Try This One For Thighs

Coscie di Pollo con Harissa

Harissa Thighs 1Little did I know when I used harissa to braise goat last October that I would become obsessed with the spicy sauce. Initially, I bought harissa from a Middle Eastern bakery that prepares the sauce on-site and provides it to a number of restaurants here in Chicago. Celia, though, suggested I make my own. Now, if you’ve been to her amazing blog, Fig Jam and Lime Cordial, you know that Celia makes just about everything and does so with a deft hand. Still, I was hesitant.

The truth is that many recipes say to use red or green chiles. Well, being a chile neophyte, I never know which ones to use and it’s not like there’s a big selection here. Then I came upon Mimi’s harissa recipe. (Take some time to get to know her blog, the Chef Mimi Blog, too, for some incredibly delicious recipes.) Her recipe took a different tack and I decided to give it a try.

Well, as luck would have it, when I went shopping for ingredients, there they were, a large display of red Fresno peppers. I bought a dozen, deciding I would take inspiration from both of their recipes, and since that afternoon, I’ve made several batches of harissa.

Over time, I’ve adjusted the spice mix to get to a flavor profile I prefer and now I’m working on the heat level. Right now, this sauce has a nice even heat when raw — there’s a roasted vegetable salad post in the works — but it dissipates a bit when cooked. Those with a higher tolerance for chiles may wish to include the peppers’ ribs and seeds, or, add another Habanero to the recipe below.

Like my harissa sauce, today’s chicken recipe is a work in progress, although I have prepared it in much the same manner 4 or 5 times now. In some ways, it reminds me of a cacciatore with a North African twist. I think you’ll find the recipe easy enough to follow without experiencing any problems.

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Chicken Thighs with Harissa

Ingredients

  • 4 chicken thighs with skin and bones
  • 3 tbsp harissa sauce – recipe follows
  • 1/2 c chicken stock
  • 1/4 tsp cinnamon
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 onion, sliced
  • 1 orange bell pepper/capsicum, sliced
  • 3 cloves garlic, sliced
  • 2 sprigs fresh rosemary
  • about 12 oz (340 g) olive salad (See Notes)
  • 12 cherry tomatoes
  • 1/2 preserved lemon, chopped
  • salt & pepper
  • lemon zest
  • mint leaves for garnish – optional

Directions

  1. Combine harissa, cinnamon, and chicken stock in a small bowl and set aside.
  2. Heat olive oil in a large frying pan with a cover over med-high heat.
  3. Season chicken thighs with salt and pepper and add to frying pan, skin-side down. Sauté until brown, 6 to 8 minutes, before turning over and browning the other side. Remove thighs from the pan.
  4. Remove all but 2 tbsp of fat from the pan. Add onions and peppers to the pan and sauté until onions are translucent, about 8 minutes. Add garlic for the final minute.
  5. Add olive salad and harissa sauce mix, stir, and heat through.
  6. Add thighs back to the pan, skin-side down, before adding the cherry tomatoes and preserved lemon. Cover the pan and reduce heat to medium.
  7. After 15 minutes, turn over the thighs so that they’re skin-side up. Do not cover the pan, giving the sauce a chance to thicken while the chicken finishes cooking.
  8. After the thighs have cooked for a total of 30 minutes, insert an instant read thermometer into the thickest part of the largest thigh. When the temperature reaches 165˚ F (75˚ C) the thighs are done.
  9. Remove to serving platter, sprinkle with lemon zest, and garnish with torn mint leaves, if desired.
  10. Serve immediately.

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Harissa Thighs 7

Someone forgot the mint leaves.

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Notes

I prefer to use a variety of olives here. Most of the groceries in this area offer olive salads, some even have more than 1 type. When they’re available, I’ll use the Mediterranean or Spanish olive salad. In today’s recipe, I combined both. Use whatever combination of olives you prefer and that are available. Use as little or as much as you like.

The chicken was served over tri-color “pearl” couscous that had been tossed with chopped scallions (spring onions) and sun-dried tomatoes.

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Homemade Harissa*     *     *

Harissa Recipe

yield: 2 cups

Ingredients

  • 12 Fresno peppers, seeds removed
  • 3 whole roasted red peppers — well-drained if store-bought
  • 1 Habanero chile, seeds removed
  • 2 tsp caraway seeds
  • 1 tbsp whole cumin seed
  • 1 tbsp whole coriander seed
  • 2 tsp paprika
  • 1/2 tsp kosher salt
  • 1 tbsp tomato paste
  • 10 garlic cloves, smashed
  • 30 mint leaves, more or less to taste
  • 1/4 c extra virgin olive oil
  • water

Directions

  1. Place cumin seeds in a small frying pan over med-high heat. Keep the pan moving and toast the seeds until uniformly brown and fragrant — no more than 2 minutes. Immediately remove from pan and reserve.  Repeat with coriander seeds and then the caraway. Once all are cool, place in spice mill or mortar and grind. (See Notes)
  2. Place the ground spices. Habanero and Fresno chiles, paprika, and salt into the bowl of a food processor and run until a thick paste has formed.
  3. Add the mint leaves and pulse the contents until mixed.
  4. Add the oil and process. If you prefer your harissa sauce to be thinner, add water until it reaches the consistency you like.
  5. Harissa is ready to use as-is, though it will be better after a few days, once the flavors have a chance to blend a bit.

Refrigerate in an airtight container. Celia recommends adding a thin coat of olive oil before storing. Harissa should be used within a couple of weeks.

With special thanks to Celia, Fig Jam and Lime Cordial, and Mimi, Chef Mimi Blog

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Notes

It is best to toast seeds of varying sizes separately. When toasted together, the smallest seeds will likely burn while you wait for the larger ones to toast.

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It’s déjà vu all over again …

Swordfish 1Today’s blast from the past, swordfish served with salsa verde, carries with it a message. See those grill marks, Old Man Winter? We want to start grilling but can’t so long as you stick around. Take the hint, vacate the North, and head to the Southern Hemisphere, where they eagerly await your cooler temps and much-needed rain. The rest of you can click HERE to learn how to prepare this dish.

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Coming soon to a monitor near you …

Pasta e Fagioli 2Pasta and Beans

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119 thoughts on “Try This One For Thighs

    • Thanks, Sam. I’m lucky to be able to get a good mix of olives at the stores. Not only do they look good, they each bring a different flavor to the dish.
      I’ve not seen posts from you for some time now. I’m going to check to see if I’m still subscribed. WP sometimes unsubscribes blogs and I’ve yet to figure out how or why.

      Like

    • I wish, Mandy! Remember, I only post 1 recipe each week. Of the 6 remaining suppers, there’s one obligatory pasta dinner and the rest are, by any standard, pedestrian. Of course, when you visit I’ll up my game. 🙂

      Like

  1. Fun to see you’re also posting recipes with chile peppers now, John. And a nice one. Good tip to toast the seeds seperately; I toast them in the oven and will pay more attention next time whether smaller and larger seeds end up being toasted to a similar degree.

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    • Thanks, Stefan. I really am a neophyte when it comes to chiles and I’ve a palate to match. As a result, I proceed very slowly. My tolerance is improving but still has quite a way to go. As for toasting the seeds, I’ve stopped using the oven because I’ve forgotten about them too many times. I think the chances of burning them is greater on the stove top where the heat is more direct. It will be interesting to see if you notice whether different sized seeds toast at different rates in the oven.

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  2. This looks really lovely John, and I love harissa! I cooked a meal with chicken thighs tonight that’s similar (okay, not actually similar) as I didn’t use harissa or capsicum but it was called ‘Tuscan Chicken’ and as I was making it I was wondering if it was ever a recipe the two-flat might have cooked! I’ll try this version next time! xx

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    • Thanks, Charlie. Your comment has me smiling. I’m sure your Tuscan Chicken was fantastic. I’ve seen too many of your recipes to think otherwise. I will say, that when chicken was cooked in our house, it was usually done with rosemary, garlic, and olive oil. Mom did make her “Crazy Gravy” occasionally and I’ve not thought about that in some time. I should post it, if for no other reason than to give my siblings a smile. Have a great week!

      Like

    • Thank you, Silva. Our countries are different in that way. Here, we have so many different ethnic groups and each brings their cuisine with them. One’s diet can be as varied as one likes. Even so, my preference will always be for Italian dishes. 🙂

      Like

    • Thanks, Tish, for the compliments and for the drink tip. I love a spicy Bloody Mary and the idea of using a bit of harissa sounds great! This I will most definitely try!

      Like

  3. Your title made me laugh out loud, which is saying something on a grey, grim, overcast Wednesday morning deep in the English countryside. Harissa’s a vital ingredient in our house too – it’s so versatile. Lovely recipe, thanks.

    Like

    • I am so glad you enjoyed the post. Though the sun is shining brightly here, we will barely reach the freezing point today. Will Winter ever leave?
      Thank you for the visit and for taking the time to comment. Hope your weather improves. 🙂

      Like

    • Thanks, Maureen. I hope this one doesn’t disappoint. I’m very pleased with it. Please let me know what you think, as well as any changes you might make. I’m all for trying something different.

      Like

  4. Such a colorful and beautiful dish, the tri-color couscous makes it even more photogenic! I’ve been so fearful of making my own Harissa, or rather making it too hot to eat. With your recipe, I’m thinking I should give it a try! Thanks also for the tip on toasting whole seeds…seeing the “size” comment in print makes so much sense! Thanks for sharing yet another delicious recipe John 😀

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    • Hello, Nancy! I think you’ll find this harissa isn’t too hot to handle. When used raw, the heat builds a bit but never to the point of ruining your palate. When cooked, the heat really does dissipate. The flavor, though, remains. With your skill in the kitchen, I’m sure you’ll come up with your own version of harissa, one perfectly suited to your tastes. Good luck!

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  5. Definitely a mouth-watering, colorful dish, John. I can’t wait to try it. I have the recipe to make the chicken, except the seeds for making the harissa sauce. I will buy them tonight. Thanks for sharing the recipe of this beautiful dish, John. It looks so delicious! Have a lovely spring. 🙂

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    • Thank you, Anna, for leaving such nice compliments. This really is a flavorful dish. Do try to get a mix of olives. They add a variety of flavors and they look good on the plate, as well. I’m looking forward to hearing what you think of the dish, Anna. Good luck!

      Like

      • The pleasure is all mine, John. I am so thankful for Wegman’s nearby. They have all kinds of olives in their salad bar. I don’t need to buy bottles of different olives. I can just go to Wegman’s and choose right from their salad bar for less price. I agree with you, olives add a variety of flavors. I love adding them to the dish I used to make and it was awesome! I will definitely give you a feedback once I make it, John. Thanks. Have a great afternoon. 🙂

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        • Well, it was a disappointing trip to the grocery stores (tried specialty and local stores). I could only find cumin seeds. I’m missing two ( caraway and coriander) They only have them in powdered form. 😦 I was so looking forward to make this dish for dinner tonight. I’ll try again tomorrow. Have a great weekend, John 🙂

          Like

          • That is disappointing, Anna. I use whole seeds so that I can toast them. If you look at Celia’s recipe — the link is at the end of my recipe — she uses the powders and you can use her amounts instead of trying to convert seeds to powder. Hope this helps. Good luck!

            Like

          • It would have been nice if I can try yours instead, but if I can’t find them, then I’ll use hers. Thanks, John for your prompt reply. Have a great evening. 🙂

            Like

  6. I haven’t tried harissa nor have I found tri-colored pasta pearls before — now I must have both! This looks and sounds delicious and I always like introducing a new flavor profile to our dinner rotation to keep things interesting.

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    • Thanks, Judy. Funny you mention adding new flavor profiles because that is exactly what I thought when I first used harissa. It is unlike anything that we ever cooked and the aroma, especially with cinnamon added while cooking, is completely new for me. I love it and have a couple more recipes using harissa in the works. i hope you have a fantastic week, Judy.

      Like

  7. Spectacular dish, Jonh! I love everything about it and, even if it’s only 9am, if I close my eyes, I can smell the aromas. I love harissa. I discovered it a couple of years ago and I fell in love with it. It gives such a nice touch!

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    • Thanks, Francesca. Compared to me, you’re an old pro with harissa. I just “discovered” it last Fall. And you’re so right about the aroma. This dish uses a bit of cinnamon and the fragrance of the cinnamon-laced harissa fills the kitchen. I was in heaven. 🙂

      Like

  8. Oh, I love, love LOVE harissa and remember that post by Celia, that woman rocks and rolls… one of my favorite spots in the blogosphere, as you probably know

    (I had a giggle with the “someone forgot the mint” – I do this ALL THE TIME)

    great minds forget alike, my friend….

    Like

    • Thanks, Sally. isn’t Celia a marvel? She’s so talented and giving, sharing every tip, trick, and recipe in her repertoire. Without her encouragement, I never would have thought to make my own. Now, I really am obsessed with it. I just used it to make a roasted vegetable salad last night. That’s another work in progress.
      I cannot tell you how many times I’ve forgotten to garnish a plate before snapping pics. It’s ridiculous! 🙂

      Like

    • Humble? It may be heresy to say but I very much prefer them over chicken breasts, which I find relatively bland and dry. Thighs work perfectly here, flavoring the dish while absorbing the harissa. Perfect!
      Thank you for visiting, Marlene, and for taking the time to comment.

      Like

      • It’s occurred to me, John, that I should have said, ‘It’s me, Musing Mar!” Yes, I’ve finally put my name on my gravatar, and that picture of apples has been replaced by my smiling, if rather flushed looking, face. (I keep meaning to get some professional head shots done, but that’s near the bottom of a very long list.) Really, how could you have known?

        Like

  9. I’ve heard of harissa (I’m such a rube in the kitchen), but didn’t know what was in it. Great post to educate. I love someone’s comment above describing it in a Bloody Mary and being sort of like rocket fuel 🙂 Maybe I’ll just have a Virgin Mary this morning and think about it.

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    • Add a little vodka and I’ll be right over. 🙂
      I just “discovered” harissa last Fall, Angeline, and like I said in the post, I’ve become obsessed with it. In your area, you should have no problem finding whatever chiles you wish to use so you can really tailor the heat level. I pretty much am stuck with just a few varieties, though things may change once Summer gets here. I should add, if it ever gets here. 🙂

      Like

  10. This certainly makes a beautifully colored plate of food, John, even without the mint leaf garnish. I’ve not seen tri-colored pearl couscous here thus far, but will look for it as it adds so much pop to a dish. And finally, a harissa recipe…I’m so excited. Thank you for sharing this wonderful looking dish! I know it must taste as good as it looks.

    Like

    • Thank you so much, Betsy, for the nice compliments. This is one flavorful dish and unlike the flavor profiles to which I’m accustomed. This is the kind of dish I order in Middle Eastern restaurants and it sure smells like it. Although I’ve seen tri-color couscous before, pearl-sized was new to me, too. They sure did work good here. Now, if I could only remember where I bought them. My neighborhood grocery closed recently, so, I’ve been hitting the others trying to find one to call “home”. I’ve no idea where half of my groceries were bought. 🙂

      Like

  11. Harissa is such a terrific condiment, isn’t it? I love the stuff! Being lazy, I often buy it (I have access to an excellent brand) but I really should make my own. I like the idea of adding mint leaves — that’s an interesting twist. And I love this chicken dish, too! Who doesn’t need more recipes for chicken? And it’s so nice to see a recipe featuring thighs — their flavor is so much better than the more trendy breast. Most of the supermarkets I visit have olive “bars” with a dozen or so varieties of olives on offer, so you can mix and match to create your own assortment. And I agree that an assortment is always better than going with just one variety! Fun recipe — thanks.

    Like

    • It sure is, John, and I know what you mean about buying it. The sauce I once bought was very good and a bargain, too. I never thought I’d make my own. Now that I have, though, I’ll never buy it again. I played around with the spices and came up with a sauce that I really enjoy, With your skill in the kitchen, I’m sure you’d come up with a fantastic harissa, no doubt about it. Just post the recipe. 🙂
      Thanks, John, for always stopping by and commenting.

      Like

  12. Lovely mix of seasonings and textures. I too love to serve such dishes on Israeli couscous. It absorbs the sauce and still keeps its shape.
    The Harissa I know doesn’t have fresh mint in it, but now that I’m reading this I’m thinking – why not?! I’ll try it next time I’m making a batch. 🙂

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    • Thank you so much, Ronit. This was the first time I’ve seen and used “pearl” couscous. I was looking for Israeli couscous when I saw this. It’s a bit smaller than the Israeli. I just wish I could remember where I bought it.
      Adding mint to harissa is Celia’s innovation. I like it, as well as Mimi’s addition of roasted peppers. Both add a little something to the final sauce. I hope you do try it and enjoy it as much as I do. 🙂

      Like

    • Thank you, Mary Frances. Making it for the first time was an eye opener. It’s not at all difficult to prepare and it’s nice to play with the ingredients to get a sauce more tailored to my own preferences. The mint is Celia’s idea and is it ever a good one. 🙂

      Like

  13. A great looking meal John and I’m with you on the chiles…they scare me so you are ahead of me in the experimentation department. Of course Celia does an incredible job with everything and I’ve found her advice to be very helpful.
    Swordfish on the grill? I’d love to also be out there grilling but I think my grill just blew into the next town! Oh we’ll, soon, very soon.

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  14. John, you are SO nice, thank you for your very kind words. Your harissa sounds amazing – love the idea of adding a little tomato paste, and I’m amazed at the habanero – I find them so hot that I can’t be in the same room as them! 🙂 Your finished dish looks better than most dishes at upmarket restaurants, even without the mint! And I love the pearl couscous you’ve served it on! xxx

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  15. Love all the flavors in this. Now though, I see I’m going to have to up my game and make some harissa! Mint and cinnamon and chilies.and preserved lemons. I’m trying to figure out what this dish doesn’t have! You have me drooling!

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  16. Came from Celi’s smiling, now I am smiling bigtime here!! OK, the title and that you have travelled south from Italy to Northern Africa [yes, I agree with the statement that this ‘feels’ Tunisian] and I know I’ll follow your recipe to the n-th degree . . . and I have had a tendency to buy my harissa too and yes, I also try to live by Celia’s word!! Hmmph ~ we only live about 90 kms apart . . . . one of these days I shall go fridge raiding in her kitchen!! Thanks heaps!!!!!

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  17. I didn’t know harissa was so straightforward to prepare. The spice combination sounds like something we would really enjoy. Will have to try it one day soon.

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  18. The “Someone forgot the mint leaves” image looks like a beautiful painting. I love the colours. I too smiled at the post title but I’m so-so about thighs. The closest I’ve been happy with are thighs on the bone cooked in the tagine. I may have to revisit thighs in light of this. And I do love olive salad, why have only one sort of olive? The more the merrier 🙂

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  19. THANK YOU for honouring the humble chicken thigh. I cook with chicken thighs A LOT because I love the more flavourful meat. (I’m not one who cares about fat content – it’s all about taste!) So many recipes call for chicken breast, which is not a big deal to substitute, but chicken thighs are often treated like second-class meat. Which it isn’t.

    (Sorry, didn’t mean to start ranting.)

    Anyway, this looks superb! Thanks for the tip re: toasting the seeds separately. I can just about taste this now…

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  20. I am obsessed with harissa too. Ever since I tried it last year, I’ve been hooked. This last time I made my harissa with fresnos too and left out the chile arbol. But I really liked my harissa from last summer when I used the Jimmy Nardellos. Those chillies made such a great harissa.
    Harissa chicken is one of my favourites. Roasted, baked or like this wonderful tagine. This looks perfect John! Olives and preserved lemons…wonderful! I have some lemons “preserving” as we speak; they’ll be ready in a couple of weeks. I can’t wait to try all these great dishes.

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  21. I am in love with this dish!!! I cook chicken thighs all of the time so I get excited when I see new recipes like this that are bursting with flavor. Harissa and preserved lemons in a chicken sauce – I’m in heaven!!!! Thanks John!

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  22. I’ve been away too long.. and am so pleased to see the ingredients you’re using here. I’ve got a little jar of Harissa that’s waiting to be used up. I make so many of the same chicken thigh recipes over and over I’m quite tired of them. Your recipe is so fragrant with cinnamon and harissa.. and then I see you’ve got preserved lemon as well which is the perfect addition. You’re really becoming such a talented chef, John.. Like we’ve said a million times before (well maybe not a million) I’d do a trade but I’d rather bring the cake and have a big feast:D

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  23. This is an ambitious dish, John. I love harissa most of the time, although I’ve found at times it can be a little too hot for me. Maybe if I made it from the ground up, I might gain the ability to control that heat. I think you’re probably the one who previously introduced me to both Celia and Mimi and between the three of you, I feel very challenged as a cook, but it’s fun to expand my repertoire. Both chiles and olives are plentiful here in Southern California and I’d really enjoy creating something different with them. Such a colorful dish, too! 🙂

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  24. Pingback: Try This One For Thighs | Foods of the World | ...

  25. I can see how much time and effort you spent perfecting this recipe, John. It looks delicious. The chiles, seeds, harissa and chicken all make for one great dish. I like the different textures, too! You have become quite the kitchen adventurer. Have a lovely, yummy week. Best, Shanna

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  26. Good evening John, excellent that you have been discovering your own Harissa recipe – I read your ingredients with interest as the one I use is very basic, and I do mean VERY basic – the biggest difference though is that I’ve always used the dried red chillies (I pick them up in Asian / Indian stores) and they are soaked a little before whizzing so I’m wondering how the fresh chilli flavour works…..

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  27. Great recipes, John. I haven’t tried Mimi’s harissa recipe, but I’ll put it on the list. Braising chickens with it doesn’t strike me as strange–after all, what’s a tagine but a braise, especially with ingredients like preserved lemon and olives. You know, when we were in Puglia a couple of years ago, I wondered why there weren’t local recipes with preserved lemon. It’s only a hop, skip and a jump to North Africa and a lot of the cooking maps over each others ingredients nicely. As you’ve shown with this post. Thanks. Ken

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  28. Bonjourno John! Good for you for stepping out of your comfort level and trying something new and fun. I know this is something my boys would love as they love the heat in their dishes. Do you think the mint in the sauce balances the hot and cool a bit? I love when you try recipes as this give me an incentive to give something new and fun and on my way over to our dear friends Mimi’s blog too. Actually my favorite photo is your last one and pinning that one for later… Have a super weekend. BAM

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  29. Ciao John! your yummy meal looks like some I had in Morocco and Tunisia where harissa is used in almost all courses… 🙂 in France, all harissa comes from North Africa, supposed to be THE best one! 🙂 bon appétit and good night! 🙂

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  30. Oh man John. I love it when I can literally taste all the flavors of a dish from an image and my senses are on overload right now…even if it is a work in progress. In fact I’d eat this chicken right now for my breakfast, have a glass of wine, call it a complete day, and head off to bed. 🙂

    Liz and I love harissa as well, but haven’t made any since we had our garden in Salt Lake City. Her recipe (http://craftyglutton.wordpress.com/2011/07/04/crafty-harissa/) is very similar to the one you posted and I remember countless times of fiery pleasure from it.

    Cheers and have a great weekend my friend!

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  31. Pasta Cacciatore with a North African Twist – a great fusion of foods and cultures! I think the thighs are the best part of the chicken and I love that you made your own harissa – well done! I have only ever bought shop made 😦 Sorry it took me so long to get here – laptop problems this week but hopefully they’re pretty much sorted now. Big hug to you from the mountains of Andalucia 🙂

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  32. John that is exactly the style of food I love, the chicken dish sounds delicious. I don’t know what variety of chillies we have here. There is usually only one variety available – long and skinny 🙂

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  33. Buongiorno John,
    non conosco questa ricetta, che sarò molto curiosa di esperimentare, sono certa che sarà molto gustosa perché tu hai grande arte nel cucinare!
    faccio in fretta copiare, che devo cercare gli ingredienti
    Grazieeeeeeeeeeeeeeee, e un sabato felice dalla bella Pisa

    Good Morning John,
    I know this recipe, I’ll be very curious to experience, I am sure it will be very nice because you have great art in cooking!
    can I quickly copy, which I must try the ingredients
    Grazieeeeeeeeeeeeeeee, and a happy Saturday from Pisa

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    • It’s the best, Mimi. I cannot get enough of the stuff. I really like your addition of roasted peppers and a bit of tomato paste. The sauce is more flavorful and has a better consistency, as a result. I’ve given it to friends and all love it, too. 🙂

      Like

  34. I too have been a little hesitant with the chili peppers. Since it is not native in Finland and the traditional cuisine does not include them in any way, our selection at the grocery is quite limited at times. I personally like spicy sauces but have very little experience with them. (Some of our children are not such fans of extra spicy food) Every once in a while I will purchase some to experiment with…but you have (and Celia and Mimi as well) have inspired me. I will try to find some suitable chilis that next time I go shopping!

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  35. There s nothing like a good harissa . Its a very helpful condiment to have in the fridge at all times.I like to put a bit of tomato paste in mine too. You have cooked that chicken so perfectly

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  36. I need a good harissa recipe. Now I have a good harissa recipe! The cinnamon surprised me. Don’t know why. All I know is this comforts (which a Minnesota snowy April requires) and delivers with some nice warming flavors.

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    • I love the touch of cinnamon. It gives the sauce a wonderful aroma and reminds me of a favorite restaurant. If you cook with this sauce, the spiciness will dissipate a bit. If you have a high tolerance for spicy foods, you may want to use whole peppers and not get rid of their seeds and ribs.
      Thanks for the visit and for taking the time to comment.

      Like

    • I’m so glad to read that you both enjoyed the recipe, Tish. I think it has such a wonderful mix of flavors and the aroma is something else. Thanks for coming back to let me know that you liked it.

      Like

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  40. And here is your harissa sauce recipe! This does sound very good. I have no doubts I will love this. Looking forward to playing with it. I know Mike and Mr. N will enjoy it too. Miss A is a tough customer these days, but she usually finds something to eat. 😉

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    • What I like about this harissa, Kristy, is that you can adjust the heat level to suit your palate. Mine has a little kick but nothing like some I’ve heard about. It can be pretty intense and that’s not for me. Let’s hope Miss A is only going through a phase. She’s too involved in your kitchen exploits to get finicky now. Fingers crossed. 🙂

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  41. Pingback: harissa potatoes | COTTAGE GROVE HOUSE

    • You’re welcome, Cheri. I’ve no idea how spicy you like things. Remember you can lower the heat by removing the seeds and ribs from the chiles, and, the reverse is true if you want more heat.
      Thanks for the visit and for taking the time to comment.

      Like

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