The Kitchens have a Peach of a Jam

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Peaches in this area are just passing their peak season and the farmers markets are filled with them. Over the next few weeks, peaches will disappear and the pears and apples will supplant them. For now, though, they seem to be calling to me, just as the tart cherries, blueberries, and strawberries did before them. So, I’ve answered their call and bought some each time I’ve gone to the market. Admittedly, the first purchases were eaten as-is. How could I not?  After that, I made ice cream and posted a recipe in honor of Mom’s birthday last week. Having made a few quarts of peach ice cream, it was time to move on.

Several weeks ago, when strawberries were at their peak for this area, I posted a strawberry jam recipe made with Balsamic vinegar and black pepper. In the Comments section of that post, Betsy, of Bits and Bread Crumbs, and Elaine, of Le Petit Potager, discussed making peach jam.  Betsy wondered about using balsamic and black pepper. Hmm …

After my last trip to the farmers market, I had what I thought was enough peaches to make a small-ish batch of peach jam — with a little balsamic vinegar. The recipe enclosed within the pectin packaging called for 4 cups of cleaned fruit. Incredibly, I somehow ended up with 7½ cups. I decided to use 6 cups here and to save the rest for a custard-based ice cream. (Recipe to come.) This recipe is very similar to the one used to make the strawberry jam, except I used white balsamic so that the peaches wouldn’t discolor; I used both lemon juice and zest; and, I didn’t add any pepper — maybe next time. Because I used so many more peaches than I had intended, I followed a tip from the Pick Your Own website. The author always adds an additional 20% of pectin than what the recipe calls for, just to ensure a good set. So, rather than add 49 g (1 envelope) I added 60 g to the peach mixture. My jam set perfectly although, next time, if I use 6 cups of peaches, I’ll increase the amount of white balsamic by another tablespoonful or two.

What if you’re not a balsamic lover? What if you just want to make some really good peach jam? Well, then, waste no time and click this link to go to Barb’s Just a Smidgen blog, where you’ll be treated to a fantastic recipe for making peach jam, not to mention a thorough, step by step, description of the canning process.

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Peach with Balsamic Vinegar Jam Recipe 

yield: 7 – 8 cups

Ingredients

  • 6 cups fresh peaches, cleaned, peeled, sliced or chopped
  • 4 cups sugar – separated
  • 1 envelope + 20% more low-sugar pectin (60 g  total pectin)
  • 1 tsp butter (optional)
  • pinch of salt
  • juice & zest of one medium-sized lemon
  • ½ cup white balsamic vinegar

Directions

To Prepare

  1. Sterilize the jars and wash the jar lids and bands in hot, soapy water. Place lids and bands in a deep bowl and pour near-boiling water over them.
  2. Start bringing to boil a large, deep canning kettle of water to be used for the canning process and a second, smaller pot of water to be used to replenish water that may boil away during the canning process.
  3. Mix the pectin with ¼ cup of the sugar. Set aside.
  4. Working in batches, add sliced/chopped peaches into a large bowl and use a potato masher to smash them as much as you like. I skipped this step; my slices were thin and needed no further handling.

To Make the Jam

  1. Place the peaches and the pectin-sugar mixture into a heavy-bottomed pot over a med-high heat. A Dutch oven works nicely. Add butter, if desired, to limit foam.
  2. Stirring frequently, you are heating the peaches until a rolling boil is achieved at about 220˚F. A rolling boil is one that will not dissipate when the pot’s contents are stirred.
  3. Add the remaining sugar and stir well. Stir frequently while you wait for the pot to return to a rolling boil.
  4. Once a rolling boil has returned, keep stirring for exactly one minute before removing the pot from the heat.
  5. With a large spoon, carefully skim the surface to remove any foam.
  6. Add balsamic vinegar, lemon juice, and zest. Stir well to thoroughly combine.

To Preserve

  1. Using a funnel and large ladle, fill each jar to ¼ inch from the rim. Wipe the rim to make sure no jam has spilt, place a lid on each jar, and then the band, tightening until “finger tight” but not as tight as you can make it. Act quickly, filling and capping all the jars.
  2. Jars placed directly on the kettle’s bottom might burst, so, a rack of some sort must be put into the canning kettle to cover the bottom. Many large pots have one, as do many pressure cookers. (I use a rack from an old pot that has long since been discarded.)
  3. Keep each jar level as you place them, one by one, into the canning kettle filled with now boiling water. The jars should not touch each other, nor should they be allowed to tip over. Depending upon the size of the kettle and number of jars, you may need to work in batches.
  4. Once the jars are in the kettle, make sure that there is at least one inch of water over the top of the tallest jar(s). If not, add boiling water from the smaller pot mentioned in Step 2 of  To Prepare.
  5. Cover the pot and begin timing when the water returns to the boil. The jars must be boiled, “processed”, for 10 minutes.
  6. Meanwhile, place a baking sheet on a level surface and line it with a clean kitchen towel.
  7. Once 10 minutes have passed, carefully remove each jar and place it on to the towel-lined baking sheet. Leave about an inch separating the jars.
  8. Once all the jars have been processed and placed on the baking sheet, remove the baking sheet & jars to a place that is draft-free and where they will remain undisturbed for 24 hours.
  9. After 24 hours have passed, check each jar to insure it’s sealed and then store on a shelf in a cool, dark place, where it will stay fresh for months.

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It’s déjà vu all over again …

This time of year, our farmers markets are filled with fresh fruits and vegetables, and with Labor Day barbecues quickly approaching, there’s no better time to make a batch of Chicago-style giardiniera. This colorful condiment is a great way to add some crunch, and a little heat, to your burgers, dogs, wurst, and sandwiches. The recipe was shared last August and you can find it by clicking  HERE.

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By any other name …

“Sunset Celebration”

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115 thoughts on “The Kitchens have a Peach of a Jam

    • OK. I admit it. I had one small, half-cup jar — not pictured — that I opened the next morning for my toast. I just couldn’t wait, even though I’ve 2 other jars of jam opened. 🙂

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    • Thanks, Roger, but don’t let the jam fool you. I’m still in full ice cream mode here. I’ve a 2nd peach recipe to post and a plum ice cream recipe to try. Life is so hard! 😉

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  1. Pingback: Peach with Balsamic Vinegar Jam Recipe | Internet Billboards

  2. Pingback: Peach with Balsamic Vinegar Jam Recipe | Le Marche and Food | Scoop.it

    • Thank you for taking the time to comment. It is awfully hard to pass up the peaches in the markets. I haven’t been able to yet and buy a few at every market I visit. If you do make this jam, I hope you’ll enjoy it.

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  3. I love the first photo John, I just want to bite into one of those fragrant peaches! I love how the sunshine makes them glow! Great jam recipe, my Nonna loved making homemade jams. Am I invited to that morning tea? Yx

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  4. Pingback: Peach with Balsamic Vinegar Jam Recipe | La Cucina Italiana - De Italiaanse Keuken - The Italian Kitchen | Scoop.it

  5. Pingback: Peach with Balsamic Vinegar Jam Recipe « goodthingsfromitaly

  6. Pingback: Peach with Balsamic Vinegar Jam Recipe | EAT MEDITERRANEAN | Scoop.it

    • Hey, Dave! I just made a batch myself. Well, actually 2 batches. The first got dumped on my kitchen floor. Luckily, it was in the brine. As bad as the clean-up was, it would have been far worse if the veggies had been dressed with the oil & vinegar. I’ll be delivering some to a certain Friend we have in common. I’ll tell her you said “Hi!” 🙂

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  7. A peachy post. I love peach jam as well as peach cobbler. Thanks also for the link to the Chicago-style giardiniera. I think I will try making it.

    BE ENCOURAGED! BE BLESSED!

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  8. I’d love a lesson on how you peel your peaches, John. The jam sounds incredible, and so beautiful. I’d love to make jam but the yield quantity scared me, we just don’t go through that much jam.
    I love that condiment, it looks gorgeous! I’m checking it out now.

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    • Good morning, Eva. Peeling peaches is no different than peeing tomatoes. Use a paring knife to make a small “x” on the fruit’s bottom and place them in boiling water. If the peaches are very ripe, leave them for 30 seconds. Less ripe peaches will take more time, as much as another 30 seconds. When the time is up, place them in an ice bath to stop the cooking process and, after a few minutes. the skins should come off pretty easily.
      I love that giardiniera, Eva, and put it on every type of sandwich imaginable. I hope you’ll like it, too.

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      • So pleased your girls are surviving; you’ve had such a hot summer!
        It will be lovely to make your jam when the peaches are in season; I noticed my strawberries have tiny fruit on them today(so exicted).

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        • I’m very happy to read that your strawberries are starting to fruit. Unfortunately for us, that means Old Man Winter has packed his bags and is heading north.
          Yes, the girls are doing much better now. One other bush is still in trouble and I worry if it will survive the Winter. I think I’ll cover it and hope for the best. Still, considering how bad so many looked about 6 weeks ago, having only 1 in danger makes me happy. Fingers crossed for next year.

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  9. Peach jam is my favorite!!! I wouldn’t have thought to combine peaches with balsamic, genius to use white balsamic. I bet this has loads of flavor! I envy that you were able to pick so much fresh fruit this summer! Yummy recipe!

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    • Thanks, Tanya. Chicago is in a great location and our farmers markets draw vendors from Wisconsin and Michigan, as well as from downstate Illinois. It may not be as cheap as a farm stand on some rural road but you certainly cannot beat the selection. I try to take full advantage. 🙂

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  10. And after the pears will be the dreaded mandarin – the true sign of winter! But you will be enjoying your peach jam on toast or scones during the colder months. This jam looks so delicious and I would love to try it with the white balsamic. Shame I have to wait so long for peach season before I can try this jam. Love your jars John xx

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    • Shhh, Charlie! Our winter can be so severe that we don’t mention its coming until much later in the year. We live in a state of denial, believing that ours is a summer that never ends. 😉

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  11. Never made jam myself, my husband is in charge, but he is partial to blueberries and mixed berries. I confess to never eating jam, I guess it’s something that was not a habit in my family growing up in Brazil, and for some reason it never appealed to me. But, I must say looking at your beautiful production, it made me want to try a slice of nice crusty bread with a spread of golden peach jam 😉

    the balsamic and pepper seem like a fantastic twist

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    • A childhood without jam? That’s terrible, Sally! I hope your husband makes enough jam to help you make up for lost time. Everyone, it seems, has their own jam preference. While your husband likes blueberry and mixed berry jams, I’m not really a fan of either. I do like, however, tart cherry, strawberry, grape, and, of course, peach. No matter what kind you like, though, serving it on crusty bread like you described is a real treat.

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  12. Summer’s bounty transformed into heaven. I feel the urge to make toast! Butter to the edge and a thick spread of your delicious jam would start the day perfectly.
    And your Sweet Celebration looks happy. Tending roses and being rewarded with such a display must be satisfying. Thanks for sharing your “girls” with all of us.
    Life in peachy in the kitchens , all right, and will be sent out and shared with my jamming friends. If one were to be in a jam, this one looks just right to me.
    Summer is grand with your excellent offerings. Mmmmmm.

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    • Thank you so much, Ruth. More so than years past, the peaches this year seemed to look so much more luscious. I’ve not been able to go to a market without buying at least a few — and I’ve been making ice cream and jam ever since. I’ve got another ice cream recipe yet to post, so, stay tuned.
      My roses are doing much better than they were a month ago. One of my girls — the one that was skipped — actually bloomed! I thought she was a goner. If she blooms again, I’ll ost the photo. When you see “who” she is, her late arrival will make sense. 🙂

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    • I agree with you, MD, and that’s why I always buy more than needed for the recipe. THis is also how I ended up with 7 1/2 cups of peaches instead of the 4 cups the recipe called for. I guess I got carried away. 🙂

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  13. Oh my! This sounds absolutely delicious John! I just bought some white balsamic at the farmer’s market this past weekend. I swear I could drink the stuff straight from the bottle. It’s SOOOO good. It sounds fabulous with peaches and better yet in a peach jam. I can just smell and taste it in my imagination. 😉

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    • Good morning, Kristy! How did I ever make it through life without white balsamic? Love the stuff! What I especially like is finding new ways to use it. This week it’s jam. Who knows what will be next? Any ideas? I’m open to suggestions.

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  14. John, your rose matched perfectly with the peaches!! Did you do that on purpose? 🙂
    So I’m beginning to get comfortable with this canning process. You make it sound doable and easy. My one concern has always been all that sugar! Do you know, is it mostly for taste or is it necessary for the jelling part as well? Like, if I decreased the sugar (alot) would it not turn out? I’ll purchase sugar free jams (no fake sugar stuff) because the homemade ones are just too filled with sugar. I want to truly enjoy and eat alot of it! I love the idea of the balsamic vinegar!

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    • Hi, Linda. As much as I’d love to say that this week’s rose was planned to coincide with the peaches, that would be one tall tale. It’s just a coincidence. I’ve pretty much followed the rose beds. The first, my girls, is on one side of the yard. The 2nd is in front of the garage and the one I’m sharing now, the 3rd, is on the remaining side of my yard. There’s one more rose to go, although one of my girls may make an unscheduled appearance. 😉
      I agree about the sugar. This recipe actually uses about half of the sugar required for “regular” jam. Really! I’ve never made a “regular” batch of jam or jelly because of the high amount of sugar. If you do make jam, be sure to get the correct pectin for the amount of sugar you plan on using. There is one kind for “regular” and another for low or no sugar. I believe that will give you a set as good as if you used a ton of sugar. The Pick Your Own website is great and has a wealth of info. I turn to it every time I make jam or can something. And if I can be of any help, you know I’m here. 🙂

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  15. What incredible peaches you have!! Beautiful.. they almost seem to glow, or is that “blush”? I’m blushing from your kind words, thanks so much. But more importantly.. what a great idea for a peachy jam, I have some white balsamic here (I’m back home) but left the canning equipment at the lake, so I shall have to try that one next summer! Oh.. that’s going to be a long wait, but I ought not purchase another set of canning equipment, dare I? To top things off.. a lovely crisp petaled blushing peachy rose. I’m so happy your roses are still in bloom:D Have a lovely day in your garden, John! Smidge

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    • Thank you, Barb. I couldn’t possibly post this recipe without mentioning that stellar post of yours. You did such a good job and that recipe sounds delicious. Peaches and cinnamon go so well together. I mentioned in an earlier comment that this year’s peaches seem so much more luscious than in years past. It’s probably just my perception but I’ve been unable to leave a farmers market without a bag of peaches in my hand.
      I’m lucky all but one of my roses have rebounded after such a dreadful early summer. I expect they’ll continue to bloom until November, unless we have a few consecutive days with temps below freezing. My “last rose of summer” actually blooms sometime in autumn. 🙂

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  16. I’m in a bit of conflict now as to what to make if I only have time for one…the giardiniera (hope I got that name right) or the peach jam. I will definitely be going to the farmer’s market this weekend and I am sure we are also at the very end of some of this wonderful stone fruit! I love balsamic and know this recipe has to be good. The “relish” is gorgeous, too, and I love the idea of the heat! Perhaps I can get to both in the next two weeks! 🙂 I love the look of the jam in those little jars! What great gifts. We were out of town last weekend, but I’m making the peach ice cream this weekend for guests. I’ll let you know what I think…although I already know it’s got to be amazing! 🙂 D

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    • You sound like me, Debra. Last weekend, I made giardiniera, this jam, and another type of peach ice cream. It seemed like I was forever in the kitchen but it sure is nice having it all done now. If you like more heat in your giardiniera, just use whole jalapeños or switch to Serrano chilis. My problem with regulating the heat is that you never know how hot the chilis are until you use them. I tend to err on the side of caution.
      The peach ice cream recipe I posted uses sour cream. I’ve just made a more traditional peach ice cream, one that has a custard base. I’m planning on posting the recipe but that won’t be soon enough for you. If you like, I can email the recipe to you. It really is no problem to do so. 🙂

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      • Thanks, John. I’ll go ahead and wait for the second recipe and I can compare then! 🙂 I saw the sour cream and I’m so curious. I’ve never added that ingredient to ice cream, but imagine it affects the texture nicely. I have decided that I need to make all the ice cream I can manage because I think once fall really hits I probably won’t feel like it! Thanks so much for thinking of me! I’ll let you know what I think of the sour cream! 🙂

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    • Sorry to hear of your allergy, Kay. I hope that’s your only allergy and that you can freely eat anything else you desire. I hope your Mom tries and likes this jam as much as we all do.

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    • Hey, Jed! If you prefer a more traditional, custard-based peach ice cream, I’ve got a recipe for you. I’m not planning on posting it for a couple weeks but will gladly email it to you, if you like.

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  17. I love peach jam/preserves and your recipe sounds so fresh and good. My mouth is already watering. Peach jam/preserves always a wonderful way to keep a little summer in your life when the weather turns cold and peaches can no longer be found. They are also versatile so you can put a variety of different ingredients with them. I never would have thought of using white balsamic but now that you did it, I can’t imagine it not working well with peaches. I do a peach preserve with jalapeños and cardamom that is outrageously good and who would have thunk.

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    • Thanks, Richard, but, I must admit, I just went to check out your recipe for the spiced peach preserves. I have to give that one a try. I’ve a few friends who love spicy foods and that would be perfect for them. Thanks for the recipe!

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      • I am pleased you checked it out. It’s a recipe we really like and very different. It has a hint of heat and loads of flavor. Let me know how you like it. In the meantime, I really need to try your recipe with the white balsamic as it sounds really nice.

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    • Thanks, Claire, and as much as I’d like to tell you this was all planned, it was just a coincidence. I’m progressing around my yard and Sunset Celebration just happened to be next in the tour. Still, both peaches and rose do make great bookends for the post. 🙂

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  18. Hi John, Your jam looks so perfect! We are long pass our peach season, I even forgot that I made some jam! 🙂 It is always interesting different ways people make jams. I like the addition of balsamic vinegar to it, but never made one myself. The rose is so perfect! Is it in your garden?

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    • Thanks, Marina. Our peach season is just coming to a close. We’ll have some for a couple weeks but supplies are starting to dwindle. I’m so glad I made this jam last weekend. I don’t like leaving things to the last minute, especially when it comes to fruits. You just never know when the season will end. I almost missd out on tart cherries this year.
      I’ve been showcasing a rose per week since my June 6th post. All of the roses are in 3 beds encircling my yard. It’s a work in progress, although I’m pretty satisfied with the way things are now. 🙂

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      • Here in the South, I missed almost all the fruits and vegetables: too hot to grow, and to buy fresh from the store is very expensive and not worth it. Can’r wait until we go back to Seattle where I canned all summer long fruits and vegetables that I picked by myself in the local farms and orchards.

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        • Hi, Marina, I understand your predicament. I read others’ bogs in the South and they’re uprooting their tomato vines before I even had one ripen. Each area has its problems. If it isn’t the heat, it’s too much or too little water, or the bugs, or critters, you name it. I cannot wait for your return to Seattle. I bet you’ll be posting some wonderful canning recipes, I hope! 🙂

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  19. John, your strawberry, balsamic & pepper jam was (sadly past tense!) fantastic! I like the idea of peaches with white balsamic too! And wow, those peaches are stunning…to say nothing of that beautiful blushing rose of yours! You never fail to offer something exquisite for the senses here.

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    • I’m so glad you enjoyed that jam, Spree. It’s been widely accepted here and, like you, everyone is sorry to see the bottom of the jar.
      Thank you, Spree, for leaving such a complimentary comment. Then again, you always do. 🙂

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  20. It’s wonderful to allow yourself to be tempted by each fruit as it comes into season and this jam looks and sounds wonderful. What a great idea to add balsamic vinegar – I imagine it must cut the sweetness just a little, just enough. I’d be tempted to try adding black pepper too – I may do if I can find a platter of cheap peaches and I don’t eat them all first!

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    • Thank you so much. The strawberry jam with balsamic & black pepper was such a hit, I wanted to try it with the peaches. I, too, was really tempted to add black pepper but thought I’d mix it up a bit. Next year, though … 🙂

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  21. Boy, I need to make jam again. It’s been way too long, and there’s nothing better than homemade. The white balsamic is a terrific idea. Alas, our local peaches are basically done, but I have to do this next year. Really nice recipe – thanks so much.

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    • Thanks, John. I hadn’t started making jam or canning things until last Summer. Since then my confidence has grown and I’m willing to experiment a bit, this peach jam is a case in point. Another commenter mentioned his recipe that includes jalapeño and cardamom. I guess I’ll be buying more peaches this weekend — and jars. I’ve run out of jars! 🙂

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    • Christina, yes, it tastes good on a warm biscuit but, there are times when warming a biscuit or making toast just takes too long. This jam is good on a hunk of bread, too, I can assure you. 🙂

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  22. Your peach jam looks beautiful! It has such a gorgeous color! I’ve never had white balsamic vinegar and I’m very curious as to how it taste, especially with peaches. Can you ship me a couple of those jars of jam? 🙂

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    • Thank you! If I could, I would but I’ve already given all but 2 jars away. In fact, yesterday I made the last delivery. Now, if you move to a home within my delivery area, you, too, can have jams, jellies, ice creams, and giardiniera delivered to your door. Remember, in real estate it’s “Location, location, location! 🙂

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  23. Tasty peach jam. Using white balsamic vinegar was a great idea, giving your jam has such a delicious color, I can just imagine the delightful aroma in your kitchen during your jam making process.
    I see you “girls” are maintaining their beauty.

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    • Thank you, Norma. This jam was a good one and the process is geting easier. I didn’t even burn myself this time around. For me that’s really something!
      The roses, save one, are indeed coming back. The photo of “Sunset Celebration” was taken at the beginning of “The Troubles” and you might notice that the outer rose petals look old. Not good since the rose was just opening. We’re nearing the end of the tour but the one girl may yet be well enough to make an appearance. SHe’s actually getting ready to bloom for the first time this season!!! YAY!

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  24. I am so dense. I saw that you had posted again yesterday. I loved and repinned that delicious shot of the peaches, I came across it on my pinterest boards. And I thought to myself why is he posting today, it is not wednesday. Then again this morning I saw that you had posted about the peaches and I am saying to myself but it is not wednesday. But it WAS wednesday.. Today is Thursday. late to the party AGAIN! Where has my week gone and who are all these people picking peaches when mine were wiped out in that frost! sheesh.. c

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    • “Dense”??? Aw, c’mon, Celi. Give yourself a break. My post will be here whenever you remember it. With my truly horrible memory, I’m certainly not going to give you a hard time over this.
      The peaches I’m getting are from Michigan farms, just on the other side of The Lake, where I think they were protected from the frost that hit the farmy. There certainly weren’t fewer peaches or tart cherries this year that I noticed. And with apples starting to show up, I doubt those orchards were affected, too.

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  25. Your jam looks pretty, John. Peaches never make it to jam around here — we are too busy eating them out of hand, making peach waffles, tossing them into bread pudding, drinking them in smoothies. I do buy a local peach chutney and some day I’ll try my hand at making it. Thanks for the giardiniera link, too — I missed it the first time around.

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    • Thanks, Sharyn, and I can so identify with your comment. At first, I was eating the peaches as soon as I bought them. I finally started buying twice what I needed so that I could make the ice creams and jam. Even then, I snacked on slices as I was preparing them. I really enjoy fresh peaches in Summer. Such a treat!
      That giardiniera is another treat. My friends and family all love it. I, myself, have gone through a pint of it in the week since I made it. If it is in my fridge, I’ll use it on everything. If you do make it, I hope you’ll like it.

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  26. I’m not quite sure how I missed this post when it first came out, other than I’m doing all the food for a party next week and I’m completely in overdrive this week…playing catch-up for sure. Wow, you did it! Brilliant idea to use the white balsamic with peaches because the dark would surely have discolored them. This looks and sounds amazing, John, and thank you so much for the mention as well! 🙂 So I’m having a senior moment on top of everything else, and can’t remember if I told you about the bruschetta that reminded me of the balsamic-peach combo, but it was bruschetta topped with peaches drizzled with a bit of dark balsamic, a sprinkle of blue cheese or gorgonzola and fresh ground pepper on top. If you still have any peaches left, it’s a terrific appetizer (though I could eat it as a sandwich!) and one I completely forgot about while I had peaches on hand this year!

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    • You may not have gotten a timely delivery of the notification, Betsy. A number of people have been having problems lately. I did but not anymore.
      Yes, thanks to your suggestion, I made it. Half of me wishes I’d added pepper, too, but that will be next year’s experiment. I’ve moved on 🙂
      I don’t recall you mentioning the bruschetta and they sound fantastic. Like you suggested, I’d make myself a sandwich if I’m enjoying it at home alone. Why not?
      I hope we have peaches for 2 more weeks. I’ve got another recipe to try and may not have time to get to the market this weekeend. This cannot be the year I go without peach cobbler. NO!!!!

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  27. Those jars of jam are like beautiful jewels on your kitchen counter. I can just imagine how good the jam tastes. I buy at least one basket of peaches a week this time of year, but I keep eating them all before I can do anything else with them! Such dilemmas we face in the kitchen.

    By the way, your blog has magically reappeared in my reader. Thank goodness! For many months it was missing, no matter how many times I re-subscribed. The blogosphere is a mysterious place at times, but apparently good things come to those who wait. 😊

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    • I am so with you, Mar. I’ve been buying twice what I need for any given recipe because I cannot stop eating them. Peaches are truly one of Summer’s highlights for me. When their season is over, it’s over. I won’t buy another until next year.
      I hope your WP problems are resolved, once and for all. I think mine have cleared up, too, although I keep checking to make sure a given blogger is only taking a break and hasn’t dropped off my subscription list. That reminds me. There’s a could people for which I’ve not received notifications for over a week. Uh, oh!

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    • Exactly, Geni! It is so nice to have a bit of jam in the dead of winter. Here in Chicago, we need all the help we can get when January rolls around — and we’ve still got February waiting for us!

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  28. Gorgeous peaches and really interesting with the balsamic vinegar. Great culinary possibilities with this jam! Oh I am thinking about baked phyllo dough with some of your homemade ricotta and drizzled with this jam. Take care, BAM

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    • Hello, BAM! Your idea is a good one. How nice it would be to have some on a Sunday morning! I was thinking of trying it as a glaze for roasted chicken. So many ideas, so little time. Thank you for your comment and such a great suggestion.

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  29. The idea of using white balsamic vinegar was very very clever. Peach jam is a very delicious treat, especially if it is homemade. Save some for the loong winter to pair it with a good, fresh Tuscan pecorino cheese and maybe a good Rosso di Montalcino wine.

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    • Thanks you, Ambrosiana. I see we share a love of peach jam. Unfortunately, I’ve given all but one jar of it away. I’ve bought more peaches, though, and will be making more on Monday or Tuesday. This batch will be for my Winter needs. Your suggestion of serving some on fresh pecorino with a glass of Rosso di Montalcino almost makes me wish Winter was already — almost, but not quite! 🙂

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  30. I have been meaning to make peach jam all summer but some how they vanish too quickly in this house 🙂
    I have never tried a jam with balsamic vinegar, I usually add orange peel and cinnamon but orange peel sounds really interesting!

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    • Your jam, Sawsan, sounds very good. I’m afraid to use cinnamon in this recipe because it can easily over-power the balsamic. I do use it, though, in my “regular” peach jam, although I use lemon juice in that recipe. I may try using orange peel next time. Variety really is the Spice of Life. 🙂

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  31. Love, love, love the idea of peaches with balsamic, simply brilliant, and a mouth-watering delight. John, you have certainly made the most of the farmers market this summer and now you will enjoy it through the winter as well. 🙂

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    • Hello Judy! Yes, it was a good year for me and the markets. Right now, I’m finishing up my last batch of jam and will be moving on to corn relish next. And to think. I’d never canned a thing prior to last Summer. Who knew?

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    • Thank you so much for the “tag” and for including me with so many great blogs. I hope you’re not offended when I say that I no longer particiapte in these “exercises” nor do I accept awards. I am, nevertheless, grateful for your kindness.

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  32. I’m not ready for Fall and would be perfectly happy to remain in peach season for another two months! Ha! Well, we know that’s not going to happen… I’ve made up my mind that next year when we are in New Hampshire and settled into the new house (God willing!) that I am going to learn how to make jam and learn how to can fruit and vegetables. You all are making it look so easy and delicious! My lovely neighbor dropped off a bag of peaches from her backyard tree last night. I’m thinking I may have to make peach ice cream with coconut milk. I finally remembered to buy the ice cream attachment for my Kitchen Aid mixer. I cannot believe how easy it is! Think I’ll have to eat it on a bed of peaches with toasted pecans like you did! 🙂

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    • First of all, April, you will be happily settled in your new home in plenty of time for next year’s peach season. Positive thoughts. Think positive thoughts. 😉
      I remember when I got my first ice cream maker, I, too, was surprised at how easy ice cream is to make — and it is so much better than anything available at the grocery. DO serve your ice cream with fresh peach slices. Use a little sugar to macerate them so that there’ll be some juice to pour over each ice cream serving. Pure heaven!

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  33. Sunset Celebration is certainly one of the most spectacular peachy-colored roses around! And that jam, especially with the balsamic inclusion, sounds tremendous. I’m salivating on the keyboard again.

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    • As I mentioned in an earlier reply, I wish I could take credit for timing this rose with this recipe. It was pure coincidence, though a darn good one! Tonight you’ll meet my last rose, and “she” is really quite special.

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  34. Pingback: Crostata | from the Bartolini kitchens

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