The Kitchens are in a Pickle

This post is really little more than a comedy of errors. I had another recipe in mind for today but that was before forces beyond my control intervened. You see, I was at the farmers market, minding my own business when I came upon the radishes, French breakfast radishes, no less. So, I bought them. Never mind that I was already lugging around a full shopping bag. Exiting the vendor’s stall, I literally bumped into the beets display. WIth my shirt now sporting a mixture of mud and beet juice, I thought it a sign and bought a bunch of large red beets. On the way out of the market, I bought a few more things, filling a 2nd bag, and headed for home.

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Once home, I unpacked my bounty, dreaming of following Roger’s suggestion for buttery radishes and re-creating Mom’s beet salad. And that’s when it hit me. I’d be leaving for Michigan in a few days. I should be subtracting from my refrigerator’s shelves, not adding to them. WIth no possible way to clear my fridge before I was to leave, Plan B was put into effect: food preservation. I’d freeze some and the rest? Well, that’s how today’s pickling post was born and first up were the radishes.

Googling pickled radish recipes, I came upon one from David Lebovitz and looked no further. I’ve had very good luck with his recipes. Unfortunately, I didn’t have any white vinegar — this was a spur of the moment pickle, after all — so I married what I had until I reached the required amount. The radishes turned out great and, subsequently having earned Zia’s seal of approval, I see no reason to change things. The “married” amounts are the ones listed in the recipe’s ingredients.

Next were the beets. I didn’t have my own recipe, so, I again I turned to google. After checking a number of them out, I decided to wing it. The recipe below is the result. There’s one critical error, however. I had intended to use these beets in a salad but I included whole cloves in jars of red shoestring beets. How could anyone find those cloves when it’s time to serve the beets? With 2 jars already filled, I had little choice but to continue with the recipe, adding whole cloves to the remaining jars, watching them disappear into the beets. Since I had promised beets to some friends, I knew I would have to make more. These wouldn’t do.

The Saturday following my return from Michigan, I once again returned to the farmers market and bought 2 bunches of beets. This time I bought Chioggia beets, an Italian variety of heirloom beets with alternating red & white rings when cut. There was no way any cloves could hide among these beauties. Still, I wasn’t going to take any chances. These beets would be sliced rather than shredded. While the beets were roasting, I surfed the web looking at pickling recipes. I stumbled upon a USDA site and their recipe for pickled beets. With some changes, that’s the recipe I used and have shared below.

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Shoestring Beets

Pickled Red “Shoestring” Beets Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1 bunch (4 or 5) large red beets, washed and greens removed
  • olive oil
  • 1 cup (235 ml) cider vinegar
  • 1 cup water (237 ml)
  • 1/2 cup (100 g) sugar
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • 2 cinnamon sticks, halved
  • 3 whole cloves per jar

Directions

  1. Pre-heat oven to 400˚ (205˚ C).
  2. Place washed beets on a foil line baking sheet, cover lightly with olive oil, and use another sheet  of foil to enclose the baking sheet and beets.
  3. Place beets in oven and bake for 45 minutes or until a knife can be inserted into a beet with little resistance.
  4. Uncover the beets and set aside until cool enough to handle.
  5. Beet skins should peel off, though a paring knife may be needed for some spots.
  6. Using a food processor with blade inserted, shred the beets created “shoestrings.”
  7. Meanwhile, add vinegar, water, salt, and sugar in a small sauce pan and heat until both are dissolved. Keep hot though not boiling.
  8. Using 4, sanitized pint-sized jars, add 1 clove and 1/2 stick of cinnamon to each. Add some beets, another clove, enough beets to fill, and one more clove. Add enough of the hot pickling liquid to fill each jar to within 1/2 inch of the jar’s top.
  9. Seal each jar until “finger tight” and process in a boiling water bath for 30 minutes, Remove from water and set, undisturbed, on a kitchen towel covered baking sheet in a draft-free spot. Jars may be moved after 24 hours.

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“Quick Pickle” Radishes Recipe

Ingredients

  • 9 oz (260 g) radishes, cleaned, trimmed, and sliced thin.  Peel where needed.
  • 2 oz (60 g) red onion, sliced thin
  • 1 1/3 cup (316 ml) red wine vinegar
  • 2/3 cup (157 ml) cider vinegar
  • 1 cup water (237 ml)
  • 1 tbsp sugar
  • 1 tbsp kosher salt
  • 2 garlic cloves, cut in half
  • 24 green peppercorns, divided
  • 24 red peppercorns, divided

Directions

  1. Add vinegar, water, salt, and sugar in a small sauce pan and heat until both are dissolved. Set aside to cool.
  2. Using 4, sanitized, pint-sized jars, add 1/2 garlic clove and 6 of each, red and green peppercorns.
  3. Divide the onion and radishes evenly among the jars.
  4. Once cooled, pour enough pickling liquid to fill each jar within 1/2 inch of the top. Seal each jar with a sterile lid and refrigerate.

Inspired by David Lebovitz

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Chioggia Beets

Pickled Sliced Chioggia Beets Recipe


Ingredients

  • 2 bunches (9 or 10) medium Chioggia beets, washed and greens removed
  • olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, sliced thin
  • 4 cups (950 ml) cider vinegar
  • 2 cup water (475 ml)
  • 2 cups (400 g) sugar
  • 2 tsp kosher salt
  • 3 cinnamon sticks
  • 10 whole cloves

Directions

  1. Pre-heat oven to 400˚ (205˚ C).
  2. Place washed beets on a foil line baking sheet, cover lightly with olive oil, and use another sheet  of foil to enclose the baking sheet and beets.
  3. Place beets in oven and bake for 45 minutes or until a knife can be inserted into a beet with little resistance.
  4. Uncover the beets and set aside until cool enough to handle.
  5. Beet skins should peel off, though a paring knife may be needed for some spots.
  6. Slice the beets as thin as you prefer.
  7. Meanwhile, place cinnamon sticks and cloves into a small pouch or piece of cheese cloth and tie to secure.
  8. Place vinegar, water, salt, sugar, and spice bag into a sauce pan and bring to the boil.
  9. Add sliced beets and onion, simmering for 5 minutes.
  10. Remove the spice bag and fill each jar with enough beets, onion, and pickling liquid to within 1/2 inch of the top.
  11. Seal each jar until “finger tight” and process in a boiling water bath for 30 minutes, Remove from water and set, undisturbed, on a kitchen towel covered baking sheet in a draft-free spot. Jars may be moved after 24 hours.

Inspired by National Center for Home Food Preservation

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Notes

The radishes should sit in the refrigerator for a few days before use and they will last about 3 to 4 weeks if kept in the fridge. Both beet pickles are processed and will last for months on a cool, dark shelf. If you like, you can skip the boiling water bath, put a sterile lid on each jar, and refrigerate them. They, too, will last about 3 to 4 weeks this way.

Although I used French breakfast radishes for this post, I’ll use the more common, globe-shaped radishes for future pickles. They’ll produce larger slices, which I prefer.

You needn’t roast the beets before pickling. Many recipes suggest boiling the beets for 20 to 30 minutes before peeling and continuing with the pickling.

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It’s déjà vu all over again …

Giardiniera-topped Mount Burger

Giardiniera-topped Mount Burger

It’s Summer and people are googling season-appropriate recipes. Pesto was hot but now my giardiniera recipe has caught the internet’s eye. It’s probably because the ingredients are all readily available now, as are reasons for having a jar on-hand. It is barbecue & picnic season, after all, and neither can be a success without a jar of giardiniera handy. You can find out what so many others are googling by simply clicking HERE.

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Coming soon to a monitor near you …

Risotto Preview

Risotto

Let’s try this again, shall we?

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174 thoughts on “The Kitchens are in a Pickle

    • They’re surprisingly good. We enjoyed then in salads, on sandwiches, burgers, or just a spoonful on the dinner plate. Now I’m on the lookout for radishes that have a bit more of a peppery taste. Never satisfied!

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    • Thanks, Roger. I still intend to try radishes with butter, as you suggested. As for the Chioggia beets, although they’re from Italy, I doubt mine were imported. Once the TV cooking chefs talk about an ingredient, the stores cannot keep it stocked. These farmers are growing them expecting a boon — and I’m doing my part to see that they aren’t disappointed. 😉

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  1. Great story with lovely photos! I prefer fresh over pickled with most things, although I can’t remember ever having pickled radishes.
    PS in the chioggia recipe, 2 cups sugar equals 400 grams

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    • Thanks, Stefan. Mom & Zia both loved pickled beets and I guess I’ve inherited it from them. The pickled radishes make a nice condiment for sandwiches or just to have a spoonful on the dinner plate. I’ll definitely make them again.
      Thanks, too, for catching my error. I’m surprised that was the only one. 🙂

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  2. Oh John, you made me laugh! I can’t tell you the number of times I’ve picked up stuff at the markets and come home and thought, “um..right…now where am I going to put all this? And we’re never going to eat it all before it goes off..” 🙂

    Your pickles look superb! Especially the shoestring beets… x

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    • We are kindred spirits, Celia, in so many ways. Should we ever shop together, we had better have a truck to carry our purchases. THose shoestrings are perfect for salads. I just didn’t think about adding whole cloves to the jars. Love the flavor but hate finding one the hard way, in a guest’s mouth. The 2nd batch was much better. 🙂

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  3. Mouthwatering…
    I totally identified with the farmers market experience. I guess all cooks share that uncontrolled buying eagerness when facing beautiful, fresh produce. 🙂

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    • Thank you. I think you’re right and that it is worse for those of us where Winter reigns for so long. Seeing so much fresh produce, after going without, is irresistible.

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  4. I am literally salivating reading this post! All that vinegar made my mouth water! The pickles look great John and great improvisation, I noticed you roasted your beets or could’ve boiled them, do you have to cook them before pickling? We eat raw beets, can’t we pickle them raw? Just curious ( or being lazy looking for a shortcut) I want to pickle stuff. My lacto fermented cucumbers came out quite nice. I was going to post about them but they are not be attractive. Not like your beautiful picked beets and radishes.

    Nazneen

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    • Thank you, Nazneen. You and I share of love of all things vinegary. That’s really why I love a good pickle, not to mention the giardiniera recipe I shared. It’s the best! There are recipes for pickling raw beets. Martha Stewart shred one. I don’t know how much easier they would be because peeling them would be harder. When baked or roasted, the peels slides right off. Not so when the beets are raw.
      I understand about the photos. Sometimes, despite our best intentions, the dish or food item just doesn’t look good when photographed. Then again, your blog’s photos are always so well done that I think most of us would happily post your rejects. You set the bar pretty high. 🙂

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  5. Love, love love pickles! I hope I can make a few jars of something this year. It’s hard to get good beetroot in Spain (well, fresh) but I know when I’m in England I can find it. Love pickled radishes too. Everything looks so pretty in the jars. Reading your post reminded me (yes, you know I’d have a story) of my mum and English grandmother sitting peeling enormous sacks of tiny onions every autumn for our winter pickled onions. The house used to stink for days and my poor mum and grandmother would sit there peeling and crying but we all knew it would be worth it for those delicious pickles a month or so later!

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    • Thanks, Tanya. Mention pickling to Zia, or to Mom when she was with us, and they’d recall a number of pickling stories, very much like yours. Zia tells of pickling a bushel of peppers that Grandpa had brought home, telling her they were sweet. They weren’t and she was up all night with her hands & arms burning. Like you said, everyone sure did enjoy those peppers later in the year. 😉

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  6. I have lots of Chioggia beets in my garden this year and I can’t wait to start harvesting them. So far we’ve been eating a lot of beet greens (the beets aren’t quite big enough yet) steamed or sauteed with olive oil and garlic, which I absolutely love. When the beets are large enough though,Thomas will be making his vegetarian borscht and the rest I can pickle! My dad was always pickling vegetables when I was a kid and for some reason I’ve never really gotten into it, but I’m excited to try these.

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    • We’re on the same page, Laura, except that I cannot grow beets and have to buy them. Aren’t Chioggia beets beautiful? Like you, I sauté the greens and I’ve a recipe for borscht that I want to try. I’m, also, considering making a ravioli with the greens. I never knew beets were so versatile. I do hope you’ll share your husband’s borscht recipe. I’d love to try it. 🙂

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  7. I love the idea of your pickled radishes but I’m confused by your instruction to divide the peppercorns. Do you mean crack them? Or as a Brit are we talking about two different things?

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    • Hello. Sorry for any misunderstanding. By divide I meant to place an equal amount of peppercorns into each jar. In this case, that would have meant 6 peppercorns per jar.
      Thanks for visiting and taking the time to comment.

      Like

  8. This post cracked me up! I have the tendency to buy things on impulse and not knowing what to do with them when I get home, I’m glad you managed to find a solution to those vegetables! Pickles are amazing and perfect addition to salads!

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    • Judging by the comments, we’re not alone, Jasline. I’ll have a totally different perspective of my fellow shoppers this Saturday at the market. Just how many of them are doing as I do, buy, buy, buy and worrying about it once they get home? You’re right, too, about pickles in salad, a mix of vinegar & crunch. Yum!

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  9. I can’t help but get excited over this post John!!! Aaah, I’ve started to love preserving fruits, vegetables and all sorts of things… my kitchen is currently being overtaken by jars of all shapes and sizes. I am exactly the same when it comes to fresh food markets… perhaps it’s a similar trait for all of us passionate food bloggers 🙂 Last trip to the market I ended up with 3kg of picked-that-day cauliflower. I roasted some, shaved some into salad and pickled the rest as part of your gorgeous giardiniera recipe! Second time I’ve made it… I adore it. Now to try the shoestring beets recipe… 🙂

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    • Thank you so much, Laura, for the enthusiastic comment and compliments. You’re too good to me! That giardiniera is one of my most popular dishes. My friends and family all really love it and use it on just about anything — even pizza. Just last week, I saw red & yellow bell peppers at the market for the first time. That means it’s time for me to start making giardiniera again. Oh, boy!

      Like

    • We’re not alone, judging by the comments. It’s probably a good thing we live all around the world. Imagine the fights if we all went to the same market? We’ d be so polite at first, and then someone would notice the zucchini blossoms or fresh beets or baby arugula. It could get ugly pretty quickly. 🙂

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  10. I’ve got a half-ton of cucumbers, and no time to make pickles…When will you be over to pick up a bag? 😉
    Seriously, these sound great. I’ve been wanting to try David’s pickled radishes for a while now, but I always forget about it when they start coming in…maybe in the fall, when the next batch is ready.
    …yeah. SURE I will…

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    • I’d gladly trade pickled radishes for cucumbers, Marie. I’d even throw in Max, for good measure. Not permanently but for a few months so that you could get to know each other. 🙂
      With all you’ve got going on this Summer, it’s a wonder to me how you grow and maintain your garden. Yours is a true garden, after all, and not a few pots on a deck like mine. You start pickling and I’m going to start calling you Wonder Woman.

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  11. I love everything pickled. You are never too old to learn something new. Now that I am retired and have time I will be enjoying your recipes. Thanks for sharing.

    BE ENCOURAGED! BE BLESSED!

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    • The Chioggia turned peach when pickled. If you look in the post, you’ll see a pic of one cut in half, revealing it’s candy-striped interior. Either way, peach or striped, they’re a great, sweet-tasting beet. Once one of your TV chefs cooks with them, your farmers will start producing them, just like here. I learned of them from another blogger a number of weeks ago and see them in just about every stall at the market.

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  12. Great recipes John! Yes, it is so much fun but dangerous going to the farms and markets. I always end up with too much since everything looks so good. These pickle recipes are a perfect solution.

    We took our grandchildren blueberry picking this weekend at a new farm down the road from us. While the kids ate 3 berries for each one they put in the basket (I hope the farm accounts for this behavior in the pricing), the rest of us ended up purchasing way too many of the delicious morsels. So, similar problem to your beets. I’ll be baking blueberry bread soon 🙂

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    • Thank you. I buy way too many blueberries every year. Right now I’ve got a quart in the fridge from which I grab a handful whenever I open that door. And I’m still going to stock my freezer with more. RIght now, though, I’ve got a number of pounds of tart cherries taking up too much room in there. I need to make cherry jam so that I can hoard my blueberries. Thank goodness we have Winter. Without it, I’d be buying fruits & berries all year round and I’d be the star of a special edition of Hoarders. 🙂

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  13. I could see you in my mind’s eye, wearing your beet and mud stained shirt, lugging your booty home from the market…….or maybe that should read “beety.” 🙂 I have never pickled anything, but those beetroots with the garlic sound awesome. 😯

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  14. I can’t believe you managed to do that much pickling and canning before you left for Michigan, but what great looking results! I love your circular shots that open this post and the fact that the whole post is centered…I’m not sure how you did that in this theme, but am jealous! As Roger said, radishes with butter (and salt) are divine. We have a restaurant close by that spreads butter on thin pumpernickel, tops with thinly sliced radish and sprinkles with sea salt…great appetizer or tea sandwich. I’ve wanted to make radish pickles as I have had them on burgers and in tacos lately…terrific. I’ve also started adding raw radish to guacamole, very good. (Can you tell I’m on a radish tear?) Really enjoyed your post, John, can’t wait for risotto and now I’m off to check out the giardiniera.

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    • Thanks, Betsy. It really wasn’t as bad as one might think. Once all of the canning equipment was out and the jars washed, these pickles moved rather quickly. To me, they’re much easier to prepare than jams and preserves. Standing over a boiling pot, stirring it to prevent scorching, is far more bothersome. Love your serving suggestion for the radishes, as well as adding them to guacamole. Both sound great! I brought a jar of the radishes with me to Michigan. We enjoyed them on sandwiches, burgers, and in salads. I was sorry I didn’t bring more. I will next visit. 🙂

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    • Forgot to mention. Those circular shots are one of the gallery options for this theme, Twenty Eleven. You can find them in the Media part of your Dashboard. Take a look and if you need help, I’ll try to lend a hand.

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  15. I sent your recipe to my friends with whom I play PICKLEball.  I thought it appropo.  

    When I make pickled beets, I boil the beets instead of heating up the oven and then pickle them with 1 cup water, 1 cup vinegar and 1/2 cup sugar, like your recipe but without all the additions.  I keep it in the fridge and watch Ron make it disappear.  It’s also a hit at tennis parties, etc. Donna

    >________________________________ > From: from the Bartolini kitchens >To: grimleafer@yahoo.com >Sent: Wednesday, August 7, 2013 1:08 AM >Subject: [New post] The Kitchens are in a Pickle > > > > WordPress.com >ChgoJohn posted: “This post is really little more than a comedy of errors. I had another recipe in mind for today but that was before forces beyond my control intervened. You see, I was at the farmers market, minding my own business when I came upon the radishes, French br” >

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    • Hey, Donna! I like roasting the beets, especially if I’m going to can them. It’s one less pot of boiling water on the stove and my kitchen stays cooler. Unless I’m going to give plenty away, I have to can them. There’s only so much that I can eat by myself. 🙂

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  16. Being in a pickle is a good thing.. I’ve been just crazy about pickles lately, not exactly sure why, but I am:) The winery here had some on their charcuterie board and it just adds that lovely zing of flavor to.. well, everything! You’ve got a few recipes for me to try once I’m back home. I’ve had to pack up our condo at the lake.. it sold in a week, an offer we couldn’t refuse.. and now I’m without any baking or cooking utensils.. and especially not anything I can “can” with. It feels a bit like camping. I will have to just imagine how good these taste for now. John, your photos of your sparkling glass jars are just gorgeous!!

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  17. Your comedy of errors is completely different from mine! (Sally gently pouts) – you see, I attempted to make pickled radishes, and not only they turned out horrible, but the smell in the fridge caused Phil to say it would be either him or the radishes. And I had to agree it was nasty.

    Not sure what went wrong, but I created a monster. It will never be on my blog, and I’m now a bit traumatized to pickle anything. Basically, I am in a pickle.

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    • Surprisingly, I read where some recipes created quite a smell. I remember some of them required the radishes to “cure” in a bowl in the fridge before being jarred. Lebovitz’s recipe wasn’t like that and no one complained of the smell. I know I had no problem with it. That’s another surprise because, normally, if there’s a possible problem identified, I’ll be sure to have it.
      If you and your husband like beets, why not try pickling them? It’s quite easy to do and there was no offending scent at all. Hope this helps. 🙂

      Like

      • Phil and beets are not a very good combination – I keep trying to make them in all kinds of ways, but he is not too fond of them. I haven’t tried picked beets, though. It could be something he might like… worth experimenting! thank you!

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    • Oh, do give them a try. They’re easy to make and the results are great.
      Sorry, as I told someone earlier, I don’t ship but I’ve got a pretty good arm. Let me know if you’re ever a little closer …

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  18. So can you guess which photo caught my eye and has me hungry? I’m sure you know it’s the risotto. I can’t overlook a good risotto. Looking forward to that one for sure! Well, I may have to give your pickled radishes a try. I’m not a big radish eater, but Miss A insisted that I buy some at the farmer’s market. She wanted to eat them sliced and with salt, just like at her grandma’s house. How could I refuse a child betting for a vegetable?! So I bought them, sliced them and served them with salt. She did not like them. I have to remember to ask my mom what she did to her radishes, but I’m suspecting they were pickled. I still have a bunch and I hate to waste them.

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    • I.m not sure you’ll like our risotto, Kristy, but we’ll see next week. Why ruin the surprise now? 🙂
      From my experience, some radishes have more heat than others. Maybe you got a bunch that was more peppery than Grandma’s were? Either way, pickling them will soften that and maybe she’ll like them again. If she still doesn’t, please don’t tell her it was my recipe. I don’t wish to impact my ability to get a table at her restaurant. Tell her it was a Paula Deen recipe. 🙂

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  19. You must have an awesome farmers market. I used to love white icicle radishes and can never find them anymore. I’ve never tried canning of any kind so maybe I’ll get brave. You make it sound so easy! And yes, I was eyeing that giardiniera recipe, too!

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    • I go to the Evanston Farmers Market, Abbe, and it is the best one in this area. Plenty of stalls and a wide variety of items. It’s a highpoint of me week to get there and stroll about. These pickles are really easy. You’ll be surprised. That giardiniera is a bit more involved, all that chopping, but the results are well worth it. Guaranteed.

      Like

  20. Pickled veggies are so good! And a great way to preserve them. Although I most often do quick pickling when I do these, and they’re not meant to keep all that long. I should really start doing the real deal one of these days. I have had pickled radishes, and they’re wonderful. And I’ve had quite good luck with those USDA recipes – they are usually at least passable, and often good. BTW, you might want to take a look at David Chang’s Momofuku for some ideas for quick pickles with an Asian theme – he has loads of ideas. Fun post! Thanks.

    Like

    • If I shared my household with others, John, I think I’d rely far more on quick pickles. As it is, if I don’t preserve them, the quick pickles would go to waste. I can only eat so much. This was my first USDA recipe and I certainly have no complaints with it. I need to spend more time on that website looking around. This is the 3rd reference to Momofuku that I’ve seen in the last few days. Sounds like I need to check it out. Everything I’ve read has been nothing but high praise. Thanks, John, for leaving such a great comment and for the cookbook recommendation.

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  21. Those photographs are so gorgeous! I am getting back into canning after over a decade of inactivity, so this post gives me plenty of help. Thank you so much for the inspiration and the recipes.

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  22. Hi John,
    Thank you for the hilarious story. Are you sure you were minding your own business though? LOL. I think it’s the other way round. The radishes were busy minding their own business when you saw them and couldn’t resist them and ended up lugging them home. I do that all the time until I had to stop and lecture myself, and now I don’t carry extra money or credit cards when I’m going shopping. That has helped me a bit, because when I really want it I can go back the next day and get it.
    What would we do without google? I use google for EVERYTHING, and I use it 24/7. It’s such an indispensable tool! Those beets sound so delicious and with cloves and cinnamon..please mail me a jar. I would appreciate immensely. And by the way that photo of Choggia Beets is very attractive. I think by now you understand that I love pretty things. I look forward to the risotto because I’m more of a Pilau person. Best wishes to Max..and wish you a wonderful day!

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    • Thanks, Liz, and Max sends his regards. 🙂
      I’m hopeless when it comes to the markets. I’ve so little control when faced with all of that fresh produce. I’ve even written shopping lists, pledging not to buy anything but what’s listed. 30 minutes later with at least 1 bag full, I look at the list and I’ve bought everything but what’s on my list. See? Hopeless.
      Google is a cook’s savior and I use it all of the time. It sure came in handy with these pickles. Without it, I don’t know what I would have done. I hope you have a great week, Liz.

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  23. I am so glad you wrote draft free for the cooling spot. My neighbour told me a horror story of her mother moving jars from a pressure coooker, very hot, to the resting spot, a stray gust of cool wind blew in the door and 4 jars shattered on the spot, spraying her with shards of glass.. needless to say that neither Wanda nor I use pressure cookers and she and Now I always think of that when removing our jars from the boiling water. I am always looking for recipes for beetroot. This one looks lovely and simple, you know how i love simple.. but my latest beets are a bit small so today i am making tomato and basil jam, with lime.. like you i am marrying a few recipes so wish me luck! Your larder must be looking fantastic! c

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    • Thanks, Celi! I always include the “draft-free” stuff but never really considered the consequences. My stuff cools in a great spot but the idea of it exploding. Yikes! I hope she was injured and I’ll make sure there are no drafts when I can.
      These pickles are quick and simple, just like most around here. I want to make tomato jam again this year. I really liked it last year; it made a great sauce for grilling chicken. I later learned that it’s also something my Grandmother made. 🙂

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  24. Hi John, Your post reminded me of the Oscar Wilde quote, “I can resist anything except temptation.” So glad you decided to preserve your bounty, it would have broken my heart if you had to waste it. BTW your pickles look a delight.

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    • Wasting food was never an option, Glenda. Mom and Zia were a little girls during the Great Depression and we were taught that you never waste food. For me, pickling is as good a way as any to preserve vegetables. This is one “mistake” that turned out very well.

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  25. This is such a great post. I totally lose it around beets and would probably leap for those lovely radishes too (I adore them braised). But yes, how to shoehorn it all into the fridge? I love preserving without freezing or refrigerating, so I was excited to read this, and you sure delivered the goods!

    Like

    • Thank you so much! I really had little choice in the matter. It was either pickle or toss them and we Bartolini never waste food. Mom & Zia were little girls during the Great Depression and those scars ran deep. I must admit, with my love of vinegar, pickle was definitely the way to go. I may even buy some more beets this weekend. I’m definitely getting more radishes! 🙂

      Like

  26. I can relate to the pre-vacation full-fridge panic scenario and pickles are a great idea John. Those ‘quick pickle’ radishes look especially delicious (I guess one could call them ‘quickles’). My corned beef sandwich was crying out for a spoonful from one of these jars yesterday!

    Like

  27. My mother loves to make pickle things as I like to call it lol. I will definitely send this link on over to her and I can already tell you she will be excited beyond belief. But now I have to deal with getting something to eat after this post lol

    Like

    • My Mom canned a lot — tomatoes were a specialty — but she wasn’t a pickler. I doubt if I would have tried these if it weren’t for the upcoming trip. Now, having tasted the results, I’m a pickler, too! 🙂

      Like

  28. I have pickled daikon but not radish. Must give this recipe a go.
    Too bad Chioggia beets does not retain its red and white color after cooking. I did read somewhere that if you rub the Chioggia beets with vinegar before baking they will retain their colors. Should give this a try to see if it really works.

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    • Thanks, Norma. I didn’t see anything about preserving Chioggia beets’ stripes. I will try this out, too. It sure would be nice if you could serve them, stripes and all. What a pretty presentation that would make!

      Like

  29. I currently have a massive beetroot glut, including the beautiful chioggia, my favorite beet, so pretty in salads. I will certainly give your pickle a try, and will still have enough left over for roast beet relish. Alas, the slugs have had most of my French breakfast ! Thanks.

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  30. YOu shop the way I do, John. Oh wait, there’ something else, and something else. Pickles are the new black, in case you hadn’t noticed. We’re all busy restoring our intestinal flora and having a great culinary time doing so. Ken

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    • I was just at the market this morning, Ken, and had to drop a load off at the car before I continued. I live alone!!! How much can one person eat in a week? I’m just glad I’ve got plenty of vinegar and empty jars. If anyone asks why all the canned food on my shelves, I’ll tell them it’s to restore my intestinal flora. 🙂

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  31. I love your canning jars. You always make me wish that I too could shop at your market. What a lovely day in the kitchen you must have had, preparing all these pickles. When I have days like that I always feel so satisfied. I don’t think I’ve ever had radishes pickled that way – something new for me to try xx

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    • Going to that farmers market on Saturday mornings is a highlight of my week, Charlie. WIth Winter as severs as ours is, it’s such a treat to see so much fresh produce, all locally grown. I’m making a double batch of giardiniera, so, today I had more to buy than normal. You’d swear I was shopping for a family of 5.
      Do try the radishes. They’re great atop sandwiches, in salads, or just a spoonful on your plate. They couldn’t be easier to make, too. I made another batch of them today, too.

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  32. Oh John, the greeneyed monster of jealousy is a’ridin’ in me again: I love all three of your pickles and have never attempted radishes before. Don’t as yet have a store of suitable jars, possess too small a fridge to house dozens of such and am always afraid that they may not be sanitized enough – big grouch today, am I not 🙂 ! But I just have to try those radishes first!! And then the beetroots!!!! AND: DO BUY ‘Jerusalem’ soonest: you won’t want to cook from anywhere else for quite awhile 😀 !!!!!

    O

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    • Do try the radishes, Eha. They’re quite tasty and will disappear from your fridge before you know it. I do identify with space problems, though. I’m lucky that most of my jars are distributed among friends with whom I’ve shared my “work” in the kitchen. Whenever I see one of them, s/he will have a bag of empty jars for me. If they ever return them all at the same time I’ll need to move to a bigger home!
      I did buy “Jerusalem” and expect it this week sometime. There has been so much talk of it that I really couldn’t resist any longer. I cannot wait to use it. 🙂

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      • John dearHeart: don’t know about you – I have a habit of taking ‘precious stuff’ like this to bed and enjoying it when noone can disturb me!! I still have not cooked from it, but enjoyed each time I took it in my hands: there is knowledge, there is style . . . and elegance . . . and simplicity . . . there is eternity at the same time as modernity – and I AM already making shopping notes . . . many of those recipes are so similar to yours: simple!!!! What a way to share . . .

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        • And what am I to do with you, my Friend? I was about to shut everything down and head to bed when I noticed this comment from you. That was such a nice thing to write and the perfect way to end my day — with a broad smile. Thank you so much. 🙂

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    • I feel the same way, no space, no time… but one day… and I know exactly where I’ll go to get my ideas and recipes – Chgo John, Celi & Celia who often swap hints and recipes 🙂

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      • Thanks for the vote of confidence, EllaDee, but, to tell you the truth. If I were still working, there is no way I would have the time to do half of the things I do in the kitchen. I’m very fortunate that I now have the time.

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  33. Oh goo, I was worried it was just me who had problems of things jumping into my cart for no apparent reason – I often buy something just because it looks good and have no idea what to do with it when I get back home. Thankfully I don’t live near a farmers market John otherwise you would have to come and visit fairly regularly to help with canning!
    🙂 Mandy xo

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    • You really do understand, Mandy. We should form a support group. Over-Shoppers Anonymous. I cannot help it. As each fruit, berry, or vegetable comes into season, I have to have some. As I’ve said previously, it’s as if I’m shopping for a family of 5. Pickling is a way out for me. Now, wouldn’t a day or two spent canning together be fun? Open a bottle of wine and get to work! Of course, the first day would be spent making ravioli and sauce. We’ll need a good dinner to reward ourselves after each day of canning. 🙂

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  34. You have all my admiration, John! You are about to leave and you still go to the market and work hard to preserve your food because you do not want to waste anything. When I’m about to leave I stop buying groceries at least a week before my departure and I start “selecting” the neighbor who will be receiving the food left in my refrigerator.
    I should learn from you and follow your example! 🙂
    Wonderful recipes, John! Thank you for sharing them.

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    • No, Francesca, don’t use me as an example! If I had been smart, I would not have gone to that market in the first place. I just have to go there on Saturday mornings. Once there, I cannot resist those vegetables and fruit. No, Francesca, don’t follow my example. Find someone with common sense to follow. 🙂

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  35. You definitely get an A+ from me on this one John – what a colorful post – not just your photos which are beautiful, but for the image of you at the farmer’s market. You really cracked me up with your adventure. These things happen to me too when I get to a great market and everything looks too good to pass up. I certainly admire your energy though with saving the bounty before heading off your trip. Good job!

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    • Thanks, Diane, Once I walked into that beet display, I really had no choice. I would have looked like a bum walking around the market with my shirt looking like that. At least the bag of beets would give my “look” some context — I hope. 🙂 When I remembered I was leaving, either I went vegetarian for a few days or pickled them all. I chose the latter and came home to a nice collection of pickled beets.

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  36. You certainly have the knack of bringing back childhood memories for me, John. My dear Mom used to make the most delicious picked beets, my mouth is watering as I type this! Oh how I miss them. I’ve not had the picked radishes, but to be honest, there isn’t a pickle out there I wouldn’t love! I would be right over to trade (perhaps with cookies? Or Hungarian cheese sticks? Cherry squares?) if we lived a little closer.

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    • I’m so glad, Eva, that this or any post can bring to mind such warm memories. It’s an added — and totally unexpected — benefit of blogging. I’m with you about pickles. It’s the vinegar. I love the tang that vinegar brings to a dish. Wouldn’t it be something if, instead of this being a virtual community, it was a real neighborhood in which we all lived? Can you imagine? 🙂

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  37. They look delicious, John! You know I’m still walking around the idea of canning…much like you did a while back 😉 But if I finally decide to start with this, I’ll know where to find the best recipes 😉
    Thanks for sharing! Can’t wait for that risotto 😉

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    • Thanks, Giovanna, and yes, I was a reluctant canner, to say the least. You’d never believe it if you saw all of the jars around here. 🙂 The risotto is coming, I hope you’ll enjoy the recipe.

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  38. What yummy little jars you’ve got there John! I LOVE beets but I’m just too lazy to pickle them. I roast them or grill them and eat them right away! Sure would love to try your radishes too… I always begin with the intent on canning, but just don’t get around to it. I admire you, as always!

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    • Thanks, Lidia, you are too kind. After all, you’ve a family to look after. I have a dog. That gives me the advantage of time that you just don’t have. If you do get some time, though, do try the radishes. They’re not cooked so they maintain their crispness in the pickle. They are so good! 🙂

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    • Oh, Michelle. You’ve no idea. I just made another batch of radishes and a double batch of giardiniera. This with 2 more bunches of beets in the fridge and tomorrow I hope to make some tart cherry jam. The Kitchens be hopping this time of year!

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  39. I do relate to coming home with too much from the Farmer’s Market, John. I somehow lose all perspective on time, or how much we can even eat, when I’m in those stalls with such beautiful produce, especially this time of year. I read each recipe carefully and I think each one is just delicious. I love the addition of the cloves in the beets, and I’m sorry you felt you had to make more for your friends. I’d have told them to just look out for the cloves! LOL! And I love Chioggia beets. I’m really eager to bring some home and take your lead. You went to a lot of work, John, but each of these is just wonderful!

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    • Thank you so much, Debra. It’s good to know I’m not aline. And we’re not alone. Today, while I was waiting to purchase jalapeños for my giardiniera, the woman before me spent $56 dollars from that one vendor. I don’t know what she bought but it all went into her 2 shopping bags without any problem. I felt better about my 2 filled shopping bags after that. Chioggia beets really are special. I just wish pickling them didn’t bleed out their color. Don’t worry about the cloves in my beets. Sure, I could have given them away as planned but now I have a nice supply of pickled beets that I wouldn’t have if I gave them away. 😉

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    • Thanks, Anne. It was a great visit. I’d never really considered pickling before but, then again, I never had so many beets and radishes either. THis worked out really well, I must admit. 🙂

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  40. Pingback: The Kitchens are in a Pickle | Italian Food &am...

    • Thanks, Stefano, and you’re so right. Instead of trying to eat, carry the produce with me, or, worse yet, waste it, I now have some pickled beets on the shelf and pickled radishes in the fridge. Not bad! 🙂

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    • Thanks, Tanya, I had a wonderful trip home. You’re right, too, it was nice to see pickled beets & radishes here. I, also, took a couple of jars home for Zia. Everybody wins. 🙂

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  41. When I was reading this, I was imaging you with mud and beet juice on you. That sounds like something that I would do. I love these recipes. I havent canned in a very long time. I think that you have awaken the urge for me to do that again.

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    • Yes, I was quite the sight. I’m just fortunate I didn’t run into any friends. That’s normally when I run into just about everyone I know. 🙂
      Thanks for dropping by and taking the time to comment. Let me know how the canning goes. 😉

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  42. Wow, how cool John! I love pickled radishes, tried it a few times at my friend’s house and got recipe from them. t’s different, so I need to try your recipe too. I am in a canning mode also: made four 1/2 jars of pickles today. 🙂

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    • Hello, Marina. I hope all’s well with you and your family. Yes, it is the season, isn’t it? I made another batch of radishes and a double batch of giardiniera today. And I’ve 2 more bunches of beets to pickle. I hope you’ll share your friend’s recipe for pickled beets. I’d love to give it a try.
      I hope things settle down for you soon, Marina. The blogosphere just isn’t the same without you. 🙂

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  43. The pickled radishes look really tasty. I’ve never tried them before…I might persuade my sister to experiment with this recipe. (She’s just finished picking beets for the entire family, so moving her into radish production should be a breeze.)

    Now, I just read that people sometimes sterilize their jars & lids in the oven instead of boiling them. Have you heard of this method? Have you tried it?

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    • If your Sister has been pickling beets, she will find this radish recipe to be a breeze. It’s meant to be refrigerated so there’s no need to process them in a hot water bath. I’ve seen recipes where jars are put in the oven and Zia even mentions that she & Mom did it that way years ago. From what I’ve seen, however, it’s no longer an approved method. I just googled it and here’s something from the University of Maine that says if the hot water bath is less than 10 minutes, some bacteria can survive so the jars must be sterilized in boiling water before use. Any filled jars in boiling water for longer than 10 minutes will be sterilized. Here’s the webpage. I hope it helps. http://umaine.edu/publications/4078e/

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  44. It’s a common problem at farmers markets, we eat with our eyes, via our wallets and then we have to cart it all home. I have beets in the crisper from a while ago, but they still look ok, and though I may not get to pickle them (ref my comment to Eha) I will bake them 🙂

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    • That’s it exactly. I cannot say “No!” while at the market, surrounded by so much fresh produce. I have beets in my crisper, too, and I just made another batch of pickled radishes. They were a big hit. Not only that, but today I made a double batch of giardiniera. Luckily, most of these jars are destined for other households. In the long run, I’ll save space because I’ll be getting rid of some of these empty jars. 🙂

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  45. Pickled radishes and beets, a brilliant and yes, delicious idea! I agree, we need to empty the fridge when going out of town but then who can resist the inviting produce at a Farmer ‘s market? Your plan B was totally a great idea. As for the burger, now I’m craving for one. Have a awesome week!

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    • It’s as if the vendors at the farmers market are Sirens, beckoning me to come and buy as much as I can carry. The problem is, I listen to them. 🙂
      Have a great week!

      Like

    • Thanks, Sawsan. In reality, the job of picking was relatively easy. Getting together all of the equipment and preparing it for use after many months in storage, was really the hardest part of all. I would have preferred waiting another month or two. 🙂

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  46. Pingback: Endless simmer | one equals two

  47. Bonjourno John, I hope by now you are well on your way to Michigan and enjoying your visit. Bring a sweatshirt, as I heard the evenings are quite cool dropping down to 50 degrees F. I have not pickled a thing since I lived at home and you have my mouth watering thinking of how good those item would taste in a salad. I love how each of the pickles have a little unique seasoning and flavourings. Which one is your favourite? I think I would love to try the radish recipe and as we only usually can get diakon radishes here in HK will see how the exchange goes. Have a super summer and take care. BAM

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    • Buona notte, BAM! I’ve been to Michigan and returned, I’m sorry to say. Yes, the temps did take a dive, unseasonably. Ours here did, too. It’s all the jet stream’s fault, or so they say. Of the 3 pickles, I love the radishes the best. They are so good and can be used in so many ways: on sandwiches, burgers, & hot dogs or in salads, you name it. They’ve got a good crunch, too, and depending upon the radish used, some are a little bit peppery. In other words, perfect! 🙂

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  48. WOW! Look at these pictures! I’ve never had beet pickles and not really a fan of beets, but I definitely thing I would enjoy these. Also love those radish pickles. Such lovely jars of goodness! Any of these would be fabulous additions to salads and sandwiches. I’m definitely craving some pickles right now.

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    • You’re right on all counts, MJ. Any of these are good as they or when served in salads or atop sandwiches. I wish I had started pickling them all years ago. Having jars on-hand is very convenient when searching for a side dish.

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