Oatmeal Cookies with Two Chocolates, Dried Cherries, and Almonds

Cherry Choc Chip 1

Despite today’s post and a few more on the schedule, I am no baker. I do not bake. It is a classic catch-22. I don’t bake because I make mistakes and I make mistakes because I don’t bake. My experience with today’s recipe is a perfect example.

Although I’ve prepared these cookies a number of times, I’ve made more than my fair share of mistakes. Some weren’t so bad, like grabbing dark brown sugar instead of light or forgetting to add the salt. I wasn’t always so lucky, however, like the time I forgot the baking soda. Those little nuggets were tasty but hardly the cookies I had envisioned. Perhaps the worst, though, was the time I forgot to add the flour. Who forgets flour? You wouldn’t but I sure did. You can rest assured, knowing that I’ll never do that again. Even so, there has to be a better way to learn something without nearly ruining 2 baking sheets.

My lack of baking prowess — a.k.a common sense — aside, these are great cookies that freeze well. That’s important for me because if I don’t stash cookies in my basement freezer as soon as they’ve cooled, they’ll be gone within a day. I’ve absolutely no will power when it comes to freshly baked anything. (Yet another reason I so rarely bake.)

This recipe can easily be modified to suit your own kitchen and preferences. I’ve made these cookies using my food processor, as the original recipe directs, but I’ve also prepared them with my stand mixer. I’ve used dried cranberries instead of the cherries, and omitted the white chocolate altogether, doubling the amount of dark chocolate in its place. And if you like almond flavoring, try using almond extract instead of vanilla. In short, feel free to make whatever substitutions you like, just don’t forget the flour!

*     *     *

Announcing …

It’s time once again for the Honey Man to open shop in Michigan’s Thumb. This means I’ll be closing the Kitchens so that I can make the yearly honey run. Normally, I’d reopen the Kitchens in 2 weeks but not this year. You see, honey won’t be the only precious cargo that I’ll be bringing back to Chicago. I’m very happy to say that I’ll be playing host to a most special Guest and the Kitchens will be closed for the entire visit, known affectionately in these parts as “The Visitation.” Rest assured, the Kitchens will reopen once I’ve returned my Guest to her Michigan home.

*     *     *

Cherry Choc Chip 3*     *     *

Oatmeal Cookies with Two Chocolates and Dried Cherries Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup unsalted butter at room temperature
  • 1/2 cup light brown sugar, packed
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 3/4 cup AP flour
  • 1 cup old-fashioned oats
  • 2/3 cup dried cherries
  • 1/3 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips
  • 1/3 cup white chocolate chips
  • 1/4 cup slivered almonds, toasted

Directions

  1. Pre-heat oven to 375˚ F (190˚ C). Place 2 oven racks on the top and bottom thirds of the oven.
  2. Cream together the butter, 2 sugars, and vanilla in a food processor
  3. To the processor bowl, add the egg, baking soda, and salt. Process until combined.
  4. Add the flour and again process till combined.
  5. Add the oats and pulse a few times. The object is to mix without pulverizing the oats. Empty the contents of the processor bowl into a large mixing bowl.
  6. Add the almonds, cherries, and both chocolates to the mixing bowl and use a spoon to mix the contents.
  7. Use a large ice cream scoop or tablespoon to create evenly sized cookies. Place scoops of dough on 2 large, parchment-covered baking sheets, about 2 inches apart.
  8. Bake for 6 minutes before turning and switching racks. Bake for another 6 or 7 minutes. Cookies should be lightly browned.
  9. Remove from oven and place cookies on a rack to cool.
  10. Store in an airtight container.

Adapted from a recipe on Epicurious

*     *     *

Cherry Choc Chip 2*     *     *

Notes

Like the fried chicken of 2 weeks ago, these cookies are good for long car rides. Very good.

*     *     *

The Colosseum and Forum of Rome

Just down the street from our flat was the Colosseum, one of the World’s few arena’s older than Wrigley Field. It is usually one of the first and last sights I see when I’m in Rome. As I’ve told my friends — ad nauseam, I’m sure — I’m a tactile person and only when I touch the Colosseum do I truly feel that I am in Rome.

(Click to enlarge any/all photos)

*     *     *

*     *     *

Right outside of the stadium lie the ruins of Ludus Magnus, the best of the gladiator schools. Tunnels once connected it to the “basement” of the Colosseum, which housed everything from wild animals and gladiators to their unfortunate victims. The amphitheater itself is huge with seating estimates that surpass 45,000 people. Yet, it could be vacated in as few as 5 minutes in an emergency. Located around the arena are thick cement posts, of a sort. These were used to support a retractable roof that provided shade from the hot Roman sun, while the arena floor could be flooded to permit mock naval battles to be performed. When not flooded, the stadium floor featured numerous trap doors, allowing for the “introduction” of fierce animals into the arena. Like so much of Rome, history comes alive as you walk around the Colosseum.

*     *     *

Inside the Colosseum    *     *     *

The heart of the ancient city, the Forum, was where Romans came to conduct business, shop, talk politics, and worship. On one side lay the Colosseum, easily the largest amphitheater of its time. On another, atop Palatine Hill, is where the emperors lived, as well as the Republic’s wealthiest citizens. Being slightly elevated, it was believed to be a bit cooler than the surrounding area and it gave the inhabitants the opportunity to literally look down upon the masses milling about the Forum. Following the main path through the Forum, the Via Sacra, you’ll pass the ruins of numerous temples, basilicas, and the Curia, where the Roman Senate met and where Julius Cæsar was assassinated. Speaking of which, you’ll also come across the altar used for Cæsar’s cremation. (The first time I visited the Forum was on March 17th quite a few years ago and red roses were strewn about the altar.)

*     *     *

*     *     *

If you are at all interested in the Roman Empire and find yourself in Rome, you really must see the Colosseum and Forum. Words and photos cannot describe the sensation of walking along the Via Sacra, tracing the steps of people like Julius Cæsar, Tiberius, Augustus, and every Emperor that was to follow them, not to mention countless notables of the ancient civilization. It was, for me, the perfect way to end my holiday and this series.

*     *     *

It’s déjà vu all over again …

Aglio e OlioToday’s blast form the past isn’t at all a seasonal dish, at its core, but you could make it one, if you wanted.  Aglio e Olio is so simple to prepare that it is a “late home from work” dish; a “we spent the night out with friends and need something quick to eat” dish; and/or a “my cupboard is bare and I’m hungry” dish. Aglio e Oilo can be all these things and so much more. You can learn all about it by clicking HERE.

*     *     *

Coming soon to a monitor near you …

Roast Duck Ravioli PreviewRoast Duck Ravioli

*     *     *

Advertisements

157 thoughts on “Oatmeal Cookies with Two Chocolates, Dried Cherries, and Almonds

  1. I bake some but I’m no great baker. I’ve also been known to forget ingredients in main course dishes too. I think it’s my age. 🙂

    I love the old city of Rome. Years ago we took two teenagers and found a guide who made the entire city come to life for them. We even extended our stay in Rome so they could get two extra days with this history teacher guide.

    Like

    • It’s good to know that I’m not alone, Maureen. Maybe I should just gird my loins and start baking. 🙂
      How lucky that you found that guide and could shift your departure date to take full advantage of him. A number of years ago, I was sitting outside Il Duomo in Florence putting film in my camera (Remember that?) when a teacher and his class stopped before me. He proceeded to conduct a class on Il Duomo, its construction and significance. It was wonderful. A couple days later, I was in Sienna visiting their Duomo when that same teacher and his class appeared. I lingered in the area and got Part 2 of his lecture series that first discussed this cathedral before comparing the two. Though the experience cannot compare to yours with the private teacher guide, I did walk away with a better understanding of both churches.

      Like

  2. John …I just wake up,and I saw this delicious Cookies made with dried cherries and Almond….Still left?I’m on the wayyyyy
    I can See that you have a good time in Roma (tutto bellissimo).
    ciaooo Massi

    Like

  3. Mmmm, these cookies are similar to cookies that my mom makes all the time when I’m home. With two types of chocolate, oats, nuts and dried fruit they are definitely loaded! I always bring my moms cookies with me on long car rides too or more recently on our flights back to Germany. My favorite combo of add-ins is definitely (coarsely chopped) dark or semi-sweet chocolate, pecans and dried cranberries. I will have to try your cookies with these, perhaps. 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’d use the aging thing, too, but my baking history is littered with so many such errors. The only good thing to be said of my sorry attempts is that I’ve probably sent the scrap iron man’s kids through college with all the pots. pans, and baking sheets I’ve ruined and discarded over the years. 🙂

      Like

  4. It must be the change in the weather, I have been craving oatmeal cookies lately and tried many different recipes.. I shall print this one and try them asap! I freeze mine too, I love to eat them frozen!.. c

    Liked by 1 person

    • Reading through the comments, others have said that they, too, enjoy frozen cookies. I’ve never eaten them frozen and thought I couldn’t. Now that I know I can, I’ll need a better hiding place. I’m running out of places, I’m afraid. 🙂

      Like

  5. Excellent cookies and you’ve reminded me of the time I forgot to cook dry kidney beans before adding them to a chilli!
    I hope you’ll be opening the kitchens privately for your guest – have a good time 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, MD. Others have shared their own kitchen errors and I do feel that I’m in pretty good company. And, yes, the kitchens will be open. In fact the larders are already being stocked, with an eye towards the planned menus. This is gonna be fun!

      Like

  6. Cause you can bake you are great at cooking- therefore baking in my books, however i have to say the hard thing is not eating it for sure. i plate it up and march it all straight to the neighnours orr the hungry at work. I love your Rome pictures

    Like

    • I once thought that the family that lives above me would help me “dispose” of the baked goods. Unfortunately, Tania, one of the two boys doesn’t care for sweets of any kind. I feel bad when I bring them something that his brother loves but that he won’t touch. Maybe i should move. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  7. I read your post to Phil – when I said: “I forgot the flour” – Phil screamed: Who forgets flour????

    this started my day on a very good vibe… I love a good laugh, and hope you don’t mind it was at the expense of your post 😉

    John, I just made a batch of cookies similar to this one – should be in the blog next month, I think. Don’t you love oatmeal cookies? I think they might have become my favorite now, snickerdoodles stepping down to second place

    (lovely photos of Rome, a place I visited when I was 28 years old – never forgot a sort of scary adventure with a taxi driver who took me to the airport for my flight back to Brazil

    Liked by 1 person

    • I know, Phil. I know.

      Mind? I’ve made so many stupid mistakes in the kitchen that I find them funny now, too. — as long as I haven’t a table-full of dinner guests waiting for the now-ruined dish. Done that, too. Glad to have helped get your day off on the right foot.

      I look forward to seeing your recipe. Poor baking skills aside, I’ve always room for another good cookie recipe.

      Rome is not a place that is easily forgotten. I was very lucky this trip. The few times I had to rely upon a cab, each ride went smoothly. I wish I had that kind of luck here. 🙂

      Like

    • Thanks, Colline. Mistakes in the kitchen make life interesting. (At least that’s what I keep telling myself.) I think this is going to be one very good visit and I can’t wait! 🙂

      Like

  8. I promised I’d bake some cookies for a friend and I may very well have found which ones I’ll be making… besides the ingredients which I all love, their golden colour is just beautiful! PS: I share your opinion on baking 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Mandy. I’ve substituted a number of ingredients in this recipe — some intentionally, even — and with good results. They’d have to be or I would have stopped trying after the missed flour incident. 🙂
      Max thanks you and we both hope you have a great week and weekend.

      Like

  9. Hahhah…you are too funny, John! Well it looks as if, even in spite of your past errors…a baker you are indeed! [Your story reminds me of the time my daughter used 1/2 cup of baking soda instead of 1/2 tablespoon…yucky!]
    Safe travels to the thumb…hope the trip and visit with your guest are memorable!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. I freeze a lot of things I bake too because of a similar need to snack on one every time I walk by. These cookies look delicious and after reading through the ingredients list, I’m pretty sure they can easily be made gluten and dairy free. I’ve taken all the fun out of it, I know. Ha!

    Enjoy “The Visitation” and do take lots of pictures so we can see all of the fun you have planned!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Take the fun our of it? Heavens, no! I think it’s great that you can de-gluten the recipe and hope you’ll post the recipe. I’ll gladly pass it along to my affected family members.
      I’m looking forward to this visit. Whether or not there will be pictures to post, though, will depend entirely upon my visitor. She can be surprisingly shy about such matters. 🙂

      Like

  11. I one time made a batch of cookies with 1/2 the flour. It took me over a day to figure out what the heck I did wrong. Didn’t stop the family from devouring the ‘weird’ cookies though. Have a great time in MI and visiting with you special guest. Love your Italy photos 🙂

    Like

    • Thanks, Ingrid. I, too, tried the flourless cookies but they were pretty much glued to the parchment paper and baking sheet and they tasted like a very weird brittle.
      This will be a great visit. I’m stocking up provisions already. 🙂

      Like

  12. I don’t know why I’ve never thought about freezing cookies so I wouldn’t eat them all at once. Well, actually I do know why…but it’s a GREAT idea! Like Cecilia, I’d probably eat them frozen, but it would at least slow me down. 🙂 This is one of those times I’d like to reach in and grab the cookie from that last shot…love these, John. The Colosseum and the Forum are truly one of the world’s most haunting and impressive sights. Seeing pictures do not do justice to the scale and impact of standing in these ruins and feeling the history they hold. So glad you had such a great trip!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hey, Betsy. I usually freeze most of what I bake: cookies, breads, and the like. If I could find the right-sized containers, I’d try freezing cakes and pies, too. Being my freezer is in the basement, it’s even harder for me to get to, especially for a mid-might snack. Clever, eh?
      You are so right about the Colosseum and Forum. Both are the kind of place one must see personally to get their impact. For me, organizing and posting these pics was a great way to keep that part of the trip in the foreground of my memory. I better figure out something new now that I’ve published the last post. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Well, Angeline, I’m anything but a baker but these cookies are worth the effort. They hit all the key ingredients that I look for in a cookie: oatmeal, cherries, and chocolate. Oh, yeah, they’re worth it, mistakes and all. Thanks for your kind words about the photos. The Forum and Colosseum are 2 of the world’s best places to point your lens.

      Like

  13. I have learned to come to your blog just after having breakfast/lunch/dinner otherwise I end up wandering around the fridge wondering what to say “No” to 🙂
    Also enjoyed a lot the photos from Rome – brought back a lot of memories – a lovely ones, of course! I don’t enjoy traveling alone but Rome is pretty much the only place (well, maybe also Firenze) I would return to again and again – even if alone.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much, Ese. In my mind’s eye, I see you opening your fridge door, shouting, “No!”, and slamming the door. My problem is I so rarely say no, instead I find something to eat. 🙂
      I, too, have traveled alone and would drop everything to get back to Rome or Firenze, traveling companions are so not required. I’d spend my mornings touring; my afternoons sipping espresso in a piazza; my evenings dinning at a trattoria; and my nights dreaming of the day’s events Bliss.

      Like

  14. Wow, these cookies sound awesome! I have always loved the cookies with white chocolate chips, cranberries, and nuts so these sound even better! Oatmeal and dark chocolate?? Yum! Also, you have gotten me so excited for my trip to Rome! I will be in Italy (starting down in the southwest tip) starting October 1. I will be making my way up through Italy and most certainly stopping in Rome 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks for your cookie compliments but let’s talk about Rome and Italy. Good for you! You’re in for a wonderful time. I’ve taken the reverse trip, traveling down the coast from Rome to Naples, a ferry to Palermo, and then along the souther coast of Sicily before crossing at Messina and heading back to Rome. It was wonderful. I don’t know how much time you’ll spend in Rome but be sure to have a good tour book lest you “miss” something. There is just so much to see there and the sam is true for Florence. No matter how long you spend in either city, you’ll wish you had more. Then do as I do. Go back again … and again … and again. 🙂
      Have a wonderful time!

      Like

  15. Ah, comfort food.
    I forgot the flour in a batch of fish cakes once and watched the first few spoonfuls disintegrate into the frying oil before I clued in.
    Wait… one can still touch the Collosseum? Stonehenge has been roped off for at least 40 years!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m beginning to think that it’s not our fault but it’s the fault of the flour. Sneaky stuff.
      Yes, you can touch the Colosseum. You can walk into it and even walk to the 2nd level. At one time you could go higher but it’s considered unsafe now. Now you really must get to Rome and know what it’s like to touch a place like the Colosseum. 🙂

      Like

  16. John – no flour? How did you forget the flour? That’s ok, we all were excited to try some sugar cookies that my daughter had made for us. She wanted to make a double batch and did double the sugar but forgot to double everything else! I think she was getting a cut from the dentist on cracked teeth because those babies were hard as rocks.
    I too got chills walking around the Colosseum and the Forum just thinking of those who had walked before. Do they also have bloodbaths at Wrigley Field?

    Liked by 1 person

    • I know, I know, Diane. Fact is I’m smiling broadly right now. I’ve made so many that these things don’t bother me any more. Well, so long as I’m home alone but let there be a table full of guests and I will no be amused. Sounds like your daughter and I are kindred spirits. Tell her to concentrate learning to make homemade pastas. Dinner guests will forgive any error when you place a plate of freshly made pasta or ravioli or gnocchi in front of them. 🙂
      The Forum is really something. On the floo of the Basilica Julia you can see marks on the stone where copper coins melted when the place burned to the ground. Over near the Basilica Amelia is graffiti scratched into the stone. It’s in Latin and dates back millennia. I love this ind of stuff.
      Wrigley has bloodbaths regularly throughout Spring and Summer. I’ve seen far more than my fair share. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  17. what a baking story! My kitchen philosophy is that good cooks are the ones who are ok with making mistakes.

    I have a basement freezer, too, though have found that most cookies taste really good frozen. What to do?

    Your cookies look great–I’d call them breakfast 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Well, Liz, I’ve made so many mistakes in the kitchen that I would have given myself a stroke if I let them bother me. I can laugh most of them off. It’s those that I commit before witnesses that give me the most grief. Like the Thanksgiving I forgot the bruschetti under the broiler. I pulled them out, aflame, in front of my guests and they went straight to the alley in a blaze of glory. I still hear about that one.
      You’re not the first to mention how good cookies are frozen. I think I’m going to need a new hiding place.
      I just realized that you are among the many whose notifications have gone missing. Sorry, Liz, for not realizing it sooner. I’m going to try unsubscribing and subscribing to see if that will “jump start ” the process.

      Like

  18. The trouble with baking is that it’s an exact science. If you leave out just one ingredient, you’re going to have a disaster. I do love the look of your cookies and with the chocolates and the fruit, they’d have great texture. I have a sister who loves Italy and she and her family visit at least every two years. They always start and end their visits with Rome. She also loves all the history and yes, you can see it come alive as you walk through the ruins. I must get there one day xx

    Like

    • You are exactly right, Charlie, and I am no scientist. It’s why I marvel so at the cakes you create. Not only do you have the baking end down, but you excel at the shaping and decorating, too, all of which are so far out of my league. I’ll stick with pasta making. 🙂
      I would love to go back to Rome more frequently than I do. I’d also like to get back to Oz. If only they weren’t at opposite sides of the globe I could go to one on my way to the other. Now, that would be a trip! I really do hope you get to Rome. The place is a gallery of Michelangelo’s works. You will absolutely love it. Guaranteed!

      Like

    • Oh, Celia. Thank you, Celia, that’s a very kind thing for you to say, being the expert baker and chocolatier that you are. Right now I’m in the cleaning phase of the pre-visitation schedule. It’s much like doing Spring cleaning, only about 6 months too early. It’s been a long time since the last Visitation and this will be fun.

      Like

  19. When I started reading this post I thought you were exaggerating about having trouble baking, until I reached the part where you mention you forgot the flour 😉 Looking forward to the duck ravioli! Please give Zia my warmest regards — I guess it will be nice to be able to show her stuff online for a change 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • No exaggeration, Stefan. My baking history is littered with burned pans and baking sheets. I’ll stick to making pasta . You are ever-present in our conversations, Stefan. She’s amazed at how many of our dishes you’ve tried. Rest assured, when your name comes up again, I’ll b sure to pass along your regards. It’s been about 15 years since the last Visitation. There’s plenty to show her and I cannot wait. 🙂

      Like

  20. So many good things… I think these cookies would be great any time but perfect as Christmas cookies. Here at Christmas, I think cherries. I have the same problem when I bake… I get distracted, I think I know the quantities… my recent effort was to add 2 1/2 cups of milk to the banana bread mix rather than 1 cup – the 2 41/2 cups measurement was for the flour… Roast duck ravioli may just be the thing that moves my new but yet unused ravioli maker out of the drawer and into use. Wishing you all the best “The Visitation” 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hello, EllaDee! Funny. Cherries are far out of season here at Christmastime. I would never associate the two. Then again, I would have a hard time adjusting to Christmas in mid-Summer, too. The Visitation went very well and both our lives have returned to normal, whatever that means. It sure was nice playing host, though, and I hope I can do it again next year. 🙂

      Please excuse my error, EllaDee. I’m just so excited to be back that I got careless. 🙂

      Like

  21. Oh! Oh! Oh! Where to start. Love your aglio e olio! Now I’m craving it. And are you kidding me with duck ravioli?! I’m trying to lay off the pastas for a while, but that’s clearly not going to happen with these pastas on my brain. Now, for your cookie, oatmeals are my favorite. Hands down. We only make them once a year (triple batch) because we can’t control ourselves. And would you believe I too have forgotten the flour once and baking soda once. What a mess! I may have to break our rules and make these soon. Perhaps my birthday…Lastly, enjoy your visitation!!! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Well, I guess it’s good to know that I’m not alone but, frankly, you’ve far more to distract you than do I. I can’t imagine forgetting the flour ever again, though, or, if I do, I certainly won’t mention it here. 🙂
      The duck ravioli were better than we thought they’d be. If anything convinces you to break out the pasta machine, these will. We certainly enjoyed them.
      The visitation was fantastic! By its end, we were 2 very tired Bartolini. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  22. I do not like to bake because one must follow the recipe (something I have problem doing) and if I forget an ingredient (which I frequently do) the outcome is most likely a disaster. With cooking however, if I forget an ingredient it can be added later without any problem (most of the time) and the dish will still come out OK if I do not follow the recipe.

    Liked by 1 person

    • You and I, Norma, are of the same mind. I can always think of something when cooking to “save” a dish but how do you save something that’s missing flour? It’s impossible. 🙂

      Like

    • Thank you so much, Meredith. The Visitation went very well, though we didn’t use a drop of honey. I did bake another batch of cookies, though, and a batch of muffins. Now, don’t worry about the honey. I did use some when I pickled 3 batches of peppers. Have I ever mentioned my love of pickled peppers? 🙂

      Like

  23. These cookies look fabulous John! As per the thoughts in my recent post, this recipe will see me head straight to the kitchen to try out your inspiring recipe. Rather funny that at least half of the ingredient list is what you need for the Homemade Granola recipe! I’ll be back soon, to let you know how I get along… must remember the flour! must remember the flour! 😉

    Liked by 1 person

      • I am so glad you tried and enjoyed the cookie recipe, Margot. They certainly were a hit during the visitation. So much so that I baked another batch! They will be a part of my Christmas gift baskets, for sure. Now I have to try your granola. You’re right. The 2 recipes are practically identical. 🙂

        Like

  24. May all the angels above make this ‘Zia visit’ a wonderfully healthy and happy experience!! What a great opportunity for the US Matriarch of the Clan to be together with all her Illinois beloveds . . . Photos for us to share too please??

    Liked by 1 person

    • It was a fantastic visit, Eha. My friends all came to see her and she charmed them all. I drove her out to see her grand and great grand kids and we had a wonderful time. I don’t think the visit could have gone much better. I guess we’ll see next year. I’m trying to get her to come back. 🙂

      Like

  25. Wouldn’t Santa love to see that cookie and milk scene when he arrives in a few short months? These sounds like a terrific combination. Too hot and humid to bake cookies today but these are in the near future.
    I enjoy your trip to Italy via your photographs and like how you have to touch the Colosseum stone. A great visual.
    Looking forward to hearing all about the honey man and you and your special guest are going to be busy in the kitchen. What an adventure. It is always wonderful to hear about all the two of you produce in the kitchens when you are together.
    Your blog is a standout above the rest, John. Thanks for the likes and comments on mine, too.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Such a lovely comment, Ruth. Thank you so much. We had a wonderful time together. The last time she saw some of my friends was about 20 years ago and others couldn’t wait to meet her. She was thrilled by all of the attention. We spent one afternoon in the burbs visiting her grand and great grand kids. All in al, it was a great visit and I hope I can convince her to do it again next Spring.
      These cookies were a big hit, Ruth. So much so that I made another batch — flour included, of course. 🙂 I’ll be baking more at Christmas, though, Santa will have to wait. I’ll be including some in my gift baskets.

      Like

  26. These look delicious, John. I love a good cookie and one can never have too many cookie recipes. I wish that freezing them kept my mitts off them…no way! I love a good frozen cookie, too. 🙂 I’m not a great baker, but I’m efficient. I do remember the flour. 🙂 Enjoy your honey run and special visitor. I’m glad “your guest” will have your undivided attention!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Debra. My Guest had my attention, indeed! She also had Max and Lucy’s attention, too. Though they both know her very well, they couldn’t quite get used to seeing her here, in “their” house. 🙂 We had a wonderful time and I hope I can get her back her in 2015.
      You know, I never thought to try one frozen but you, and a number of others, have planted the idea in my head. I guess it’s a good thing that I keep them in the basement freezer. My fear of spiders will preclude any thoughts of a mid-night snack of frozen cookies. 🙂

      Like

  27. I smiled ear to ear when I read about your baking experiences, John; fret not, we’ve all made these types of silly errors…even me! And I’ve been baking since 12 years old! I get distracted or I’m tired and I forget a line in the recipe. I’ve even pulled out a cake from the oven having forgotten the flour; yes, something was nagging at me after I put the darn thing in the oven and I realized my error after a few moments! I had to pour the batter out add the flour, wash and grease the pan and pour the batter back in.
    These cookies are lovely, oatmeal is one of my favourites and as I mentioned on FB I just love all the inclusions.
    Your photos are gorgeous; I love the old European cities, so rich in history. I also love the below ground ruins — Hungary has a lot of it too. I always try to imagine what it was like to walk those street so many years ago.
    Have a lovely break with your special visitor. It must be such a gift to be able to spend time with her.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Eva. This post has become some sort of confessional, with so many admitting their mistakes. How lucky that you remembered the flour moments after placing the unintentionally gluten-free batter into the oven. I didn’t realize my error until I opened the oven door to rotate the baking sheets. What a mess! Even so, these cookies are worth all of the misfires. They really are that good.
      I’m such a fan of antiquity, Eva, and it’s a thrill to walk about places like Rome. Hungary would be a great place to visit, though I’d need a tour guede to help show me around. Are you available? 🙂

      Like

  28. Those sun-kissed cookies look inviting! Like yourself, I am no baker but if a person-who-forgets-flour-while-baking-cookies can do it, I can do it too 🙂
    I’ve never been to Rome. Thank you so much for the sun-shiny Roman images. That was a bonus!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Deal, Abbe! I can boil a mean pot of water! Max is ever-present whenever I’m in the kitchen. He’s the ultimate opportunist and watches me like a hawk, hoping something will fall to the floor. Sad to say, he’s right more than I care to admit.
      I won’t say how many cookies were eaten along the way but I will say that I made another batch once we were back here in Chicago. 🙂
      I, too, have many wonderful memories of Michigan. I was fortunate to spend time all around the state. It really is a beautiful place.

      Like

    • Thanks, Glenda. I did enjoy my time away. This recipe can be easily modified and I bet there are a number of versions on the web.. I made a batch with dried cranberries and black walnuts. They, too, were very good.

      Like

    • Hi, Stacey. Every September, I accompany Zia to the Honey Man’s farm and we buy a year’s worth of honey for friends and family. This year, we bought 4.5 gallons, or 17.3 liters!!!! The honey is better tasting than anything we can buy from a store and costs less than half the price.
      Believe me. I’ll never forget to add flour again!

      Like

  29. It must be bikkie season, John. Everyone I know is coming up with delicious recipes.
    I’m not likely to visit Italy, but I know the Roman Empire through Lindsey Davis and Steven Saylor novels. PS. I’m following you but not getting your new posts. I’m going to re-follow and hope that it works.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I think we’re all getting ready for he holidays, Mary. Everyone likes baked goods around the holidays. I’ve been lucky enough to visit Italy a few times and it never loses its appeal. Now that I’ve reconnected with my family, I cannot wait to get back there.
      i do not know what’s going on with WP. Like you, others tell me that they no longer receive notifications of my posts. I, too have “lost” a number of blogs and have to remember to check to see if they’ve posted something. I hope this is all just temporary and they figure it out. Of course, I could use this as an excuse for baking more cookies. 🙂

      Like

  30. John, I bake a lot, and I still mess up royally. My husband has observed quite astutely that I’m prone to changing things up, which is what causes these mishaps. Often the changes lead to delicious innovation, but sometimes, it results in all out failure.

    I think your cookies look like a very satisfying treat. I LOVE the combination of cherries and chocolate, and adding oats just makes for a substantially yummy treat. I’d want a really tall glass of cold milk with these. Thanks for shaking things up with a yummy sweet treat!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I so admire cooks like yourself who are willing to experiment when baking. As my experiences with this recipe proves, I’ve a devil of a time just following a recipe. I’d be asking for real trouble if I were to try and wing it. On the other hand, turn me loose on a stocked fridge and some pasta and I’ll do very well. 🙂

      Like

  31. You’re no baker? I beg to differ! These cookies … oh, what am I to say. Chocolate? Cherries? In an oatmeal cookie? That’s cookie nirvana as far as I’m concerned. With regard to baking, we often hear that it’s an ‘exact science’ and in fact, I saw that phrase at least one in the comments. Well, I beg to differ about that too. Sure, if you leave some things out altogether you may have a ‘fail’ on your hands, but tweaking this and that can result in cookies, for example, that are a little chewier or more crispy, and so on. I suppose it’s only an exact science if you want exactly the same cookie as the last time you baked. That’s my view, anyway!

    Enjoy the Visitation. I’m guessing that it’s a certain elegant and talented Auntie who’s coming to stay with you, and if I’m right please give her my regards.

    As for your photos and travelogue of your trip to Italy, I can only sigh and say, ‘Bucket list.’

    Liked by 1 person

    • You are too kind, Mar. I guess I just don’t have the courage to tweak a baking recipe. I have played with this recipe but that’s because I’ve baked these cookies so many times. Perhaps with more experience, I’d be more courageous with other recipes. BUT, how may cookies and cakes must I ruin before I get the necessary experience? Oh, the confections! 🙂
      I did pass along your regards and she was pleased to hear from you. She gets a good chuckle whenever I mention our swimming to meet you on your side of The Lake. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  32. I think you were really just experimenting with gluten free cookies for a future bake off 😉 I never make cookies (like you, I feel I’m not really a baker) but Big Man loves them – so perhaps your recipe can give me that little push! Loved the Rome history (much more athentic my my dad’s lessons….Enjoy the honey run and the visit….love to all!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m back, Tanya! Warn the villagers!
      Yeah, that’s it. I’m experimenting with GF recipes. Ha!
      I happen to love your Dad’s tale and have repeated it a number of times. What a great way to capture a young girl’s imagination! Zia — or should I say my Visitor? — agrees. Yes, I told her the tale. We had a wonderful visit and we were both plenty tired when it was all over. Now I’m trying to get her to come back next year. It’s never too early to start cajoling. 😉

      Like

  33. By now you must be thoroughly enjoying your “visitation”! But I interrupt your visit with a belated comment.. you see I read this last week and thought I’d commented, but I think I only thought about what I wanted to say and then must have been interrupted:) Or I forgot.. yeeesh! Anyhoooo.. I love this sort of cookie and wouldn’t you know tonight I was thinking that what I needed was the crunch and chewy texture of an oatmeal cookie.. if only I had a cookie jar or freezer full of these right now. Actually, I am quite fond of frozen cookies, so hiding yours in there would do you no good at all:) I loved Rome, loved the Forum and could almost imagine the ghosts whispering in their robes as they walked about those ruins! xx

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hey, Barb! I’m baaack!
      Until you and a few others mentioned it, I never thought of eating frozen cookies. Thank heavens — I guess — that my fear of spiders will keep me from late night raids of the basement freezer. 🙂
      I really enjoyed playing host and I’m sure my guest enjoyed herself, as well. It was really special, Barb. With a little luck, I may be able to convince her to return to Chi-town next Spring. Fingers crossed. 😉

      Like

    • Sorry for the delayed reply. I think you’ll love these cookies. My Zia just called me this evening to tell me she made the cookies and is having a hard time not eating them. They’re that good!

      Like

  34. I have no willpower, either, when it comes to baking. This is why, like you, I have to freeze baked goods ASAP.

    These look like terrific cookies. My fave husband has been hinting for some oatmeal cookies, and I’m going to surprise him with these. (Although, if he’s been hinting, it won’t really be a surprise.)

    It looks like you had good weather on your trip to Rome. If I’m ever there, I will follow your advice to visit the Forum and the Colosseum.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Judging from my tasters’ responses, you cannot go wrong with these cookies, Ruth — so long as you remember the flour. I’d no idea how important flour was until the moment I opened the oven door. 🙂
      I do hope you can manage a trip to Rome. Guaranteed no matter how long you stay there, you’ll wish you could stay longer. So much history and all of it so approachable. It’s an incredible place.

      Like

  35. John, you never fail to amaze me with your recipes, writing and photographs. Although the fires are raging in California, cooler weather is finally coming back so that I can bake and hit that huge box of COSTCO oatmeal and make some kind of a dent. Your cookies will be a hit this coming holiday season when I’m doing charity baking. That is, if there’s any cookies left after I slide them off the baking sheet!!! Thanks again!!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • This has been a terrible fire season, Arlene. I just read that an airtanker crashed while fighting the fire at Yosemite. How tragic! I saw a graphic depicting the growth of the California drought over the past decade. It’s shocking. I hope you’ve a wet Winter ahead. You can have as much of our snow as you need. Gladly!
      I’m thinking of baking these for the holidays, too. And that’s something new for me, considering my baking experiences. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • John, I’m finally catching up (I think) to your wonderful blogs! Thank you so much for your comforting comments. Life goes on–whatever happens. The fires continue since your last post to me. This time, it hit close very close to Sacramento. Our dearest friends in the area right above our hometown had to evacuate. Then return home the next day with still the threat of leaving. It all comes down to friends and family. Without relationships, we are nothing. Again, John, thank you so much for your writing and your photographs. You are my anchor in this California madness. When the going gets tough, this American-born Filipino with an Italian surname gets cooking and EATING!!! Yes, yes, yes. Looking so forward to more of your outstanding recipes!!! Can’t do anything with stuff we can’t control. Suck it up and carry on!!!

        Liked by 1 person

        • We go through life thinking we’re in control but, in reality, the forces of Nature have the control. Nowhere is that more evident than in California. I feel for your poor friends having to go through that kind of uncertainty. How awful! I’m like you and cook when I’m stressed. If I lived in California, I’d never leave the kitchen. I’d end up on Hoarders but instead of newspapers stashed everywhere there’d be piles and piles of pasta. 🙂

          Like

  36. Haha… this makes me think back to my first baking experience as a child (my mother often tells me this story!). Apparently she gave me free reign in the kitchen at the age of 3 and I made ‘cookies’ with just flour and water. Upon tasting them, I said; “Mummy, these don’t taste very good”. That was my first lesson about butter and sugar! 🙂 Luckily I seem to have the baking thing worked out these days but I don’t think that baking is for everyone. It seems that people are either savoury or sweet cooks in most cases, with only a minority of people who enjoy doing both! Although in saying that John, your oatmeal cookies look delicious!!! I would happily devour a few of these! Loved the Rome pictures too. Aaron and I visited Rome for the first time a few weeks ago and I was amazed by the architecture, history and food. Italy is truly a beautiful place.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Oh, Laura. If only my flour-less cookies were a distant memory and not current events. 🙂 I’ll never do it again, though.
      Rome is such a special place. I’m sure your both had a lovely time. I hope you tossed coins in the Trevi Fountain. Yes, it superstitious but, I must admit, I’ve tossed coins in it every trip and, against all odds, I seem to find a way to return. Just saying … 😉

      Like

  37. What do you mean you’re not a baker John? I’ve seen some tasty looking fresh baked goods here, at Bartolini Kitchens. Forgetting salt and substituting light brown sugar with dark is not a big problem, but forgetting baking soda or baking powder when baking is unforgettable. If you forgot the flour then you win John. I confirm you’re not a baker….forgetting flour…is the final straw. On the contrary, I always eat whatever I bake the next day. I taste it better then. These cookies look awesome. I wouldn’t mind them with a hot cuppa! Enjoy your weekend!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hey, Liz. I’m back … at least for now. There’s another Michigan visit in my future, if the weather cooperates. Yes, my baking history is littered with many errors, though forgetting the flour was by far the worst. It does have its silver lining though. I know I’ll never forget it again, much to the dismay of my gluten-free friends. 🙂

      Like

  38. These cookies look great !! And I’ve got a suggestion for you. Put all your ingredients on one side… after you added an ingredient, put it over to the other side. If there’s anything left by the end…. you’ll know what it is. And my bet is it’ll be either salt or baking powder! And certainly wouldn’t worry about using dark brown sugar instead of light – I use the dark for everything! I hope The Visitation is going well – we can’t wait to hear all about it !! Sending you a Big Hug !! PS Loved your photos of The Coliseum – it was sooo much bigger ‘in person’ than I ever could’ve imagined !!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Cecile for the advice. Funny thing. That batch was my test of the recipe as I had written it for posting. It was missing flour in the ingredient list and so did my cookie dough, as a result. That won’t happen again but I am soo glad I tested the recipe before posting.
      The Visitation went very well. It’s hard to believe she came and went so quickly, though I do have a clean house as a benefit. 🙂 Now I’m trying to convince her to come back for a visit next May/June.

      Liked by 1 person

  39. I’ve been trying to bake a decent oatmeal cookie for 40 years, so I’m not much of a baker either. 🙂 Have never had an oatmeal cookie with chocolate and cherry. Looks like the perfect oatmeal cookies to me!! Now I need to give this one a try. 🙂 A couple of days ago I watched “The Gladiator” for the umpteenth time and I remember the line in the more when the gladiators pull up to the Colosseum for the first time and one of them say “I didn’t think man could build something so big.” Back then, it’s pretty amazing!!! Have a great trip John!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hey, MJ. I’ve had similar luck with cookies, not just oatmeal. This recipe — once you remember the flour — is really a good one. I’ve switched out a couple of the ingredients and still baked a tasty cookie. I’ve so much confidence in them that I’ll be baking them for Christmas. This will be a first 🙂
      There is so much about Rome that was meant to inspire. The Colosseum was/is the World’s largest amphitheater. You can’t help but stand there and be awed, like so much of Rome. If time travel were ever possible, I’d go back just to see Rome in all its glory, and then Athens, and the Giza. Now that would be a vacation!

      Like

  40. You’re no baker? Ha! Those cookies say otherwise. 😉 I love the forum and the Colosseum — one can spend hours (days!) there. Looking forward to seeing you when you return.

    Liked by 1 person

  41. Buona Sera John! These cookies look packed with goodness. I am with you, I am a much better savory cook than a baker. That whole “measuring thing” is for the birds. I am more of a dash of this and a dash of that kind of girl. I have not yet been to Rome so glad I can live through your photos. Have a super time with your super “special guest” and looking forward to some delicious recipes with a bit of honey in it upon your return…Take Care, BAM

    Liked by 1 person

    • Buona notte, BAM! You and I would get along in a kitchen just fine. I, too, am more of a bit of this or that, rather than weighing ingredients. Even so, forgetting flour was a new one, even for me. You will LOVE Rome when you get there, BAM. There are so few places where history is quite literally all around you. Love it! My Visitor is back home now, safe and sound. We had a wonderful time.

      Liked by 1 person

  42. Pingback: The Visitation of 2015 | from the Bartolini kitchens

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s