Homemade Gnocchi in Gorgonzola Sauce

Gnocchi in Salsa di Gorgonzola

“The future ain’t what it used to be” and today’s post is the proof. You may have noticed last week’s “Coming Soon …” photograph depicted a recipe called “Jack BRICKhouse CHICKEN” and, as a result, you may have deduced that was to be today’s recipe. Well, guess again. That recipe is scheduled for next week — has been all along — and cannot be rescheduled for reasons that will become apparent in the post. I must admit that it came as a surprise for me to learn that I cannot read a calendar and my newly found malady did leave me in a bit of a lurch for this week’s post. All’s not lost, though, since I’ve a bagful of recipes from my recent visit with Zia from which to choose. Because so many of you were interested in my family’s risotto, I set to work writing that recipe and blog entry. All was going swimmingly until Saturday morning when I noticed that Stefan, of Stefan’s Gourmet Blog, posted his recipe for Risotto with Peas & Mint. The very next day, Nick, of Frugal Feeding, posted his recipe for Tomato and Basil Risotto. That’s when I began to rethink my post. The third and final blow was struck when Paul, of That Other Cooking Blog, posted his recipe for Risotto al Nero di Seppie (squid ink risotto). Deciding that my post could be postponed a bit, I went back to the bag of recipes from my visit home and pulled out today’s gnocchi recipe. Even so, if all of this talk of risotto has you yearning for the creamy rice dish, be sure to check out those 3 recipes and, while you’re at it, spend a little time looking around each blog. You will not be disappointed.

One of the first things we kids were allowed to help make in the kitchen were gnocchi. Mom and Zia would make the dough and then hand us a piece to roll into a log, though we called them snakes. With a butter knife we were taught how to cut the snake and, depending upon the gnocchi’s use, we might even have been allowed to try to roll them across a fork’s tines to make the grooves. By “use” I mean whether dinner guests or family were to dine on the fruit of our labor. Mom always put her best gnocchi forward for company and she took charge of the groove-making, reshaping any malformed gnocchi along the way. Unlike today’s recipe, however, Mom’s gnocchi were always served with her meat sauce.

Although I’ve enjoyed gnocchi with gorgonzola at restaurants, I never thought about replicating the recipe at home until several years ago. My Entertainer Friend mentioned how much he enjoyed gnocchi with bleu cheese and I thought I’d come up with a recipe and treat him. Over the years, I’ve tried a number of variations, using several spices and herbs, and eventually switched from bleu cheese to gorgonzola, but I always came back to the simple recipe I’ll share today. It’s yet another example of “Less is More.” As for my Entertainer Friend, now that I’ve reminded him, I’d better start planning that gnocchi dinner.

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Gnocchi in Gorgonzola Sauce Recipe

yield: roughly 1.5 lbs (680 g)

Ingredients

  • 2 large russet potatoes, once cooked, peeled, & riced = 18 oz (510 g) (See Notes.)
  • 2 cups (10.2 oz; 290 g) all-purpose flour
  • 1 large egg, slightly beaten
  • corn meal or additional flour for dusting surfaces
  • 5 oz (142 g) gorgonzola, crumbled, more or less to taste (See Notes)
  • 1/2 cup (118 ml) heavy cream, more or less to taste
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  • grated or flaked Pecorino Romano cheese for garnish — Parmigiano Reggiano may be substituted

Directions

To make the gnocchi

  1. Pre-heat oven to 400˚ F (204˚ C). Use a fork to pierce the potatoes numerous times.
  2. Place potatoes on center rack and bake until cooked, from 50 to 60 minutes, depending upon potato size.
  3. Meanwhile gather the other ingredients. Allow the egg to come to room temperature.
  4. Once cooked, remove potatoes and set aside until they can be safely handled.
  5. Slice each potato in half, lengthwise, and use a spoon to scoop out all of potato, reserving the skin for some other purpose.
  6. Run cooked potatoes through a ricer or food mill. (See Notes.)
  7. Use the riced potatoes to create a mound on a floured work surface. Make a well in the center of the mound, as you would when making pasta dough.
  8. Sprinkle the top of the well’s walls with 3/4 cup of flour. Place the egg in the center well after the potato has cooled enough so that the egg won’t cook.
  9. Using a fork, slowly combine the potato & flour with the egg. Once the dough renders the fork useless, continue mixing the dough with your hands.
  10. The dough should come together within 4 to 5 minutes. It will be ready when it is firm and a little moist-to-the-touch without being tacky. Add more flour as needed but remember: the less flour used, the better.
  11. Form a ball with the dough and divide it into fourths.
  12. Take one-quarter and divide it in half. Roll one of the sections into a log with a width of your preference. We normally roll them about an inch (2.5 cm) thick — the width of an index finger.
  13. Use a sharp knife or board scraper to cut the log into segments, each 1/2 (1.3 cm) to an inch (2.5 cm) long.
  14. If grooves are desiredFlour the back of a dinner fork, place a segment at the top of the tines, use your finger to roll it over the tines, creating gnocchi with grooves on one side and a dimple where your finger rolled it.
  15. If grooves aren’t wanted: Use a finger to push and roll each segment across the work surface, creating smooth surfaced gnocchi with dimples where you’d placed your fingers.
  16. Place the gnocchi on a lined baking sheet that’s been dusted with flour or corn meal.
  17. If not going to be cooked within a few hours, place the gnocchi-covered baking sheet in a freezer and once the gnocchi are frozen solid, place them in containers/bags suitable for freezer storage.

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To cook the gnocchi

  1. Bring a large pot of salted water to the boil over high heat.
  2. Once the water boils, add the gnocchi and stir gently.
  3. When the water resumes boiling, reduce the heat to a simmer and notice when the gnocchi begin to float. This should only take a couple of minutes when fresh and a few more when the gnocchi are frozen. Gnocchi will be ready about 1 minute after the last start floating. If in doubt, taste one.

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To prepare the gorgonzola sauce

  1. While waiting for the water to boil, heat the cream in a small sauce pan over medium heat.
  2. Once the cream is hot, add the gorgonzola and stir until melted. Taste and adjust, adding more cream or gorgonzola to suit your own taste. If you prefer, you can add a bit of the water used to cook the gnocchi to thin the sauce without adding more cream.
  3. Don’t forget to taste and season with salt & pepper, if required.

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To assemble and serve

  1. Use a hand strainer — “Spider” strainer — to remove the gnocchi from the boiling water and place in the serving bowl. Add the gorgonzola sauce and mix gently until all are coated.
  2. Serve immediately, garnished with grated/flaked Pecorino Romano cheese.

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Variations

Like most Italian dishes, there are many recipes around for making gnocchi. No matter which recipe you choose to follow, 2 rules will apply. 1) The fluffier the smashed/riced potato the better, and, 2) the less flour the better. Keep those 2 rules in mind and you’ll be well-rewarded with a most palatable platter of puffy potato pillows rather than the much less than spectacular spud scuds.

One popular variation for preparing gnocchi is to bake them before serving. Follow the directions above for making and cooking the gnocchi, as well as making the gorgonzola sauce. Use all the sauce to dress the gnocchi and place in a baking dish. Top with grated cheese or bread crumbs that have been moistened by olive oil or butter. Bake in a 375˚ F (190˚ C) pre-heated oven for 20 to 25 minutes or until hot & bubbly with a golden brown topping.

Even after being reduced, some may want a thicker sauce. (Bear in mind it will thicken once taken off the heat and begins to cool.) If you want a very thick sauce, you can start by making a roux. Melt 2 tbsp of butter in a small sauce pan. Add an equal amount of AP flour and whisk until fully blended. Allow to cook for 2 to 3 minutes. Do not let the roux darken or it will color your cheese sauce. Add the half the cream and whisk till incorporated. Add the remaining cream and keep whisking as it heats and begins to thicken. Once thickened, about 5 minutes, add the gorgonzola and keep whisking until melted. If too thick, you can adjust by adding more cream or some of the water used to cook the gnocchi.

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If they’re all identical, no one will believe you made them.

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Notes

Much like making pasta, making gnocchi is not an exact science. The moisture in the potatoes, the size of the egg, the humidity, and even the brand of flour can all affect the amount of flour required. As was mentioned, use as little flour as possible to create a firm, slightly moist-to-the-touch dough that isn’t at all tacky.

I used 2 large russet potatoes that weighed 26.8 oz (760 g). Once baked, peeled and riced, they weighed a total of 18 oz (510 g). For accuracy I weighed the flour, starting with 2 cups or 10.2 oz (290 g). When I was finished, the remaining flour weighed 4 oz (114 g), meaning I used a little over 1 cup of flour for a little over a pound of riced potatoes. Lastly, to determine the yield, I weighed the frozen gnocchi before bagging. Your yield may vary due to the above-mentioned factors.

Not everyone has a potato ricer or food mill and I seriously doubt that my Nonnas had either one. They used a large fork to smash the potatoes and there’s no reason you can’t do the same. You can, also, use a potato masher or a box grater, if need be. Just be sure to use a fork to fluff the smashed potatoes as much as possible before proceeding.

It had been some time since I last made this dish when I prepared it for Zia. As a result, I misjudged and used a full cup (236 ml) of heavy cream with 5 oz (142 g) gorgonzola. That resulted in a very runny sauce. Thankfully, gnocchi was to be our primo piatto so I was able to reduce the sauce to the consistency I wanted without affecting the rest of the dinner. Today’s recipe uses half the amount of cream I used for that dinner.

It’s not a bad idea to have extra gorgonzola and cream on-hand the first time you make this sauce, just in case your idea of the perfect gorgonzola sauce differs from mine. You can add more cheese or cream, as required.

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It’s déjà vu all over again … 

Blueberry

I don’t care what the weatherman says. The calendar says it’s June and that means it’s ice cream season. Time to dust off the ice cream machines and get those canisters into the freezer. Now I’ve shared several ice cream recipes but this one, blueberry swirl cheesecake, is Number One among family, friends, friends of family, and families of friends — but don’t take our word for it. Try it for yourself. You can find the recipe by clicking HERE.

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Coming soon to a monitor near you … 

Jack BRICKhouse CHICKEN

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204 thoughts on “Homemade Gnocchi in Gorgonzola Sauce

  1. Lovely John, one of my all time favourite Italian dishes. I can’t eat it much anymore – getting a bit lactose-intolerant in my old age – but looking at your photos I can actually taste it in my mind. I inherited my neighbour’s ricer when she passed away – she used it for making gnocchi all the time! 🙂

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    • Thank you, Celia. I know what you mean. I’m not severely lactose intolerant but I wouldn’t drink a couple glasses of milk either. And I wouldn’t go back for a second helping of these gnocchi, too. Makes me savor them all the more. Zia gave me the ricer that I used here. 🙂

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      • I recommend lactAse tabs to help your system digest lactose, they are cheap and available over the counter in Australia. I can now eat dairy without regret after years of intolerance.

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        • Thank you so much. I will definitely look into this. Like I mentioned, I do not have a major dairy problem like so many others and an OTC remedy will handle it just fine.

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  2. I am so happy to see this post John! Gnocchi is my absolute favourite Italian food. I look for it in restaurants and make it often. I too have recruited my children to roll the “snakes”. I have not tried the Gorgonzola sauce though and since I like blue cheese, I will definitely try it next time. It’s funny, I was going to email you about a family gnocchi recipe..you must’ve read my mind!
    On the other note, I just put my canisters in the freezer yesterday! Ready for ice cream making. After months of snow and cold, Denver is at a searing 95 degrees the last few days, it’s just too hot for me.

    Nazneen

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    • Thank you, Nazneen. I’m so glad that you enjoyed this post. Yes, we rolled many snakes in our youth and I can’t help but think of those times when I make gnocchi today. I bet one day your children will do the same. 🙂 95˚ already? That’s hot! Once the needle goes to 95˚, I start to melt. I’m not very good in weather that hot. I hope it cools off for you. Have a good week!

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    • Thanks, Angeline. I tried to “improve” the sauce, adding garlic, nutmeg, onion, thyme, and heaven knows what else. I always came back to this recipe. Go figure! 🙂

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  3. For a gal who is forever boring others with the ‘I don’t eat potatoes’ bit I sure love gnocchi tho’ I have not made them awhile. Adore gorgonzola . . . 🙂 ! Shopping Friday: guess what’s just gone on the shopping list! As you say less is more and that has all the pure. real flavour anyone needs [well, have to get around the full cream bit 😉 !] And making these ‘puffy potato pillows’ has always felt therapeutic to me!! As for Stefan’s risotto, have already made and very much enjoyed it, even tho’ a tad more wine went into the making . . .

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    • Thanks, Eha. I’m sure that the sauce could be made using a lower fat dairy product, though a roux may be needed to thicken it. I agree that making gnocchi is indeed therapeutic, as is making ravioli or even just plain pasta. Whether alone or with Zia, I do so enjoy getting everything set up before spending a couple of hours in my own little pasta world. Yes, I could see that Stefan’s risotto recipe was a good one, as are the other 2 recipes I highlighted. The fact is, 2 more blogs that I follow posted risotto recipes since this was posted. Too funny! I haven’t seen any gnocchi posts, though … well, not yet anyway. 🙂

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      • Who would dare ? 🙂 ! [said in the nicest possible way re other bloggers, with a big smile on my face – but honestly . . .]

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  4. Thank you for this detailed, step-by-step recipe which has encouraged me to think of making gnocchi again for the first time for years. I think the last time I made them they ‘melted’ in the cooking water and put me off trying again! “If they’re all identical, no one will believe you made them” – I like that. This is real food!

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    • I’m so glad you like the post and I do hope it emboldens you to try again. Although I’ve never had any dissolve like that, I have had more than a few batches that had all of the texture and lightness of rocks. From what Zia said, if the dough is too soft/moist, the gnocchi will not hold together. If too much flour is used, the pillows will be anything but light and fluffy. It’s a tightrope you’re walking but, if you get it right, it’s pure bliss on a plate. 🙂

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  5. Mmmmm now THIS looks delicious! I’m hungry already and I’ve only just had my breakfast!

    It’s always a shame when you’ve put so much work into a detailed post (as you always do) and another blogger in your niche posts a similar post. Still, you’ve earned yourself a “free week” in a month or two!

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    • Thank you, Marianne. This is a great dish but a rich one. It’s such a great starter.
      I found the risotto thing rather funny, to be honest. In fact, 2 more bloggers have posted risotto recipes. I must have missed the memo announcing Risotto Week on WordPress. 🙂

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    • Wait. You mean they’re two different things? That would explain so many missed appointments.
      It would please me no end to know that this inspired you to make your wife some gnocchi, Roger. Good luck.

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  6. Bonjourno John! Love this recipe and post but quick you need to hide it from my family… If they realize that you and Zia made this at home together without speciality Italian ingredients, they will never leave me alone again until I make it for them. I know my husband would love the gorgonzola sauce and my boys would love Zia’s meat sauce. I love how you mention that the making of this is not an exact science as it really does just depend of the size of the eggs, etc. Maybe even more importantly is your experience with priming the dough to the perfect texture. As Zia would tell us, that comes from experience!! Indeed. I am sure she has made them a few times before as you can tell by her perfectly shaped gnocchi. Take care, BAM

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    • Buona sera, BAM! Much of this post’s instructions came from both Mom and Zia. I remember talking about gnocchi with Mom over the phone years ago and, of course, Zia’s words were spoken just days before this post was written. And I remember, as a boy, watching Mom forming the dough countless times, hoping that this would be one of the times she’d give me dough and I could roll snakes. The prepared dinners of today just don’t rob us of nutrition, we also miss out on the stuff of which warm memories are made. Have a great week, BAM. 🙂

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  7. There have been a batch of risotto recipes hasn’t there! Guilty of it myself 😉 This is a lovely dish John, great recipe and notes! I first tried this in a little, unremarkable, restaurant in Tuscany and I loved it. It was one of those typical Italian places where the atmosphere makes it.

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    • Guilty? Heavens no! I saw your risotto recipe and it’s a good one. I only wish I had I seen it earlier. I would have referenced it in my post. I’m glad that you not only enjoyed the post but that it reminded your of a meal in Tuscany. I’ve been there a couple times and cannot wait to return one day.

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  8. I particularly enjoy gnocchi with blue cheese, and thanks for your great tips. I’ve not tried baking gnocchi before and also (maybe surprisingly) have not eaten them with a meat sauce, like your Mom would have made either. Thanks for the ideas!

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  9. As always a well written recipe that makes me want to reach for my ricer! I particularly like the idea of the meat sauce. The picture of Zia rolling the Gnocchi over the fork tines rather than the fork over the Gnocchi I think might be a little secret of making the perfect Gnocchi!

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    • Thank you so much, Maria. I cannot begin to tell you how many times I watched Mom, Zia, and Nonna roll gnocchi over the back of a fork. It was nice watching Zia do it again. It’s been many years since I’d seen her do it. 🙂

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    • Next time someone announces a theme week, I hope I get the memo! 🙂
      Your’s was a great risotto recipe and I want to give it a try. Meanwhile, I’m glad you enjoyed this gnocchi recipe. Thank you.

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  10. Oh dear – before I get lost in Risotto recipes, and ice cream and things – a question about the gnocchi (oh they do look gorgeous, and I’m determined to try making them, when I get settled!) – the quantity you’ve prepared here – 680g – would that be for six as a primo piatto?

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    • I am so bad with portions, Meredith, so I searched for DeCecco gnocchi and looked at the packaging. It claims 165 g per serving. That would mean this recipe makes 4 servings. Now that’s not for a primo piatto nor, would I imagine, for a sauce as rich as one with gorgonzola and heavy cream. I think your estimate of 6 servings would be spot on. Serve your guests much more and they may not finish the rest of the lovely dinner you prepared. 🙂 I hope this helps.

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  11. One of my favorite Italian dish. I am coming for dinner. Can you believe I never made gnocchi? Meaning to but never got around to doing so. Gave my ricer to my son-in-law but I have a food mill so no excuse, especially with your clear and easy to comprehend tutorial and photos.

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    • Thank you, Norma, but you are so busy all of the time, that I don’t now when you would find the time to make gnocchi. I do hope you find some time, though. Homemade gnocchi are not at all like store-bought. 🙂

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  12. Great post, John, with an exceptionally generous first paragraph (we would probably have just shaken our heads and plowed ahead as planned). Is there any better comfort food than gnocchi? I have to say I’ve never had them bake–a new one for the list. When our son was still a baby I tried making gnocchi one night to surprise my wife. She arrived home just at the rice-the-potatoes stage. I didn’t have a ricer, and clearly didn’t understand the principle because I just threw them in the food processor. Jody walked in and asked me what I was making. “Gnocchi,” I replied. She glanced down at the empty potato skins and the whirring food processor. “No, you’re not,” she said. “Not anymore.” Ken

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    • Thanks, Ken. There’s been another 2 risotto posts in this little section of WP. I honestly didn’t know we had theme weeks. 🙂
      Your gnocchi story reminds me of the many times I called Mom with a question about a family dish that wasn’t quite the success I had envisioned. I knew I’d taken a wrong turn when Mom grew very quiet. Zia is very much the same way. Back then, I learned to call Mom before I started to cook and, today, I shut up, watch Zia, and learn. 🙂

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    • I’m just glad I realized my mistake on Friday and not on Sunday or Monday. I never would have gotten another post written in time. I do hope you give this sauce a try, Maureen. If you like gorgonzola, you will really like this sauce. 🙂

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  13. Gnocchi is also a favorite and I haven’t made it in many years – as to the Gorgonzola sauce, I always have problems “adjusting” its seasoning, so I more or less gave up on making it. I should re-visit. The ice cream sounds wonderful….

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    • Thanks, Sally. I, too,had problems adjusting the seasoning. I tried a number of herbs and spices. Every time either the I didn’t use enough and you couldn’t taste the spice or herb, or, I used too much of the herb/spice and it ruined the sauce. I just couldn’t seem to get the right balance. Finally, after having eaten so many dishes of so-so gnocchi, I went back to a sauce of just gorgonzola and cream. Perfection! 🙂

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      • I tried your recipe last week and my husband and I really loved it. The gnocchi were quite easy to prepare and I liked that, especially these days!
        The result was really yummy 🙂
        Thanks for sharing your recipe!

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        • I’m so glad you tried and both of you enjoyed the recipe, Carine. It took me years to try making them myself because I thought them too difficult. Once I made them, though, I found them far easier to make than I had thought. (Mom was right all along!) Now I’m hooked and make them frequently. They’re much better than those available in the markets.
          Thanks for coming back to let me know your thoughts — especially since they were good. 🙂

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  14. Funny: I was about to post a risotto primavera but maybe I will delay that post and substitute it with something else. A sweet, perhaps? But thank you for the introduction to “that other food blog,” and thanks for blogging one of my favorite ways to serve gnocchi. I made them recently using a ridiculous but fun new tool: a gnocchi paddle. I roll them out on rice flour, which doesn’t contain gluten and drops away from the gnocchi as you cook them (a trick taught me by a chef at an Italian restaurant).

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    • Just when did WordPress start theme weeks and why wasn’t I notified? 🙂
      I have one of those paddles, bought ages ago. Both Mom and Zia thought it a ridiculous waste of money especially when there was a drawer with plenty of forks in each of our kitchens. It wasn’t used for this post because I didn’t remember to bring it with me to Michigan. Thanks, too, for the rice flour tip. I will definitely give it a try.

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  15. Oh Man, John: not only did you post an awesome recipe (I totally LOVE gnocchi, although I will confess that my absolute favorite ones are those with pesto or with meat sauce as your Mom used to make) but you also brought back a flurry of childhood memories when I too was giddy with excitement whenever my Grandma made me help with the gnocchi rolling process! What fun it was! And, if you ask me, it ain’t gnocchi if they’re not groovy! 😉 Thanks as always for sharing so many wonderfully authentic dishes of our common culinary heritage.

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    • Thank you, Stefano, for always being so encouraging and complimentary. It’s always a thrill for Zia and I to see these family recipes so well-received by those with whom we share a common heritage.
      Wasn’t it a thrill to be able to help make gnocchi? I think we asked for gnocchi for dinner so often just in the hope that we’d be allowed to help. I also agree that gnocchi have to be groovy to be good. No shortcuts here!

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  16. I love the risotto recipes you shared today, but I mess confess I have a weakness for Gorgonzola! I have been wanting a tried and true gnocchi recipe, I’m happy you posted this today John!

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  17. Beautiful, beautiful gnocchi, John! I’m adding this to my “dinner” list for sure. I’ve had these in a restaurant, but I can tell that yours would be ever so much more delicious. I thought at first you’d grated some nutmeg over the top when I saw that close up photo. Do you think that would be good or too over the top? Can’t wait for ice cream…I may get some of the first peaches today and it’s way up in the 90’s here this week…time for it! 🙂

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    • Thanks, Betsy, for always being so complimentary. In the past, I added nutmeg to the sauce but either it got lost or I added too much. Grating a little on top, though, might be just the ticket. Like a grated cheese garnish, it would accent the dish. Why not make the dish and then grate a little nutmeg and taste them before bringing the dish out of the kitchen. If it passes muster, then grate a little nutmeg over the entire platter. Just be sure to come and tell me how it went. I’ll gladly add a note detailing your success. 🙂
      Yes, I cannot wait to break out the ice cream machine!

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      • Gosh, what’s not to compliment, John? With little exception, everything you make looks divine and like something I’d love. 🙂 Great idea about the taste testing of the nutmeg on the gnocchi…a great excuse to get an extra nibble in, too, not that I need one! So that must have been the ground pepper on top that I saw in your photo.

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        • AH! Yes, it was pepper. That’s a constant with most of the dishes I serve myself: a healthy dose of pepper. I must admit, though, I usually add pepper after the pics are taken. I don’t want to frighten anyone. 🙂

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          • I blame Uncle. As a boy, I was too young to pepper my food. When both families ate together, I often sat next to Uncle and he loved his pepper. The aroma of pepper on the freshly grated cheese on his pasta was intoxicating. To this day, I can’t resist it. 🙂

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  18. Those pillowy little gnocchi are just so gosh-darned cute! And I love the shots of your Zia’s hands lovingly making them. My hands, on the other hand 😊, have never made gnocchi. Just what have I been doing with my life all these years? Clearly, I need to get with the program and follow your good example. I might substitute something else for the gorgonzola sauce (just not much of a fan of blue cheese) but there are gnocchi in my future!

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    • Thanks, Mar, for leaving such a nice compliment. Zia will smile when I tell her she should consider hand modeling. 🙂
      Gnocchi are not at al hard to make. Trying to get a feel for the perfect dough is the hard part and I tried to define it as best as I could. Only with doing will you see what I mean. Get the hint? C’mon, Mar. You can do this. As for the sauce, a Parmesan cream would do fine, as would pesto, vodka cream, etc. 🙂

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  19. I sometimes have that calendar problem too! And I wouldn’t have worried about other blogs publishing risotto recipes – they were just a build up for the perfection that I’m sure is yours. 😉 But gnocchi is a wonderful substitute! I’ll never say no to gnocchi, although it’s not a dish I make often enough (just never think to do it, because it’s really not hard – just takes a bit of time). I used to be very much in the camp that wanted a thicker consistency in my Gorgonzola sauce, but in recent years I’ve thinned mine out quite a bit. Great tip, though, to have extra Gorgonzola and cream at the ready, in case one needs to make adjustments on the fly. Great recipe (as usual!). And a very fun read – thanks.

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    • Thanks, John, for the compliments and vote of confidence in our risotto recipe. Who knew WP had theme weeks? 🙂
      I was surprised how quickly it was to make gnocchi. After I came home from Michigan, I made another batch just to fine-tune the ingredient amounts. It honestly took longer to bake and prepare the potatoes than anything else. Once they were baked, riced, and cooled, making the dough and forming the gnocchi were a snap.

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  20. Ah gnocchi, how I love thee. They look utterly amazing, I don’t think I could ever get them to look that good! Like little potato-y pillows. I won’t rest my head on them though, for fear of having hair that smells of gorgonzola sauce for a month 🙂

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    • Thank you! You most certainly could get your gnocchi to look like these. It’s not at all hard and, believe me, I’m pretty much ham-fisted. If I can make these, you certainly can, too. 🙂

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  21. I’ve always wanted to make Gnocchi – and now I’m going to try it!
    You and I were just “talking” last week about how many of our fellow food bloggers seem to think alike as far as posting recipes for similar things either right before – or right after – you & I either posted or planned to post. And the fact that several of the blogs you follow recently posted recipes for risotto proves our point !
    Love this post – and looking forward to your recipe for risotto !

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    • Thank you, Cecile. making gnocchi won’t be at all difficult for you, Remember to use just enough flour to make a firm, ever so slightly moist dough. If your dough is too moist, it will fall apart when you cook them. Too much flour and your little pillows with be more like bricks.
      There were 3 more risotto posts for a total of 5 in less than a week. Great minds really do think alike! Can’t wait to see your shell recipe. Yum!

      Like

      • Too funny – five posts featuring risotto ! Is there some kind of Cosmic Mind out there governing food bloggers !!?? ; o ) And thanks so much for the tips on making gnocchi !!

        Like

  22. What a wonderful overall recipe and excellent tutorial, John. The gnocchi with the gorgonzola sauce really fits my tastes! You’ve de-mystified the process for me quite well, and I can hardly wait to give it a try. I appreciate the note that if they are all uniform they won’t appear homemade! I think the act of preparing these little pieces would be therapeutic–like making clay beads-although I rather like the idea of the segmented snakes! Thanks for the reminder, too, of the blueberry cheesecake ice cream. I have company again this weekend and I just took the ice cream maker out of the box last night. I’m going to prioritize this one–although it looks a little dangerous to me. 🙂

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    • Thanks, Debra, for aways being so appreciative and encouraging. I had you and Kristy in mind while I wrote this post. Once you make gnocchi on your own and get a feel for the dough, this would be a perfect Grandma~Granddaughters project. When you make it by yourself, you’ll see what I mean. Once the dough is made, the remaining steps are simple and make for a great opportunity to work in the kitchen with your Girls. Although I agree with you that this type of work is very therapeutic, I wouldn’t necessarily call it that if the Girls are involved. It will be fun, though. 🙂

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    • Do it, Anna. The most common failures are because the dough is too moist & sticky, or, too much flour has been used. It’s a delicate balance but if I can figure it out, I’m sure anyone can. Truly. Good luck.

      Like

  23. I love making, and eating, gnocchi but we’ve never had them with Gorgonzola! Yum! You know I’m going to try this is as soon as we can. Yours look so good John. They make me forget that you can’t read the calendar anymore, LOL!!! That was so funny. If you can make recipes like this one, you can read any calendar you want. Or none at all. Fantastic!! Thanks for posting this, I promise you that it will be used here shortly.

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    • You are truly my biggest fan, Sarah, and don’t think for a minute I don’t appreciate you and the support. I bet you’ve got a good gnocchi recipe, too. Have you shared it?
      Although it isn’t easy to learn one has a malady at this point in life, I’m glad that my calendar problem has finally been identified. It explains so many missed appointments and late library books. 🙂

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  24. I have to confess that as a child I never liked blue cheese. However, I am now an adult and am learning all kinds of new things. My friend from Pittsburgh once made me homemade gnocchi. This inspires me to now make them for her. These sound and look so rich and enticing and heavenly and well, I am running out of adjectives. Thanks, John!

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    • You’re so welcome, Abbe. Gnocchi aren’t at all hard to make. Considering the may fine dishes I’ve read about on your blog, I know that gnocchi will not be a problem for you. Remember to only use enough flour to make a firm, ever so slightly moist, dough. It shouldn’t be completely dry nor should it be tacky. Find that point of balance and you will really be rewarded. 🙂

      Like

  25. I must admit, this is the dish I miss the most since I don’t eat pasta out anymore! I do manage to steal a few fork fulls from JT when he orders it. We perfected our gnocchi recipe to the point where we were rather disappointed at restaurants so we stopped ordering it and just made it at home. I bought a fantastic gnocchi ridge maker in Venice from a street vendor selling kitchen supplies on a cart, very cool!
    Your friends are very lucky to have you, you are very thoughtful to make these wonderful favourites for them.
    I’ve had that calendar issue happen with WP and it’s not pleasant, once I even posted two posts the same day — now that was annoying! I couldn’t take one down because people had already started commenting!

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    • Thanks, Eva, and I admire you for being able to cut carbs like you have. I need to do it — or something similar — but could never go without my pasta. So many Bartolini ancestors would spin in their graves if I tried. 🙂
      I, too, have a gnocchi paddle that Mom & Zia thought was a ridiculous waste of money. “We’ve got plenty of forks!” We didn’t use it in Michigan because I didn’t think to bring it with me.
      Although I’ve had WP date problems, this one was all me. I knew the post was scheduled for the 19th and thought that was today. I skipped over a full week! On the positive side, I’m a week younger than I thought I was. 🙂

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  26. Can you believe I’ve never had Gnocchi? I know I can’t believe it. Yours look absolutely delicious and amazing. I definitely have to try to make this and hope I don’t faily epicly lol.

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    • Oh, Kay. I’d no idea yours was a life of such deprivation. If I lived anywhere near you, I’d be on my way with enough gnocchi that you cold have your fill tonight, with many more in your freezer for future meals. You can make these, Kay, and I’m here to help if you’ve any questions or problems. Just do it! 🙂

      Like

  27. Hi John, great to read how you prepare gnocchi di patate al gorgonzola, because it’s one of my favorite dishes and it was the first ever recipe I posted on my blog! (http://stefangourmet.com/2011/11/30/gnocchi-di-patate-al-gorgonzola/)

    Thanks for the link and nice words. How very thoughtful of you to consider the variety in the blogosphere. I find it hard enough to manage what I post about on my own blog. (Sometimes I have three sous-vide meat recipes lined up and I need to think of what to blog about in between…)
    I’ve learned how to make gnocchi from Biba’s books, and I agree with you that as little flour as possible should be used. I’ve never used an egg though, only potato and 00 flour.
    Homemade gnocchi are vastly better than store-bought. I hope a lot of your readers will be inspired to make them. Excellent post! And another great photo of Zia in action 🙂

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    • Thanks, Stefan. We’re fishing in the same pool. Soon or later we were bound to hook the same fish. 🙂 I was lucky enough to have a number of other recipes to draw from. Besides, there were 2 more risotto recipes posted in our corner of WP. It must be a theme week.
      Even though I’d brought Zia some 00 flour, I didn’t want to use it for fear of messing with her amounts. It would have just introduced another variable into the process that we could do without.
      You are so right about homemade versus store-bought gnocchi. I know a few of my readers will try these, just as they did the wonton ravioli and/or ravioli fillings. I really enjoy reading that they’re giving these old recipes and pastas a try.

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  28. Yum! This sounds just divine, I have always been very wary of trying to make gnocchi myself but your post gives such excellent direction( As always)! I may need to give it a try this weekend! Great post you always make me wish I grew up in your house!

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    • That’s a very kind thing to say and the type my Zia loves to hear. Thank you.
      If you remember to add only enough flour to make a firm, very slightly moist dough, you should be all right. Most problems with gnocchi arise because they are too wet or too much flour was used. Find that balance and you’ll do just fine! 🙂

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  29. Oh now you’ve done it – if my husband sees this he’s going to hound me until I’ve made some. Homemade gnocchi is about his favorite thing & with the cheese sauce, he’d be a happy guy. That ricer is a very nifty gadget you have there (helps to have the tools to get the job done). Your comment about the “use” (company) made me laugh. I bet your mother would be thrilled to see that your gnocchi making is ready for prime time.

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    • Uh, oh! Do I need to overnight gnocchi to your house? I do it to save your marriage. 🙂
      That ricer is Zia’s but, a couple years ago, I mentioned mine had broken and was having a hard time finding a good one. She left the room and came back with the one I now use to make gnocchi here at home.
      You’re tight, Diane. Mom would be thrilled to learn that I really was listening to her way back then. Much Like Zia, she would love to know that I’ve learned her recipes and that so many people like and use them. It really is amazing for us to read that this or that recipe has been so well-received. 🙂

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      • Overnight the gnocchi’s – QUICK!
        I can honestly say that I haven’t come across a recipe of yours that I haven’t loved. I’ll bet your mom would also be amazed that you can fire off these recipes all the way around the world & get instant feedback.

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  30. A very generous approach to having others steal your blogging clothes John. As I type, I realise that not only have I never made gnocchi, I have never eaten them either. I now must redress both situations. Beautiful, generous post and a wonderful walkthrough.
    Best,
    Conor

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  31. I think if I was served this every night for the rest of my life I wouldn’t have any complaints. I just love homemade gnocchi and a creamy blue cheese sauce is my favourite – but so rich though! I love the image of your very individual looking gnocchi and yes, that’s the perfect way to let everyone know you made them. I loved your comment on my blog about the Mustang – oh to be able to buy one for less than $3,000! xx

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    • Thanks, Charlie, and you’re right. This is one rich dish. I can only eat a fraction of what I eat when the gnocchi are dressed with a tomato sauce. That makes it a perfect starter. It’s a great tasting dish, easy to prepare, and a little bit goes a long way.
      That billboard of the Mustang is burned in my memory, Charlie. If I could draw, I’m sure I could replicate it. The new mustang was big news. And, yes, under $3000. Unbelievable!

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  32. We made a gnocchi recipe at a Cooking School for a friend’s 50th birthday. I remember rolling them on some kind of wooden tool?? I can’t wait to try this one, I’m feeling quite confident after the pasta attempt.. and this is the same technique that I love.. the fluffing and squishing of dough between the fingers! You’ve done a great job again explaining the texture and the steps.. and I happen to love gorgonzola. It is past dinner time and I’m now hungry again, lol! Maybe ice cream would do it..I wonder why that naughty idea popped into my head:D

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    • That’s what I’m here for, Barb. 🙂
      The board you remember is a gnocchi board. I bought one years ago and both Mom and Zia thought it a waste of money, especially since we had so many forks. 🙂
      You can do this, too, Barb. Just remember to add only enough flour to make a firm, very slightly moist dough. It shouldn’t be tacky or sticky. It will not take you as long as you may think. The most time-consuming part of the process is baking and ricing the potatoes, as well as the cooling down periods. Other than that, it just zips along. Whatever you do, don’t fret if they don’t look perfect. The ones you make with the last of the dough will look much better than those you first made, and all will look homemade — just as they should!
      I think I just may have some ice cream, too Thanks for the suggestion. 🙂

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  33. I love this post John. I have tried making gnocchi a few times and without much success. I am going to try again after reading your post. I love gnocchi and I’m inspired to get it right. Looking forward to your risotto post too! Never enough risotto recipes in my book and I know you must have some very insightful suggestions. I’ll keep my eye on your blog!

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    • Thank you and do try again. Most failures come from either dough that’s too wet or too dry from too much flour. Use only enough flour so that the dough is no longer sticky or tacky, even though it may be very slightly moist. Once you start working with the dough, you’ll see what I mean. Get the dough right and the rest is easy. And what a dinner you’ll have! 🙂

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  34. I love gnocchi and yours look so tender and pillowy! Actually, I use gnocchi as a litmus test for new Italian restaurants cuz the simpler something is, the more it shows your skill cuz there’s only so much you can do to obfuscate the fact that you’ve turned melt in your mouth starchy dumplings into leaden rocks. Will need to test my “snake” making skills once I come out from the tsunami of strawberries 🙂 Thanks for another gem.

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    • Thanks, Cam, and that’s a good litmus test. You can tell if gnocchi are handmade or store-bought. At a diner, I expect store-bought. At an Italian restaurant, pasta products should all be made on-site. Funny you mention strawberries. Yours is the last comment for the night. I’ve a strawberry shortcake calling my name. Gotta love this time of year! 🙂

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  35. How funny that you posted a gnocchi recipe! I was talking to a pal on Monday and she was asking for my recipe for gnocchi and I had to confess that I hadn’t made them for years. I recounted a story of my mum and I making them when I was young (with lots of love and hours of work) and they looked beautiful – they cooked perfectly and rose to the top, then we drained them and they cinoketey collapsed and ran straight through the colander and down the sink 😦 I will now have to mae sure I make them again and, of course, follow your recipe to the letter!

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    • Thanks, Tanya, for the vote of confidence. What a disappointment! All that work literally down the drain. I’ve never had my gnocchi fall apart like that — but they have tasted more like bricks that fluffy pillows. This recipe, though, has Zia’s seal of approval. I can’t do any better than that! I hope you’ll agree with her when you do try the recipe. 🙂

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  36. Your stories, photos and recipes always create a longing within.
    I definitely need to get to a kitchen store and buy a “spider strainer” and perhaps a potato ricer.
    So much for downsizing! This looks absolutely delicious (no other word will suffice) and I love the tang of Gorgonzola. So rich and satisfying. Looking forward to the risotto and that ice cream season can’t start soon enough. Last day of school is Monday so maybe a cooking fest will be in order when I visit my sister or the family. Love the snakes reference. My grandsons would like that, too.

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    • Thank you so much, Ruth. Your Grandkids will love making gnocchi. It was a big deal for us 6 kids in the two-flat and a couple decades later when the Grandkids all learned. It’s a sure way to get them to clean their plates, too.
      Congrats on the end of the school year! How fast it went by. I know how busy you are but hope that you’ll take a little time to relax and enjoy your Summer. 🙂

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  37. As always a beautiful dish John! I wish I had a bowlful last night as I hunkered down while the storms rolled through! I’ve got to give this a try.

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    • I thought about you, David. Around here, it wasn’t much at all but I read some of the burbs got hit bad. I hope I’m right in assuming that all’s well at your place and garden and that things quiet down now for a while. Thanks for leaving the nice compliment.

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  38. Have you ever wondered why kids roll everything pliable into snakes? that used to be my favourite pastime, many years back. I made a great many snakes and I loved it. I was wondering what a potato ricer is and am glad if I ever decide to make the gnocchi I can just smash them with a fork, it’s the stage I love most about making mashed potatoes, the smashing. I would prefer a thick sauce, so perhaps the roux is a better option for me and I also prefer the baked option topped with cheese, bubbling and golden a the end, sounds so delicious. The Gorgonzola sauce sounds delicious and easy to make, and I bet I can add it to pasta as well? Thanks for sharing John, your stories are always so entertaining and I have learnt a lot about Italian cooking. My next door neighbours are Italian, so I shall be surprising them with some of the Italian vocabulary or cooking tips I learnt whilst visiting your blog like “primi piatto” Have a pleasant day and a wonderful week. Best wishes!

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    • Thanks, Liz, for dropping by and leaving such a great comment. I probably should have left a link to show you all what a ricer looks like. If you click HERE, you can see one listed on Amazon. Riced potatoes are very light and fluffy. They are great for making gnocchi, of course, but also for mashed potatoes.
      You’re right about making snakes. We loved “helping” Mom. She had the patience of Job. 🙂

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      • Is that the ricer? I know it so well. I used it many years ago for making baby food, before the era of food processors. When food processors flooded the market, I threw away my ricer, I just didn’t know it was called a ricer. I think I shall buy one. Thanks for sharing. Have a lovely weekend!

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  39. Gnocchi and Gorgonzola is a dream come true!! Funny, I never make it a home either and wait instead for a visit to my brother’s restaurant to have it. Beautiful Gnocchi John and Zia!

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    • Thanks, Lidia. It had been so long since I made them that I’d forgotten how good homemade can be. Making them with Zia was special in so many ways. I’ll be sure to show her this comment. She’ll love it. 🙂

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  40. I have had Gnocchi a few times, and this looks delicious! I love your tutorial. You are a perfectionist, and I love that you share so many time honored secrets with us. Thank you so much!! Now off to check that ice cream.

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    • Thanks, Minnie. I hope that one day the younger members of my family will want to know how to cook some of the dishes that Grandma or Great Grandma made. By breaking everything down into easy steps, I hope to convince them to make the dishes. I don’t know if I’ll be successful but it’s a plan! 🙂

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  41. I recently attended a cooking class with Maryanne Esposito at a restaurant here near my home….
    Everything they cooked we had for dinner (Speck and Fig Spiendini, Duck Ravioli, Chickpea Meatballs, Pork Shank & Polenta) and by far my favorite of the whole night was the Sweet Potato Gnocchi with a Sage Butter sauce (and I don’t even like sweet potatoes!) I LOVE any Blue cheese (used to eat it with a spoon as a child) Can not wait to try this…

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    • Hello, Jennifer. How lucky to attend a cooking class with Maryanne Esposito. I’ve been a fan of hers for years! That menu sounds delicious and what a treat learning to prepare it all. I hope you enjoy this dish if you make it.
      Thanks for visiting and taking the time to leave a comment. 🙂

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  42. Pingback: Gnocchi at last! | olivesandartichokes

  43. This looks do good. I love the simplicity of the sauce and you’ve almost gotten me to believe that making the gnocchi would be easy too. Maybe I will give it a try – I can think of a couple of willing snake rollers…

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    • Thanks, Siobhan, and making gnocchi is surprisingly easy — and you already have snake rollers on-hand to lighten the burden. If you do make them, I hope you can manage a photo or two of your helpers. 🙂

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    • It had been long time since I made them, Marie, and it is very easy to do. I find making pie pasty much more difficult, to be honest. Yes, Niko looks like a great snake wrangler to me. Please, please, PLEASE take pictures!!!

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  44. I LOVE GNOCCHI!! I used to eat it all the time when I lived in Italy and London but never again did i find a gnocchi that was as good. But aha, NOW I have the recipe. This is another one i can make and will soon. I don’t have a ricer however i have seen them and shall look for one in the stores first, surely i can find one down here.. I think it is lovely that you use Zia’s. I was watering her tree today. the two lower branches will have to be pruned off but i am holding off until the winter due to the nasty blight! But it is looking great, so when I make MY gnocchi using the recipe from Zia and yourself, I shall have to take a photo of it under her tree.. (hopefully not a tree stump!) I agree.. less is best! Love love.. c

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    • Now that will be some picture. You holding a plate of gnocchi under Zia’s tree. She’ll love it, Celi! If you cannot find a ricer nearby, I’m sure we can find one up here. I didn’t realize so many people love gnocchi. I would have posted the recipe ages ago. I know one thing’s for certain. I’ll be making them again soon. They’re not hard to make and they make a great dinner. Have a good morning, Celi. Fingers crossed for Char …

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  45. This is interesting. I have never thought about making gnocchi, ever. But I’m going to give this a go. Just reading through it made me incredibly hungry – and I just finished dinner!

    Thanks for including all the extra tips, too. A neophyte like me is going to need ’em! 🙂

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    • Gnocchi aren’t as hard to make as you might think. I’ve described the process in its entirety; there rae no hidden steps. You can do this, I’m sure of it. Remember: the less flour you use, the better. Good luck! 🙂

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  46. Looks fantastic! And always a yes for blueberry swirl cheesecake ice cream. Looking forward to your risotto (and chicken) post whenever they appear.

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    • Thanks, Liz, Both of these recipes are popular in these parts. The chicken will be posted on Wednesday. I’ve postponed the risotto for a spell. Not to worry, We’ll get there. 🙂

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  47. I’ve been known to mix up calendar dates too… Gnocchi has been on my to make list for a while, and a riceer is on my kitchen wish list… hhmmm, the gorgonzola sauce may just get me moving. Risotto is very “in” at the moment… I like it but homemade gnocchi wins hands down 🙂
    Hope that big storm didn’t impact you.

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    • Thanks, EllaDee. These were the first gnocchi we’ve made in some time and I’d forgotten how really easy they are to prepare. When you make them, I think you’ll be surprised. The severe part of the storms pretty much missed us in the city. Some suburban areas got hammered, though. More are expected Saturday night. We still haven’t settled into Summer weather yet. Once we do, I hope the worst of these storms will disappear. Fingers crossed.

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  48. Well you know this one is one of my favorites. There’s few things better in my book than homemade pasta and gnocchi is at the top of my list. Now if we could just get ours to look as pretty as yours! I’ve never tried gnocchi at home with anything other than our vodka cream sauce. It is incredibly heavy though and I wonder if we would eat more gnocchi if we had some other lighter sauce options. I don’t think Mike would like the gorgonzola sauce, but I bet I could come up with some lighter, creamy options. He would for sure like the meat sauce though. Delicious John! You and Zia ate like kings and queens that week. It sounds like the perfect getaway to me. 🙂

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    • Thanks, Kristy. Yes, we did eat like there was no tomorrow. We usually do OK but that week was beyond all expectations! Although this sauce isn’t heavy, it is incredibly rich. I wouldn’t be able to eat a portion larger than a starter (primo piatto). If Mike doesn’t care for gorgonzola, maybe he’d like a parmesan cream sauce instead. We’ve served them with pesto and a blogger friend followed my recipe and dressed them with a hazelnut pesto. Is the sauce too heavy of the gnocchi? If you think it’s the gnocchi, try using less flour. That will definitely lighten them up a bit. Good luck! 🙂

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  49. Looks delicious as always! I use my crinkle cutter to get the ripple on my gnocchi. 🙂 Trying my pie dough roller once too.

    Don’t worry, during summer vacation, I cannot keep my days and dates straight! You’re in good company!

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    • Thanks! Yo are so crafty! I never would have thought to use either to make the grooves. 🙂
      Maybe we with calendar recognition problems could start a support group. We’d have a devil of a time scheduling meetings, though. 🙂

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  50. As always I have enjoyed reading your post John – from the change in recipe topic (I look forward to reading about the risotto) to reading the story and recipe for gnocchi.

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  51. How nice John! They look fantastic. we dont eat gnocci very often at home, I don’t know why, maybe because I didn’t have the proper recipe for them…until now. Thanks for sharing, my friend! 🙂

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    • You are very welcome, Giovanna. We haven’t made gnocchi ourselves for quite some time. It was a bit of a surprise to see how really easy and quick it was to make them. It won’t be nearly as long before I make them again. 🙂

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  52. Liked the pictures of the Gnocchi though to a rookie like me, the recipe appears way too complicated.

    I wonder what is it that makes a food connoisseur like me avoid cooking altogether.

    Shakti

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    • It’s really not at all hard to do. I broke the process into simple steps. You should have no problems following them. Honestly. 🙂
      Thanks for the visit and for taking the time to comment.

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  53. Less is more!! especially when you already have goodness locked up. Now seeing your wonderful gnocchi reminded me that Liz has not made any homemade pillows of happiness for me in a long long time. I think I’ll clear a space for her in the kitchen, leave the ingredients you’ve provide and hint away. 😉

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    • Thanks, Jed, but will your plan really work? I’ve a feeling she’s just as likely to walk into the kitchen, size up the situation, and ask, “What are YOU making for our dinner?” Either way, good luck! 🙂

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  54. John, can I just come over and have you make me some gnocchi and pasta or whatever you want to make from your family’s table? Your dishes are always so delicious looking and makes you feel so warm inside. Another fabulous recipe!

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  55. Pingback: Homemade Gnocchi in Gorgonzola Sauce | Italian ...

  56. I love homemade gnocchi. In fact, I have made them today and will serve them to my kids who will return from school shortly. LOVED the way you made your gnocchi, and with that sauce, John, it is just mind-blowing! I appreciate the tips you mentioned for a good gnocchi dough. Thanks!

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    • I’m so glad you enjoyed this post. I hope your children liked the gnocchi you prepared for them. When I was a boy, a gnocchi dinner was a real treat! Thanks for visiting and leaving such a nice compliment.

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  57. Bravissimo!! Gnocchi are very hard to make! I remember once trying to make sweet potato gnocchi and it was a mess, but after trial and error, I got them right!! The dish you just made is what I call comfort food: rich soft potato dumplings with a velvety cheese sauce & a touch of ground pepper on top!!

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    • Thank you so much, Ambrosiana. Of course there’s pepper on top. I wouldn’t have it any other way. 🙂
      The best part of these gnocchi was being able to make them with Zia. We had a wonderful afternoon together that day..

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  58. Yum John. I love stinky old gorgonzola (in fact we enjoyed some recently on pizza with sauteed leek). Your gnocchi looks fabulous. Especially love the close-up shot. I’ve been planning a post on pumpkin gnocchi, and yes – the ‘snake’ rolling is my son’s favourite task! Like your mum though, I do the rolling and shaping if the final product is for guests (or indeed, for photographing)!

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    • You Mums all think alike when it comes to gnocchi! And we “boys” do love our snakes.
      I think I’ve inherited my Dad’s love of stinky cheese. I never understood it when I was a boy but how things have changed in just “a few” years.

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    • Thanks, Kathleen. I try to write these recipes for the benefit of the youngest members of my family. They don’t have the teachers I had, so, I try to break everything down into easy-to-follow steps.

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    • Thanks, Eleni. No matter how many times I’ve tried to improve this sauce, I still come back to this “recipe.” It’s embarrassingly simple but oh, so very good! 🙂

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    • 🙂 The work surface doesn’t matter. Over the years, I’ve made gnocchi on whatever clean, hard surface that was available. Most of these photos were taken at Zia’s home when I visited her last. That board is at least 40 years-old and has been used countless times to make every pasta you can imagine. In a couple photos you can see my pasta board. I bought a piece of butcher block countertop at Lowe’s and added trimming so that it would snugly fit one end of my dining room table. It’s light enough to move around but I keep it there unless I’m expecting visitors. 🙂

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    • Thanks, Sawsan. The longest part of the process is prepping the potatoes, Once you get them baked, cooled, peeled, and riced, the rest goes pretty quickly. There’s no need to knead the dough or let it rest like with bread or pasta dough. Just make your snakes, cut them, and get groovy. 🙂
      Good luck!

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  59. Sitting here having a dish of your strawberry cheesecake ice cream…didn’t have Graham cracker for the crumble….added a drizzle of balsamic cream instead……Yum! Need to get a new ice cream maker…have an old cheap one and came out a little icy….tastes good though…

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    • I’m glad you tried and enjoyed the ice cream. I like the drizzle of balsamic you added. yum! Do try it with the crumble, though. It really does give the ice cream that cheesecake feel. The strawberries can get a bit icy because of their water content. Someone suggested a little vodka to help prevent that, saying it was in a Cooks Illustrated recipe. I’ve not tried that yet.

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  60. I love reading about how you spent time in the kitchen and garden as a boy! I love gnocchi, but it seems to complicated to make at home. I am not a big fan of gorgonzola cheese, but your recipe makes it look so inviting!!

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    • Thank you and you shouldn’t feel that gnocchi are too difficult to make. It really is a simple process. Don’t worry about the gorgonzola, either. You can dress you gnocchi with pesto or a tomato sauce with or without meat. You can make these. All you need is some time.

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  61. I’m sure the result is very rewarding but… wow, those gnocchi look like they would be a very time consuming project. I’m very impressed! I don’t think I’d have the patience for it… I love the gorgonzola sauce that goes with your amazing homemade pasta!

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    • You’d be surprised, Amber, at how really easy this is to make. The langest part of the process is baking the potatoes and waiting for them to cool enough so that they can be handled. After that, the dough is a cinch to make and the gnocchi couldn’t be easier to form. Look at it this way, I’ve made them 2 more times since the time Zia and I sat together to make them. Now, if they were that difficult, I doubt I would have made them once in that time frame, let alone twice.
      Thank you for taking the time to go back and read some of the recent posts and comment upon each one. 🙂

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  62. The intricate nature of your recipes is awe-inspiring, John! Your dishes always look beautiful and masterfully created. This gnocchi is certainly no exception. The lucky people who get to share your meals!

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  63. Pingback: How to make potato gnocchi from scratch | Chef in disguise

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