Roasted Vegetable Salad with Harissa

Harissa Veg 1Oh, harissa! How do I love thee?

This is another in the series of recipes dedicated to my new love, the ever so delectable harissa. I told you that I was harissa obsessed and today’s recipe is further proof. Prior to this, I’ve shared recipes for goat and for chicken cooked in harissa. Included in the latter post was a recipe for the spicy sauce. For that recipe, I trimmed away the seeds and ribs from all the chiles and said that I wouldn’t do it again the next time I prepared the sauce. And so I did, finding this batch to be more spicy than its predecessor and, this time, the heat didn’t completely dissipate during cooking. Perfect.

So, armed with a fresh batch of harissa, I went searching for a new use. I didn’t have to go far because the internet is jam-packed with recipes using harissa. I eventually chose a salad with roasted vegetables, which should be popular with our friends to the Far South, where colder temps are taking hold. If you’re in the North, though, don’t let that dissuade you from trying this salad. I found it to be a perfect lunch for a chilly Spring day — and we seem to be having more than our fair share of those.

Aside from using my own harissa sauce, I did make a few changes to the original recipe. In the first place, I halved the quantities. It’s a good salad but there’s only so much one person can eat. The cilantro/coriander was the next thing to go and in its place I used the leaves from a bunch of flat-leaf parsley. Once again, since good fresh tomatoes cannot be found, I used grape tomatoes that I sliced in half. I followed the rest of the recipe and was rewarded with a great salad, one that fits nicely into my plans to go meatless one day a week.

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Harissa Veg 4*     *     *

Roast Vegetable Salad with Harissa Recipe

Ingredients

  • 3 tbsp harissa, divided – recipe found HERE
  • olive oil
  • 1lb (450 g) butternut squash, peeled and chopped
  • 1 lb (450 g) carrots, peeled and cut into chunks
  • 5 oz (142 g) green beans, trimmed and halved
  • 5 oz (142 g) fresh baby spinach
  • 1/2 preserved lemon, flesh removed and skin finely chopped
  • 12 cherry or grape tomatoes, halved
  • .5 oz (15 g) fresh parsley leaves – cilantro/coriander leaves may be substituted, if you’re one of those

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Harissa Veg 3*     *     *

Directions

  1. Pre-heat oven to 365˚ F (185˚C)
  2. In a small bowl, mix 1 tbsp harissa with 2 tbsp olive oil.
  3. Place squash and carrot chunks in a large bowl and pour harissa-oil mixture over it. Mix to evenly coat the vegetables.
  4. Place on a baking sheet/dish, set on middle rack in oven, and bake until both types of vegetables can be easily pierced — 30 to 45 minutes. Remove and cool.
  5. Meanwhile, blanch green beans in a small pot of boiling water for 2 minutes. Remove and place in an ice water bath until needed.
  6. In a large non-reactive pot, add green beans, spinach, preserved lemons, tomatoes, parsley, and the now-cooled roasted vegetables.
  7. Combine remaining 2 tbsp harissa with 1 tbsp olive oil and use to dress the salad. Add more oil, if needed.
  8. May be serve chilled or at room temperature.

From a recipe published in The Australian Women’s Weekly.

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Harissa Veg 2*     *     *

Notes

How much oil you add will depend upon how thick your harissa is. Mine is rather thick, so, I add olive oil to make it easier to coat the vegetables and, later, to dress the salad.

In all, I tried this recipe three ways. One is as you see listed above. In another, I used baby arugula (rocket) in place of the spinach. I found the leaves weren’t strong enough to withstand the harissa dressing and wilted pretty quickly. The 3rd and last time was prepared without spinach and with half the amount of parsley. The result was a dish of roasted vegetables that make a perfect side for a roast. This version is definitely worth making again, perhaps adding additional root vegetables to the mix.

I’ve found that my recipe for harissa yields 2 cups of the sauce, far too much for most recipes. Using an ice cube tray, I freeze the excess, placing the frozen harissa cubes in plastic bags until needed.

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It’s déjà vu all over again …

Grandpa's Tuna SaladIt was about a year ago when I shared a favorite salad of my Grandpa, one simply made using canned tuna, anchovies, and sliced onion. I included my updated version, which used seared  tuna over a bed of salad greens. Both are lighter fare and equally tasty. You can see them both and decide which is best for you by clicking HERE.

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Coming soon to a monitor near you …

Prosciutto Pizza PreviewPizza

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108 thoughts on “Roasted Vegetable Salad with Harissa

  1. You chose a good recipe source John, the Australian Women’s Weekly is always reliable. This looks like a really versatile idea, I can imagine any number of permutations, as the main course or a side dish.

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    • I think I struck gold when I found this recipe. Not only did I learn to use harissa in new ways but I found a great recipe source. Yes, as you said, this salad was my dinner the first night and lunch the second day. i could have easily served it as a side and probably will next time.

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  2. Freezing the extra harissa in ice cube trays for future use, great idea not to mention time-saving, . Roasted vegetables freeze well also. For some strange reason I never add roasted butternut to my salad, will be doing so from now on, thanks for the idea, love the color in the salad and the smooth texture must be delightful.

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  3. Bravo and ‘thank you’ from the Far South for a fabulous recipe and I should write to my old favourite ‘The Australian Women’s Weekly’ and tell them – actually they are very good in the recipe department at the moment 🙂 ! This is beautiful and colourful and appetizing and methinks could be done with harissa, as you have, or without, making it almost a Greek dish! [OK, confession: was watching the Greek version on our latest ‘My Kitchen Rules’ ten minutes ago 🙂 !]. And John, I have worked up to two vegetarian mains a week and am so enjoying the scenario!!!!!!! [Oh, 3C in the morning here . . . ]

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    • Thanks, Eha, and I agree. A number of dressings would “work” with these vegetables, just as a number of vegetables would also work. As I just mentioned in another reply, I was very lucky to stumble upon this recipe and magazine. I’m sure I’ll be going back to see what else is cooking Down Under. 🙂

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  4. You certainly can’t go wrong with roasted vegetables! This sounds very marvelous. I’m big on freezing things and am always happy to see freezing tips in a recipe. All your tips are very helpful.

    As a side note: I brought your rosemary marinade for lamb to a relative’s house on the weekend. Once they tasted the lamb with the marinade, they snatched my printed-out recipe and refused to give it back.

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    • Thanks, Ruth. The harissa recipe makes a pint of the sauce. That is way too much for one recipe and, even after giving half away, I’ve still plenty left over. Freezing it is the only way to go, unless you plan on having harissa-based meals all week long.
      I’m so glad you all enjoy that rosemary marinade. It’s a simple recipe but it sure delivers the flavor. We used it with steaks and pork chops, too, before being grilled. Thanks for mentioning your family’s reaction. You’ve made my morning.

      Like

  5. Had to laugh! John is the cilantro one (one of those!) and I am the parsley lover.. I am looking forward to making the harissa. I will pop over and check out the recipe now. I love roast vege salad, this one looks great.. c

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    • I guess you two are further proof that opposites attract. 🙂
      I didn’t taste cilantro until I was well into my 20s, Celi. Maybe if I’d been introduced to it when I was younger I may feel differently about it. As it is, though, I’m the guy at the table removing each piece of cilantro garnish from my plate of food at the restaurant. With the chiles you grow each Summer, I bet you can make a wonderful harissa.

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  6. My daughter has been making veggie bowls lately by roasting chickpeas and sweet potato chunks in advance. I can’t wait to show her this recipe and try it, I was thinking the other day that we needed a new method for roasting (typically we just season and use evo) and this is perfect! I have a small jar of harissa that I’ll use up but I will be making your recipe once that’s done. Nothing is better than homemade and fresh! Love these meatless meals.. we’re doing a lot more of these ourselves now that spring is here.. no, spring is right around the corner:) xx

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    • I love roasted chickpeas, Barb. I thought the same thing when I saw this recipe. It’s a great alternative to roasting veggies in EVO, though I love that, too. I’m looking forward to experimenting with other veggies. I never had enough recipes in my playbook to make meatless meals a regular part of my diet. Thanks to all of you in the blogging world, that’s not the case anymore. I can go meatless, using a nice assortment of dishes.
      It seems we have a couple beautiful days and then several follow that are quite chilly, like today. Still, so long as there’s no s**w, I’m happy. 🙂

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    • I hope you’re seated, Glenda, because I don’t like rhubarb either. I’ll eat just about anything but if there’s a cilantro garnish or even a hint of rhubarb in the jam, I am so not going to like it. Believe me. I’ve tried both far too many times to count. Just call me ChgoJohn, Picky Eater.

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  7. Harissa is my new love too John. Just made harissa potatoes last night! I’ve noticed you are not keen on cilantro. The flat leaf parsley must of been great here too considering it’s heartiness. I’ll make your salad for sure.

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    • Thanks to Mom and Dad, I’ve an “accepting” palate and there are few foods I do not like. Cilantro, though, was not something I tried until I was well into my 20s. Evidently, that was too late. 🙂 As you say, though, parsley does “work” here, too, and the salad is a good one.

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  8. Looks like harissa needs to be the next step on my culinary journey! Looks delicious, John. Thanks for providing a variety of recipes to implement it’s use. Now, where to start remains the problem!

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    • If you like things with a little spicy kick, Nancy, harissa is for you. You can control the heat, too, by selecting hotter/milder chiles and by including/excluding their seeds and ribs. I’m relatively new to it, as well, and have been experimenting with it. Next on the agenda is a fish dish. I’m learning that the possibilities are endless.

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      • I do like more of a medium heat versus extremely spicy, so I’ll keep that in mind, thanks! Fish too? Yum! I imagine if I make it once, I’ll end up always having it on hand. Let the experimentation begin. 🙂

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  9. Freezing leftover harissa is a great idea! I’m so going to steal that. 😉 Love this salad — it’s one that you can make a bit differently each time you make it, so you never tire of it. Fresh tomatoes are awful at the moment, aren’t they? I’m using grape ones too, Can’t wait until I start seeing local ones! Anyway, I really like this recipe — thanks.

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    • Thank you, John. That “great idea” was an accident. In the dead of Winter, especially around the holidays, I use my back porch as an additional freezer, more specifically, my barbecue grill. Well, I made a batch of harissa and, somehow, it ended up in the grill. I certainly didn’t plan on putting it there. When I discovered it out there, it was frozen solid and was none the worse for it. Granted, as far as accidental discoveries go, this is no penicillin but it does mean that you don’t have to make harissa every time you need some.
      I am soo looking forward to seeing “good” tomatoes again. There’s an Insalata Caprese in my not-too-distant future.

      Like

  10. The roasted vegetables are actually making me drewl… great simple recipe. I guess that with such a base to coat the vegetables, the possibilities are endless…. going to check if I still have some harissa 😉

    Like

    • Thanks, Minnie. Your complement means a lot being you’re such a lover of harissa. I was surprised that the salad makes a great meal by itself, too. The roasted squash makes it more substantial than a normal salad and I left the table quite satisfied.

      Like

    • Thank you, Ronit. This recipe was an eye-opener for me. Like you, I’d only used it with meats. Seeing harissa used in this recipe as a dressing and with roasted vegetables was a game changer. Now I’ve a recipe using it with fish in the works. Harissa’s uses are apparently limitless.

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  11. John, I’m a fool for a pretty, colourful salad and love roast veggies, so this looks amazing to me! I realize that I have a lot to learn in the kitchen, I’ve never heard of a Fresno pepper. Harissa does sound like a great staple to have around, so freezing extra seems really sensible. Great ideas here. And I’m so looking forward to your pizza post! 🙂

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    • Thank you. We’re of the same cloth. It was the photo that accompanied the recipe that first drew me to it. It’s such a great looking salad. Fresno peppers are equal in “heat” to a jalapeños. The reason I use them is because of their red color. Green harissa wouldn’t seem right and red jalapeños are hard to come by this time of year. Pizzas are coming. Stay tuned… 🙂

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  12. Looks delicious John! And I’m going to check out your grandfather’s tuna salad. One of the best sandwiches I ever ate was a simple tuna salad with chopped hard boiled egg and fresh tomatoes on top – served on some super hardy and crusty Maltese bread. I’m looking forward to your salad recipe my friend.

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    • Hi, Cecile. Though not the same, Grandpa’s salad is similar to your sandwich in that it is very simply made. I keep a couple of cans of tuna around just for that salad. Now I’ll save a can for yours, too, the next time I make bread.

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  13. I ate harissa once in Morocco and I remember ita s very very spicy! Nice idea to combine with roasted vegetables…Do you think I might get my harissa using my home-grown red peppers?
    ciao

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    • Harissa can be very spicy and I cannot eat it when it is. Mine has some heat but not too much. You can make harissa with any kind of pepper. Red is best because the sauce is normally red. How spicy are you peppers? If they are very hot, you can still use them but do not use the seeds and ribs. That will cool the harissa a bit. I hope this helps. Good luck!

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  14. Oooh! I can’t wait for your pizza recipe. It will no doubt be added to our batch of favorite Chicago John and Bartolini recipes. 🙂 This harissa salad looks really good. I’ve never made a harissa sauce before, but have made a harissa spice mix. I like it in a couscous salad with chickpeas and other veggies. I wonder if the sauce would work well with lentils. That might make another good meatless option. I’m getting all caught up on posts again – and will hopefully put up some new ones soon. It’s been a whirlwind since we’ve been back. Lots to fill you in on – and believe me – we ate our fair share of meat on the trip! 🙂

    Like

    • Welcome back, Kristy! I’m a relative novice with harissa, so, I googled “harissa lentils” and, sure enough, recipes appeared. Many used lentils as a side to a protein cooked with harissa but there were those where the lentils and harissa were cooked together. I say you won’t know until you try it. Who knows? You may end up with a tasty dish and great post.
      As for the pizza post, it was supposed to be about Naan pizza, featuring number of them — until I went to the wrong grocery. The post took a turn, as you’ll soon see. Even so, a number of pizzas are still shared.

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      • Oooh! A naan pizza does sound good. Now I’m excited – a number of pizzas! It’s so hard to go wrong with pizza. And yes, I think we’ll have to give lentils and harissa a try. You’re right, it might make a good post. 🙂

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    • Thanks! I was never one much for spicy dishes, either, but that’s all changed since I started this blog. I’ve been experimenting, increasing the heat in increments. I’ve nowhere near the tolerance many have but I am improving. This harissa is another step along that path.

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  15. I can’t wait for that pizza recipe – looks fantastic with all that parma ham. I think I’ve mentioned it before but I love that serving plate – so Italian and so pretty. So this is a recipe from the Australian Women’s Weekly! Great to know those cookbooks have traveled all the way to Chicago. I love harissa too and I’m always saying I’m going to make some – must actually do so! It’s lovely to see salads popping back into the lives of those in the Northern Hemisphere; your weather must be turning for the better xx

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    • Hi, Charlie. I love those plates and the memory of buying them on Capri. We literally “missed the boat” when I stopped to purchase them. From what others have said, Australian Woman’s Weekly is quite a good source for recipes and I’ll be going back for more. Yes, our weather has turned a corner. We still have our chilly days but things have improved greatly. Yay!!!!

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    • Thanks. I really did enjoy this and have made it a few times now. I like that it’s substantial. I don’t leave the table still hungry nor did I overeat to get there.

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    • Hi, Angeline. If you want it more mild, definitely remove the seeds and ribs from the chiles. That really does cut the heat. You’re right, too. The harissa adds a nice zing to roasted vegetables. This is a welcome change from roasting them with olive oil.

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  16. I love roasted vegetable salads, and I have never thought about harissa, or any really spicy/hot addition, but this is really delightfully appealing. I’ve only had harissa with chicken once before and I still remember it as incredible! Sriracha is bottled not too far from where I work and there’s a movement trying to get them to tone it down because during one stage of the pepper processing apparently some people are experiencing eye irritation. I have a similar concern that I’ll make this harissa and find out I’m too much of a light weight. My son-in-law is my fail-safe if I find it’s too hot for me! It makes my mouth water, though, just thinking about it!

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    • Hello, Debra.I really hadn’t thought of using harissa on anything other than meats but seeing a recipe where it was used to roast vegetables and dress a salad was an eye opener. I really enjoyed this. If you do decide to make harissa for yourself, be sure to clean out all of the seeds and ribs from the chiles. That will cut the heat considerably. If you’re still concerned, then do not add the habanero. That should give you a mild harissa sauce. I can understand the workers being affected by the fumes of the peppers being cooked. Here at home, when I’ve put hot peppers in hot oil, I stand back because my eyes may burn. I cannot imagine doing that time and time again every day. They should be wearing some sort of protective eye-wear, at least.
      Hope you have a great weekend, Debra.

      Like

  17. I love the sound of this spiced-up salad John… and perfect for this time of year to be roasting a variety of vegetables to coat with the harissa! Look forward to trying this.
    By the way, your braised lamb shanks were an absolute hit with the whole family! So wonderful also having a kitchen that smells so warm and delicious all afternoon/evening too! Thanks!

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    • I really enjoyed this dish and have made it several times since I found the recipe. I’m sure that I’ll be using harissa to roast quite a few vegetables from now on.
      I really am glad to hear that your family enjoyed the lamb shanks, Margot. The way braises perfume the kitchen is one of the reasons I enjoy them so much. It’s one day to work up your dinner guests’ appetites. 🙂
      Thank you, Margot, for coming back here to tell me that the shanks were so well-received. Have a great weekend!

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    • Thanks, Ruth, for passing my recipes around. You have friends & family with such varied diets. It must be awfully hard to throw a dinner party. I think I’d “punt” and have everyone bring their own meal. 🙂

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  18. I absolutely adore salads like this and we often have meat free days. Love the idea of using the harissa, wouldn’t have thought of that! My favourite time to make a salad like this is when I’m on my own, I have control of the remote for the evening and can watch whatever i want on tv, so I put on my pjs, make something wonderful to eat like this and snuggle up om the sofa with the pups, my meal, a glas of wine and a good BBC costume drama to watch 🙂

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  19. Pingback: Roasted Vegetable Salad with Harissa | Foods of...

  20. That is such a pretty salad & I’ve never thought of doing a roasted vegetable salad. You’re always on the cutting edge John. Now harissa…well it scares me a little. I know I’ve got to expand my options but it’s baby steps for me.

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  21. I think I will try this but stop at the carrot and squash, omit anything green and see if it has a chance at our house. The roasted vegetables alone look delicious – I can always sneak some spinach onto mine. And we are waiting anxiously for the pizza recipe!

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  22. I am harissa obsessed, too, and haven’t had any for so long now. Been too busy to make my own lately and now looking at this I’m craving it all over again. A beautiful salad, John, and another great and creative use for harissa. 🙂

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  23. You had me at harissa! Love that stuff, Remember my roasted butternut squash and sweet potato salad? That was laden with harissa and ras el Hanout, so I know this salad is pretty amazing.
    Harissa just adds such a lovely depth of flavour to dressings, meats and vegetables, and of course, tagines.
    I forgot you don’t like cilantro, had to chuckle at the bit about throwing out the cilantro. What will you do when you come to dinner at my house one day? 🙂
    Have a great weekend, John!

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  24. I wasn’t expecting the preserved lemon. What a pleasant surprise! This is a “must make” John! You know I love harissa and anything spicy sauce and I just love the combination of ingredients and flavors. Great salad!

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  25. Oh my John, those roasted carrots sure look delectable! Beautiful salad! Just my kind of dish. I love salads but it’s not a dish I take time and care to muster up. I much prefer it when others prepare lovely salads for me. But now that spring is finally here, kind-of, I really must make more of an effort in preparing salads as meals.

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  26. What a flavorful recipe…hoping to try your harissa soon. I can understand your obsession! Thanks for the good idea for storing the left overs by freezing the harissa in an ice cube tray. Then it will be ready when one decides that they must have some harissa immediately! 🙂

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  27. You KNOW, don’t you, that if I lived closer, I’d arrive at your door with a giant mutant pumpkin squash and beg you to make this for me! I’d even be happy to leave the bulk of the monster squash with you (do I sound desperate? :)). And as for Grandpa’s tuna and anchovy and red wine vinegar salad – I reckon I eat the original version that you posted of that about once a month! 🙂 xxx

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    • You and your squash, Celia. Are you sure you’re not living atop an old nuclear power plant? I’ve heard of a green thumb but this is ridiculous. Yes, I, too, make Grandpa’s salad frequently and always keep a few cans of tuna on-hand. I’ve never tired of it and don’t think I ever will. 🙂

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  28. Oh how I share your harissa infatuation!! I have three different types of it at home (two paste form, one powder) and I’ve gotten into the habit of putting it on everything, or alternately, having a smidge on the side of my plate as an accompaniment! Love this salad recipe. I can imagine how wonderfully the flavours would meld together. Delicious as always John!

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  29. Speaking of catching up… which you did in your replay to my comment on two pizzas post… you reminded me that I read this post but didn’t comment as I meant to how I admire that you create a range of delicious flexible recipes that can be vegetarian, or no. We eat meat, but sometimes I’m in the mood for just veges.

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    • If you had asked me, 3 years ago, what I thought about eating meatless meals, I would have said it’s great — for someone else. Thanks to the blogging world’s influence, it’s a part of my diet now. That’s mainly because I’ve been exposed to so many wonderful recipes for veggies that are completely new to me. What wasn’t possible 3 years ago is a reality now. I’m glad you enjoyed this one, too, EllaDee.

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  30. Pingback: Chicken Skewers with Harissa - Brochettes de Poulet avec Harissa | FoodidiesFoodidies

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