Braised Goat in the Moorish Style

Capra Basata nello Stile di Moresco

Braised Goat with Harissa

I’m back and the Kitchens are once again open. Zia and I thank you all for your kind words and well wishes. She sends her warm regards. She, also, sent me home with a few new recipes — octopus and quail are at the top of that list — and I’ll be sharing them in the weeks to come.

Of course, we did buy our share of honey, over 4 gallons between the two of us. Although I brought home 2.25 gallons (8.5 l), almost all went to my neighbors for distribution among their family members. The “Honey Man”, Mr. Falkenberg, has about 100 hives and they produce enough honey for him to sell it in some of that area’s markets, as well as during not one but two weekends this year. He also sold apples, grapes, and black walnuts.  I bought a 5 pound bucket of grapes for $2.00 and used them to make grape jelly yesterday. The apples were used to make apple sauce and my Zia Mariolla’s apple cake. That recipe will be shared in the near future.

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(Click to enlarge any photo)

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I’ve mentioned in the past that my family prepared goat, very often at Easter. As the years past, we relied more upon lamb for that holiday meal and I cannot tell you the last time I enjoyed goat in any form. Worse yet, I had no idea where I might purchase some. Well, that all changed a few weeks ago. I didn’t realize it but the vendor at the farmers market from whom I buy organic chicken also sells a variety of meats, goat being among them. Although I couldn’t buy any at the time, I knew I’d be back to purchase some. And that’s the last I’ve seen of that vendor. For whatever reason, they are no longer at the farmers market. Not only did I lose my long sought-after source for fresh goat meat but I lost my organic chicken vendor, too.

Well, returning home after the third week of the vendor’s absence, I decided to take matters into my own hands. I pulled the car to the curb and googled, “Where to buy goat in Chicago?” Lo and behold! Just about a half-mile from my home, there’s a Middle Eastern grocery and butcher. It’s one block West of the Indian market where I buy spices and I’ve walked past it any number of times. Within minutes, I was on my way with a goat shoulder wrapped in brown paper.

Once home and after a quick web search, I settled upon a great recipe. Unfortunately, it required harissa and I didn’t have a recipe for the sauce nor did I feel like experimenting. So, I did what I often do. I went to the Middle East Bakery & Grocery, a little gem of a store located in my old neighborhood. As luck would have it, they make their own harissa on-site and it’s good enough to be used in a number of the restaurants in town.

So, with a goat shouder on the counter, harissa in-hand, and a jar of preserved lemons hiding out in the back of my fridge, I set about making braised goat — but with one major difference. The original recipe uses a dutch oven to braise the roast, slowly, in the oven. When I finally bought the meat, Summer had returned to this area with a vengeance, I wasn’t about to turn on my oven for anything, let alone a long and slow braise. Instead, I pulled out the slow cooker and my kitchen kept its cool. This is the version described in the recipe below.

Oh! One more thing. I will be bringing some goat with me to Michigan next time so that I can learn and share my family’s recipe for roasting it. Get ready, Zia!

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Raw Goat Shoulder

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Goat in the Moorish Style Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1 cup harissa for marinade
  • 2 – 3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 carrots, chopped
  • 1 large onion, sliced
  • 6 cloves garlic, smashed
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 3 cilantro stems – that’s right, I’m using cilantro
  • 2 cups low/no sodium chicken stock
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine
  • 1 tbsp honey
  • the rind from half of a preserved lemon, finely chopped
  • salt and pepper
  • harissa for serving
  • Greek yogurt for serving

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Goat ready to be cooked

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Directions

  1. With a very sharp knife, remove gray skin from the meat. Season with salt & pepper.
  2. Place meat in a large, seal-able plastic bag, add the harissa and completely coat the meat. Place the bag and contents in the fridge overnight. Turn bag over every couple of hours. Remove from fridge 1 hour before cooking is to begin.
  3. Heat oil over med-high heat in a medium sauté pan. Add onions, carrot, garlic, bay leaves, and cinnamon stick, sautéing until soft and fragrant. Season with salt and pepper.
  4. Meanwhile, place stock, white wine, and honey in a small sauce pan, bring to a boil, and then keep warm over a very low flame.
  5. Once the vegetables have been sautéed, dump that pan’s contents into the slow cooker. Add the cilantro and stir.
  6. Place the goat meat atop the vegetables, Be sure to include any remaining harissa left in the bag.
  7. Pour the wine mixture around the roast in the slow cooker. Cover and set to “Low”.
  8. Turn the roast after 1 hour, and then again every 2 hours after. Roast will be cooked in 8 hours.
  9. After 8 hours, remove roast to a dish and cover. Strain the pan juices, discarding the braising vegetables. Set aside to allow the fat to separate and then remove.
  10. See Serving Suggestions below

Inspired by a recipe in the NY Times.

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Goat Plated

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Serving Suggestions

1) Once cooked, the roast can be carved and served as-is. Sprinkle with the preserved lemon. Suggested accompaniments would be rice, yogurt, and a bit of harissa on the side. The sauce can be reduced to the thickness of your choice. Check for seasoning before serving on the side.

2) Debone the cooked roast and treat it as you would pulled pork. Return in to the slow cooker. Add the preserved lemon and mix thoroughly. Reduce the sauce to the desired thickness and either add it to the pulled goat or serve on the side.

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Goat Sandwich on Baby Arugula with Greek Yogurt and Harissa

Pulled Goat Sandwich on Baby Arugula with Greek Yogurt and Harissa

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It’s déjà vu all over again …

About a year ago, I posted a recipe for plum cobbler that I jokingly called “magical.” What I didn’t know, but learned while I was visiting Zia, was that the recipe contained a typo. Instead of listing “1 TBSP baking powder”, I had written “1 TSP baking powder.” Big difference, no? I’ve since corrected the recipe  and please make sure you do the same if you’ve made a copy for yourself.

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Coming soon to a monitor near you …

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Blueberry-Lemon Slice

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209 thoughts on “Braised Goat in the Moorish Style

  1. Welcome back John, we missed you. I’ve only had goat once and it was prepared Jamaican style in a roti, and it was very tender indeed. I’m loving your Middle Eastern preparation. That good old slow cooker has made many appearances in our home and cottage this year too. There’s nothing like walking into the house with the aroma of a slow cooked delicious dinner waiting for you.

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    • Thanks, Eva. It’s good to be back. Goat can be a little tough and using a slow cooker really helped. ‘m looking forward to making it again. Those pulled goat sandwiches were killer! 🙂

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    • I’d read that goat cold both dry and tough. That’s why I thought I’d try the slow cooker and it worked just fine. I still want to see how Zia prepares it, though. I’m sure she would have explained how to do it over the phone but I’d rather watch La Maestra at work. 🙂

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  2. Hi John, looks like you had a very productive (and hopefully enjoyable) time away in Michigan! That goat looks amazingly tender – I’ll keen to give this one a go… perhaps with lamb though (much easier to find in my part of the world!) Already looking forward to that Blueberry-Lemon Slice of yours! Cheers, Margot

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    • Thanks, Margot. My visit back home was really nice. This was my first time using so much harissa on anything and I really enjoyed it. I wondered if it would work with lamb, too. I guess there’s only one way to find out, eh? If it’s half as good as the goat was, I’ll be very happy.

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  3. John, this looks delicious in the extreme! I have no idea where I could get goat around here, maybe online? In Venezuela, goat is very popular in some cities and I love it’s taste but I think your preparation far exceeds anything I’ve had in the past! I haven’t made Harissa myself either, but it’s on my to do list 🙂

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    • Hello, Paul! If anything is to be learned from my experience, seek out a Middle Eastern market and butcher. I cannot believe that I’ve looked for goat for years and all along it was being sold about a half-mile from my front door. This harissa I bought was very good. I do want to make my own but certainly have no complaints with this one. Freshly made and for $3.00? It’s hard to beat.

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    • Thank you. Many compare goat with lamb and, from what I’ve been told, the older the goat, the more it tastes like mutton. My goat was young and, honestly, tasted closer to beef than it did lamb, although it definitely wasn’t beef. I look forward to watching my Zia prepare it. She will certainly not be using anything nearly as spicy as harissa and I’ll have a better idea of the meat’s true flavor.

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  4. Welcome home John. I am terribly sorry to tell you this BUT, I have always wanted to try goat and cant buy it anywhere here SO we will have to go onto our ever growing list for when I visit! It looks delicious!
    Have a beautiful day.
    🙂 Mandy xo

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  5. Buona Sera John! I have missed you, your stories and recipes. I guess that amount of honey should hold you for a while. It sounds like you have been a very busy bee, making jam and visiting the markets. I love your spices and slow cooking of this dish but might have to swap that out for pork or another protein that is a little more readily available in Hong Kong. Finishing off will preserved lemons sounds fantastic. Did you see Nanzeen just posted a recipe for making your own homemade Harissa so that sounds like a great challenge with this dish. What do you plan to do with all of that honey? I can’t wait to see what you make with it. Chow, BAM

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    • Buona notte, BAM! I think pork would work wonderfully here, with the harissa. That was a very tasty meal and I bet the Men in your house would love the sandwiches. I’ll make it again just for those sandwiches. I will definitely head over to Nazneen’s to see her harissa recipe. I’ve not much experience with this sauce but did enjoy it here. Homemade can only be better. As for the honey, almost all was destined for my neighbors. I’m not much of a baker and don’t use it very often. (I say that knowing that, quite uncharacteristically, I’ve a few dessert/sweet posts coming up.) Maybe I should look into subbing honey for the sugar in the recipes. Hmmm …

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  6. I just showed the pics to the G.O., and he said I’ll have some of that, so slow cooker Moorish goat is a plan, and good with the weather warming up… I love how you’ve done the pulled goat rolls with ‘slaw but the G.O. doesn’t eat rice, so if you, or anyone else can think of another accompaniment to particularly suit the flavours, that would be great, otherwise I’ll go with the usual veges, salad 🙂

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    • Thanks, EllaDee, I’m glad you liked the recipe. How does the G.O. feel about couscous? You could serve some with a Moroccan twist. Say, a little mint, some golden raisins, a sprinkling of capers or perhaps chopped olives. Maybe add some toasted nuts for a little crunch? Now, it that fails, do what Zia and I do. Serve it atop some polenta. In our minds, you can never go wrong serving something with polenta. 🙂

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    • I’ve yet to learn how may family once prepared it but, I must admit, using harissa as a marinade worked beautifully. I’m very pleased with the outcome and will definitely do it again — and soon. 🙂

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  7. It’s good to hear that you are back and that you had a nice time with Zia. Wow, what a lot of honey! It’s great that you and your aunt are supporting the local bee farmer. Now we’ll need some posts involving a bit of honey in the recipe! Your goat with harissa looks good. I’ve never had goat meat before, I don’t think… I’ll have to ask my mom about that one though! We did raise goats when I was a kid (no pun intended) and used the milk from the goats to drink and to make cheese but I don’t remember what happened to those goats in the end.

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    • Thanks, Laura. It was a very nice visit. I hope to be able to get back there one more time before the weather turns the roads too ice to travel. I envy you having had access to fresh goat’s milk. The cheeses your family made must have been wonderful. I’ve made some with pasteurized goat’s milk and the flavor just isn’t as good as when raw milk is used. If your family didn’t cook the goat meat, I, too, wonder what happened to the goats. Maybe yo had some very grateful neighbors. 🙂

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    • Thank you so much, Silvia. A slow cooker is an electric cooking vessel where the heat is supplied along the bottom. It never gets exceptionally hot and cooks soups, sauces, and roasts, slowly from 4 to 12 hours, depending upon the recipe. Many will place all of the recipe’s ingredients in the slow cooker in the morning before leaving for work. That evening, when they return, the dinner will be ready for serving. I hope that gives you a better idea of what a slow cooker is. I’m sorry for not being more clear in the post.

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  8. Excellent! Goat isn’t something I see everyday in London, but I did find a Caribean shop quite close to me recently that sells it. I’ve been thinking of doing curry goat. Maybe I’ll try your recipe too while I’m at it!
    Great pictures of the bee man too.

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  9. Good to hear about your nice time away and also good to know you are back. I love the photo of Zia and the honey man and also the plate and fork. I ate curried goat in Jamaica once and remember it seeming tough and stringy but I’m sure your cooking instructions would be perfect and I probably ate an old goat. Preserved lemons sound mouth watering.
    Thanks for all your good words on my blog posts John. My followers will be happy to see the comment section come alive again with your additions.

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    • Thanks you so much, Ruth. From what I’ve read. goat can be touch and stringy and, the older it is, the stronger the flavors. Cooking it in the slow cooker really did keep the meat moist and tender, much like it does a pork shoulder. I learned how to make preserved lemons last Fall and am always looking for ways to use them. They worked very well here.
      I truly do enjoy visiting your blog, Ruth. Your photos are wonderful and your perspective unique. Your blog is on my Must Read list. 🙂

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  10. Your recipe for goat has an intriguing line up of flavors John. isn’t amazing how google holds the solution to so many of our challenges??? although i don’t think it will help me find a supplier of harissa as good as yours! Looking forward to your apple cake recipe too!

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    • Thanks, Barb. It is amazing how big a role computer technology plays in our lives. What would we do without google? Go back to phone books? Ugh! 🙂
      This is the first time I made my Aunt Mariolla’s apple cake and it’s a great recipe, perfect for this time of the year. Stay tuned …

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  11. This recipe looks great! I do like goat. I’ve had it in several restaurants and have been tempted to make it. This should motivate me. I do know I can get it from our local farmer’s market since I’ve kept an eye out for it!

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    • Thank you so much! This was my first time using so much harissa and I really enjoyed it. I hope that vendor returns to my farmers market. They really did have a nice selection of organic, grass fed meats and free range chickens. Thankfully I get my eggs from another vendor or I’d really be up the creek. 🙂

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  12. Welcome back, John. You sure bought a lot of honey and how kind of you to distribute among your lucky neighbours.
    Not a huge goat fan, but that pulled goat sandwich sure looks inviting.

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    • Thanks, Norma. This honey is really good and my neighbors much prefer it over anything that we can buy around here. Much of it goes to the Grandkids whose parents don’t want them to have processed sugar. I’m glad because it gives me “an excuse” to visit Zia. 😉

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  13. Great come back!!!! Missed your virtual presence…

    you are arriving, and I am leaving – 12 days work-related trip, but hopefully a couple of scheduled posts shall keep my blog running smoothly

    commenting might be iffy, so don’t take it personally if I am silent

    (loved this recipe!)

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    • Like 2 ships passing in the night …
      Thanks, Sally, and it’s good to be back> I hop you business trip is successful, giving you some time to relax a bit. I look forward to hearing about it when you come back. Buon viaggio!

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  14. Good to see you back.
    How nice to see the honey man in his place of work. Not too many craftsmen around anymore and what a shame that is. The honey looks so good….
    I never had goat meat but the recipe here makes me want to try and get some. Harissa and pickled lemons sound like the perfect match.
    Looking forward to the promised recipes 🙂

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    • Thank you so much. It’s good to be back. The Honey Man has quite an operation. When there, it’s hard to se how he could possibly supply so many with so much honey. When we arrived, there was a couple purchasing double the amount of honey that Zia and I bought. As we left, a pick-up arrived and, from the looks of things, that person was going to buy gallons, too. And you can see his honey on the shelves of the area’s markets, too. Those little bees must be working overtime! 🙂

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        • You’re so right, especially with so many bees mysteriously dying over the past few years. Thanks for the lesson, too. I’d no idea that “Deborah” was derived from ‘D’vora”. I’m fascinated. 🙂

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  15. Hi John! Welcome back! We’ve missed you around here but glad you had a great time with Zia. Family time is important.
    As I was reading your goat meat woes, I was thinking “halal butchers, John!!” You will always find goat at ME halal stores (though they eat lamb but keep goat for Indian and Pakistanis) or Hispanic grocers.
    My family eats a lot of goat in curries, biryanis masala etc, but my favourite prep is like you’ve made it. Cooked till tender in a dry prep. I have many goat recipes but rarely post them because at my house we don’t eat it that much.
    Your harissa marinade sounds awesome. Well, while you were gone, I did post my harissa recipe, it’s pretty awesome 🙂 Maybe you can make some and give me you thoughts?
    Nice to have you back. Looking forward to your quail recipe, octopus, not so much 🙂

    Nazneen

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    • Thank you, Nazneen, and thank you for the halal butcher tip. I should have figured it out on my own, especially considering how frequently I walk past that market. Well, at least I’ve found it now. Thank you, too, for your harissa recipe. This will give me something to experiment with in the months ahead. 🙂

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  16. Your timing is impeccable! I purchased a goat shoulder last weekend at my local farmer’s market [in Michigan, no need to bring your own!] and tossed it in the freezer not quite sure how to prepare it. Now I know 🙂 Looks like braised goat is on the menu this weekend…thanks!

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    • You’re so welcome, Nancy! I did love the flavor that the harissa gave this braise and the sandwiches were really good! Even so, I still want to learn how my family prepared goat back in the day. I believe they roasted it with garlic and rosemary, much like they did lamb. Hopefully, Zia will show me the next time I visit her. 🙂

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  17. Hey John!! The blogosphere was eerily quiet without you 😉
    You know, I’ve eaten kangaroo, emu, crocodile, camel, some strange ‘meat’ in China which I’ll never really know what it was but have never tried goat before, I’d love to get my hands on some and give this a go!

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    • Thanks, Lisa. You really have given your palate a work out. I, too, have had kangaroo and once had an ostrich burger but camel? No, not that I recall and, as for China, the less time spent wondering about that meal, the better. 🙂
      I hope you do find a source for goat. I bet you’d prepare it wonderfully!

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  18. Oh wow – what a recipe! You know we are lucky and get to eat goat here but I haven’t ever done it like this and now I know I will 🙂 Love all those flavours – I buy harissa as it’s wonderful stuff, a little spoonful here and there in soup or sauce really lifts it. So glad you had fun with Zia and look at that beautiful honey…looking forward to all those fabulous recipes you promised us 🙂 Lovely to have you back, we missed you!

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    • Thank you, Tanya. We had a wonderful visit together. I did enjoy this harissa marinade but still want to learn how my family prepared goat back in the day. I get they roasted it like they did lamb, with plenty of garlic and rosemary. Hopefully, I’ll be able to get back to visit Zia before the roads get too bad for travel and we’ll take a trip down Memory Lane and roast some goat. I know you’ll be departing soon, so, safe travels.

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  19. (Apologies if my comment appears twice… not sure where the first one went off to…)
    I’m glad to see your kitchen is open again John. Hope you and Zia had a wonderful visit. That goat dish looks fantastic! LOVE it! And love the spice combinations that you used. So much warmth. I could probably find goat easily enough, but I don’t think my girls would be happy with me. Perhaps I’ll try it with lamb. And that sandwich is the BOMB! Pinned it, because it’s just fabulous!

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    • For whatever reason, Lidia, your first comment was flagged and required moderation. Since you posted a second comment, I trashed the first.
      Thank you for the nice compliments. I will definitely make this again with lamb. That harissa marinade worked wonderfully. Truth be told, though, for me it was all about the sandwiches. They really were fantastic! I hope you daughters will like this but, if they don’t, all the more for Mom. 🙂

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  20. It’s great to have you back John and it certainly sounds like your quest for honey went a lot better than mine … http://dianeskitchentable.wordpress.com/2013/09/21/just-trying-to-buy-some-honey/
    I’ve been so scattered lately with all that’s going on that I misread what your wrote about buying the goat & had this vision of you walking out of the market with a goat over your shoulder (my brain’s fault, not your writing).
    I don’t think I’ve ever tried goat before although I’d be willing to give it a try. It looks fabulous.

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    • Thank you, Diane. Your vision is remarkably similar to a yearly trip to the farmers market with my Grandpa. Once a year, they’d make head cheese and I’d have to carry a hog’s head on my shoulder as Grandpa shopped the market. I’d plead with him to let me take it to the car and his response was, “Just one more stop.” Thank heavens it was only once a year!

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      • Oh John you crack me up – I am going to have a hard time getting that image out of my mind today but I thank you since I needed a good laugh & smile. While I’ve been frantically packing the kitchen for Monday’s demolition & after driving my daughter’s ‘fixed’ car back to her in Boston last night, she just called me to say it’s stuck in the parking garage & won’t start! These are calls you don’t need first thing in the morning.

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        • I accompanied Grandpa to the farmers market almost every Saturday morning but “hog’s head” day was by far the worst. How I hated it! I certainly can sympathize with you and the car problems, having gone though a bad patch back in July. I hope her car is fixed an that it wasn’t a major ordeal doing so. Good luck packing up the kitchen. i don’t envy you but I bet you’re going to love your new kitchen. Don’t let the next few days get the better of you. 🙂

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          • Oh John, what can I say? They just delivered the dumpster for the kitchen demolition & I feel like jumping in it myself…take me away! Since my daughter was flying out of town & her car was ‘possibly’ fixed (the shop owner personally drove out to Boston to replace the part he thought it was), we still needed to get in there & move it out of the valet parking since they stack the cars & can’t have a potentially dead one in the way. My husband got a ride in to Boston & alas, the Bruins were playing & the garage is next door to Boston Garden. 2 HOURS to get in, an hour out, then I picked him up to drive out to his work where he’d left his car. Do you think some holy water might help? I will love the kitchen & am happy to say I’m really making progress today packing it up 🙂 you are so encouraging – thank you!

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          • Well, it’s late Sunday night and I hope you and your husband are relaxing with a cocktails in hand. You’ve had one heck of a week, Diane. Hang in there. The kitchen of your dreams is on its way to you …

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      • John – I missed this comment before. I didn’t know that Italians made Head Cheese! I’ve never seen in the States but it’s BIG in Quebec. They even sell it at the stores. I remember, years ago, my husband’s aunt – who lived on a big farm in Quebec – had a pig’s head on top of her fridge ’cause she was going to make Head Cheese. (She’s the one who showed me how to make blood pudding from the blood of one of our pigs!)

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        • It was a favorite of Grandpa and Zia and Nonna made it. Zia even included it in a recipe book she gave me years ago, as a joke. In return, I keep threatening to bring a hog’s head with me to Michigan so that she can show me how to make it. Believe me, it ain’t gonna happen. I’ll buy my head cheese at a deli counter if I want some. 🙂

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          • So – you can find Head Cheese at the deli counter where you live? Amazing. And…. I wonder what the difference would be between Italian and French Canadian Head Cheese. I’ll but the Italian Head Cheese had/has more flavor !

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          • I hope you’re sitting down …
            Not just at the deli counter, Cecile, but pre-packaged with other lunch meats like bologna and ham. It’s pretty common. That might be due to our having so many ethnic groups that live here. Whatever the reason, we’ve got plenty of head cheese. 🙂

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          • Well, I’ll be….. hog tied !! ; o ) Do you, perhaps, know the song, “Yes, We Have No Bananas” – my grandfather used to sing it. If you DO know the tune, then ‘sing along with me’.. “Yes, we have no Head Cheese. We have no Head Cheese today!”

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  21. It looks delicious – as always! You know, I’m thinking of posting a recipe for Moroccan chicken and it, too, calls for Harrisa and preserved lemons. I checked out the Harrisa recipe… and decided…. NEVER MIND! Maybe I can find some – and some preserved lemons as well.
    I remember sampling preserved lemons in Casablanca. Luckily, due to my husband being an international banker, we sometimes had the pleasure of visiting his customers at their homes. Once I was shown a large, decorative glass container filled with preserved lemons, and told how they were made. And at that point I’d never even heard of them!

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      • Somehow I missed your reply – thanks for posting the recipe for preserved lemons.
        This has nothing to do with the recipe but when I was in Morocco, I only got to spend one day there – in Casablanca. I was waiting for my husband to meet me. I got a call about 8:30 in the morning, Moroccan time. My husband’s best friend had died. I got my husband out of a meeting in Eritrea & we immediately began making plans to return to the States. We ended up landing in Montreal, then catching a hop from there. We just made the funeral, where the man’s wife asked me to speak. And I did. Sometimes when life gets “crazy”, what I call “Our Better Selves” rises to the top!!

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          • After, someone asked if I was a “public speaker” & my husband complimented me by saying he could never have done it – and he was proud of me. (I normally wouldn’t be posting things a personal as this..but hey.. I’m “talking” to my friend John!)

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          • How nice that you were able to step up and do such a wonderful job, Cecile. You must have been a great comfort to the family. Good for you!

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    • If I’m not mistaken, goat is served at celebratory dinners. THey must have thrown a feast in his honor. 🙂
      Concord grapes at the farmers market cost $4.00/quart. I felt like I was robbing the guy when he said $2.00 for the bucket.

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  22. Welcome back! Sounds like you had a great time. I’ve never cooked goat, though I’ve eaten it many times. I don’t know why I haven’t made a recipe with it – sheer laziness, I guess. And I do know where I can get it (in fact I’ll be at an ethnic market later today that usually carries it). Anyway, such a nice recipe. A cup of harissa is a lot! But I’ll bet the flvor it adds is wonderful. I do have a recipe for it, but I often buy it (that laziness thing again). Good stuff – thanks.

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    • Thanks, John, it was quite a nice visit. This goat was really tasty and I loved the harissa flavoring. Now that i know where to purchase it, I want to watch my Zia prepare it the way my family once did. I was just a little boy the last time it was made and it’s one recipe I want to learn. Since writing this, I’ve received a number of suggestions for homemade harissa. You’re right, though. Buying some, especially when it is a good sauce, is so much easier. 🙂

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  23. Welcome back John, it’s not possible to get goat here in Ireland, despite my going eye to pink rimmed eye with them when cycling through the Devil’s Glen in County Wicklow. Their cheese is readily available but they manage to avoid the chop themselves. I love the recipe and I feel that the Honey Man would be my kind of guy. Post on, we have missed you.
    Best,
    Conor

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  24. Welcome back John! Missed you and your insightful postings a lot 🙂 And finally a goat preparation!! My favorite meat is goat, and I am so glad to see a preparation that is NOT Indian. I am bookmarking this to try out. You know the coolest thing? Nazneen from Coffee and Crumpets recently posted a harissa recipe I am dying to try out. This recipe seems a made for each other thing.

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    • Thank you so much, Minnie. It’s good to be back home. One of these trips I’ll have to bring Zia back with me. That will be something! A few of my blogging friends have mentioned Nazneen’s harissa recipe and I’ve pinned it for later use. I can’t wait to give it a try. Next time I cook goat, though, it will be with Zia’s direction. I’ve yet to learn how my family once prepared it back in the day and I’ve got to get that recipe recorded. I wonder if the promise of goat would entice Zia into coming? 🙂

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    • You’re right, Stefan. This is not in our style at all. I am glad I gave it a try, though, and really did enjoy it. Next time, though, I’ll be watching Zia roast goat like my family once did. She and I were talking and it’s been 50+ years since we last served goat. That cooking session is sure to stir up some old memories. 🙂

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  25. Your meat-shopping adventures get me thinking that some of the many great Hispanic grocers around here will surely stock goat. Hmmm. The slow cooker is sometimes empty between broth batches…! Gorgeous recipe once again, John.

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    • Thanks, Kathryn. I love using my slow cooker but don’t use it too often anymore. Now that I no longer work, it is pure torture to sit in my home, smelling my dinner cook for 8 hours. I’ll surely do it again for this goat, though. It really was that good. 🙂

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  26. If you’re still thinking of what to do with that truck load of honey, I have a solution. You send that to me and in exchange, I’ll send you some home grown flowers. Deal? 🙂
    Loved your recipe and versatile use of that red-hot-sexy goat preparation.
    Reading this post and staring at those almost-real pictures drooling have been a true pleasure indeed 🙂

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    • I wouldn’t mind that deal at all, Nusrat. You are right about the truckload. Each year, as word spreads in the neighborhood, I being back more honey. I bet those bees dread seeing my car pull into the drive. 🙂
      As always, thank you for being so complimentary. You’re the best. Nusrat!

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    • I don’t know how widespread a tradition it was but, when I was a boy, a young goat was brought to the house and Dad slaughtered it for Easter.By the time I was about 6 years old, lamb became the holiday’s main course and I don’t recall ever seeing goat served again. Too bad because as I’ve just learned, goat makes a great meal. 🙂

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  27. I have never eaten goat either, it looks very lean in the photo.. I bet it was tasty. And I bet that honey is even tastier.. Your store room must be groaning with pleasure.. welcome home!! c

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    • Thanks, Celi. From what I’ve read, the older the goat, the stronger the flavor. This one must have been young and the harissa is a very strong marinade. Together, it was a great combination. As for the honey, as good as it is, I have it on good authority that your is much better. 🙂

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      • Hopefully by next year I will be able to harvest some more honey, this year i am determined to have a hive that survives the winter so I can divide it next spring. Fingers crossed! c

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        • The Honey Man said that last year he lost 80% of his bees. I don’t know how he managed to rebound so well but it didn’t look like his production was in bad shape. His honey is on store shelves and he was open for 2 weekends this year.

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    • Thank you so much. I have to admit, as much as I like the goat dinner that first night, I absolutely loved the sandwiches that followed. I do want to try using harissa as a marinade for lamb. Your comment and the promise of lamb sandwiches are really pulling me in that direction. 🙂

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    • Hello, Francesca. Zia & I had a lovely visit. My family always roasted goat but I was just a little boy the last time it was made. The next time I go home for a visit, I’ll be bring some goat so that I can watch Zia prepare it. When I return, you and I can compare notes to see if our preparations are similar. I bet they will be. 🙂

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  28. Omg!!! Let alone that you are a magician with words, those pictures are magical! Mr Falkenberg’s place is like an alchemical laboratory! Beautiful! And i am so proud to see my country’s flag on the visitor’s flag counter! (It’s the golden eagle on the red background – just across of the Italy’s boot’s heel ;))
    Warm regards to Zia and you from Montenegro! I will try to persuade my mother to make the Carpa Basata for us, as it surpasses my skills by far 😉

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    • Thank you. I’m so glad you enjoyed the post. How lucky that Montenegro’s flag remained visible. So many have gotten buried as others have been added.
      I only was able to take a few photos as the Mr Falkenberg’s. It was a bad time to learn that my battery’s camera was faulty. I’d wanted to take at least one photo of the bees flying around in that room. It really was something to see — and hear! There were dozens!

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  29. Welcome back, John. We’ve all missed you. Sounds like you had a fabulous time with Zia. The honey would be like treasure and I love the sound of your grape jelly. That’s excellent that you found where you can buy goat – what every would we do without google! I love harissa and there are some great recipes around for making your own so I’m going to try making some. When you say ‘1/2 preserved lemon rind’ do you mean half a preserved lemon? I can buy goat fairly easily from a butcher that’s within walking distance but I’ve never yet bought any. I must change this and your recipe would be a good place to start xx

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    • Thanks, Charlie. It’s good to be back on the grid, again. I, too, want to make my own harissa but, I have to admit, it is so easy walking into that little market, walking up to the cooler, and grabbing a container of harissa. Nu muss, nu fuss, and no chile-stained finger tips. Yes, you should use the rind from half of a preserved lemon. I’ll change the recipe to clear up any confusion. Thanks for pointing that out to me.
      I’m looking forward to bringing goat with me the next time I go home. I can’t wait to learn how my family roasted goat back in the day. You may be making more than one trip to your butcher. I know I am. 🙂

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  30. Dang, I had written and submitted a comment but for some reason it doesn’t show: I hate it when it happens!
    Anyway, I was saying: good to see you back, John! 🙂
    Your pulled goat sandwich just made me drool profusely: it looks phenomenal!
    Also, I am looking forward to your octopus recipe as I love octopus, but it is unfortunately way too easy being served chewy, bubble-gum like octopus at many restaurants, so much so that I have become skeptical ordering it if not from those restaurants that I know make it the way it is supposed to.
    Finally, enjoy your delicious, fresh honey: those jars look great! 🙂

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    • For reasons that escape me, Stefano, your first comment was flagged as if it was your first time commenting. In that you re-wrote it, I trashed it in favor of this, your latest “work.” 🙂
      Thanks, Stefano, and it’s good to be back. This is another meat preparation that I’ll make just for the sandwiches, much like I do for pulled pork. They really were that good! We used small octopi that we cut into small pieces. It wasn’t at all chewy — something we were very concerned about. I hope you’ll like our recipe. 🙂

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    • Thank you so much. Almost all of that honey goes to my neighbors, Grandparents all. They give it to the parents so that the Grandkids can stay away from processed sugar. Every year I bring back more, as word of it goes ’round the neighborhood. It’s good stuff! 🙂

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  31. interesting…sounds good with all the ingredients, even the cinnamon stick….I’ve never had goat meat before even though I love goat cheese on my burritos suizos.

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  32. Yum-yum! And that’s a lot of sweet, good tasting honey. I like goat meat. Back home with have a local delicacy called “Kaldereta,” with the right spice, herbs and cooking prepration, each bite is divine. Thanks for another unforgettable taste bud adventure.

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    • Thank you! There is a Filipino restaurant right around the corner from where I live. It’s next to my butcher’s, in fact. I should stop by and see if they serve Kaldereta. It sounds delicious and I’m sure I’d love it. Thank you for the recommendation. 🙂

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  33. Welcome back John – and with such a fabulous recipe! I love goat and living in Oz have mostly had it in mouthwatering curries. Your way of doing it is right up my alley: have everything but that goat. Shopping tomorrow: I wonder whether I too could be lucky!! You have flavoured your meat very elegantly and I shall copy faithfully! Of course you have used red harissa ~ one of my blogs yesterday gave a very interesting green harissa recipe: like red and green Thai curries methinks! Oh, and you won’t forget the octopus and quail in the near future, pretty please? Great faves of mine!!

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    • Thank you, Eha. A few have mentioned enjoying goat curries and now my curiosity is definitely piqued. And I’ve already asked Zia to teach me the family preparation. It’s been about 50 years since it’s been done. 🙂
      Both the octopus and quail recipes are coming. I need to make both again, here at home, to make sure that I copied the recipes correctly. They won’t be too long. Promise. 🙂

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  34. you’ve been busy! The goat has me most intrigued. And I’m so very fond of local honey. My husband and I knock about the idea of keeping bees. Maybe someday?

    Thank you for sharing your culinary adventures 🙂 Delish!

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    • Thank you, Liz. The bee keepers are having a very tough time. The Honey Man said he lost 80% of his bees last year. I really do hope they find the cause and a means to combat it. I think it would be great if your could keep a hive or two. The bees need all the help they can get right now. 😉

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  35. Hi John, welcome back! I’ve been away almost all summer and missed all my blogging friends. I am glad to be back. I love that photo of Zia checking on the Honey Man. So cute! I know the goat meat problem, hard to find. But the meat itself is really good. Isn’t goat meat the most popular meat in the World? Looking forward to read about your family’s recipes.

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    • Hello, Marina. Welcome back! I know you had quite a busy Summer ahead of you and I hope all went well.You were certainly missed.
      Yes, i just had to include that photo of Zia keeping an eye on the Honey Man. There’ll be no games with the scale as long as she’s around — not that the man ever would. I think you’re right about goat’s popularity. I think I read somewhere that it is the most popular meat everywhere but here. I certainly enjoyed it. 🙂

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  36. Welcome back, John. I had a similar issue trying to find goat in Seattle. I wanted to make a Calabrian style braised goat but the butchers I visited didn’t stock goat, and not even Google helped. I haven’t given up though! Love the flavors in this recipe. Susan

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    • Thank you so much, Susan. It was a nice visit. Isn’t it frustrating when you cannot get a key ingredient? It really drives me nuts when, in a city as large as Chicago, I cannot find something like goat. I hope you do find some. A Calabrian style braised goat sounds delicious! I’d love to se how you prepare it. 🙂

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  37. All that beautiful honey! I would love to visit the Honey Man! Goat is very popular in Los Angeles especially in the better Mexican restaurants. Birria de chivo, a stew, is on a lot of menus, and goat tacos are also popular. I’ve only had the tacos! Funny that I don’t see goat in most of the grocery stores or butchers. But there are a lot of international markets I don’t frequent and they are probably a good source. I do think the Middle Eastern flavors would be particularly interesting to me. I’m really looking forward to that apple cake. I put on weight just reading your posts, John!

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    • I hope you’re doing better now, Debra. Purple is not a great color when talking about one’s complexion. You’d love taking a trip to the Honey Man, Debra — so long as you don’t mind a few bees. That room is about the size of a double garage and there were dozens of bees flying about. Their constant drone made the room sound like a machine shop. I’ve never seen goat in any of the mainstream markets. From now on, I’ll look for it at the ME markets. I’m fortunate to live near a few and doubt I’ll ever have problems locating it again. That apple cake was very good. I think you’ll love it, especially if you make the salted caramel sauce to go with it. 🙂

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  38. Welcome home John!
    I was looking for special lentils for Celi to try and I wrote to your middle eastern store ………what a coincidence! Can you tell me the name of your Indian market; would they have a website?
    Your honey looks gorgeous.

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    • Thanks, Elaine.That little grocery is a great shop. No wonder you found it. I buy my spices at Patel Bros. There are a number of them around the US, mine is located on:
      2610 W. Devon Avenue
      Chicago,Illinois 60659
      t:773.262.7777
      f:773.262.7914
      Here’s their corporate website: http://www.patelbros.com/index.php
      I’ve taken Celi to Patel’s. It’s a “must-see” stop on the Bartolini Shopping Tour. 🙂

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    • Thanks, Tanya. I’ve not seen goat prepared in our homes in about 50 years. Although today’s recipe is nothing like my family’s preparation, it was still very good. I’ve already warned Zia that I’ll be bringing some goat with me the next time I visit. We’re going to resurrect the old family recipe. I wonder how it will compare with your Parents’ recipe?

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  39. Hope you had an awesome vacation! I have to admit that I probably wouldn’t eat goat, just like I don’t eat red meat. However, this looks totally awesome and I do wonder what goat tastes like! I love shopping at the Middle Eastern markets and often buy ground chicken there in addition to great breads, spices and produce!

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    • I had a wonderful visit with Zia, Abbe, thank you. Others have also said that they probably wouldn’t eat goat, too. I myself am not familiar enough with the meat to say much about it. From what I read, the older the goat, the more flavor it has, approaching a mutton-like taste. The meat can be tough and a little stringy. I didn’t notice any such thing. The flavor wasn’t at all lamb-like and the meat was tender. Perhaps the harissa affected the taste and cooking it in a slow cooker softened the meat. I rarely buy ground meats any more. I’ve a meat grinder and do all my own grinding. It really makes a difference and I’ve no fear when there are outbreaks of salmonella due to poor meat handling. And, yes, the ME markets have wonderful spices! I’m a frequent customer. 🙂

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    • Thank you so much, Elaine. Most of the honey we buy goes to family and neighbors for the youngest members of their families. The parents are really watching the amount of processed sugar the kids eat and this honey is very popular with them all. Every year we buy more. If you lived closer, I’d be sure to bring some back for your boys. I’d love to hear their reviews. 🙂

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  40. Hi John. I love your photos of the honey man. I so much love getting my hands on local produce, especially produce that is traditionally made. I had goat for the first time in Portugal. When we got back I bought some and made a curry. I really like it and your recipe looks very nice with all those Middle Eastern flavours.

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    • Thanks, Glenda. It’s nice to be able to support locals like this. I try to buy as much a variety as I can and bring it all back home with me. It certainly is better than anything I can buy at the grocery. I bet that goat curry you prepared was delicious.That’s another preparation I’d love to explore. That butcher is going to get to know me very well. 🙂

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  41. I can’t “do” goat John because I’m ridiculously (insanely) fond of them. But I’m anxiously waiting to see what you might make of that honey of yours…and of course Zia’s apple cake!

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    • I certainly understand your feeling, Spree, about goat. In fact, we cooked quail — a recipe I’ll share soon — because I couldn’t go back to the live poultry place and watch them handle the pigeons. Once, a dozen years ago, was more than enough. I think you’re going to love this apple cake, especially if you make the caramel sauce to go with it. 🙂

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    • Hello, Maria. It is nice going to the Honey Man every September with Zia. It’s liquid gold and everyone really likes his product. Thank you for leaving such a compliment. 🙂

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    • Thank you! I love slow roasted lamb shanks. It’s a meal I prepare every Fall. it kind of takes the sting our of Summer’s ending. Hmmm … Now you’ve got me thinking about buying lamb shanks. 🙂

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  42. The story behind the recipe is amazing – particularly the lengths you went to obtain the goat and Harissa. I love the journey that lead you braised goat in the Moorish style! Oh, and if only we all could find amazing local grapes and honey at such great prices. What a treat!

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    • Thank you, Shanna. I cannot believe how long it took me to find goat here and then it was only a half-mile away! Who knew? I was at the farmers market yesterday and the vendors were asking $5 and $6 per quart for Concord grapes. In Michigan, I paid $2 for 5 lbs. Guess where I’m buying my grapes next year? 🙂

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  43. I have not eaten goat in over 40 years. I won’t even eat goat cheese. I should get over myself, but as a child, you might say that I was traumatized when watching goats being led to slaughter. I am better off tending to plants and trees.

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    • I’m not so sure I’d be a willing diner of goat if I had your childhood experiences, Arlene. Besides, I’m sure your plants and trees are happy with all of the attention — and your area’s goats are probably pleased, as well. 🙂

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      • John, I get attached to animals just by feeding them. I don’t have give them names. If I had to slaughter animals for my own food, I’d be looking for the nearest lawn to eat! I do feel better about yanking plants and trees out of the ground. No problema!

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  44. Welcome back John! We missed you! Sounds like you had a fun and very productive trip! Look at all that honey and 5 pounds of grapes to 2 bucks? What a deal! I’ve had goat a couple of times and loved it. This is a great recipe and that slow cook has got to yield a tender and wonderful tasty piece of meat. It sure looks good! You certainly came back with a bang! 🙂

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    • Thanks, MJ. When the Honey Man said his grapes were 2 bucks, I almost bought 2 buckets! THank goodness I didn’t. Just how much grape jelly do I need. And, yes, this recipe is a keeper for sure. I’d like to try it with a pork shoulder, too. That harissa was wonderful.

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  45. Welcome back John and so glad you and Zia had such a great visit. I really love the look of that goat sandwich. Harissa is one of my favorite ingredients and the store where I usually bought it has stopped carrying it. I’m afraid I will have to brave the international farmers market to get some more. I love your spicy and sweet preparation. We are up to 87 here today with a hurricane and a cold front on its way. Looks like I’m getting to enjoy some summer after all! 🙂

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    • Thanks, Betsy. We did have a nice visit. We chatted, cooked, and chatted some more. I feel fortunate to have a place nearby that prepares harissa and I really liked it. A few commenters have suggested harissa recipes and they should keep me busy experimenting for some time. It sure does sound like Summer in your area. We’re well into Fall, I’m afraid. Thankfully, that hurricane fizzled a bit. At least there won’t be such severe winds to go with the rain. There’s always going to be some coastal damage but I hope this time it’s kept to a minimum.

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  46. Welcome home John. I love that you’ve dived straight into a complex recipe on your return. No post-holiday sluggishness for this young man! Your pulled goat sandwich looks marvelous. We have a Nepalese restaurant nearby that serves a lip-smacking goat curry and I’ve been meaning to cook goat for years. Your recipe sound incredible, and I’m very tempted to give it a go. Like you we’re lucky enough to have a fab Middle Eastern grocery store nearby. I’m very happy to lose myself in the spice aisles for an hour or more, but have never actually perused the meat section! I may have to rectify that…
    PS. Looking forward to your octopus and quail recipes.

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    • Thanks, Saskia. I’ve very fortunate and live near a variety of ethnic markets. Aside from my Italian and Greek markets, there are Asian, Middle Eastern, and Indian spice shops that, like you, I can get lost in for hours. Thanks to the blogging world, I’m learning to use more and more of them. I do hope you like this goat recipe if you try it. If, however, you decide to make a curry, I’ll gladly borrow that recipe. I’d love to find a good curry goat recipe. 🙂

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  47. John, a whole CUP of harissa! Was the dish tongue burningly hot? Or did you leave most of the marinade behind when you actually cooked it. I have to say, it looks absolutely superb – tender and cooked to perfection. I knew there had to be an Italian tradition of cooking goat, because I often see “capretto” for sale at the local Italian butcher. How fabulous to find a supplier within walking distance! 🙂

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    • Yes, Celia, I cannot believe I can walk to the butcher and get some goat — after looking for it for years! As for the harissa, I, too, thought it would be quite hot. In fact, the shopkeeper told me his, the homemade harissa, was hotter than the one sold in a tin. I bought his, using the entire cup as a marinade, but it mellowed once the other ingredients were added and the goat had cooked all day long. I’m not one for really spicy foods and found this to be just right. Those pulled goat sandwiches were incredible!!!

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  48. I’ve eaten goat several times but have never cooked it myself. It is a meat I have never seen in my rural area. Your middle eastern recipe sounds delicious.

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    • Thanks, Karen. You’ve such an extensive cooking background that I would have thought you’d cooked goat before. You’re right, though. Goat is more an ethnic dish here and I don’t see much of a demand for it in New England. To be honest, it’s not al that common here or I would have found it long ago.

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  49. Spent a weekend in Austin. You’re right more than about food, it’s spending quality time with family. A plantain is just as delicious as the ribs at Rudy’s when shared with great stories, laughter and love among friends and family. Have a great Sunday.!

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  50. John, Pulled goat sandwiches. Now that one I’ll have to ponder. This is something I have not sampled as yet. Glad to have you back. As always many interesting things to try. Honey is something steeped deeply into Egyptian cooking as well. Their desserts are dripping with it. Yum.

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    • Thanks, Susie. Im telling you. Those pulled goat sandwiches were fantastic. I’ll be cooking goat again just to make sandwiches. No doubt about it. I’m fascinated by the flavors of honey, depending upon the pollen collected. I’ve been lucky enough to taste a few varieties and the difference in taste is remarkable.

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  51. I’ve never tried goat – the meat looks lovely. And that pulled goat sandwich!! YUM!

    Gorgeous honey! I always try to buy it that way rather than from the grocery store. I don’t always trust grocery store honey; sometimes I wonder if it’s really honey they’re selling, or if it’s just sugar.

    Also, I cannot wait for the apple cake recipe. We have a large box of apples at our house and, as you know, you can eat only so many apples in a day,

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    • Thank you, I wold advise cooking this goat just for the sandwiches. They are definitely worth the price of admission. Since we’ve been going to the Honey Man, I rarely buy honey elsewhere. I guess I’m spoiled but I think you’re right. You really don’t know what the store-bought is or where it was collected.
      That cake recipe won’t be posted for a couple weeks. If you like, I’ll email it to you so that you don’t have to wait and your apples won’t be wasted. It really isn’t a problem for me to do so. Just let me know. 🙂

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  52. John, this is one of the most beautiful dishes I have ever seen. I love anything that’s been slow-braised, and the idea of tender goat marinated in harissa and wine is absolutely drool-worthy. I love buying my produce from local storeholders also. It always seems like such a privilege to chat to them about their products, their cooking traditions and recommendations. This recipe is defintiely a worthy use of the goat shoulder… I’m going to try it myself very soon! Love the look of the honey also. Yum.

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    • Thank you so much, Laura. I must admit that I’d no idea what the final dish would be like. With so much harissa, I was worried it might be too hot and I wasn’t at all certain whether the goat would tenderize properly. Well, were those fears put to rest. I’m very happy with this dish. I try to shop local whenever I can. The big chain stores are running the small shops out of business and I don’t like it. I’ll throw as much business their way as I can — and be better served in the process.

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  53. I have to thank the lovely Laura from Laura’s Mess to leading me to find your fantastic blog! This braised goat looks and sounds amazing and living in the Middle East I can certainly get my hand on all of those ingredients – oh except the wine, but will just add another 1/2 of stock. We eat a lot of goat here, but most of the time I find the way they prepare and eat the meat makes it far to strong in flavour for me. The animal is killed and cooked all in the space of a couple of hours which means that there is no hanging time for the meat to mellow out the strong barnyard flavour that freshly killed goats meat has. And then the way that it’s cooked here I find it very tough. But U think that your recipe could change all that for me as the idea of slow cooking it for hours with all those other beautiful flavours will mean that it the meat should be tender and beautifully flavoured. Looking forward to giving this a go. Andrea

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    • Hello, Andrea, and welcome! Yes, Laura is wonderful and I do enjoy her blog. I’m glad she “brought’ us together. When I was a very young boy, I remember the adults would bring a baby goat home and it would “disappear” a couple days later, just before a holiday. They stopped doing it and I had goat very rarely after that. Finding a ME halal butcher nearby was a lucky stroke. The next time I buy goat, I’m going to bring it home to learn how my family cooked it all those years ago. I was far too young to know what they were doing.
      If you do try this recipe, I’d love to hear what you think. These are not spices that I use frequently and any help or suggestions you may have would be greatly appreciated. Thank you, Andrea, and I cannot wait to look through the recipes on your blog.

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  54. Goat and Easter mmm…my family used to prepare goat at Christmas. It was one huge, happy event that no one dared to miss, but as years go by, things change… and people do to, including priorities. Google, Google, I do that the whole daylong. I can imagine you walking home with a goat shoulder, wrapped up in a brown paper. That must be one huge slow cooker, John. I have one in my basement that sits comfortably in the cold room, gathering dust and counting years. I have to try and use it this year…ouch!
    The recipe sounds delicious John. I wouldn’t mind slapping some of that pulled goat on a hamburger bun with some nice peppery arugula. Sounds so delicious and looks so delicious too. I enjoyed reading through this recipe. It’s one I would love to try. Thanks so much for sharing the recipe and your hilarious tit bits. I enjoyed them all. My best to Max and wish you a great weekend!

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    • Thanks, Liz. Mine is a 6 qt slow cooker and the goat shoulder fit in easily. It was only about 4 lbs and I had the butcher chop it at the shank, otherwise it would have been far too long for anything but a sheet pan. (I’ve visions of a goat’s foot sticking out of my oven.) Once “trimmed”, it easily fit into the slow-cooker and the recipe was a new one for me — but a very good one. My cooker is pretty new and I rarely use it, compared to the its predecessor. I was working then and it was great to fill it before work and come home to dinner. Now, I fill it in the morning and pretty much smell it cooking all day long. Depending upon what I’m cooking, it can drive me crazy. 🙂
      I hope you and your family are having a wonderful Thanksgiving Holiday Weekend, Liz.

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      • Mmm… 6 qt is large, mine is large too, probably the same size as yours. I love the smell of food cooking, but smelling it the whole day, might not be very interesting. We had a wonderful Thanksgiving and now it’s back to school tomorrow. Wish you a wonderful week , John. Hugs to Max!

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  55. I can always count on you to tempt me with a dish like this! I’ve never ever tasted goat.. I’ll be back in a second..I’m back:D Well, that google is an amazing thing, I was going to tell you we don’t have goat meat here, but I just “googled” it and I was surprised to find out Chinook Edge at the Farmer’s Market carries it! Go figure, I think I’ve just never looked for it. What does it taste like? Is it similar to lamb? I can just imagine the seasonings as you sauteed them must have made your kitchen smell just terrific! Nice to have you back, say hello back to Zia:) xx

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    • Hello, Barb. Having just found a goat source, you fully understand how surprised I was when I found mine a half-mile away. Since then, I’ve found a number of others, all within 2 miles. I’m going to take a morning and explore them all. What did we do before Google? Many claim goat tastes like lamb and the older it gets, the more mutton-like the taste becomes. I didn’t notice that at all with this piece. Maybe because it was so young or due to the harissa but I found the meat to taste closer to beef or pork. Next time I go home, I’m bringing another shoulder with me to learn how my family cooked it back in the day. I’ve a feeling I’ll have a better idea of its taste after that meal, as well as another recipe to share. I’ll be talking to Zia later today, Sunday, and will be sure to pass along your greetings. I hope you all are having a very happy Thanksgiving weekend, Barb.

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  56. I can’t wait for your quail recipe and if you know a good place to get quail, I’m all ears. It’s one thing that we’ve tried to find without success and I do enjoy it so much. And I’m definitely going to have to get down by you soon. You have so many wonderful stores nearby. I’d either be in heaven or on total stimulation overload. 🙂 While you know I’m not a big fan of lamb or goat, I bet the boys here would be thrilled to bits with your recipe. 🙂

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    • Hey, Kristy. Though I enjoyed the goat dinner, the sandwiches that followed were really good. Next time I may forgo the dinner and just make sandwiches as if it were pulled pork. I bought the quail at Caputo’s. They’re frozen and can be found near the duck and rabbit. Quail wasn’t something we normally served but I’ll talk about that in the post. Stay tuned …

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  57. I’m curious to try goat at home sometime and this looks like a great recipe. I’ve been exploring some Middle Eastern food this year, but am not familiar with harissa yet. Love how there’s always something to learn in cooking, and generous people like you willing to teach!

    Like

    • Thanks, Mar, but I’ve little experience with harissa, too. Although I’ve had it served to me in dishes at restaurants, I’ve never cooked with it. I really enjoyed this goat, though, and have since used it with chicken a couple of times. Next step is to learn to make it myself.
      By the way, sorry for the delay in answering your comment. I’m a bit behind but catching up — I hope! 😉

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  58. Pingback: A Shout Out Sunday, Award Season & St. Patrick’s Day | feasting with friends

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  60. Pingback: Bartolini Roast Goat | from the Bartolini kitchens

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