Roast Duck Ravioli

Ravioli dell’Anatra di Arrosto

Duck Ravioli 2She came. She saw. She conquered.

The Visitation ended, far too quickly, and Zia is back in Michigan. While here, we met with family and friends, both near and far, new and old. We toured my favorite Italian and farmers markets and we dined out a couple of times, including our customary Friday night fish fry. This being Chicago, however, this fish fry took place at a sushi restaurant. Of course, I did cook and some of the recipes will make their way to this blog. All the while, incredibly, we were graced with some of the year’s best weather. All in all, it was a wonderful visit and I hope to import her again next year. Fingers crossed.

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The making of ravioli has roots that go as far back as the 14th century in the North of the Italian peninsula and perhaps even earlier in Sicily. (Source: Wikipedia). Their creation involves a couple of axioms I’ve said many times before: nothing is wasted in a traditional Italian kitchen, and, meat was a dish reserved for holidays and special occasions. Well, when meat was served — and with no means of refrigeration — leftovers were a problem. Let’s face it: re-heating a piece of roast over a hearth isn’t necessarily the most appetizing means of dealing with leftovers. On the other hand, finely chopping the meat before adding it to, perhaps, a little cheese and some greens, and using the mixture to fill pasta “pockets” would make quite a tasty alternative. Not only that but a little bit of leftover meat would go a long way, far enough to feed the entire family.

This was certainly the case when Zia and I were left with some roasted duck after our meal. We discussed how to use the leftovers and decided that making ravioli was the best way to go. I think we were pretty successful, as does my Zia. In fact, when we roasted a goat shoulder during my next visit, Zia set about making ravioli filling with the leftovers, as well. Frozen, it awaits my return so that we can make “goat” ravioli. The recipes for both the roast goat and the subsequent ravioli filling will be published soon.

There is nothing complicated about our duck ravioli recipe, though the use of broccoli raab, rapini, requires a bit of blanching. How long depends upon your taste and whether you are fond of bitter greens. Blanching will remove some of the bitterness, as well as soften the vegetable’s “woody” stalks. Since we both do not mind rapini’s bitterness, we kept the blanching to a minimum. You, on the other hand, may wish to blanch the vegetable for a few minutes more and, therefore, boil away more of its bitter flavor.

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Duck Ravioli Filling*     *     *

Roast Duck Ravioli Filling Recipe

Ingredients

  • 9 oz (250 g) skinless roast duck, shredded (See Notes)
  • 10 oz (280 g) rapini (broccoli raab)
  • 2 large red onions, sliced
  • 2 tbsp butter
  • extra virgin olive oil
  • Marsala wine
  • 1 cup ricotta, drained
  • 1/2 cup Pecorino Romano cheese, grated
  • 1 large egg
  • salt & pepper, to taste

Directions

  1. Melt butter in a large fry pan over medium heat. Add onions and stir to coat with the butter.
  2. Sauté for about 10 minutes, season lightly with salt and pepper, lower to med-low heat, and continue to cook, stirring frequently.  You want the onions to brown but not burn. It may take from 30 minutes to an hour to be fully caramelized. Add a little bit of olive oil if the onions are too dry.
  3. Just before the onions are ready, deglaze the pan with a couple ounces of Marsala wine. The onions will be ready when the wine has evaporated.
  4. Once the onions have cooled, drain any excess liquids before placing them in a clean kitchen towel, wringing out as much moisture as possible.
  5. Meanwhile, bring a large pot of lightly salted water to the boil.
  6. Add the rapini and, once the boil returns, blanch the rapini for 5 minutes.
  7. Remove the rapini from the boiling water and immediately place the vegetable into an ice water bath.
  8. Once fully cooled, drain the rapini of as much liquid as possible before wringing in a clean kitchen towel.
  9. Use a meat grinder — or food processor — to grind the duck, caramelized onions, and blanched rapini.
  10. Add the Pecorino Romano and ricotta cheeses to the mince and stir well.
  11. Taste to check for seasoning before adding the egg. Stir till well-combined, cover, and refrigerate for a few hours or overnight.
  12. The filing is now ready to be used to make ravioli.

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Duck Ravioli 1*     *     *

Notes

For step-by-step instructions for making ravioli using dies/molds, please check out my previous post for Ravioli dei Bartolini.

Here’s Mom’s Pasta Dough recipe, for those who need one. In this case, I substituted 3 duck eggs for the 4 large chicken eggs.

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Serving suggestion

Dress ravioli with brown butter-sage sauce to which grated Pecorino Romano cheese has been added. Garnish with sage leaves that have been shallow-fried until crisp in olive oil. (See opening photo.)

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It’s déjà vu all over again …

Ravioli Day

With today’s post dealing with a new edition to the Bartolini ravioli recipe collection, I thought a look back to the granddaddy of them all, the original Bartolini ravioli filling recipe, was in order. It’s still our favorite and the mere mention of it will cause any Bartolini clan member’s mouth to water, as his/her mind fills with memories of holidays past. You can learn all about it simply by clicking HERE.

*     *     *

Coming soon to a monitor near you …

Roast Duck Risotto PreviewBlack Rice Risotto with Roast Duck and Porcini Mushrooms

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134 thoughts on “Roast Duck Ravioli

  1. Pingback: Roast Duck Ravioli | Italian Food & Wine | ...

  2. Hi John, I’m currently traveling in Italy and your ravioli dish looks amazing! I normally stay away from pasta dishes…so sad..but this week I’m craving pasta and pizza like crazy! I’ve been trying to daily post my stay here…capturing every moment to I can re-live it when I get back!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Buongiorno, Lynda. I’ve been away from WP for a few weeks now, so, it was a very pleasant surprise to read that you’ve made it to Italy. Writing a daily post is, in a way, creating a daily journal of your travels. When I was there last May, I used social media to record the trip and, now that I’m home, those posts have helped me to remember more of the trip. I need to head over to your place and see what you’ve been up to “over there.” I hope you’re having the trip of a lifetime, Linda.

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  3. What a lovely way to use the leftovers of the roasted duck! I am French and I had the chance to spend about 15 years in South of France in Bordeaux, I simply love duck in all forms. The meat is so tender and so flavourful! I am planning to roast a duck over the weekend as I have a recipe in my mind for quite some time now. If any duck is left over I will try to create some ravioli as well! Thanks for the inspiration!

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  4. Just thinking to myself… what are the chances I will get to make pasta with both you and Zia. Will have to plan my visit very carefully. Then again with all the recipes we are going to be making I might just be there long enough to incorporate a visit with Zia.
    Hope you are well John. Lovely to see a post again.
    Have a wonderful day.
    🙂 Mandy xo

    Liked by 1 person

    • It’s great to be back, Mandy, and you needn’t worry. All you need do is get here. I’ll be your private jitney, ferrying you to Zia one day and our friend on the Farmy another. And I can pack a mean picnic lunch to enjoy along the way. 🙂

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  5. Haha, whenever I read ‘Zia’ and ‘duck’ now, it makes me smile 🙂 I’m glad that you got some quality foodie and family time together, despite the fact that she’s left now 🙂 This ravioli looks delicious. I’ve never made ravioli myself but I definitely want to try this beautiful filling. Delicious!

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    • Hi, Laura. Yes, we did spend some quality time together and had a great time doing so. I’ll admit that making ravioli for the first time was a bit daunting. That’s why I used wonton wrappers for the first few attempts. Once I got comfortable stuffing pasta, I tried making the pasta myself. For me, it was all about getting experience. I tell you, it’s a task well worth learning. The rewards are delicious! 🙂

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  6. Very fitting, duck ravioli with Zia – it sounds like you both had a good time. It looks delicious, I can almost taste it with a hint of sage. I’m looking forward to reading about the goat soon 🙂

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  7. We missed you but it was worth the wait! Duck ravioli sounds delicious and decadent but I have to confess I am still laughing so hard at that last photo of Max looking on hopefully while Zia is busily making the ravioli. Hope he got one!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Got one? That photo is from a few years ago, Tanya, and he managed to steal away 6 from the table top. To this day, we don’t know how he did it because he was never left alone. Worse yet, later that day, he “vacuumed” about 3 dozen that were to be that night’s dinner. I wouldn’t have believed it if I hadn’t seen it for myself. We leaned our lesson, though, and I can say that he hasn’t snatched one since, though I think Zia sneaks him a couple when my back is turned. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Until I saw your Gravatar, I’d no idea this was you! 🙂
      We’re in agreement about rapini. In fact, just last night I had some with my dinner. It really does work well here.

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  8. Love sage and butter with ravioli! And, now I know what to do with some of the duck confit I’m making from the procedure that Celia (Fig Jam & Lime Cordial) posted a little while ago. The bitter greens are a perfect balance with the duck – Yum!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Lisa!! How are you? I hope all’s well in your corner of the World and in your garden. Max is as much a fixture near a pasta board as is a pasta machine. He’s always on the lookout, hoping to score when something drops to the floor. Of course, he isn’t averse to snatching a bit of anything too close to the board’s edge. That photo sums it up perfectly. 🙂

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  9. Welcome back to the blogosphere, John, sounds like you and Zia had a great time. I am sitting down to breakfast but would not mind a plate of your roast duck ravioli. Like the Italians, nothing is wasted in a traditional Chinese kitchen, fried rice is one of the dishes created to use leftovers and to stretch a small amount of protein.

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  10. Wonderful!!!! Of course the doggie shot melted my heart – look at the attention and the thoughts running through his mind: no need to cook it, Auntie, just pass them all to me, one by one….

    and what about that risotto shot at the end? I am drooling already…..

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  12. What a delicious visit you had, John. I found it most interesting, reading about the origins of Ravioli. Makes a lot of sense, and it’s one of my favourite pasta dishes. Your recipe sounds really delicious, and your dog’s face is an absolute picture. Thanks for the smiles. Great to see you back here again. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much. We did enjoy our time together. I’d be willing to bet that all stuffed pastas, no matter the cuisine, have origins similar to ravioli’s. It’s such a great way to re-purpose leftovers. We sure did like these ravioli. 🙂

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  13. That first photo of the plate of ravioli has me drooling at 5:30 in the a.m. Though I would usually prefer this with a nice glass of red wine, I am thinking it would taste good with a cup of coffee right along about now. Delicioso!

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    • I don’t think it matters what you serve with these, Angeline. Truly, they were far better than either of us had anticipated. They were one surprise in the kitchen that I really loved.

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    • Thanks,Conor. Zia was last here with Mom, back in 2000. It was nice having her here again and cooking for her on my turf. 🙂
      I look forward to seeing your ravioli. You’ve got such a knack with spices that your pasta “pillows” will be fantastic, I’m sure.

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  14. Glad you had a wonderful visit with Zia! And glad to see you back posting, too. This is a spectacular recipe — I could see making roast duck just so I had the leftover to make this. 🙂 Love this — thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

    • It was a wonderful visit, John. Thank you. It’s nice to have her here on my home turf where grocery stores and ethnic markets abound. 🙂
      You’re right about the duck. We’re both in the mood for some more, not so much for the roast dinner but for the ravioli. They really are special.

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  15. Gorgeous ravioli, John, and I’m so happy that you and Zia had such a great visit filled with adventures and wonderful cooking (and eating) together. That picture of Max plotting to steal the ravioli cracks me up every time I see it. Did he manage to snatch some duck ravioli this time? Welcome back!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Betsy. We did enjoy our time together. She kept saying that she thought she was dreaming. To be honest, I never thought I’d get her back here again. 🙂
      No, Max hasn’t gotten any more ravioli since that photo was snapped. He got a lifetime’s ration in that one afternoon. Now he’ll have to be content with a little pasta scrap. He’s so mistreated. 😉

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  16. Serves me right. Instead of being the ninth commenter on this post, I read post after post — my browser is displaying five Bartolini tabs right now — and then spent three hours weatherproofing the house.

    Hi, John!!! Glad you had a good visit with your Zia. It’s currently pouring rain and windy here, just the right sort of day to stay in and try making some homemade pasta. E.g. is working on the pier today; she’ll be delighted!

    Liked by 1 person

    • It was a wonderful visit and I enjoyed having her meet some of my friends and seeing others again. What a special time!
      I just got to your pasta post. Those were some ravioli that you made!!! So glad that you made them and that you did it your way. I doubt if any Italian Nonnas had recipe files when they cooked. Their cookbook was the pantry, though I don’t think many would have found an avocado in there. 🙂

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  17. So glad you enjoyed Zia’s visit. Looks and sounds like you had fun in the kitchen! These ravioli look wonderful, I could really go for some duck ravioli too. Growing up in Milwaukee I too have fond memories of Friday fish fry, though I never went to a sushi restaurant for one!

    Liked by 1 person

    • It really was a wonderful visit, Gretchen, though the time flew by. I always enjoy cooking with and for her but, this time, I had the home field advantage. Talk about fun! I’m sure I could have found a real fish fry if I tried hard enough but what fun would that have been? This will give my Zia something to talk about when she goes to her next fish fry with her lady friends. 🙂

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    • You know, Celia. I’ve never tasted duck confit, let alone prepare it. I’ve read your very well-written tutorial, though. One of these days I’ll give it a try if, for no other reason, than to make the ravioli you’ve suggested. Roast duck filling was a definite winner. Can duck confit be any less good?

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  18. I’m glad you’ve enjoyed some lovely weather. It’s always lovely to see a dog helping in the kitchen – he looks like a good student. Your duck ravioli looks amazing. I need to buy one of the pasta cutters so I can make a lot at a time. I’ve only made the circle ravioli before. Duck ravioli sounds amazing and I love your pretty plate xx

    Liked by 1 person

    • The weather, CHarlie, was estraordinary. It was the longest stretch of dry weather we’ve had all year. It was a little chilly the first day but, after that, the days were sunny and warm. Considering how relaively cool Summer was, these days were a gift. The dies/moulds will make a dozn or more ravioli at a time. Once you get the knack for using one, you can really fly, making enough for that night’s dinner, with enough in the freezer for at least one dinner more. If you have a helper, you’ll be amazed at how quickly you’ll make them. Zia and I will make 30 to 400 in an afternoon. I must say, seeing bags of homemade ravioli in the freezer is like viewing gold – only tastier. 🙂

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  21. Homemade ravioli (even using wanton, which I have noted as a beginner) still hasn’t eventuated in my kitchen but roast duck and sage butter are the things that are likely to make it happen. Really any excuse to roast a duck! I love that photo of Zia and Max. I miss having four-legging cooking companions. Nice to see you back 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • It really is great to be back, EllaDee. It’s been an incredible Summer and hard o believe it’s come and gone already. I hope Winter is as fleeting.
      I do understand that making ravioli can seem daunting at first but, I promise you, it really does become easier with experience. Best of all, the rewards, no matter the filling, make it all worthwhile. This duck filling was far better than Zia and I had imagined. Now I cannot wait to try her goat filling. 🙂

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  22. Huge smile on my face about the ‘Visitation’ going so well and a return one already planned: hope your Zia threw a coin in one of the beautiful Chicago fountains a la Trevi 🙂 ! Love the recipe: worth while cooking duck to have the leftovers . . . like the marriage with marsala!! The lamb shank idea above sounds good also: always have them in the house! Oh and I think Max highly regards Zia also – in spite of his interest he sure kept a very respectful distance from her . . . anyways a warm welcome back after your very happy summer and early autumn!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Always glad to put a smile on your face, Eha. I’m trying my hardest to get her back here, though there were no coins in any fountain. Poor dear was so tired that I doubt she could have tossed one. 🙂
      I know I’m repeating myself but this recipe was better than we thought it would be. What a treat! And, yes, that lamb shank idea sounds good, too. The only drawback, like duck, is having enough left over for the ravioli. I’ll just have to make extra. 🙂
      Max adores Zia. He greets her every morning far more eagerly than he does me. Of course, the fact that she always gives him a treat as soon as she can might have a little do with it. Even so, he is always around her, even trying to get up on her lap. Ha! Can you imagine?
      Glad to hear your Summer is coming, though it means our Winter is on the horizon. Well, you cannot have one without the other, I guess. I hope both are within normal ranges. Neither continent needs any more extremes.

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    • Thanks, Maureen. Funny how our tastes change. At one time, I wouldn’t touch rapini unless it was blanched until it was very bland. Now, the more bitter the better. I want to try making ravioli again with rapini but without blanching it at all. Last time, I was concerned that it is too woody and it would ruin the ravioli, thereby wasting the duck. Next time, I’ll use a different protein with raw rapini. If it works, I’ll be revisiting duck ravioli for us bitter lovin’ folks. 🙂

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  23. Hello John! Glad you are back. What a gorgeous looking dish! So flavorful! I think butter and sage is the perfect way to enjoy your ravioli. I have to say that I have never added marsala to a pasta dish. Lovely idea!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Good to be back, Francesca. Thank you. It’s rare that Zia and I try out a new recipe without saying we should try to do this or that. WIth this one, all we did was pat ourselves on the back. All we need to do now is find a reason to roast another duck. Those ravioli went fast! 🙂

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  24. Everything about this post is lovely; I love using left overs in a completely new way, I love that Zia had a great time and lots of deliciousness to eat, that you had great weather and I particularly love that black rice risotto! I really must get on to roasting my own duck.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much, Eva. This visit was so special for me. It’s been 14 years since she and Mom came to Chi-town and it was nice to be able to show her around again. She kept saying she thought she was dreaming. How special was that?
      I must admit that I was very pleased with how that one duck was used. We roasted it, made ravioli with the leftovers, made stock with the carcass, and then risotto with the stock. I know Zia was pleased. We didn’t waste a bit. 🙂
      I hope you and JT are having a wonderful Thanksgiving, Eva. I can’t wait to see the photos.

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  25. it does seem simpler than one would think, but somehow even just purchasing the duck seems more than I could handle 😉 But I’d order it in a restaurant in a heartbeat. Looks amazing. Always so impressed with your family connections and how tied together it all is by food. 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    • Like you, Liz, I put off buying a duck for years. Finally, I bought and roasted one — and was hooked. Believe me, it isn’t much more complicated than roasting a chicken. Just take steps to drain the fat early on and you’ll have a fantastic dinner. After that. we’ll talk about making ravioli. 🙂
      You know, Liz, I didn’t realize how big a part food played in all of our memories until I started this blog. Every family recipe has memories associated with it — and not just mine. All of my family’s members will chime in when I post a favorite recipe. Blogging rewards in ways I never dreamt possible.

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  26. Hi John, welcome back! Great to hear you two have had such a wonderful time together. You’ve certainly returned with a bang. I love all kinds of ravioli and it is the centerpiece of almost all the dinner parties I host. Your duck ravioli sound lovely. I’ve made ravioli with roast meat and bitter greens before (angelotti), but never yet with caramelized onions. What a great idea; they surely add a lot of depth and some sweetness to offset the bitter. Sounds like I’m going to try yet another Bartolini recipe!

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    • Thanks, Stefan. for the warm welcome. We did have a great time together and she’s home now getting some much-deserved rest. I mentioned to Zia that I thought you would like this recipe. I hope you do. Like you, I’m prone to serve ravioli at my dinners, usually as the primo piatto. All the while we were “testing” these, I was thinking about serving them at Thanksgiving.Of cours, that wold mean roasting another duck before hand. Damn! 🙂
      I do hope that we can arrange a Skype meeting. Talking and seeing someone from the Netherlands? “Incredibile!” She’ll be talking about if for months. 🙂

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    • Food memories are the best souvenirs to bring back. You can experiment and make them at home, preparing them whenever you want. Butter sage sauce is a fantastic one to bring home. 🙂

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  27. It sounds like you & Zia had a terrific visit and kept pretty busy. Now I have to say that I love duck and if you put it inside a ravioli I just can’t think of anything more mouth watering good! Umm, that picture with Max…reminds me of what it’s like cooking with Lola underfoot. A while back there was a book written called The Secret. I didn’t read it but it had something to do with this idea that you can have anything you want – anything at all – if you just focus & think positive thoughts about it being yours. I’d say Max has read that book & he’s channeling all his thoughts on how many ravioli bites he can snag. (I think the person who wrote the book had thoughts about making money & sure enough, after writing the book made a bundle).

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    • We had a fantastic time, Diane, eating and cooking the entire time. Zia kept mentioning that there was so much food! She didn’t know that I was secretly freezing much of the leftovers and brought them to her house when I returned her to home. She’ll continue to eat very well. 🙂
      Loved your take on “the Secret”, both from Max’s perspective and the author’s.Too funny! Max did score plenty of ravioli one day. While we were making them, we came up 6 short. Now, the dies make 12 at a time, so, we should have ended up with some multiple of 12. Yet, as many times as we counted, we were 6 short. One of us was always at the table and neither of us “treated” Max. It remained a mystery until later that afternoon. My cousin, Zia, and I were in the next room that overlooked the one where there was that night’s ravioli dinner on the pasta board. With my astonished cousin and I looking on, Max vacuumed up about 35 raw ravioli in all of 2 seconds. Dyson would be proud of that suction! WIth that one act, Max is became a permanent character in the folklore of the Bartolini Clan. 🙂

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        • I’ve tried to warn people that if it’s on a counter top, it’s Max’s but no one believes me until they see that frog tongue of his “grab” whatever it is he wants. Maybe he and Lola are related. 🙂

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  28. Great to hear that Zia’s stay went so well – it sounds like you both had a wonderful time! John, I feel like a bit of a foodie failure in that I still haven’t managed to master fresh pasta yet! As soon as I have that sorted, I’ll be delighted to try your roast duck ravioli… it sounds amazing! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Margot, we did have a great time together. When even the weather cooperated, I knew that the gods were smiling upon us. 🙂
      I will admit there is a knack for making pasta. Once you get the hang of it, you’ll get a feel for the dough and you’ll be off and running. Just hang in there and keep trying. Here’s Mom’s pasta dough recipe, if you’d like to try something different. It works for me. Good luck! 🙂

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  29. This sounds ultra fabulous. I have a dear friend who adores duck and this would be a great recipe for her. Thanks for posting this!

    I know that you mean about chopping up leftover meat and including it in anything. Heating up a slab of leftover meat, while still delicious, is a little unexciting. I’m always squirrelling away pieces of meat in the freezer because I know this beef or that chicken will be perfect in my next “masterpiece” (ha ha). I just can’t bear to see meat end up in the trash. Mushy peas…? Well, that’s another story.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yeah, mushy peas aside — far, far aside — I’m with you. I feel almost guilty when I find myself tossing leftover roast of some kind into the trash. It’s just not right! This duck ravioli filling was an eye opener — and for Zia, too. When we roasted that goat shoulder, she wasted no time using the leftovers for another ravioli filling. And, in the comments, someone mentioned using lamb shanks. I can’t wait to mention that one to her. It will be a race to see which of us finds lamb shanks first. 🙂

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  30. Dear John! So, the day you posted this, I wrote a lengthy comment and because it was 6 am and my eyes were still focusing, I accidentally deleted the entire comment, ugh. Then I had to get up. So here I am a week later almost!
    So glad to see you back. I have missed you here and on Facebook. It’s been crazy at my end as well. I’m finally somewhat free and have starts to pay attention to my neglected blog.
    Looks like you had a great Visitation and came away with some tasty recipes. Love ravioli so this looks fab to me.
    Take care!
    Nazneen

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    • There ought to be a name, Nazneen — or at least a support group — for people trying to post comments when tired. I cannot tell you how many comments I’ve lost that way.
      I’ve missed you, too, Nazneen, and it is great to get back into the groove. I’ve quite a few posts to read but I will, all in due time. Hope you and yours are doing well and ready for a beautiful Autumn. We’ll just forget about Winter for now. 🙂

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    • Thanks, Mar. That filing did make a good ravioli and we both patted ourselves on the back during dinner. 🙂 Yes, the Visitation went very well and just yesterday she agreed to come back next Spring. Yay!

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  31. John, you are always TOPPING your last post. I absolutely LOVE duck! You have opened up a whole new world for me because all I’m familiar with is the greasy stuff at the local Chinese place (if they have it) or the ones hanging in some window in Chinatown (San Francisco or wherever I can get it in California). You make cooking FUN!!! Need to get my retired act together and get serious about Italian cooking. You are truly my main inspiration!!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • That’s very kind of you to say, Arlene. Duck was not something we had very often while growing up and, even now, it is more a celebratory-type dish. These duck posts may change all that. We not only enjoyed it roasted on Day One but we made this post’s ravioli and this week’s stock and risotto . Duck will definitely be a more frequent visitor at our table.
      When you do “go Italian”, rest assured I’ll be here to help. 🙂

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    • Another rapini convert. Wonderful but I do have to try that fried scamorza. Luckily, a new grocery opened in the area and they’ve a nice cheese department, scamorza being part of the displays. Yay!

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  33. Yes, this was worth the wait. Duck ravioli. I had never thought of that before, but it makes perfect sense. I love duck. I love ravioli. And that crispy sage with butter and sage sauce…perfection. This is the leading contender for our annual Christmas Eve dinner. It will take a lot to knock this one out of place too I believe. I’m so glad you had a good visit with Zia. I do hope you’ll get to import her again next year as well! 🙂

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    • Thanks, Kristy. You know it really is a compliment of the best kind to hear that you’re cooking one of our recipes for Christmas Eve. I’ve always said that this blog was meant to preserve the family recipes, in effect the the legacy of both Mom and her Sister, my Zia. What better way to celebrate and remember that legacy than to prepare one of the dishes over the holidays? Thank you so much for that honor.
      (Pssst … she’s coming back in May. 🙂 )

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  34. I have some left over roast chicken.Can i use that in place of duck? The ravioli is impeccable and the photo is equally good. This is the kind of meal I would enjoy at lunch time. Thanks for sharing John.

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    • Funny you mentioned this, Liz. I was considering doing that very thing with some leftover chicken. A lack of time prevented me from doing so but, yes, I think it would work very well. Fact is, I think any type of roasted meat — even some fish — could be used as ravioli filling. If you do try, please et me know how it turns out. Thanks.

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  35. Pingback: Four Years Ago « Eat, Play, Love

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