put a recipe on my blog on occasion, since it’s mostly a writer’s blog. I do have a recipe page with the links to those recipes, and a few of them were passed down to me. I’m so glad you have those recipes from your family. I have many scribbled recipes from both of my grandmothers, but they weren’t well written out. I wish I would’ve spent time cooking with them before they left this earth. It’s so good that you did that with your family.

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    • Hi, Lori. It’s a pleasure meeting you. I just took a quick look at your WP home and checked out the recipe page. You’ve got some good ones listed and I cannot wait to get some time to look deeper, as well as to check out your writings. Although mom and I did some cooking together, I really wish I could have spent more time with her, learning all of her recipes and “tricks” in the kitchen. I have been able to spend time with her sister, “Zia”, and I’ve learned most of our family’s recipes from her. This blog would have ended after a couple of months without her help, no doubt about it.
      I’m glad you popped in, Lori, and look forward to seeing more you in the future, whether here or at your place. Take care. 🙂

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  34. This crostata is lovely John. It’s quite different from what I call a crostata, which is basically a pie presented atop a very rustic (read: lopsided) crust with the edges folded over. Your crostata has reminded me of an old Belgian recipe, a jam tart that my mother used to make. Mom died in June. In a few weeks I’ll be hosting a baby shower for my eldest daughter, and I think serving that tart will be a touching way to honour my mother, who would so have wanted to be there. It’s our first special event since her passing, so I imagine there may be a few bittersweet moments.

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    • Your crostata, Mar, is what Zia and I call a Thingamajig because we never could figure out a good name for it. It sure is a simple way to create an apple pie-like dessert, especially for those who are crust-challenged like me. 🙂
      So sorry, Mar, to learn of your Mother’s passing. Too bad she wasn’t here and in good health for her great-grandchild’s birth. Serving this tart will be a great way to honour her, just as it is when I make one with my Mom in mind. I know Mom was in the kitchen with me when I made these and I bet yours will be with you, too. 🙂

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  35. I’ll say it again, John, you’ve turned into quite baker…and photographer! Look at all your lovely photos! So you grew up with a crostata and I grew up with jam tart 🙂 Oh, I love jam tarts or crostate, what’s in a name? It’s all deliciousness to me! I love a straightforward strawberry or raspberry one, with lashings of warm custard. Have you tried them with custard? You must, I think you’ll love it.
    Can’t wait for your Osso buco recipe, I made it once a while back and loved it. I’d love to see how you make yours. Hope you’re having a great week! Mines about to get hectic soon, so I thought I’d better visit you!

    Liked by 1 person

    • You really are too kind, Nazneen. You spoil me with your compliments — and I’m very grateful!. 🙂
      I’ve not tried a custard tart and you’re the 2nd person to mention them. It does sound like a great way to go, especially with a little jam. Yum! I have to give it a try.
      Osso buco is coming! Osso buco is coming! Less than an hour to go, Nazneen. I hope your week is more calm than you expected. I’m glad that you managed to drop by and hope to see you again real soon. 🙂

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  36. Bonjourno John! Your photos are just drop dead gorgeous. They look like something out of a gourmet magazine. I love your mom’s idea of using two kinds of jam as that would just make me an excuse to have a second slice. Flaky crust and perfect with an afternoon cappuccino. It is amazing the things that one can find when you gather with family. It is like little pieces of your life getting glued back together one memory at a time like the magical cookbook. Send Zia my well wishes. Take Care, BAM

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    • Buona notte, BAM! Thank you so much for the lovely compliments. One of the joys of living alone is that there’s no one around when I have a 2nd — or 4th — piece, so, no excuses are required. I’m living la dolce vita! 🙂
      You’re so right about getting together with family. I’ve found that this blog will often spur the discussion and reminiscing. It’s kind of nice to see and be a part of.
      I’ll be leaving for Zia’s very soon and I’ll be sure to give her your well-wishes. Take care, BAM.

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  37. Thank you so much for this recipe. I have that tart pan and also 4 small pumpkin shaped tart pans that the bottom lifts out of. I made tons of jam last year and this recipe will be a big hit for Thanks giving dinner. I enjoy looking through your recipes.

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    • Individual tart pans will be perfect for a crostata. They’ll make quite the impression on Thanksgiving, I’m sure. I know what you mean about having jam around the house. I can only eat so much toast, no matter how good the jam. There’s no growing tired of crostata, on the other hand. I love ’em!
      Thanks, too, for taking the time to go through the archives. I’m very glad that you’ve liked what you’ve seen. Have a good week.

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  38. Pingback: St. Gallen Convent Jam Pie - FoodidiesFoodidies

  39. I’m pretty certain there are pools of drool on my iPad now. Those look luscious and adding the balsamic vinegar to the jams must give it that extra tangy oomph. Definitely worth the 10 miles of biking calories 🙂

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  40. Pingback: Foodie Friday: Crostata | Mom the Obscure

  41. I made your Crostata recipe this past weekend with Fig preserves and I topped it with a little bit of prosciutto (I’m a salty-sweet girl). I’m totally addicted to this dessert. I’ve even taking this to my family Thanksgiving this year. Thanks Again for sharing this wonderful recipe.

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    • Oooh. I love the idea of a savory crostata and fig jam with prosciutto would be the way to do it. That sounds wonderful and will give me a reason to make fig jam next year.
      I hope your family all enjoyed your dessert on Thanksgiving. I know I would have! Thanks for coming back to tell me.

      Liked by 1 person

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