Black Rice Risotto with Roast Duck and Porcini Mushrooms

Risotto Venere con Anatra Arrosto e Funghi Porcini

Roast Duck Risotto 3This is the second and last post using leftovers from the duck that Zia and I roasted and that I blogged about in early September. Last week was the first when I shared our recipe for duck ravioli. Today’s post resulted from a dinner I served Zia during The Visitation and, in doing so, we used the very last of that duck, save for the quack.

To start, make a stock by placing the roasted duck carcass in a large pot of cold water after removing and reserving any pieces of meat that may still cling to the bones. Into the same pot, add a large quartered onion, 2 roughly chopped celery stalks, 2 roughly chopped carrots, a few sprigs of parsley, and a quartered tomato. No need to season the stock for the carcass is already seasoned. Bring the pot to a boil before reducing to a simmer. After 2 hours, strain the stock and use it in today’s risotto.

Now, I’ve already shared 4 risotto recipes (Bartolini, Turkey, Strawberry, and Tricolor risotti) so there’s really no need to go into great detail here. There are, however, a few things to note with this particular recipe.

There are two kinds of Italian black rice, riso venere. Both are a medium grain rice, one of which is made by dyeing Arborio rice with squid ink. The other — the one that was used in today’s recipe — was developed by crossing the storied Asian Forbidden Rice with an Italian variety. This is a whole grain and, much like brown rice, takes a bit longer to cook than, say, Arborio, for example. In fact, it could easily take an hour to prepare today’s risotto. This means that you will need more stock to cook the rice. In the past, I’ve suggested using a 3 to 1 ratio — meaning 3 parts stock to every part rice — plus an additional cup of stock for good measure. Because of the increased cooking time required for this particular rice, you may need a much as double my original suggestion. Though that may seem excessive, remember that you can always use any leftover stock in any number of ways. (See Notes for a way to cut down on the cooking time and, therefore, the amount of stock required.)

In this recipe, I used dried porcini mushrooms. (I’ve yet to find fresh ones here but the search continues.) To hydrate them, place the dried mushrooms in a bowl and add very hot water. I tend to avoid using boiling water, as some might suggest, for fear that it may partially cook the mushrooms. After 20 to 30 minutes, carefully remove the now plump mushrooms and coarsely chop them for use in the recipe. Take the leftover water and add it to the heated duck stock, being careful to leave behind any of the grit that may remain in the bottom of the bowl. The stock will now be both duck and mushroom-flavored.

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Riso Venere*     *     *

To prepare the risotto, in a medium sauce pan, melt a couple tbsp of butter over med-high heat. Add some finely chopped shallots and sauté until soft. Add some minced/grated garlic and continue cooking for about a minute before adding the reserved duck meat and the chopped reconstituted porcini mushrooms. Sauté for a few more minutes and then add the rice. Cook the rice, stirring frequently, until the grains are toasted — about 5 minutes. Reduce the heat to medium, add about a half-cup of dry white wine, stir, and cook until almost all the liquid is absorbed. Repeat the process with the heated duck stock (See Notes), adding more liquid, stirring, and allowing it to be absorbed before adding another ladle or two more. Once the rice is cooked just about to your preference, add another ladle of stock, cover, turn off the heat, and allow to rest for 5 minutes. Next, remove the cover, add 2 tbsp of butter, if desired, and about 1/2 cup grated Pecorino Romano or Parmigiano Reggiano. Stir well and serve immediately, garnished with more grated cheese.

*     *     *

Duck Risotto 2*     *     *

Notes

Black rice should be rinsed before use to remove any inedible bits — pebbles, sticks, and the like. If you wish to lower the cooking time, the rice may be soaked before cooking. The longer it is soaked, the less time will be needed to cook it. Though I’ve never done this, I did see where some have soaked it as long as overnight.

Always use heated stock when making this or any risotto. Using cool or even warmed stock will greatly increase the cooking time. On the other hand, do not use stock that is boiling. Stock that is too hot will evaporate when it hits the rice-filled pan before it can be absorbed by the grains.

*     *     *

It’s déjà vu all over again …

Duck SoupThis isn’t so much a look back as it is a footnote to the 3 duck-related posts. In the past, I’ve suggested that you use leftover scraps of pasta dough to make quadretti. (Remember: waste not.) That’s what I did when I made last week’s duck ravioli and, with a cup of today’s duck stock, I enjoyed a delicious bowl of duck soup for that day’s lunch, all the while contemplating the challenges faced by the country of Fredonia.

*     *     *

Coming soon to a monitor near you …

Roast Goat PreviewBartolini Roast Goat

*     *     *

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120 thoughts on “Black Rice Risotto with Roast Duck and Porcini Mushrooms

  1. I do love duck! I love how you made every good use of every bit of your duck and that none went to waste. I do think that if we’re going to eat animals we need to be respectful enough to not be wasteful with what they have provided us with. This is a beautiful looking risotto. I’ve never seen black risotto rice before – something for me to investigate and I agree with how you have to keep that stock at the right temperature before adding it to the pot. How satisfying to enjoy this knowing you made your own stock and made every good use of your duck xx

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much, Charlie. Not to pat myself on the back but this was probably the best risotto I’ve ever prepared and to serve it to Zia was just about too good to be true. You’re right, too, that there was a certain satisfaction knowing that none of that duck went to waste. Mom would have been proud. 🙂

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  2. That looks and sounds absolutely amazing – and that shot of the rice coming out of the bowl is beautiful! I have a duck in the freezer so am going to do a bit of experimenting with it. And I hear the quack makes great soup 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Tanya, for the kind words. Here duck is a little pricey and I avoid it unless I’ve guests. These posts, though, prove that I can stretch that one duck across several meals and dishes. Put that way, duck is really rather inexpensive. Who knew?
      If the quack does make a good soup, can quack risotto be far behind? 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I keep thinking the top picture shows a Southeast Asian sticky-rice dessert sprinkled with coconut. (Apparently I’m adept at tuning out celery leaves.)
    This risotto would look great paired with chicken or pork or haddock, something white whose visual appeal would suffer alongside white rice.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sticky rice with coconut?!?!? You’re killing me here! Next you’ll be calling my ravioli misshapen pierogi. 😀
      You’re so right about the serving. It’s such a great color to play with on a plate.

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    • Thanks, MD. How I envy your selection of meats and game! Only very recently did I find venison here and it was ground/minced. I think my best bet is through Zia in Michigan. No, I’m not sending her out into the marshes with a shotgun. 😀
      She knows many people. Maybe there’s a hunter among them.

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      • It has all changed here in the last 20 years. Venison is farmed (though they need lots of room to run around, so it’s very free range) and the popularity of pheasant shooting with rich bankers means that the birds cost less than chicken. They do shoot a ridiculous amount, but as the season goes on the glut of birds makes the price plummet. I use to hunt myself (just for the pot), but it’s not possible in London. Good luck meeting hunters via Zia – perhaps you could come to an arrangement where you swap meat for cooked dishes or invite the hunters to dinner 🙂

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  4. That’s interesting about the two black rices in Italy, John. I’ve had the Asian Forbidden Rice but it was a very long time ago and I can’t remember what it tastes like. For the mushrooms, I usually soak them overnight (no need to worry about overcooking them) in room temperature water, but remember to cover them otherwise your home will smell like mushrooms. I always save the mushroom ‘stock’ too, it adds such great flavour to the risotto.
    There is something so magical about mushrooms and butter and although I try to cook on the healthier side, I will NEVER pass up the butter in my mushroom risotto! I’ve probably mentioned this story before but quite a few years ago, we were staying at the Seminole hotel in Fort Lauderdale and as I was on the stair machine I was watching one of the hotel chefs make risotto on TV. What shocked me was the amount of butter he added at them end…I’m talking pounds! Yes, his quantity served about 10-12 people but the proportion was still whacked! To be honest, I haven’t been able to order it in a restaurant since then. Not that all chefs make risotto with pounds of butter, I’m guessing there is usually more butter than there should be (no wonder it’s so damn good!).
    Hope you’re having a lovely fall, we had one really nice day yesterday (it was even warm) but it ended in rain and today is just yucky. Hope this doesn’t mean we’ll have a nasty winter again.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hello, Eva. Happy Fall! Up until Max discovered that there could be food on a counter top, I, too, soaked my mushrooms overnight. I should be able to go back to it, though. He’s matured quite a bit. He’s nowhere near normal but he has calmed down a bit. At least that’s what I keep telling myself. 😉
      You and JT are very health conscious with your diet. You must have been horrified to see all that butter added to the risotto. I, too, like a little butter in my risotto but that was overkill. Risotto is one of those dishes I so rarely order when dining out. Mom really spoiled me and I’ve been disappointed too many times. As a result, I never order risotto, ravioli, nor lasagna — unless I’m in Italy. Then, watch out!
      Since Zia left, it’s been pretty wet around here. Today, though, is sunny and warm. Max and I will be heading out for a nice walk in a bit. We have to enjoy these days for they won’t be around much longer. Have a great week. See you soon. 🙂

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  5. Looks so delicious, John. I’ve never had black rice, and yes, I would be very wary of pebbles and sticks. 🙂 I love Porcini mushrooms, but have also not seen fresh ones. You really got a lot of mileage out of that duck. he didn’t die in vain. 😀
    ‘Roast Goat’ sounds like whole different kettle of fish. 😆

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you. As much as Zia and I had talked about making this risotto, it really did surprise us when I served it. A very pleasant surprise, too. People tell me that this store or that one has fresh porcini but I’ve yet to get there when they’re available. One of these days … 🙂

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  6. You’re certainly wringing every last morsel of flavor out of that duck! Good job — too many people never make stock from their leftover carcasses. (That sounds a bit funny, doesn’t it, but you know what I mean!). Lovely risotto — I haven’t made one in ages. Great recipe, and I’m looking forward to that goat!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, John. The best part of these dinners was that the risotto and ravioli were full of duck flavor. I was a little concerned that there wouldn’t be much left for the risotto. I almost reserved the porcini soaking water for fear it might be too strong. I could not have been more wrong. The risotto was full of flavor. I will be doing this again — and soon.

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  7. John, I have my plate and my place setting out. I will wait for the duck to arrive. I’ll look for a slightly greasy stain on the outside of the envelope as that always signals there’s a duck in there somewhere. Haven’t had duck in many moons. This looks lovely.

    Risotto is a bit of an art form to my mind. The first chef we interviewed when planning to open the restaurant flew in from the east. In our kitchen in full chef garb he created a beet risotto which looked beautiful but tasted somewhat disappointing. The third chef on the scene, Todd, to be our chef in the restaurant, made the most delicious porcini mushroom risotto I’ve ever eaten. I would bet this was just as good. and with the duck wonderful Goat. Hmmm, not sure about goat. Just kidding. Sorry. I’m in a 12-step program for my puns these days.

    Liked by 1 person

    • You’re more than welcome, Susie. It had been a long time since I prepared a duck, too. After these 3 dishes, though, I’ll be roasting another pretty soon. The ravioli and risotto each turned out better than we had expected. So go that I may roast a duck for myself alone. That’s one way of making sure I’ll have plenty of leftovers. 🙂
      Get out of that program!! Your wit, puns and all, is what makes your blog a favorite. Well, your recipes are great, too. 🙂

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  8. What a beautiful colour! I know, I find black quite beautiful 🙂 I adore risotto as much as I adore pasta. So, this black rice, you said it’s a cross, does it get creamy like arborio? I’ve had the black Forbidden Rice and I thought it really was no different to brown rice. Does this rice tend to stay chewy like brown rice? I’m curious to try this now. I like brown rice so it’s no problem for me. A cross between my two fave rice seems like too good to be true! It’s been a while since I’ve had risotto. Time to change that! I’ll have to hunt down the black risotto rice. Thanks John, for another fab recipe!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • You, Nazneen, are most welcome. 🙂
      I found this rice to be just a bit more chewy than normal Arborio — and I loved it. Yes, the risotto was creamy. In fact, the “cream” was black in color. It proved to be the perfect vehicle for the duck and porcini. That I know, there’s only 1 store here that carries the rice and I bought some just yesterday. I haven’t got the duck yet but I will — and soon.
      Good to see you around and posting again, Nazneen. Hope you’re having a great week! 🙂

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  9. This looks wonderful. I have not heard of this,particular rice, a nice twist for risotto. I was just telling my husband the other day that we should have risotto soon. It is finally cooling off a little and I can think about making it again!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Fall is definitely risotto season around here and, from what I’ve seen, a few other blogs. For my family, it’s real comfort food. Black rice isn’t very common and sure does up the “Wow factor”.

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  10. I am familiar with the Chinese black rice (forbidden rice) and black glutinous rice but did not know about Italian black rice, I will be looking for it when I go to an Italian market, learnt something new, thanks.
    You sure got your money’s worth from that duck. Would love to be feasting on a bowl of your risotto this very moment.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Norma. I’ve never tried the Chinese (original) varieties of black rice. I should look for them, too, just to see how they’re cooked and taste.
      When you consider that we got 3 good meals — with more in the freezer — that duck probably cost what a chicken would have cost us at the grocery, maybe less. Such a bargain!

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  11. I am delighted you and Zia had such a lovely time together and I’m certain she really enjoyed sharing the companionship over such wonderful meals. Do you have any leftovers? If so, I’ll be there by lunch, thank you! This is gorgeous and so appealing, John. Thank you for clarifying the distinctions in different varieities of black rice. I have purchased black rice before but I wasn’t thinking risotto…it might not have been an appropriate variety. I will have to see what I can find, because even though this would take a while to prepare I can see it would be well worth it as a crowd pleaser! This may be the most elegant risotto I’ve seen. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • You know, Debra? We did have a wonderful time together. The last time she visited was 14 years ago with Mom, who was ill at the time. She’d insisted, though, on spending Thanksgiving here, in Chicago — and she made it! It was so nice having Zia back here and cooking for her on my own turf. I know she enjoyed herself because she’s agreed to come back next year. YAY!!!
      Thanks for the kind words regarding today’s dish. There is a definite “Wow factor” with it. I only know of 1 store here — Eataly — that carries it and you can find it on Amazon but it’s much more expensive. Best to try and find it locally. Hope you’re having a great week.

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  12. What a sexy dish… both in appearance and content derived from simple but strong ingredients and technique. I would like to give it a try but I’m yet to persuade the G.O. to eat rice even in the form of risotto… I can hear Daffy saying “not this little black duck” which would mean dinner often suggested when I was a kid of “bread & butter and a duck under the table!”. Goat however is on our menu 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Too bad the G.O. isn’t a rice person. This risotto was really special, better than Zia and I had imagined. I just bought more riso venere yesterday. There’s another roast duck in my future, to be sure. I want more of this risotto. I hope you’ll enjoy the goat recipe. It’s not at all complicated to prepare — just like they did back in the day. 🙂

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    • Thanks, Francesca. Probably because you’re more experienced than I but I never thought of cooking it any other way. Granted, the duck was a new addition but, from the time I found and bought the rice, I knew I’d be making risotto with it. 🙂

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  13. Delicious! Duck and porcini go beautifully together in risotto, I often braise legs and thighs especially, cooking the meat and making stock at the same time. I’ll have to look out for black rice to turn the wow factor up a notch! Thanks John!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you! I enjoy duck but have shied away from it, preparing it only when I’ve guests.. These 3 posts have shown me the light and I’ll be roasting it anytime I want. The ravioli and this risotto are definitely worth it. I’ve already bought more black rice for next time. 🙂

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  14. Great risotto, John! I’ve never seen black risotto without squid ink before and will look for it. Being wholegrain it must have more flavor of its own, and the longer cooking time allow it to absorb more flavor of the stock! Last time I had leftover duck I used meat and stock to make a Tuscan duck pappardelle. It’s fun to see how much your risotto cooking technique resembles mine 🙂 including making your own stock and using porcini soaking water.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Stefan. Yes, not only are our methods similar but we post the recipes on the same day. 🙂 Even so — and having seen your comment on FaceBook, I cannot wait to see how you prepare this rice. We really enjoyed it and I’ve already bought more. Time to go duck shopping. 🙂

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        • I’ve not tasted wild duck in over a dozen years and never have I prepared it, Stefan. The only “game” butcher shop that I knew of closed about 3 years ago.So, I guess I’d vote farmed. I’m not the type to grab a rifle and go get a wild one. 🙂

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  15. That looked and sounded just perfect, nothing beats homemade stock and I loved how you served it in its lovely roundy shape.. I have never had black rice, sounds like something I should try. have a gorgeous day, is it still wet?.. c

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hello, my gallivanting friend! I only know of 1 market in town — other than Amazon — that sell black rice. We can to there when you come into town next time, or, I can buy some and bring it to you the next time I come down to the farmy. I go there on my way home from a Dr or Dentist appt. Little kids get a lollipop reward when they go to the DR; I get Italian goodies. I had a Dr appt on Thursday and on the way home I bought more black rice, squid ink for pasta, and some cheeses. The kids can keep their lollipops!
      Although it’s not raining anymore, yesterday morning’s sun has left us and it’s pretty dreary outside. So glad to see you’re on a beach with warm weather. Soak up as much as you can. Autumn will be here waiting for your return.

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  16. Black rissotto – nope, we aren’t that sophisticated here yet. What a mouthwatering meal John. Fabulous!
    Have a beautiful week. Things are going mad here – not all good either. We have had large amounts of break ins and have had to implement patrols and and and.
    🙂 Mandy xo

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  17. I havent used black risotto rice. i must amend that!. I have to say you have really got me here because the flavour of duck and porcini together would be heaven they are two of my favourite things.

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  18. Pingback: Black Rice Risotto with Roast Duck and Porcini ...

  19. Looks fantastic and how wonderful that every bit of the duck was utilized too. I’ve only used black sticky rice, but will be looking for this variety now too 🙂

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  20. What incredibly beautiful rice that is and your risotto defies words…it is simply incredible looking. I find it so interesting that you put the duck in before the risotto has completed cooking. Don’t know why since one does this in casseroles as well, but I’m sure the moist duck meat helps to infuse the rice even more. Wow. Many thumbs up, John. Love this dish!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Betsy. Yes, we place the duck in early to infuse as much of its flavor as possible into the risotto. Evidently, it worked because we both really enjoyed this dish. We don’t prepare duck often but now, after 3 fantastic meals, we’re going to be seeing a lot more duck around here. I’ve already bought more black rice. 🙂

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  21. Well done, John, this sound absolutely delicious. We tried black “forbidden” rice last year and it is now what we prefer as we like the texture. We also appreciate the rich flavor of duck, so I think this would be my favorite risotto as well. 🙂

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  22. Wow, as I read the title I thought to myself, John is sure getting every bite out of that duck. What an absolutely beautiful and unique recipe. I’ll bet it was mouth watering. I can’t say that I’ve seen any black rice around in our regular grocery stores but it’s possibly something to look for in the specialty shops. I can’t say enough about how stunning this is John.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much, Diane. I will say that Zia and I smiled all through dinner that night. You may be able to find Riso Venere in a well-equipped Italian market. I’ve seen it on Amazon but the price is a bit high. You may find it in one of NYC’s Italian markets, but beware of the shipping costs. I tell you, Diane, it’s worth the effort searching for it. Good luck!

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  23. I’ve honestly never made duck myself…don’t really know why, but now I have no reason not to seeing that you have posted several ways to prepare and use up the duck – carcass and all! I’m liking this black risotto for a fun Halloween dinner!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi, Linda. You know, that duck was probably one of the most economical purchase I’ve made in a long time.e had 3 fantastic meals from it — and there’s still ravioli in the freezer. As a result, there will be quite a bit more duck being served around here. Someone else mentioned the rice and Halloween, a connection that had escaped me completely. Add a little orange or red decorations and you’ve got a plate of scary risotto. Boo!

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  24. I was planning to make the tricolour but am still procrastinating, as usual. I would probably use the one from Asian Forbidden rice. One hour is not so long. The risotto in the final picture looks awesome. I wish I could taste it. I am sure it tasted really good. Have a pleasant week. John. I am heading back to Ontario!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hello, Liz. I mentioned to Zia that this was probably the best risotto I’d ever prepared. I knew it would be good but this surpassed my expectations. And I’m so glad that it did then when I was serving Zia. If ever that’s going to happen again, please let it be in front of that same very special dinner guest. 🙂

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  25. Oh dear. I believe I spoke to soon. Ravioli or risotto? Which will grace the table at Christmas Eve? Both sound absolutely divine. I’m guessing we’ll have to go with the ravioli though – more palatable for the kids. I’m still trying to win them over on risotto. We’re getting closer. I love that you used the duck carcass to make the stock too. Genius! I will definitely look at the duck differently next time we roast one. We can get three meals out of one of those tasty ducks. I also have to find this black risotto. It sounds very appealing. Sorry it took me so long to get you. Know that you have been sitting in my inbox and these recipes have been tantalizing me daily for weeks! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • That is a dilemma, Kristy. If you roast a duck and use part of it for the ravioli, you can make a stock from the carcass, freeze it, and use it to make risotto once the SousChefs have evolved into risotto-loving children — or when they’re both off to college. Better double bag it. 🙂
      No need to ever apologize to me for anything related to comments here, Kristy. I’ve not been caught up since Italy. I think it wonderful that you”re as current as you are. What’s your secret? 🙂

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  26. Duck is such a wonderful thing to eat and I love that you have made full use of this one. I am staying tuned for the goat…just had a most fabulous lunch at Sitka and Spruce in Seattle that included goat braised to perfection with thinly sliced, raw porcini mushrooms and the best roasted, browned squash I have ever eaten.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Stacey. In a way, this duck was a personal test. I’m aways saying that nothing is wasted in a traditional Italian kitchen and it was time to put my words into action. And it worked far better than I thought it would.
      That braised goat dinner you enjoyed has set the bar pretty high. I hope our family measures up. Fingers crossed…

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  27. such a yummy post again, amico… 🙂 long story, short: any color or rice & duck – any time! btw, duck is the most popular ‘bird’ in our region Midi-Pyrénées, South-West of France… you’ve certainly heard of: confit & magret de canarad, ‘canard à l’orange’ and foie-gras, the last one served with fresh figs(or fig jam) and white wine… bon appétit & cheers! buona notte é à presto! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hello, Melanie. You can tell that canard is your region’s delicacy — look at all of the dishes they are known for. I’ve enjoyed more than one of them, though not while in France. Still, the French do kow how to roast and present a duck,
      I hope you have a wonderful day, Melanie. I’m going to bed now. Bonne nuit, mon amie!

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  28. I haven’t made risotto with venere rice but now that I see the result I’m so very tempted to try. By the way, I love the idea of duck stock. Ducks are not a common meat I can find all year round over here… but wait till the holiday season starts 😉

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  29. I have never eaten black rice but with the delicious duck I bet the flavours were amazing together. I am thinking about making risotto for lunch as the boys are already foraging in the kitchen on their day off and they just only finished off breakfast moments ago. I need something hearty to hold them off until dinner. Great recipe!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Buona serra, BAM! I loved it when Mom served risotto for lunch. It was almost as good as when she served pasta. 🙂 I must admit that both Zia and I were surprised at how much we enjoyed this rice and risotto. It really was that good and I’ll be making it again, sooner rather than later.

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    • Black rice is not something that was served when I was a boy, so, it was a real treat for me to serve it to Zia. She comes to Chicago so rarely that “visit” just doesn’t seem special enough. “Visitation” combines both regal and saintly elements. 🙂

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  30. i risotti sono la mia passione, però il riso nero non l’ho mai mangiato, ho mangiato un semplice Cannaroli con il nero di seppia, questo sì!
    John sei un HRANDISSIMO cuoco, la passione per la cucina è davvero grande e da ottimi frutti( anzi piatti eccellenti!!!!!!!)
    passa un buon fine settimana

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  31. Love that you savored every bit of the duck and it’s flavors available, John! I imagine the stock provided not only deliciousness in every bite, but a wonderful aroma as well. The black rice provides such an elegant beauty to the dish…great photos! I imagine the flavor of the porcini mushrooms (I’ve yet to find fresh either) elevates the flavors…yummy!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I must admit, Nancy, that it wasn’t my plan when I bought the duck. Everything just fell into place, like finding black rice at Eataly the week before we roasted the duck. It worked out so well that I’ll be getting another duck sooner than later. I’ve already bought more black rice. 🙂

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  32. Pingback: Black Risotto with Crab and Artichoke (Riso Venere con Granchio e Carciofi) | Stefan's Gourmet Blog

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