Homemade Garganelli Pasta

Garganelli Fatti in Casa

The draft of today’s post has been waiting a couple of years to be posted. This is, in fact, the 4th intro that I’ve written for it. Something has come up to prevent its publication every time I’ve penciled it into my schedule. This, though, is definitely its time. You see, I was “introduced” to garganelli while in Rome — twelve years ago with Zia.

Rome was the last stop of our vacanza and I found a restaurant with the same name as that of my family’s surname. Mind you, it’s not like we have the Italian version of “Smith” or “Chang” as a surname —  quite the contrary. Yet, there is a restaurant or trattoria with our name above the door in just about every city in Italy and in many major cities here, across The Pond, as well. Be that as it may, I noticed a dish of penne being delivered to a nearby table and, when the time came, mentioned to our waiter that I would like the same as my primo piatto. He politely pointed out that it was garganelli and not penne. I decided right then and there to learn how to make garganelli once I got home — and get my eyes checked. Not long after, I was back home making garganelli — but the story doesn’t end here.

Last May, upon arrival to our flat in Rome, the owner went out of her way to make us feel at home, describing in detail each of the flat’s amenities. She was especially anxious to show us the terrace. With a view of the Colosseum, the dome of St. Peter’s, and the Vittorio Emmanuel II Monument, it was easy to see why she couldn’t wait to show it to us.

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A Flat with a VIew*     *     *

When we returned from the terrace, she presented us with her own guide-book to Rome, paying particular attention to the flat’s locale. When we got to the page with her restaurant recommendations, the first on the list was a restaurant bearing my family’s surname. I thought it a coincidence — until we arrived there later that evening. The route looked so familiar, especially a long flight of stairs along the was very much like the one that had troubled Zia a dozen years before. Any lingering doubts I may have had vanished upon entering the establishment. This was, indeed, the same restaurant in which Zia and I dined and where I “discovered” garganelli. Surely, this was a sign that I should finally publish my garganelli post as soon as I returned to WordPress.

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Similar in shape to penne, garganelli are a tubular pasta that come from the Emilia-Romagna area of Italy. With Bologna as its capital, Emilia-Romagna is known for its hearty meat sauces. (Pasta Bolognese, anyone?) Garganelli, like penne, is particularly well-suited for such sauces and its use has spread to other areas of Italy because of that. In fact, Abruzzo, a mountainous province just south of Marche, is known for its lamb ragu and very often garganelli is the pasta of choice. Lamb not your thing? Well, go north a bit and into Tuscany. There you’ll find they make a rich veal ragu and it, too, is used to dress garganelli. Before you start googling, I can save you the keystrokes and send you to  Rufus’ Food and Spirits Guide, for a veal ragu recipe that’s about as authentic as you’ll find anywhere on the web. (Greg, by the way, introduced me the movie, “Big Night“, in which garganelli is handmade in preparation for the film’s climactic feast.)

Whereas it’s quite difficult to create perfect penne by hand, garganelli is very often handmade and has a “flap” where the pasta is joined to create the tube. Just like penne rigate, garganelli traditionally have ridges on each tube’s outer surface; the better to hold on to that rich tomato sauce. Now, you can search the web and you’ll find gadgets made just for putting ridges on your garganelli, but not me. Years ago, much to the amusement of Mom & Zia, I bought a gnocchi board that is used to put ridges on gnocchi. (In my defense, I needed a few more dollars in my order to qualify for free shipping and a gnocchi board was just the ticket.) As you’ll soon see below, and I was quick to point out to Zia, putting ridges on garganelli is yet another (of two) uses for this wonderful kitchen gadget. Now, don’t fret if you haven’t this nifty little gadget taking up space in a junk drawer. You can just as easily use the back of a fork, like you would when making gnocchi, or leave them smooth, like normal penne. No matter. Don’t let the absence of a few ridges cause you to miss out on this great tasting pasta!

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How To Make Garganelli

Begin by making a batch of Mom’s Pasta dough. That will give you 1.5 pounds (680 g) of dough. Roll the dough to a thickness of 6 or 7 on a pasta machine, where 1 is the widest setting. Pictures will tell the rest of the tale.

Note: I use a straight edge here because I could neither cut nor draw a straight line if my life depended upon doing so.

Use a straight edge to divide a dough sheet into 2 strips about 2 inches wide

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Use the straight edge to cut the strips into 2 inch squares

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Place a square on the gnocchi board and moisten the lower corner

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Use the dowel, begin with top corner, and roll the square to form a tube

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Create ridges by applying pressure while square is rolled to bottom of board

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My garganelli have ridges, thanks to my gnocchi board!

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A Gaggle of Garganelli

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Just One Thing More

Some of you have requested that I post photos from my trip and I’m in the process of getting them all identified and organized. As you may well imagine, I’ve literally dozens of photos shot during my recent holiday and I intend to share some of the more memorable ones. Unfortunately, several dozen were “lost” when I tried to upload them to my iPad and the Cloud. (Ironically, I was uploading the photos to insure I wouldn’t lose them should I encounter a problem with one of my flash memory cards.) As a result, I have only a few pictures of Bologna and San Marino. Luckily, the photos of my family were spared, as they were on another flash card and I discovered the problem before I attempted to “save” them. I guess I’ll just have to go back to Italy so that I can re-shoot those pics.

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Bologna proved to be a wonderful start for my holiday. It’s an old city and there are plenty of medieval structures still remaining. At one time, some 180 towers reached for the skies, though only about 20 remain today. Of those, the Two Towers, Due Torri, are the most famous and dominate the city’s skyline. Walking about the city, you can’t help but notice that many of its walkways are covered, with columns forming the street-side “wall”. They’re a photographer’s dream, so long as you don’t botch the memory card upload. (Sigh.)  As capital of Emilia-Romagna, Bologna offers the best foods of the district and, some would say, all of Italy. I certainly found no evidence to the contrary. I really enjoyed my time there and hope to return one day. I’ll be sure to stay longer, though, so that I can more fully explore the city.

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(Click to enlarge)

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It’s déjà vu all over again …

michigans bountyIt’s tart cherry season once again in my former home state of Michigan. Having a season of barely 3 weeks, now’s the time to head to the orchards and get your share. If you miss out, the best you’ll probably be able to do is to buy them canned or in jars. In the past, I’ve used them to bake pies and muffins, as well as to make jam. Click on each item to see its recipe.

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Coming soon to a monitor near you …

Fried Sage PreviewFried Sage

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157 thoughts on “Homemade Garganelli Pasta

    • I cannot encourage you enough to take your family to Italy, and yes I’m aware of the costs of traveling with a family. We rented flats for our stays and saved a bundle versus hotel rooms. And we stayed in terraced flats in prime locations. I’ve advised others to go to Italy and, without exception, they have all returned home planning for another trip. Your first trip will teach you that Italy — and Europe — is far more accessible than you may have believed. If and when you start to seriously consider a trip, email me and I’ll show you the resources we recently used to book our flats and the like. And no, I am in no way connected with any travel/booking service. We Bartolini are a helpful lot. 🙂

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  1. It must be so satisfying making pasta like this – what a lovely task to enjoy with family and friends while enjoying a glass of wine at the same time maybe – just saying.
    Your holiday looks heavenly John.
    Have a beautiful day.
    🙂 Mandy xo

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  2. You have a wonderful story to go with your gaggle of garganelli. I love how you happened to end up at the same restaurant as 12 years ago, what an auspicious and tasty coincidence! Lovely pictures, I’m looking forward to seeing more from your trip.

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  3. I’ve never heard of Garganelli, but it really looks so pretty. You really had a wonderful trip, John, and your photos are lovely. What a beautiful view from your window in Rome! Yum….that fried sage looks so delicious. 🙂

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  4. Excellent and it’s good to have you back. That’s a great back story to go with the home made garganelli. Your flat owner was right to be proud of the view too – great post 🙂

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    • Thanks, MD. That view was spectacular but, unfortunately, we’re among the last to rent there. They’ve put the place up for sale and it’s sure to sell quickly. What a shame! I would have happily stayed there whenever I visited Rome.

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    • I have to get back to Bologna! It’s a beautiful city and the food is incredible. What more does one need for a vacation spot? Just yesterday I bought 20 pounds of pitted cherries. 8 went to a neighbor. I’ve not decided whether I’m going to make cherry liqueur again but I had better make up my mind pretty soon, eh? 🙂

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  5. I have never seen this type of pasta – yet another reason for a visit to Italy!
    How frustrating to lose your photos when trying to save them. But as you say, just another excuse to visit again 🙂 I look forward to see the ones you still have John.

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    • I must admit to being quite angry when it happened but what can one do? These things happen. I still have plenty more, though, and I’ll sharing some in the weeks to come, Colline. Stay tuned … 🙂

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  6. John, thank you for sharing your trip to Italy. I have been wanting to go since I was a little girl. Although I am a first generation Filipino, my name IS Italian. Let’s just blame it on Magellan. Anyway, as usual, your dishes look so appetizing. I am working on getting my noodle maker in the fall. The valley heat in Sacramento hit about 111 degrees last week. And the firemen are very busy. Way too hot to work in my kitchen, so I am looking forward to cooler weather. I hope! Then I can really take advantage of your blog and your outstanding step-by-step recipes. You always have something new to me. Then there’s always that teaser in the end. Something for everybody!

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    • You’re very welcome, Arlene Writing these posts and including the pictures is one way for me to keep the trip fresh in my mind. I keep reading about your poor state and its drought. 111˚!!!! That’s brutal. I wouldn’t be able to function at all in that kind of heat. I hope it changes and soon, ending with a nice rainfall for your area. Not oo much, though, 🙂

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  7. Your gaggle of garganelli is so pretty! I love the shape and the ridges, and can just imagine how it catches all of that rich ragu. So sorry to hear about your pictures. I still always back mine up on an external drive and DVD, but technology fails us all at some point. My husband’s memory card failed recently and he was only able to recover a few images. Sometimes I miss film! Your photos are stunning and I can’t wait to see more of your trip…and the food! 🙂

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    • Hello, Betsy! Yeah, I had a fit when I realized the photos had been deleted but what’s done is done. I’ve plenty others and at least the pics of my family were spared. Whew! A meat sauce works so well with garganelli, especially when homemade. You should try it with that Bolognese sauce. Yum! Stay tuned for more pics … 🙂

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  8. Good to find you again, John, You had disappeared off my Reader and my radar. The Garganelli and sauces sound wonderful but the little appartment in Rome sound perfect…and with your eponymous restaurant just next door. I’ve just arrived in Lyon where I’ll be shooting a story about the wonderful food here….Bocuse, charcuterie, La Mere Brazier ..the lot:)

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    • Agreed, Roger. I hope it’s settled, at least between our blogs. It sounds like you’re in for a fantastic time in Lyon. I hope you have spare time to do your own sampling. If not, make time! 🙂

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  9. Oh my goodness, how I miss Rome, Your view from the balcony had me transported, and this wonderful pasta, i made gnocchi last night but without the board (I need one of those too i think) It worked perfectly for your pasta..love love the photos today.. Oh (as I said before) how I miss Rome!
    Take care my friend.. c

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  10. I learned about garganelli only a couple of years ago when a new restaurant opened close to where I live, and this was one of about a dozen housemade pastas they featured (they use a machine, though, to make theirs). I love the shape! Haven’t made any yet, but I will one of these days — I love making pasta. So thank you for the recipe — your instructions are quite clear and complete. And thanks for the pictures from your vacation! More, more! 😉

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    • Thanks, John. Yes, I love pasta making. I can do it day after day and never tire of the process. It doesn’t really matter what pasta, either. Just last week, unable to sleep, I found myself making ravioli at 6:00 am. By 8:00 am, I had 10 dozen in the freezer and others set aside in the fridge for that night’s dinner. That ravioli will be in an upcoming post, as will the leftover pasta. Making pasta sure beats watching morning news on the TV.

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  11. I have really enjoyed reading this excellent post in which you give explanations of Bologna and Rome in combination with the GARGANELLI. Visitare l’Italia e godere il loro cibo e la loro cultura è un vero sogno! Tante grazie e saluti dal Ticino.

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    • Grazie mille. I had such a wonderful time during this trip. Seeing my family again, after so many years, was the highlight. Florence is my favorite city in the World and I feel blessed every time I find myself walking its streets. It’s a thrill, too, for me to stand outside of the Colosseum and gaze upon its arches, or, to walk around the Forum. It’s indescribable.

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  12. Great post, John, and it looks like you had a wonderful Holiday. Too bad about the photos but what a great reason to go back. Love the pasta and the fact you now have an additional use for your gnocchi board. 🙂

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  13. Oh how I’ve missed you! I loved following your travels on IG though! And the garganelli pasta looks just superb – we actually use our gnocchi boards as butter pats, but this is a wonderful thing to make with them. I think using the dowel is so clever – I was curious how you were going to get them to form a tube! Do you need to oil the dowel, or just flour it? xx

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    • Hi, Celia. I’ve missed you, too, and it’s good to be home.Making garganelli is a fun little exercis. Once you get going, it’s rather mindless. I’ve never oiled the dowel but I do flour it before use and occasionally while in use. It works just fine. Give it a try — if you ever have the time. 🙂

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  14. Great to see you back on wordpress today. Love all the Italy pictures. And your bowl of cherries?
    Perfection.
    Sharing your post around the web. I tried to make giant bubbles at the beach in FL but the wind was too great. Love your photograph of the bubbles.

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    • Thanks, Ruth, it is good to be back. There’s an art to blowing those monster bubbles an I’ve never quite mastered it. That guy, though, had it down pat, much to the joy of the children. Then a small bubble snuck up on me and popped on my lens. That was it for snapping photos that outing. 🙂

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  15. Hmmm, garganelli… this looks possible for me. I will keep an eye out for a gnocchi board, of course free postage is always worth adding an extra item to the virtual shopping cart 🙂
    Oh the fried sage looks wonderful – maybe it will overcome the G.O.’s aversion to it. I love sage.

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    • Hi, EllaDee! I hate to pay postage if I can avoid it and keep a “wishlist” of low priced items to be used to get me over the spending limit. I’m going to spend the money anyway, I might as well get something for it. There’s a secret to the fried sage. Maybe it will entice your GO to give it a try — or thoroughly repulse him. 😉

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  16. Welcome back John – missed you but am so glad you’ve been having such a great time. Love all the photos and what a happy wonderful coincidence with the restaurant. Happy memories of Rome with your photo – what an incredible location to stay. That gnocchi board is pretty amazing too and I adore the film Big Night – sad but heartwarming too (and it always makes me hungry)!

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    • Hello, Tanya! Yes, this was quite the holiday in so many ways. It was far better than I had imagined it would be. I loved that little restaurant and will be sure to return there whenever I’m in town. I truly had expected a better ending for Big Night. I wanted a happy ending. 🙂

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  17. Another wonderful post, John. Love the story about how you got to know garganelli. I’ve made them only once years and years ago, well before I had the blog, and I remember they ‘collapsed’ a bit. Apart from making them ‘lisci’ as I don’t own a gnocchi board, I’m pretty sure I made them exactly the same way as you did. I haven’t made them since. Did you run into that problem, too, and if not, what could I do to prevent it?

    I actually wanted to get a gnocchi board while in Italy, but didn’t get across a store that carried them and didn’t want to go out of my way for it.

    Bologna sure is wonderful. We were there last Friday. We’ve been there before, but I didn’t remember it was so grand. Especially the ‘portici’ supported by wooden beams are just amazing.
    San Marino was also very nice, as was the rest of our trip.

    We really did *just* miss each other. Next time you go to Italy, let me know so I can come, too 🙂

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      • Gosh, Stefan. We Bartolini are everywhere! Sounds like you had a fantastic trip, too. I really should have taken another week and split the days between Bologna and San Marino. I really didn’t spend enough time in either place. There will be a next time. And it would have been nice to meet up with your both. I do hope we can next time.
        Yes, some of my garganelli did collapse as yours did. It’s not what I would have wanted but the pasta still tastes better than any I can buy so I feel it’s still worth the effort.

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  18. Gorgeous pasta John, nice to see you back at WP. Your lost images may be recoverable John. A friend had a similar incident recently and in the end a tech managed to retrieve them. Might be worth asking an expert ( not that I’m questioning your know how)

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    • Thank you so much! No, I do not mind the advice. I’ll call someone tomorrow and see if they can help. I’ve done all I can, so, it’s time to call for reinforcements. I really hated to lose them all. Fingers crossed.

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  19. great to see you back! With a fantastic pasta recipe, a real labor of love to prepare, but I’m sure it is worth every second of work!

    John, I know you must be super hyper busy, but I don’t think I’m getting notifications of new posts by you, even though I am following the blog. any ideas if I’m the only one?????

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    • Thanks, Sally. It’s good to be back. I don’t find pasta making like this at all taxing. I imagine it’s like knitting for some. Once you get going, it’s rather mindless and I get “lost” in it — and I’ve got a great pasta dinner for supper that night. 🙂

      No, you’re not alone. Others are experiencing the same problems. Writing to Support did no good. If anything, it made it worse. I’m hoping that this settles itself, like most of these problems seem to do. Time will tell, I guess.

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  20. I’m glad I’m not the only one with half finished posts sitting in the queue. 🙂 What an inspiration you are! I’ve never made pasta but every time I see one of your homemade pastas, I get the urge to give it a try. I’ve never heard of garganelli, but it does look easier than penne and as with all of your pasta – delicious!

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    • Thanks, MJ. You’re such a good cook. I bet you’d be able to tackle any of these pastas in no time. Once you do, there’ll be no stopping you. There’s just no comparing homemade pasta to store bought. You’ll see … 🙂

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  21. Hello John! Nice to feel a ‘balance’ in the blogosphere again!!!! And to know I am not the only one who orders somewhat unthought-of gadgets online to get free postage . . . 🙂 ! Oh Lordy: weren’t you lucky with your apartment! I can place it almost exactly as I used to be about 1 km, I would say, to the left of you photo 🙂 ! Beautifullest!!!!!! Oh, I love the pasta, but you would understand that anyways . . . .

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    • Howdy, Eha! I have a wishlist of low cost items that I use to avoid postage. I’m going to spend the money anyway. Might as well get something for it, eh?
      The flat was on Lubricana, about a 5 minute walk to the Colosseum. How we loved it! When the sun set, it gave the monuments a beautiful glow. We were awe struck in the evenings. There’ll be no going back to that flat, however. It’s for sale and I doubt it will linger on the market for very long. I’ll just have to find a better one, that’s all. 🙂

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      • John: could find via Labicana on Google but not your version?? My usual address was atop the Spanish Steps and perchance a wee bit further! If via L – everyone seems to have praised it . . . well, you’ll just have to find a new address in the neighbourhood for next time; seems an ideal location!!!!

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        • Forgive me my faulty memory, Eha. Yes, it was Labicana. I did like the location. We weren’t in the thick of things but could easily get there, if we wanted. It sure was nice being back there, though. I really didn’t see a trip like a possibility. What a treat!

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  22. So happy you’re back, John; your photo at the top has me drooling, and craving a lamb ragu. This pasta seems perfect for just that. Your flat in Rome had a pretty sweet view! You may have lost some photos, but they’re in your memories…and you will just have to go back!

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    • Thanks for the warm welcome, Angeline. You’re so right about the memories. I’ll never let go of those! Garganelli is such a great pasta for a hearty meat sauce. Publishing this post has me thinking about breaking out the gnocchi board and making some more. 🙂

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    • Thanks. Those ridges do their job well. The tomato sauce really does stick to the pasta because of them. One day I’ll post a recipe for pici pasta. You and your boys will be able to make them together without any problem. 🙂

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  23. A labor of love. Good for you! We’ve never made garganelli–oh, the precision, the precision. But I love it when somebody else does. Those ridges hold the sauce so well. Great post and lovely photos. Thanks. Ken

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    • Pasta making can very well be a community building process. Gather a few friends and get to work. Zia and I are like a well-oiled machine at this point. I have always been interested in Antiquity and it’s always a thrill for me to find myself in Rome. I’ll never tire of looking at the Colosseum or strolling about the Forum. Never. 🙂

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  24. I’m just oohing and ahhing all the way down to the fried sage. Everything looks so good. Save that name of where you stayed. Who knows, maybe one day, I’ll stay there? What a grand trip, John and it is so nice of you to share with us! Now for the garganelli!

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    • There’s a secret to the sage, Abbe. You’ll find out in a couple of days.
      As for the flat, I’ve saved all of the info but I fear it’s for naught. The flat is for sale and I cannot imagine it staying on the market for too long. In fact, we weren’t sure that it would be available for our stay when we booked. All facts considered, we were very lucky. I’ve more pics to share and, like the sage, stay tuned … 🙂

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    • Ah, Francesca. It really isn’t at all difficult. Once you get a feel for the process, it really does move along. And you get to enjoy freshly made garganelli for that night’s supper. 🙂

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  25. Bonjourno John! Welcome back and I certainly have enjoyed traveling around Italy with your facebook updates. I am dreadfully sorry to hear about the mishaps with the photo uploads but this will just give you an excuse to go back again. How ironic that you landed in the same restaurant almost 12 years later! I am delighted you posted your recipe on garganelli as I learned how to make this in Bologna as well, but she had one of those old fashion boards with string and I love your idea using a gnocchi board. Way more practical. I know you will have lots to report about your travels and so glad you were able to get home to visit family and take some time to soak up some fun and some delicious dishes. Rest up, Take Care, BAM

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    • Buongiorno, BAM. and thank you. It was a fantastic trip! I looked into classes in Bologna but all the 1 day classes spent the morning making pasta dough. Not to brag but I’ve got that part of the process down pat. If — and when! — I go back, I intend to look into classes of more than 1 day, hoping to find one that is more worthwhile. If not, well, I’ll just spend my time in restaurants and trattorias doing “field research.” Have a wonderful week, BAM. 🙂

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      • Indeed you could teach that course….You just needed to eat lots of delicious dishes whilst you were there and from the looks of it you did your part quite well… LOL Great job on your field research! Take a good rest now that your back and take care.

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  26. Oh, what a fabulous view from the terrace John! Wow! All of your photos are fabulous, as are those garganelli. And I just LOVE the movie Big Night. I actually have the soundtrack if ever you would like me to send you a copy. I’m glad your experience at the resto bearing your family name proved to be a good one. There’s a resto in Boston called Spagnuolo, which bears my family name, which proved to be horrible! My cousin is going there this weekend and when he mentioned that there’s a resto bearing our name, I made him promise not to go! xox

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    • Hello, Lidia! Yes, we were shocked by how good that view was. Sure, the listing said that it had a view of the Colosseum but that could mean anything. As it was, we 3 spent much of our non-touring time up there. Entering that restaurant was like taking a step in a time machine. What a fun experience!
      I hope all’s well for you, Lidia. Have a great Sunday!

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  27. Where to even begin with this wonderful post but let’s just start with your view from the terrace – wow! Now that is impressive. That is so cool that you were able to find the same restaurant so many years later. As with all of your pasta, this garganelli is awesome & I think that little board you bought is a very nifty tool to have.
    Some of my husband’s relatives on his father’s side are from Bologna & although I didn’t get a chance to visit there, I have heard the same about the food being the best although there is just so much good food in the entire country that it’s hard to decide.
    Sorry about your photos though – are you sure they’re not in some separate file still on the camera? They got erased from everything? Errrrgggghhhh!

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    • Oh, those photos are gone. I was very thorouh, making sure I cleared the memory cards as soon as the photos were uploaded. Never again!
      I hope you someday get to visit Bologna. It’s a wonderful city and the food is incredible! I really shold have aken another week and split the time between Bologna and San Marino. It would have been time very well spent, though I probably would have had to buy a new wardrobe and a 2nd seat for the plane ride home. 😀

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  28. I feel so ‘at home’ reading one of your posts about pasta. It makes me want to make some dough and try my hand at shaping it. I actually made handmade pasta earlier this year. I’ll probably use the machine next time, but it was a nice way to spend some time that ends with a tasty meal! Welcome home from your travels.

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    • Thanks, Mar, it’s good to be home — though I’d head back to Italy in a heartbeat.
      You’ve pretty much described why I enjoy making pasta. With a little effort and an hour or so, you can make yourself a delicious dinner. Some knit; I make pasta. 🙂

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  29. It’s wonderful to see some photos and hear some more stories from your trip John! I’ve never heard of garganelli pasta before, but it must be delicious, made fresh and tossed through with the lamb or veal ragu! Hope all is well with you and that you have a lovely weekend. 🙂

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    • Thanks, Margot. All is indeed well with me and hope you can say the same.
      This was such a wonderful trip on so many levels. I became reacquainted with family, saw some wonderful sites, and ate my way across the peninsula. I really couldn’t have asked for anything more.

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  30. I don’t know why I’m not getting your posts, John, but nonetheless, I check from time to time and here you are! I’m so sorry you lost some of your photos and I’m sure you’ve done all you can. So yes, you’ll just have to return. The photos you did share are just wonderful and your entire adventure sounds sublime! I’ve never even heard of garganelli pass, but it looks delicious and I would love to give it a whirl! I’ll keep checking back…and maybe WP will heal itself!

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    • You’re not alone, Debra. It appears many are having the same problem. It’s rather annoying, isn’t it? I hope WP figures out what’s wrong and corrects it. Fingers crossed …

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  31. Welcome back to the blogosphere. Can’t wait to see more photos of your vacation.

    The pasta looks really tasty. I’ve never heard of or seen garganelli before. Question: Why is penne served with a cream sauce, while garganelli is served with a tomato sauce?

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    • Thanks, Ruth. It’s great to be back. Penne is a great pasta for any kind of sauce, especially penne rigate, penne with ridges. Actually, I’m more familiar with it being dressed with meat sauces but I have enjoyed it with cream sauces, too. Although garganelli is traditionally served with a meat ragu, you could easily serve it, too, with a cream sauce.

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  32. Great story. I have not been getting notifications of your posts either. I think WordPress has a glitch as this seems to be a common thing.

    Lovely view from the terrace. I am still yearning to travel to Italy…someday.

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    • I don’t know what’s going on with WP. I hope they figure it out. Many have said they’re facing the same problems. I do hope you can get to Italy. Believe me. You’re in for a wonderful experience and then, like me, you’ll be scheming for ways to get back there. 🙂

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  33. Just reading your post leaves me on Wonderfulness Overload! Great travels, great family, great adventures, great food. Oh, yeah: that’s your whole blog. Well, I’m delighted you have so much to show for your summer thus far, even if the Interwebs stole some of the pictorial evidence. Lousy ether!! ‘Scuse me, I think I have to go hunting for some Garganelli con Ragu alla Vitella, or whatever you’d call it, because, well, *because*!!!
    Welcome home!
    Kathryn

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    • Thank you so much, Kathryn. As far as Summers go, this has been one for the record books. I so thoroughly enjoyed Italy and cannot wait to get back there — somehow. I hope you do find some garganelli with a hearty veal sauce. You’re in for a great dinner, when you do. 🙂

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  34. Italy is way up on my bucket list along with Greece and the wine country in France. Ahhhh, for now I shall have to live vicariously through your stories. Glad you’re back. The pasta looks wonderful, and seems like a project worth taking on.

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    • I do hope you can travel to these places, Susie. I’ve not been to wine country — a fact my liver applauds — but Greece was incredible. Now, though, my touring days are over and I’m happy to return, when I can, to Italy. This trip reignited my desire to get back there again and again. I will figure out a way, too. 🙂

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      • John, I’m definitely going to make it at some point. Must admit I’d rather twitch myself there than have to fly with everything swirling in the news, but you can’t live in a mole hole so will fly again.

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  35. There are so many coincidences in life if you keep your oeyes open, aren’t there. That was an omen that you would find the restaurant. It is also an omen that a cghef looking for some pasta asked me for Garganelli today and I had to google it. so sorry o hear of your photo mishap. That is so awful, you must have been very upset. I look forward to the others however….

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    • You are so right! There is much to be seen and realized if we only pay attention, like the chef inquiring about garganelli today. 🙂
      Yes, I mourned the loss of my photos but not for long. I really did resolve to get back there to reshoot them all. Fingers crossed.

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  36. I’m just as interested in the sauce that goes over the garganeli. Perhaps you can post that next, John. I so love your photos. Architects just don’t have a clue these days.

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  37. Pingback: A Souvenir from Florence: Fried Sage | from the Bartolini kitchens

  38. Your garganelli look perfect John. I’m so impressed. I really need to bust out the pasta maker and start practicing again. I’m sure once I get good at it, it won’t feel like it takes too much time. It certainly makes far superior pasta than you can get anywhere else (except maybe Italy). My favorite picture of the whole batch is of the kids with the bubble guy. So cute! The kids would love that. I can’t wait to get back over to Europe and to Italy in particular. 🙂

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    • Your comment almost slipped past my notice, Kristy. Sorry about that!
      You’re right about making pasta. It’s to the point now where I can make almost 2 pounds of pasta in under an hour — and that includes the half hour rest period needed for the dough. Then again, I haven’t 2 Sous Chefs vying for my attention. I should post a recipe for making pici pasta. It’s definitely a kid-friendly pasta and there is no wrong way to make it. You’ll see. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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