Salted Cod Salad

Insalata del Baccalà For some, the timing of today’s post may seem rather odd. A salted cod salad is very often served in Italian households as part of the Feast of the Seven Fishes on Christmas Eve — but not in our house. We Bartolini prepared this salad virtually any time throughout the year except during the holidays. On Christmas Eve, we served our salted cod stewed in tomato sauce, baccalà in umido. Frankly, I prefer it this way, with a stew served in Winter and a salad served in the warmer months.

This is the third recipe I’ve shared that features salted cod. The first, Baccalà alla Marchigiana, is the stew that we served on Christmas Eve. In the second post, the cod was barbecued, although the same preparation could be used to bake the fish. Today’s recipe is a salad and a snap to make, once you’ve re-hydrated and rinsed the cod.

Briefly, in the days long before refrigeration, cod was dried and salted as a means of preservation. To make it suitable for cooking, the cod must be soaked in cold water for at least one day and no more than three. During that time, the water should be changed three times daily. The longer the soak, the less salty the taste. It is up to you to decide what level of salinity is acceptable.

With the cod re-hydrated, the dish, like most green salads, is really quite simple to prepare. Though the ingredients may have varied from one salad to the next, we always dressed our salad with a bit of red wine vinegar and olive oil. You, like many, may prefer to use lemon juice in place of the vinegar. Even so, with absolutely no cooking involved, you can easily see how this salad would make a perfect meal during Summer’s dog days.

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Salted Cod Salad Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1lb (455 g) of baccalà (See Variations)
  • pickled bell peppers, chopped (See Notes)
  • 1/2 yellow bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 celery stalk, chopped
  • red onion chopped
  • nonpareil capers, rinsed
  • Kalamata olives, halved
  • 1/4 cup fresh parsley, chopped
  • extra virgin olive oil
  • red wine vinegar — lemon juice may be substituted
  • salt & pepper, to taste

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Directions

  1. To ready the baccalà: Place the fish in an oblong glass dish or pan. Add enough water to cover, dump the water, and repeat a few times. Add enough water to cover and set aside. Change the water 3 times daily for at least 1 day and no more than 3. When ready, the cod will be considerably thicker than when your started and will taste far less salty. (See Notes)
  2. Remove any bones and skin before proceeding,
  3. Bring a large pot of water to the boil.
  4. Meanwhile, cut the re-hydrated baccalà into chunks from 3 to 4 inches apiece.
  5. When the water is boiling hard, add the baccalà and, when the water returns to the boil, reduce the heat to a soft simmer.
  6. Simmer until the baccalà can be easily flaked, usually about 5 to 8 minutes.
  7. Using a slotted spoon or small strainer, remove the baccalà from the water and set aside.
  8. Once cool, carefully flake baccalà and place in another bowl.
  9. To that bowl, add the peppers, celery, onion, capers, olives, and parsley. Gently toss the ingredients until combined.
  10. Add enough of the olive oil to lightly coat the salad, followed by the vinegar/lemon juice to taste. Season with pepper but be sure to taste before adding any salt.
  11. If not to be served immediately, cover and refrigerate until you’re ready to do so.

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Variations

This recipe used raw salted cod, baccalà, to make the salad. The salad could also be made using left-over baked, broiled, or grilled baccalà, as well. When using left-over cod, there’s no need to boil or cut it up into chunks. Skip those steps and start flaking the pieces.

You can vary the salad ingredients to suit your own tastes. Carrots, shallots, garlic, etc., can be added or used to substitute for any of the ingredients listed.

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Notes

You’ll note that I used bell peppers twice in this recipe. The first were miniatures, “Tulip Bells”, that I pickled last August. They added color and a vinegar element. The yellow bell was added for both color and crunch. Neither pepper brings any heat to the salad. If you like, you can add cherry bomb peppers, jalapeños, or Serranos, raw or pickled, to kick up the heat.

One sure way to know whether the baccalà is ready to be cooked is to taste a very small piece of it, once it seems fully hydrated. If it is still too salty, keep soaking the fish until it reaches the level of salinity that you prefer, bearing in mind that it will be boiled once it passes your inspection.

Do not add any salt to the dish until the very end.

This salad will keep for 2 days if refrigerated, though we’ve rarely had left-overs.

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It’s déjà vu all over again …

Today’s post featured a recipe tailor-made for Summer’s hottest days, when we’re all loathe to turn on the stove. The same can be said for today’s blast from the past. Two years ago I shared a recipe for a couscous salad that requires not one bit of cooking. Just put the ingredients in a bowl, give them a toss, and set your salad in the fridge while you sip Long Island iced tea on the patio. A few hours later you’ll have a tasty salad for lunch or dinner without ever touching a pot or pan. You can see how it’s prepared by clicking HERE.

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Coming soon to a monitor near you …

Pickles

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147 thoughts on “Salted Cod Salad

  1. Hello, John! Do SO hope you had a really good time! And God bless to Zia!!! [Max; did he behave 🙂 ?!] Trust me to be amongst the first and not the last!! And with a recipe of baccalo provided . . . Actually your recipe includes everything at home, so I faithfully P’WOMISE to try it again and I shall let you know!! Hmm, pickles next . . . shall be delighted to follow the route . . . 😉 !

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    • Howdy, Eha! I had a wonderful visit home and Max was as well-behaved as he’s ever been. My Cousin came up for a few days and Max worships him. The two were inseparable and disappeared a couple times each day going for long walks. I brought home one very tired dog. 🙂
      If you like salted cod, baccalà, you’ll enjoy this salad.

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      • Hmm, [well, not usually quite ‘my thing’!] But, ’cause it’s you, shall try again and may change my mind 🙂 . No, it was just that [laughter!] you almost offered to ‘pass him over’ for the summer on another post . . . methinks I kind’of wondered . . . [sorry and pat, Max: big pat !!!] . . . Still think the pickles may just pip the bacalao . . .

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  2. A very good salad indeed. Having Portuguese blood, I’m no stranger to salt cod recipes. I just never make them myself. We have a great deal of salt cod in the fishmongers in this part of France, so I really must start. I’ll check out your recipe for salt cod in tomato sauce for the wintry months to come.

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  3. Huge amounts of deliciousness in this cod salad John! I’m glad that the Bartolini clan don’t just wait for the once-a-year Christmas occasion to enjoy it 🙂 I adore raw cod. I still imagine eating my first plate of ceviche in Spain a few years ago… mmm, so delicious. I’d love to try this version. Bookmarked for when the weather warms up a bit (still winter here. I’m craving sunshine and cold salads!)

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    • Thanks, Laura. Just to be clear, this cod isn’t raw. It’s salted and dried before purchase. Once bought, you must soak it to get rid of the salt and to re-hydrate it. After that, it must be cooked. I bet cod ceviche is delicious but it’s a different preparation altogether. Even so, this is a great salad and perfect for summer, no matter the hemisphere. 😉
      Now you’ve got me wondering where I might find cod ceviche. Hmmm …

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  4. Hope you had a great trip John!! We’ve missed you! A great salad to get back into the groove with, but I still need to find some place where I can get the baccala. I really like all the pickly things in there. Can’t wait to see your pickling post. I just did my first lacto fermentation pickles, the cucumbers came out delicious.

    Nazneen

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    • Thanks, Nazneen, it was a wonderful visit home. Zia is already asking when I’ll return. Try looking for baccalà at Italian or Latino markets. Most will carry it around Christmas. I’m lucky that my 2 stores carry it year-round. I had to google lacto fermentation. What an interesting process. I hope you’ll blog of your experiences. I’m very interested. You’ve taught me something today. Thank you.

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    • You’re very welcome. I’m lucky that 2 of my favorite groceries keep it in stock year-round. I now make it for myself far more than I ever did and this salad is perfect for Summer. I hope you’ll enjoy it, too.

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  5. That sounds perfect for summer to me! I’ll be visiting the Brandada (and salt cod) Lady in Barcelona soon. It’s a joy to buy her salt cod as she’s pre soaked it and it’s ready to eat 😉

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    • Thanks, MD. If I could buy baccalà pre-soaked, I’d have it far more often than I do. I know you can buy it like that in Italy and maybe in NYC or Boston. Here, though, there just isn’t enough demand to warrant keeping it soaked. Besides, at Christmas, where would they put the eel?

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      • That’s the same here in London and in reality, the fact that it can be dried, kept for months and refreshed is a miracle. I’m very tempted to buy a postcard sized piece, stick a stamp and address on it and send it somewhere by post – I bet it would stand up to it. Maybe I could send myself a piece from Spain later in the month 😉

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  6. OH MY! This looks so wonderful!! I know, salted fish tastes so good! In India, it was very popular around 1945, as my father says. I loved this recipe. I never knew that the salt water needs to be changed thrice and it should not be kept in salt water for more than three days. Thanks for this KEEPER recipe, John! Those jars of salted fish make me crave for them right now!

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    • I’m so glad you liked the post. I’d no idea that it was known in India. I learn something new here every day. Although my family never needed to soak it longer than 3 days — 2 is usually enough for us — I’ve seen warnings that soaking it for too long will cause it to disintegrate, while changing the water 3 times daily will speed along the process. I hope you do give this recipe a try and enjoy it as much as we all do.

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  7. This is a perfect salad for a summer day. I have been eating a lot of salads lately and can’t wait to prepare this one. Looking forward to see the pickles.

    BE ENCOURAGED! BE BLESSED!

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  8. Welcome back, am sure you had a grand trip.
    Love this salad. In my area, I see baccalà only during December. I should experiment with freezing so I can enjoy throughout the year. Soaked and cooked then freeze would be my preference, but that all depends on taste and texture after freezing and thawing. My guess is the quality would be best frozen as is from the store, then soak and prepare as needed.

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    • Thanks, Norma, for the welcome. I’m not so sure about freezing baccalà. If you find it stored in a bag or wrapped at room temperature, it will last that way for many months without a problem. I don’t believe that refrigerated baccalà will last as long but it will last for some time. My point is that, depending on the type you buy, you may not need to freeze it. The fish is preserved in such a way so that it will keep for a long while. If in doubt, be sure to ask the fishmonger where you buy it. He’ll surely know. I hope this helps.

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    • Thanks, I had a nice visit back home. I’m sure you could use a vacation just about any time. Your boys are as cute as could be — and I bet a real handful at times. 🙂
      I’e shared 3 ways to prepare salted cod. Maybe you could get the men in your life to like one of them – just keep them away from it while it’s soaking. It isn’t the the most pleasant aroma, especially if you’re trying to win converts. 🙂

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  9. Welcome back John! Your baccala salad brings back sweet memories. My dad also made a similar salad, and not just for the holidays. And he made a baccala stewed with tomatoes, as well as in the oven with potatoes. Beautiful salad John!

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    • Thank you, Lidia. Again our family’s culinary histories merge and I’m glad today’s post brought back some warm memories for you. I hope you can find some baccalà and make this salad while it’s still warm outside. Save the potatoes and tomato sauce for the colder months to come. 🙂

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  10. Welcome back, John, and thanks for stopping by. When it comes to food, I don’t follow any rules, I just eat what I want when I want to eat it, if it’s available. I love living a stress free life.
    I’m learning a lot from you. I’ve never heard of the Feast of the Seven Fishes, but now I have something new to add to my personal almanac. Salt is a very important ingredient in food, both as a preservative and a taste enhancer. A lot of times when I don’t feel like fussing about food, I just boil/steam/bake, throw in a few herbs and salt. I have been doing that most of this week and I just love it.
    I haven’t eaten fish salad for sometime so your post has motivated me to plan for some fish salad before the end of the week. Thanks for sharing and wish you and your family a wonderful week! I look forward to pickles!

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    • Hi, Liz, and thank you for always finding time to stop by for a visit.
      Living alone, I’ve no fear of preparing something that someone won’t like. I pretty much cook whatever I’ve a taste for. That’s one of the benefits of starting this blog. It’s “forced” me to go back and try all of these old family recipes. And I’ve enjoyed each one so far. 🙂

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  11. Welcome back! Bacalhau (as we call in Portuguese) is very popular with all members of my family, but they normally either do a baked dish with potatoes in it, or the very popular fritters. Both recipes are Portuguese in origin, and the fritters a required dish on New Year’s Eve. I don’t think they ever made a salad. I should tell my sisters about it.

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    • Thanks, Sally, and do tell your Sisters about this salad. It’s got that great baccalà flavor and you can pretty much add whatever you want to make a great salad. I hope you do try it and like it like we all do.

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    • Thanks, Maureen, I had a nice visit. As cold as a few of our recent nights have been, I could just as easily have made the baked version and been very happy with it. This Summer’s temperatures have been anything but normal.

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  12. John… YOU’RE THE MAN. I can’t even begin to tell you how many dishes you have inspired me to make by just visiting your blog. You inspire me and this salted cod will be made in my house.. and I know it will be good 🙂

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    • Thanks, Kay. You’re always so supportive. I hope you do give one of the salted cod recipes a try. If we ever rent a villa together in Tuscany, you can be sure that I’ll be cooking baccalà at least once during our stay. It would be nice to know of your preference ahead of time. 😉

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  13. Welcome back! Love that top picture. And love the recipe too – I’ve never had salt cod in a salt, much less made one. I do associate salt cod with winter, I must admit – especially with Christmas Eve, even though that was never the tradition in my family. But I knew so many people who had it every Christmas, I guess. Anyway, really like the idea of serving this in summer – it’d be such a nice change. Thanks so much.

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    • Thanks, John. That is the nice thing about serving this salad. A fish salad is rarely expected, even less when baccalà is the main ingredient. And for us baccalà fans, it’s another excuse to start soaking another piece without having to wait until the tree is decorated. 🙂

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  14. I still have yet to try salted cod. I see it every now and then at Caputo’s. I remember we did a recipe a while back that called for salted cod and I wasn’t able to find any. And at that point in time I wouldn’t have had a clue what to do with it either. You’ve changed all that! So next time I see it, I’m going to get some and give it a try.

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    • Hey, Kristy! The Elmwood Park Caputo’s has baccalà pretty much year-round, as does a Greek market I frequent. And I’m quite happy about it. I’ve shared recipes for it, thus far, and I hope you guys like one of them. I know I’d get a kick reading that the SousChefs are eating baccalà. 🙂

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  15. Nice Salad, if only the weather would cooperate! You have no idea how tickled I am to see those jars of pickles! Welcome back!

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  16. A wonderful cod salad! I have never heard of this rehydrating technique and process. Very interesting and it makes sense. I have just recently started using fish in green salads and it is a very nice alternative to a chicken salad. I am going to made your salted cod. It sounds delicious. Glad you are back! 🙂

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    • Thanks for the welcoming and compliment. I don’t really make fish salads other than this one. I do like it, though. It’s that salt and vinegar combo that I like so much. Once you see baccalà, you’ll realize that a good rinse is a must. It’s not the least bit appetizing in its dry state. 😉

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  17. Welcome back, John, Hope you had a great trip with a little rest and relaxation. The salad looks and sounds great. I need to scour the markets for salted cod. I’m sure there is a market somewhere in DFW with it. I would love to try this salad sometime this summer.

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    • Thanks, Richard. It was a very nice visit. I would suggest a well-stocked Latino market for salt cod, though I’ve heard Whole Foods has a boxed, refrigerated version. I just don’t think DFW has many Italian markets. 🙂
      Even then, your best bet for finding it is during December. It’s a very popular dish on Christmas Eve. Good luck!

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  18. I’ve always wanted to try salt cod and never have. This looks perfect for summer! Hope you had a great trip. I used to love going to Michigan. And thought I’d pass on the name of a book my daughter read in college and then gave to me. Very interesting book about cod. That’s the name of it. Cod-a biography of the fish that changed the world. Interesting.

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    • Thanks, Abbe, I had a wonderful time. If you can find the salted cod, this is a perfect Summer dish. It’s light and colorful with a lot of flavor, just what you want. I’ve placed the book on my wish list and will pick it up. oddly enough, I find that kind of thing fascinating.

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  19. So glad you’re back. You were missed! Even if I know you’re out of town I still pop over on Wednesday to see if you posted Tuesday night. You’re allowed a week off, however. I’m very sorry about the car trouble, however! You’re probably very happy to have some of these no-cooking recipes to bring out when life gets very compressed. I’m not completely sure how I feel about the cod, simply because I’m pretty limited in my taste for fish, but in appearance it reminds me of flaked tuna, which I do like. The salad looks healthy and refreshing, that’s for sure. Now I’m very excited about the pickles! I’ll definitely be back for that post. 🙂

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    • Thanks for the warm welcome, Debra. I had a great visit back home. Finally, it would appear my car is fully repaired and running fine again. It’s been a tough few weeks, I will say that, and all because of a recall that I never received. I was very lucky I didn’t lose a tire on the freeway. Yes, that’s how serious it was but it’s all better now. 🙂
      You may not appreciate baccalà as much as we do. Although it isn’t a strong tasting fish, like mackerel, it does have a bit of a salty flavor, no matter how long it’s rinsed. It’s perfect, though, for flaking and building a salad around. You’ll just have to visit so that I can give you a taste, that’s all. 🙂

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  20. Welcome back! 🙂

    I will admit, the thought of salted cod makes me cringe. However…I’ve never tried it, so what do I know? You’ve made it look quite tasty in a salad. I may have to brave it someday.

    ~ April

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    • Thanks, April, and I fully understand. We like what we like and there’s often little reason for not liking something. No need to brave it. There are plenty of other fish to enjoy. 🙂

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  21. It certainly seems to make sense to me to enjoy salted cod this way when it’s hot and in a stew at Christmas time when you’re experiencing the cold. There are some lovely ingredients in this salad xx

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    • Thank you, I did have a nice visit. The Portuguese do love salted cod and I bet you were served some delicious dishes. Your homegrown chillies would be fantastic additions to this salad. Any salad is always best when the ingredients are fresh from the garden.

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  22. John this looks beautiful, especially all those colorful fixins! Your post had me heading straight to Youtube for C’e La Luna Mezz’o Mare by Louis Prima – “O Mamma, piscia fritta baccala”! The perfect song to listen to (preferably at full volume) whilst cooking up a storm.

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    • Thank you so much, Saskia. Yes, this certainly is a salad in need of a good Italian song but there’s no need to go to YouTube. I posted the song, with lyrics, last year for St. Joseph’s Feast Day. You can see it HERE . 🙂

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  23. What a wonderful looking salad! I haven’t had much experience with salt cod—other than a delicious hash that was the specialty of the Mainer stepfather of a college roommate and addictive fritters that they sell at the markets in southern France. Have never cooked with it myself. But this looks like the perfect use.

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    • Thanks, Michelle. I’ve never heard of a hash made with baccalà nor of fritters. I’m always learning something new when I post one of these old family recipes. It really is part of the fun. I have to do some googling to find the recipes. 🙂

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  24. Bonjourno John! With a salad this delicious why wait to serve it only on Christmas eve. Life is short, eat what you like and when you like it. I don’t use salted cod very much in my cooking and I think that is because I am here in Asia. I try to avoid the mystery dried bits and bobs at the wet market that have been drying along the busy roads. (LOL) However, if I was in the States or in Italy I would certainly give this recipe a go, straight away. I also love the idea of adding a little pepper with some heat in it. It gives it a nice added crunch and zest to the dish. Have a super week and take care. Chow, BAM

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    • Buona sera, BAM! I know what you mean about the unidentified “bits and bobs”. Just Thursday, I took friends to Indian and Vietnamese markets. I’ve no idea what at least 75% of the items are, especially when I get to the frozen fish area. I would definitely think twice before buying anything dried and salted. However would I prepare it? I’ll stick with items from the countries I know and wait for someone like you to visit and teach me a few things. 🙂
      Hope you have a great week, too.

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  25. I’m sold on “all the fixins” and two types of peppers, one pickled. I’ve never tried salted cod, or any kind of salted fish.. I’ve seen dried fish in the Asian grocery stores and they look quite horrific but in salad the fish is much more appealing, thank goodness 😉

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    • In the previous comment, BAM (Bobbi) mentioned the dried fish in Asian markets. I’m not that adventurous. I’ll stick with the tried & true, though I’m sure that many would find baccalà every bit as challenging. Even baccalà is a bit on the scary side when seen before it’s “resuscitated”.

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  26. There is so much good stuff in this post John….thank you. This salad looks so very good….but I suspect I’ll have trouble finding the fish. But, we’re headed to the Milwaukee Market this weekend, so I’m hoping we’ll find some. Enough for the other dishes too…..and those elusive blossoms.

    I’m so glad you’re back 🙂

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    • Made it today John! OH MY! I was worried, I have to say, that it would be too “fishy” for me, but I was so wrong. This is perfect! The recipe is perfect! Thank you!!

      Also, just wanna let you know I’ll be here now on this avatar. I’ve deleted my blog and that account and am using this one instead. Thank you for all the support of my blog. But now, I have WAY more time to enjoy and learn from you….which was my whole point for deleting my blog, more time to practice and learn the art of cooking from the experts like you 🙂

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      • I’m so glad that you found baccalà and made this salad. You can see where it would be fantastic on a really hot Summer’s day, when no one wants to go near a hot kitchen.

        I fully understand your reasons for letting your blog go. You are so busy with so many projects that time is in short supply. Blogging, though enjoyable, is time-consuming. Though I hardly consider myself an expert, I just hope I see you around from time to time. I’ve enjoyed getting to know you and would hate to lose touch. Besides, I still need that egg ravioli recipe! 🙂

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        • I’m not going anywhere, no way. I’ll be here John, and probably more often now. Just let me know when you want the egg ravioli recipe and I’ll send! xoxo

          That salad was delicious, and I’m making it again for our guests at the end of the month. Whew! One meal taken care of 🙂

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          • I’m thrilled that you would make this salad for your guests, Sarah, and very happy that you’re not going anywhere. I’m going to hold you to that. Max is part hound, you know, and we’ll hunt you down! 🙂
            I won’t be going back home for several weeks. I’ll let you know beforehand, for I want to show the recipe to Zia. As I mentioned, she was mighty impressed that you made them. Who knows? We may spend an afternoon making them for ourselves. 🙂

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  27. Know you had a wonderful time away, John, and look forward to hearing more about all you cooked.
    Good to go on vacation and good to return home again, too. Looking forward to the pickles.
    Will share the Salted Cod Salad with some friends and family who might actually make it. Looks delicious and your directions are always thorough and complete. Glad you are back.

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    • I did have a wonderful visit, Ruth, though we didn’t cook many new dishes. I was busy showing a some of the recipes that I’ve blogged but that she hadn’t tasted. Throw in a couple dinners eaten “out” and the week flew by.
      Thanks for the vote of confidence and I hope those that receive the recipe are as enthusiastic. The pickles are coming right up! 🙂

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  28. Welcome back John. It’s so good to see your posts again and I’m sure you and Max had a great vacation. You’ve certainly picked some great ideas to try for these hot humid days. You know I don’t think I’ve ever tried salted cod but this gorgeous salad looks too good to pass up. I’m sold.

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    • Thanks, Diane, it was a great visit and Max got more exercise than he’s had in some time. I drove home with one very tired dog. Yay!
      This would be a great intro to salted cod. It’s easy enough and you can add whatever you like to the salad. It really is a great Summer salad.

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    • Thanks, Stefan. I don’t recall ever seeing this served with tomatoes, though I bet they would make a tasty addition. I need to ask Zia if she remembers using tomatoes. We certainly wouldn’t do it anytime other than in the Summer, though. You just cannot get tasty tomatoes around here in the colder months.

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  29. Whose gonna wait till summer to have this mighty glamorous fish preparation?! I eat all the year round whatever I find soulful . And I just added your Salad in my ‘Dying to try’ list 🙂

    Loved the slideshow addition. Super smart !
    And welcome back 🙂

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    • Thank you for always leaving such great comments. I hope you do find some baccalà and enjoy this salad as much as we all do. Please let me know if and when you do. 🙂

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  30. This salad really does look so light and refreshing, John. And so colorful, too. Really a perfectly balanced summer salad, I would say! Welcome home and I hope your vacation was restful, fun and all that a good vacation should be. 🙂

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    • Thanks, Betsy. The visit home was wonderful and too short — just like a visit is supposed to be. This is a great salad and one you won’t find every day. I hope you give it a try some day.

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  31. Are you ready for this? I’ve never had salted cod! I know – have I been living in a cave? 🙂 I guess it’s just not something that is common in the south or southwestern U.S. You certainly make it look quite tempting. I do love fish, salt and salads, so I would said that I would probably love this salad! Welcome home and hope you had a fabulous vacation!

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    • Thanks, MJ. I did have a great time back home. Zia is already asking when I’m going to return. 🙂
      You certainly are not alone. There are many who haven’t tried it for a variety of reasons, not the least of which being the way it looks before it’s “resuscitated.” It definitely could frighten away a number of the less adventurous. 🙂

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    • Thanks, Anne. I had a wonderful visit home. I know what you mean. This is supposed to be a light meal. It isn’t, though, the way I attack it. It’s just too good! 🙂

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  32. Hi John, a light fish salad is exactly what I’m craving after our gluttonous time away and this recipe sounds and looks perfect. I’ve never tried salted cod before but this really makes me want to. Your attention to detail with the lovely colours is spectacular. It’s very interesting that your family ate the dish every other time except the holidays, was there a reason? We didn’t have many dishes reserved for specific holidays and I think that tradition is slowly dying; we don’t even have to wait for fruits and vegetables to be in season any more, such a shame.
    Hope you enjoy the weekend.

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    • Hello, Eva! One of the things I like most about this, or any, salad is that they offer you a chance to mix colors and textures with the least bit of effort. This is certainly true with this salad. I’ve no idea why my family chose to eat this in the warmer months other than their baccalà recipe, being prepared in the oven, was better suited for Winter. One thing is certain: we were going to have baccalà on Christmas Eve. You’re right that we don’t associate foods with specific holidays like we once did. I miss those dinners.

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  33. Lovely salad.. the colors once assembled are so pretty and happily summery! Glad you’re back and whipping up some salad love in the Bartolini kitchens again! My summer’s gone off the rails and I’ve not been making much of, well, anything! But I did go out for dinner last night and they had pickled radishes on the charcuterie board.. I can’t wait to see your pickles next!

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    • Thanks, Barb. The nice thing about a Summer salad is that you can take your pick of colors and textures. Everything is nice, fresh, and locally grown. Despite the weather, Summer is flying by. I’ve not gotten nearly as much done as I had hoped I would. Now I’m hoping for a long Fall. 🙂

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  34. Looks lovely! I can’t believe I’ve never tried salt cod, although I’ve heard a lot about it. Does it taste very different to normal fresh cod?
    Can’t wait for your pickles post 🙂

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    • Thanks! The texture and look are very much like fresh cod. There is a saltiness, though, that will remain no matter how long you soak it. It really is a matter of how salty you like it. I certainly would never soak it for only a day. Two days works best for my tastes.

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  35. What happened to the Long Island part of the ice tea? haha. Is salted cod in the same vein as lutefisk? Thirdly, that couscous salad looks amazing–love the colors!!!

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    • The Long Island went the way of the Manhattan. 🙂
      Although lutefisk is dried like salted cod, lye is involved in preparing lutefisk but not with salted cod. I’ve never tasted lutefisk so I’ve no idea about similarities in flavor. You bring up an interesting point, though. Prior to living here, I lived in a neighborhood that was primarily Swedish, at one time. Lutefisk was on the menu of the few remaining Scandinavian restaurants but I never thought to try it. Maybe I should go back and give it a shot. 🙂

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  36. Yet another excellent, authentic recipe, John!
    When I was a kid I used to love baccala’ (or stoccafisso, which I think was the simply dried version of cod) alla genovese, which if memory serves me was cooked in a pot with potato, black olives and pine nuts…
    Good memories, good memories 🙂

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    • Thank you so much, Stefano. I’m glad this post brought back some warm memories for you. Amazing how many of our memories are associated with food, isn’t it? I believe you’re right, Stoccafisso is cod that is dried but not salted. As I recall, it smells horribly, much worse than baccalà. We never prepared our baccalà alla genovese but that sure does sound good. I need to google the recipe. 🙂

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  37. I smiled at your introduction because that was exactly what I was thinking when I saw the title to this post. This is a dish that we tend to eat on Christmas eve. I don’t really know why we don’t eat it at other times of the year…tradition, I guess like turkey at Thanksgiving. I know I would like your version as it has very flavorful ingredients.

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    • Likewise, Karen, I cannot tell you why we never ate this salad on Christmas Eve. We certainly weren’t in the majority. I am glad that we served this year-round, though. It makes a great light lunch when Summer is at its peak.
      Thanks, Karen, for leaving such a nice compliment.

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  38. A salad in hot weather…makes perfect sense to me. I was very interested in this because I didnt really think of making a salad with salt cod John.

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  39. I had a neighbor once who used to make salted cod salad. I never asked her what her ancestry was, but looking at this makes me think she could have been Italian. That salad was one of the best I have ever tasted, and tried re-creating a couple of times that came out nice, but tasted like any regular salad with fish in it. Looking at the recipe, I realize it’s the process which made it so different and flavorful. I love how beautifully you are preserving your traditions – both the conventional and the unconventional ones. And you serve food with so much warmth…..I always feel I am a part of the party 🙂

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    • Your neighbor was Mediterranean, that’s for sure, Minnie. Most prepare some sort of salad with salted cod. I do enjoy my family’s recipe but I’m a bit biased. 🙂
      Thank you for leaving such kind words, Minnie. That’s about the nicest thing I’ve read in some time. 🙂

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  40. Pingback: Linguine with Seafood in Parchment | from the Bartolini kitchens

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