Baked Haddock

Eglefini al Forno

Today’s recipe once again calls upon my family’s breading mixture to keep the fish fillet moist as it adds flavor to the dish. There really is no need for me to explain the breading much more than that for fear of boring you to tears. And I wish I had a great story to tell about haddock but, the truth is, I had originally planned to use baccalà for this post. Then I saw fresh haddock on sale and, well, that piece of salted cod will be used to make a fine salad.

Haddock is a popular fish on both sides of the Atlantic. Having once been over-fished, its numbers have increased and it is now considered a success story here in the US. In our Northeast, specifically the Boston area, young haddock may also be called scrod. That’s a bit of a misnomer, however, because that name is used for both young cod and young haddock. Needless to say, haddock is very similar to cod in both taste and texture, with haddock having a slightly stronger flavor. Like cod, it flakes when cooked so be careful if you try to grill haddock. If you do, it’s probably best to use a grilling basket.

*     *     *

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

*     *     *

As I’ve mentioned in other posts, this breading mixture is used in a number of the Bartolini dishes. To be honest, I never realized how many until I started documenting my family’s recipes. Depending upon its use, it can be more/less moist and with/out lemon juice. Combine bread crumbs, diced garlic, chopped fresh parsley, and salt & pepper in a bowl. In this case, I used the juice of a half-lemon and then enough olive oil to moisten the mixture but not to the point that it’s sopping wet. How much of each ingredient you need will depend upon how many fillets there are to cook and whether you’ve plans for the excess breading. (See Notes.) Under normal circumstances, you’ll want enough breading to adequately cover each fillet, as well as to form a thin layer underneath each piece of fish so that there’s little chance of it sticking while baking. And what if you make too much? Spread it on the baking dish/sheet and roast it along with the fish. Excess breading can be frozen for later use with pasta.

Once the fillets have been breaded and placed on a baking sheet, place them in the center of a pre-heated 375˚ (190˚ C) oven. Your fish should be ready in about 15 minutes, maybe 20 depending upon the thickness of the pieces.  Haddock fillets will be opaque white and flake easily when fully cooked, very much like cod. Remove the baked fillets to a serving dish, garnish will lemons slices, and serve. In the photo, the haddock was accompanied by sautéed artichokes.

*     *     *

Notes

Normally, my family would only put a small amount of bread crumbs under the fish to prevent the fillets from sticking while baking. Here I placed the haddock on a bed that was about 1/3 inch (.85 cm) thick because I had use for those bread crumbs. Once the fish was removed to a serving platter, I used the now-roasted bread crumbs left on the baking sheet to garnish a side dish of pasta aglio e olio instead of cheese.

*     *     *

An Update

I telephoned a 5th company today to inquire about getting the vine removed. Within an hour, they were here and removed the vine within the next hour. They will be back to haul it away at the end of the week. The only real damage sustained was to a single rosebush but it is early enough in the season that it should recover without a problem. Thank you all for your concern and well-wishes.

*     *     *

It’s déjà vu all over again …

Though the weather may not be cooperating, it is definitely grilling season here in the US & Canada. If you’re at all like me, a burger just isn’t a burger if there aren’t pickles on top. Now, as much as I love a good kosher dill, for my burgers and sandwiches, I crave Bread & Butter pickles. Easier to make than you might think, my original recipe didn’t require canning and the pickles were stored in the refrigerator. I’ve since added instructions for canning them. Either way, I think you’ll agree that a few of these tasty slices is the only way to top a burger. Click HERE to learn how to make these great tasting pickles.

*     *     *

Coming soon to a monitor near you …

“Jack BRICKhouse CHICKEN”

*     *     *

Advertisements

163 thoughts on “Baked Haddock

  1. Very glad to hear your vine saga is over John.
    Your haddock looks magnificent. Watching your step-by-step movie really brings on the hunger pangs too! Love the idea of baking and freezing your excess crumbs. Can never have too many crumbs I always say. In fact I’m looking at a kitchen bench positively caked in them, having just made a batch of croquettes.

    Like

    • Thank you, Saskia, It really is a relief to get that vine out of here, though it will take some getting used to seeing that corner of the garage. It looks so bare! Those bread crumbs left in the baking sheet are full of flavor, whether they were used to top off roasted vegetables or fish. It;s a shame to toss them, especially when they make such a great garnish for pasta.

      Like

  2. Mmh: normally I do not use breading as the next step usually is frying and this lady avoids that! But you bake and I daresay I can tweak with panko crumbs and the crumbing is interesting! So, guess what 🙂 ! Don’t remember using lemon juice last time I ‘crumbed’ either, so there is another lesson:) ! And thank you!!! So glad that poor vine has at last been cut down and the rose seems to have survived!

    Like

    • My family really didn’t do much frying, Eha Almost very fish we ate was prepared like this, except baccalà. That was braised in a tomato sauce. I do hop you try it, tweak it, and let me know what you think. If your tweaks work, I’ll be more than happy to give them a try. Yes, the vine is out and waiting to be picked up. I’m very grateful that the damage was so light.

      Like

  3. This sounds gorgeous, John, love the chunky flakes of haddock and cod (favourites for super duper white fish curry!), and I’ve flagged it in my mind for later, when I’m back home. As always, I got waylaid (lost, if truth be told, doing on the internet what I love best about seeing a path, any path, that looks interesting – this time it was your artichokes that did it … ) so before I get lost over pickles, glad to hear you found someone to cut down the collapsed vine but more importantly that there was very little damage. By the way, with Spring so late this year, have you found baby artichokes yet?

    Like

    • Thanks, Meredith, for always being so kind and supportive when you comment. Sounds like we browse WP blogs in much the same way. I may start at point A and be at point M without knowing how or why I got there. I was really quite lucky the way the vine worked out, especially that no one was hurt. Now it’s just a memory. And yes, baby artichokes are back and I’ve bought some every week. I even brought some to Michigan so that Zia could share in the bounty. WIth artichokes and asparagus so plentiful right now, I’m in heaven!!

      Like

      • Thank YOU for your posts that take me places – both mentally and inter-bloggedly!

        So glad to hear the baby artichokes (and some for Zia – terrific!are) and asparagus are abundant – oh indeed, heaven! Any special Bartolini asparagus recipes?

        Like

        • You’re too kind. I find your photography a real delight and look forward to your responses to the weekly challenges. It would be something to sit with you as you determine which of your photos will “make the cut” and be posted.
          We don’t really have any special asparagus recipes. Most often we season them with olive oil, salt & pepper before roasting them in the oven or on the barbecue. Nothing fancy, although hollandaise sauce sometimes comes into the picture. When they are this abundant, I throw them in all kinds of pasta dishes. I’ve shared one HERE. I’ve also got a recipe for asparagus-filled ravioli in the works.

          Like

    • Thank you, Marie. TIme spent RUNNING outside is very important, too. Mom and Zia’s back doors were separated by 2 lots, about 150 feet. When one group of Grandkids were very young and left with Mom and Zia for the weekend, they gave them squirt guns to play with in one yard. The pail of water for refills was in the other yard. The kids ran back and forth all afternoon — and went to bed early and without a problem. 😉

      Like

  4. I am glad you managed to get the vine cleared even though it took 5 attempts. I can only imagine that this 5th companies number is going in your black book for the future? The crust looks divine, and the picture just says ‘eat me’. John another recipe from your family recipe book which I will be copying.

    Like

    • Thank you, Maria, you always being so complimentary. I’ve already spoken with the 5th company about coming back this Fall for some other work. I’ve told them that they have a customer for life now.

      Like

  5. I absolutely LOVE haddock (did you know when the French refer to fish in a dish, they mean haddock? that’s how much haddock is appreciated), and that looks really moist. My mouth is watering!

    Like

    • Isn’t it the best? Pangritata wasn’t something my family used but I’ve been preparing it for some time. using the leftover breadcrumbs from roasted fish or vegetables adds a nice subtle flavor to the pasta. Do give this a try. I bet you’ll love it.

      Like

  6. I’m glad you’re garden will make a full recovery. I love the sound of your breading mixture. I make something quite similar but sometimes I also add a touch of lemon rind. xx

    Like

    • Thanks, Charlie. I, too, sometimes add lemon rind, though I forgot to do so this time. I like how it gives the breading an extra pop of citrus flavoring. I consider myself very lucky the yard damage was so limited, especially with all that’s been happening elsewhere. This was really nothing other than inconvenient.

      Like

  7. you know it is so funny, there is some old school Italians that just won’t part with the family recipes, my youngest sister makes the BEST biscotti cookies, she will not give even me, the baker, the recipe…but the reason I am saying this is because I have a friends whose mom makes the best artichokes oreganata. She uses canned artichokes and drains and leaves them out to dry…then puts on this very mild crumb…I bet your breading would work nicely…I must try…the dish looks lovely, glad the vines issue is cleaned up…m

    Like

    • Thank you, Maria. You’re right about the recipes. Mom’s biscotti recipe was a “secret” given to her by an old family friend. Mom was not at all like that and felt honored when someone asked her how something was made. I look upon her recipes as her legacy and want them used and enjoyed by as many as possible. Although she never called it oreganata, Mom took small-ish artichokes and baked them with a version of this breading. I like the sound of your friend’s version, too. Let’s face it. I pretty much love artichokes no matter how they’re prepared. 🙂

      Like

  8. Ooh that looks so good – in fact anything with breadcrumbs is good in my book! Had to laugh at the word “scrod” as some girlfriends and I refer to a dreadful women’s fashion of an item of clothing that is a mix of skirt and trousers as “scrousers” and it made me think of this 🙂 Oh dear, and I haven’t even had a glass of wine yet. So glad the vine saga is sorted and as you say, roses are tough and I am sure it will soon be blooming again – it wasn’t Miss Elizabeth Taylor I hope (I think she was one of yours)?

    Like

    • Thanks, Tanya. I bet your family has a similar breading mixture. Most do and mine used it in so many dishes. Never heard “scrod” used in relation to fashion. 🙂
      No, It wasn’t Miss Taylor that got hit. She’s fine and about to bloom for the first time this season. The affected rose was the red hybrid tea, Opening Night. It’s the most prolific bloomer, so, I’ve high hopes for her to have a speedy recovery. Fingers crossed.

      Like

  9. John, I once made a fish with a coating similar to yours and fell completely in love with it, so much lighter than the usual breading and frying… tastes fresh and the texture of the fish is better preserved, I think

    Absolutely loved the use of the lower layer of breadcrumbs as a pasta addition – you rock!

    Like

  10. How clever to use the breadcrumbs as a pasta topping! I’m going to have to try that one. Another superb fish recipe John. You are always enlightening my palet!

    Like

  11. As a transplant to Boston, it took me awhile to understand the souvenir t-shirts “I got scrod in Boston” on sale at Faneuil Hall Market. I’ve since learned to ask exactly what “scrod” on menu means, to the person who’s serving it. Great business with the bread crumbs. I’ll try it! Ken

    Like

    • Love the t-shirts! Too funny, Ken. From what I’ve read, in some restaurants you’re lucky if the scrod is haddock or cod. I think you’re certainly right. Asking the waitstaff is a good policy. 🙂

      Like

  12. A good recipe of Bread and Butter pickles brings back memories of my grandmother — my mom, after many attempts while I was growing up (after she learned to never follow Grandma’s reported “recipe” but tweak it just as Grandma does), finally got as close to it as anyone could. Haddock is such a great versatile fish for cooking — and better-yet, it is one of the Seafood Watch’s sustainable choices!

    Like

    • So many of my recipes involve family members and I always enjoying reading that one has reminded someone of their family member(s). 🙂
      I’ve grown to really depend upon Seafood Watch, sometimes to my great disappointment. I hate seeing a great piece of fish at a market, only to learn it’s not currently approved. Still, I’d rather eat my seafood guilt-free. 🙂

      Like

  13. The breading mixture sounds fantastic John, and something I am dead sure my family will enjoy. The fish looks so moist and flavorful…..it is making my tummy growl.

    I am glad that your garden is recovering, and your poor vine finally gets to rest in peace.

    Like

    • Thanks, Minnie. I’m glad the vine has been dealt with and I can get my yard back in shape. I think you’ll find that this breading is a flavorful way to cook fish without frying. The breading also offers some protection for the fillet from being dried out in the over. I hope do try it and your family enjoys it. 🙂

      Like

  14. Hi John,
    Glad to know that the vine was removed and that only one single rose bush was affected and might still survive. I love plants and I always hate to see them die. I am the type that broods for several days if a plant in my garden dies. I have some frozen fish in my freezer, and some parsley from the last soup I garnished and so you have guessed right I shall be putting that fish on a bed of parsley breading and I love the idea of using the roasted bread crumbs to garnish. Thanks for sharing this recipe, as I have said before, and I repeat again, I love simple and straightforward recipes, because you don’t have to toss a coin when you want to make them. Have a wonderful day and thanks so much for visiting my blog several times. Your presence is always appreciated. Best Regards!

    Like

    • Hello, Liz, and thank you for the nice comments you leave here. I’m with you about the plants in my garden and don’t like seeing them die or just plain disappear over winter. My roses are “my girls” and I dote over them. I would have much preferred that vine remain there but, once fallen, there was no way to secure it again. It was just too big. My family’s recipes are very much in the tradition of country Italian cooking. The recipes are straight-forward and with just a few spices and herbs. The main thing is to buy and use ingredients when in season. Have a great week!

      Like

      • Hi John, I am a country person at heart, and I love simple and straight-forward-recipes, without too many additives. They are always so refreshing, but I also love experimenting with everything I come across and trying out cuisines from all corners of the world. Enjoy the rest of the week, and have a lovely weekend!

        Like

  15. This looks delicious John, a much healthier breaded fish and definitely more flavourful. I love breading on my fish but my children prefer their fish straight up. I like how you can do a couple of fillets with the breading and the rest without.
    I hope you had a great vacation and I did read about your poor vine. My Internet just got activated and I am like you, I cannot read nor type a comment on a tiny iPhone screen. Don’t know how others do it!

    Nazneen

    Like

    • Thank yo so much, Nazneen. I was raised eating fish this way and very much prefer it over deep frying. As you say, it’s healthier, too. My little holiday was a very good one. Time spent with Zia is always special. I do know of people who post from their iPhones and I’m baffled. It’s the impossible dream for me. 🙂

      Like

  16. John – This looks delicious, as always. Do you bread fish directly with your crumb mixture or do you use standard breading steps (flour, egg, coating)? With fish, I often just bread directly to keep the delicate fish flavors, but was wondering your preference…

    Like

    • Thank you. Yes, the fish is breaded directly and without being dipped in egg and/or flour. You’re right. The fish’s flavor better shines and I find the breading is much lighter and more flavorful itself. Have you ever posted your breading recipe? I bet it’s a good one. 🙂

      Like

  17. This will be a fabulous fish dish to make, and I love that it is baked. A side of sautéed artichoke is perfection! How can I be craving fish at 7:20 in the morning?

    Like

  18. Oh I love all your useful information. I would have never thought to use the breadcrumbs for pasta! This all looks so delicious and I’ve vowed to eat more fish lately. Wonderful… thank you!

    Like

    • You are very welcome. It’s funny. Over the course of writing this blog, I’ve started eating less red meat and far more fish. Sharing all of these family seafood recipes has reminded me of just how good they were.

      Like

  19. Good suggestion to use a grill basket when you grill these – I always have difficulties when I don’t Haddock is one of those great fish with subtle flavor that takes well to all sorts of recipes. This is a good one! I don’t bread much, but I probably should – it certainly adds a lot of flavor. It’s interesting, isn’t it, how some elements of our cooking – the breading in your case – pop up again and again in our recipes? If something works for you, use it as much as you can! Glad you had your vine cleaned up. And thanks for a terrific recipe.

    Like

    • It’s been said, John, that Italian cooking is the cooking of Nonnas. In my family, there are no written recipes from my Grandparents and before, nor did they own cookbooks. Mom and Zia were the first to write recipes down and I’m filling in the blanks. It’s easy to see why a recipe like this breading mixture would be passed down and used repeatedly. There simply weren’t any other recipes available. Where would they have come from? Thanks for commenting, John. It’s always a pleasure reading what you have to say.

      Like

  20. It sure looks good, I’ll have to try the moistened bread crumb technique. Ah yes, pickles…..I’m almost out from two years ago so I’ve got a couple-a- three cukes planted out.

    Like

    • Thanks, Dave. 3 cukes? You may have plenty of pickles come September. I planted 2 cherry bomb pepper plants. They were so good pickled last Fall that I didn’t want to risk not being able to find them this year.

      Like

    • I so agree with you. When I called one company a 2nd time, the guy actually hung up on me! I called him back directly, thinking it might have been a dropped call and I went right to his answering machine — which was too full to accept more messages. I did find a great company, though, and I’ll throw as much business their way as possible. Heaven forbid it’s more downed anything, though.

      Like

  21. Oh John! I have haddock right here and now that I was just going to bake. Ahem. Not any more! This is wonderful, thank you sir! It looks so good in the picture, I hope it looks that good here 🙂 It never does for some reason…

    Hooray for the vine clean up! I hope they get back to pick it up this week. 🙂

    Like

    • Thanks, Sarah. I do hope you try and enjoy fish cooked this way. I can’t do much about the past but, if this attempt at baking fish turns out less than perfect, you can blame me. 🙂

      Like

  22. I’m really glad you mentioned that Haddock flakes. That sounds lighter to me, and I tend to prefer that. I also really like anything with a good breading, and the combination of tastes just sounds wonderful to me. But I think beyond the fish I’m even more excited about the bread and butter pickles. I just don’t have time to do much canning, but these are more than do-able. I love cucumbers and pickles in every form!

    So glad to hear your storm damage is cleaning up nicely with little lasting damage! Let’s hope for calm “seas” for a while! 🙂

    Like

    • Haddock is such a great fish, Debra, and my family’s breading is a great way to prepare it without losing the fish in the process. It’s certainly healthier than deep frying. I hop you do find time to make the pickles. They are truly good and the recipe isn’t at all complicated. They surprised me the first time I made them and I’ve always had a jar in the fridge since. Be forewarned! 🙂
      Yes, I agree. I think the whole country could use some calmer seas. So far, this has been a year for the books — and not it a good way, I’m afraid.

      Like

  23. Your family breading sound incredibly wonderful, I know JT would like this better than just naked fish. Thanks for the sustainability notes, it’s a prerequisite when we buy fish.
    My Mom used to gather up the breading and mix it into the left over egg and flour and make a dumpling with it. Of course, she used to deep fry it, but OMG it was good! I do love your pasta post though. The Hungarians would often mix the breading mix with some sour cream and top green beans with it and bake it…very tasty too!
    I’m glad your vine issue is being resolved John, it’s incredible how fickle these service companies can be. We had some water damage in our kitchen on the wood floors, maybe about 2 square feet had to be replaced…we got a guy to come out and give a ridiculous quote to do the work and then we were never able to get in touch with him again! I ended up doing it myself — didn’t turn out half bad, and it was free, with the exception of a few curse words and sweat!

    Like

    • Thanks, Eva. I’m glad you enjoyed the post and recipe. I tell ya, this breading mix gets used again and again. It’a like my family’s duct tape. 🙂
      Those dumplings your Mother made sound incredibly good.I imagine you guys gobbled them up as soon as they were cool enough.
      Yes, the vine has been handled and my yard is on its way to getting back in shape. Some of today’s companies act like they are doing us favors by accepting the job. I did find a good company, though, and I’ll send them all of the business I can. Unfortunately, I think their coverage area extends only as far as London, Ontario. 🙂

      Like

  24. Believe it or not, I’ve never had haddock. And I love your breadcrumb tips. Those are keepers. But the magic of the photo with the fish to the cooked fish-I really thought that was cool. Yes, I’m easily pleased! And I think this fish will please many in my family.

    Like

    • Thanks, Abbe. Haddock is a good fish. It’s easy to prepare and doesn’t have an overwhelming fish taste. Even people who don’t like fish like haddock. I bet your family will, too. 🙂

      Like

  25. I think baked breaded fish is one of the tastiest methods for cooking fish. I really like the moist you added with the lemon juice. Next time, try adding also lemon zest for a different twist…Lovely recipe!

    Like

    • Thank you, Ambrosiana. I have a touch of lemon zest in the past. You’re so right, It does add a nice twist to the breading. I hope you’re having a great weekend, spent with that beautiful daughter of yours. 🙂

      Like

  26. Great recipe (s) John! Normally I use the already made bread crumbs from the store. But next time I’ll try yours 🙂
    Thanks for sharing.
    Ps.: I’m glad the whole vine affair is being taken care of 🙂

    Like

    • Thanks, Giovanna. What’s nice about making your own breading is that you can adjust the spices and herbs to suit your own tastes. I hope you’ll like this breading when you try it. Yes, getting that vine off of the walk was such a relief. Now I can get back on track fixing up the yard. Yay!

      Like

  27. Pingback: Baked Haddock | Italian Food & Wine | Scoop.it

  28. I love breading, just love it, esp with home made bread, but why did i never think of adding fresh garlic.. and parsley.. a super addition.. have a glorious evening.. c

    Like

    • Thanks, Celi. Our breading is an awful lot like the seasoned breadcrumbs you can buy — only very much fresher. Back in the day, they would have used bread to make the breadcrumbs but I never have when I need it. Panko bread crumbs work great. Have a good morning! (I am so far behind getting back to everyone,)

      Like

  29. Mmmm, this looks delicious… I can see why the Bartolini’s are so fond of crumb… it makes everything better, and adds a wonderful texture. I’m so glad your vine saga ended happily… I have just dealt with a broken window saga 600kms away… and finding a good tradesman makes a lot of difference 🙂

    Like

    • Thanks, EllaDee. The breading works wonders, creating a crunch factor while protecting the fish, keeping it moist. My family sure used it a lot. Repairs from 600kms away? That’s never easy when you live in the area, let alone from a far distance. I went through something similar with my parents’ home before it was sold. That was so not fun!

      Like

    • Thanks, Roger. I check out whether a particular fish or seafood is a “good” choice by using an App supplied by a marine aquarium. They cover areas in the US — but nowhere else. Although haddock has rebounded on this side of the Atlantic, it could be that it hasn’t fared as well on your side, especially if it is being fished in territorial waters. I’ll just have to make sure to have haddock available when you come to visit.

      Like

  30. That breading mixture looks so delicious John. I think I’m new enough to your blog to not have actually read about it before, but I love the fact that you’ve not only got it on the fist but the slow-roasted (flavour infused!) crumbs are actually being used to top the pasta. Delicious!!! Just checked out your pickle recipe too. Yum! You are the pickle king (actually made a small batch of the giardiniera last week. SO GOOD!).

    Like

    • Thanks, Laura. That breading is used on fish, shrimp, pasta, and roasted vegetables. It keeps popping up in recipes that I long ago forgot about. 🙂
      Those bread and butter pickles are so easy — and so good! Love them in sandwiches or on burgers. It’s still a bit early here to be making giardiniera. The farmers markets don’t have much produce yet. In about a month, though, I’ll be making giardiniera, batch after batch. My friends are all addicted. 🙂

      Like

  31. Love the ingredients in your breading mixture, never thought of adding lemon juice but that sure is a great idea especially with seafood. Must remember. If my artichokes grow successfully and produce, I will be making your Mom’s sautéed artichoke.
    Glad you were able to get rid of the vine, hope your rose bounce back with vigor. Looking forward to hearing and seeing photos of your newly designed garden.

    Like

    • Thanks, Norma, though I wouldn’t say there will be much of a redesign. The vine was growing up a corner of the garage. With it gone, I have a spot for a clematis vine and for a rose in front of it. I’m waiting, though, to see if they removed it all. If not, new vines will appear in a couple weeks. They would ruin any new plantings. Better to wait and be sure.

      Like

  32. And I always thought the third time was supposed to be the charm but I guess #5 will be your lucky number and I’m glad that you finally got ‘the vine that ate Chicago’ out of there.
    I can’t get over how beautiful that bread crumb topping looks – you’ve got the texture down perfectly but also caught it at just the right moment in the cooking process. Hats off to you John. I love haddock and I’m thinking that it’s exactly what I need tonight since I just had four fillings replaced all at the same time to get it over with. Soft food is my friend right now.
    Now I have to go check out those bread and butter pickles, my favorites.

    Like

    • Thanks, Diane. Sorry to hear that you’re suddenly a dentist’s best customer but you’re right to get them all done at once. Your Summer would have been pretty much ruined otherwise.
      It took me seemingly ages to get this breading right. I pestered Mom and then Zia about it all of the time. They never once measured any of the ingredients, even to this day. As a new cook, hearing Mom say, “A handful” or “You know. Just enough” drove me insane. Finally, I started watching Zia and feeling the mixture to get a sense of the consistency. It worked! Although, now I fully understand why the two of them could never give me exat amounts. I can’t do it now, either. 🙂

      Like

      • I agree completely that a chef has to be vague about quantities, especially when working with any kind of dough. You just get the right feel & know when you’re there. Sounds like you did what my husband did with his mother’s recipes – sat down while she made her sauce & lasagna & documented everything. But then you still have to play around with it for yourself.

        Like

        • I can so identify with your husband, Diane. After years of trying unsuccessfully to make my family’s sausage, one day I pre-measured everything before Zia began to make sausage. When she was done, I measured everything again to, finally, determine the amounts and write them down. I’ve been making sausage ever since. 🙂

          Like

  33. Another winning post, CJ. Maybe it’s time for me to try something other than salmon on the stovetop. Haddock in 15 minutes in the oven, with a beautiful breading and bread crumbs ready to sprinkle on a side dish (or a salad?). Sounds divine.

    Like

    • That’s it exactly, Kathleen. My Zia would use this breading on salmon, too, and bake it just like I did with the haddock. Mom & Zia used this breading on every kind of fish I can think of. I certainly never tired of it.

      Like

  34. I don’t bread fish very often – why is that? I see your recipe here and how easy it is. I’m going to try this next week! Also, great tip about roasting the extra bread crumbs. Favourite Husband is going to be very pleased.

    Like

    • Thanks! You’ll find this is lighter than the standard breading practice using eggs, flour, and bread crumbs. Not only does it taste better, IMO, but there’s little mess in comparison.
      “Favorite Husband.” Gotta love it! 🙂

      Like

  35. You know, I rarely put breading on any of my foods. That close up photo makes it seem like I’m depriving myself and I love carbs. Guess I should get to it, huh? 🙂

    Like

    • Yes, Cam, you should give this a try. It’s nowhere near as heavy as a coating of flour, egg, and bread crumbs. It’s almost like a crumb. You’ll like it! 🙂

      Like

  36. Bonjourno John, I can hear the crunch of the crumbs when you put your fork into the haddock from here. Love that first delicious picture. Great little crumb mixture. You know it is funny when you mention this as I am sure you have many things you make ever day and never have written it down or really thought of it as a recipe until you start to write on your blog and need to explain the steps. Thanks for documenting these lovely Bartoli family recipes. My boys love your pasta aglio e olio and I make it for them regularly. Have a super weekend. Chow..BAM

    Like

    • Buona Notte, BAM! Thank you so much! That aglio e olio recipe has been picked up by a few families and all love it. It’s such a classic. Teach your boys to make it before they go off to university and they’ll never go hungry. No rush. There’s still time. 🙂
      As a boy, I never thought twice about fish prepared like this because fish was always prepared like this, Only once I moved away did I appreciate just how good it was. Now I use it for my fish all of the time. 🙂

      Like

  37. I’ve been wanting to use your bread crumb recipe for a while, and your pictures have me counting the days until I can try this. Love the idea of cooking extra to top a side dish of pasta…the girls would love to have pasta with fish. I keep wanting to make bread and butter pickles, so this recipe is on the list too. Looking forward to reading about your vacation…the pictures look spectacular!

    Like

    • Thanks, Barb. How lucky your Ponytails like fish, with or without the pasta!! And yes, the leftover breading really does make a good pasta topping. Be forewarned that the bread & butter pickles are addictive. They’re the kind of thing that invites you to have a couple every time you open the fridge door. I’m not the only one with this problem. Best to put the jars in the back of the shelf where they won’t be easy to reach. 🙂

      Like

  38. Yes! I want to make that chicken. Can’t wait! And what a great post for me. Not only is this a succulent fish, but you gave me a new idea for my favorite summer pasta dish! Delicious!!! I have not yet made your families bread crumbs, so it’s surely time to add that one to my repertoire. 🙂

    Like

    • Thanks, Kristy. I’m sorry to say that the chicken will be postponed a week because I misread my calendar. Do you believe it? I think you’ll be happy with the substitute.
      You can use this breading on just about any fish I know of. I like it much better than the traditional flour, egg, and bread crumb breading that precedes deep frying. Please let me know if you do try it and how many spoons the Sous Chefs give it. I’m still trying to secure the best table in their restaurant and don’t wish to disappoint. 🙂

      Like

    • Mom and her Sister, my Zia, were children of the Great Depression. Nothing ever went to waste in their kitchens. This is just an extension of that philosophy — and a very tasty one, at that! 🙂

      Like

    • Well, I was hoping I’d be cooking for you at some exotic locale but, if you want a send-off dinner before we leave for parts unknown, so be it. I hope you’ve got a good fishmonger because I don’t think the TSA will like my carrying a pound of halibut onto the plane. 🙂

      Like

  39. Baked haddock, cod or scrod is very popular in New England. When we lived in Florida, we also used mahi mahi or grouper. Whatever fish you use, this is a great way to cook fish.

    Like

    • Thanks, Karen, and believe me. Mom & Zia cooked most fish this way. It was their go-to preparation and we all truly enjoyed it. Now I’ve followed in their footsteps and do the same. 🙂

      Like

  40. “Oh, dear,” she says fretfully, “which rosebush was it?? I’m quite fond with all of them! Will she bloom again??” I’m so glad your mess was cleaned up and Max has his play area back up and running! This haddock!! You seriously have access to the best fish.. I need to go on a hunt around my city for a better fishmonger. I already travel between several grocers.. so what’s one more stop? I don’t think I’ve ever ordered or eaten haddock, but if it’s light and flaky I know I’d love it. And those crumbs.. I would have loved a few of those on my pasta the other night! Btw.. thank you for the fresh pasta storage instructions.. is Zia’s pasta basket quite a large one?? ps.. any other roses starting to bud??

    Like

    • Fear not, dear Barb. The affected rose was “Opening Night”, the large red hybrid tea. It’s size is what got it into trouble. The vine fell onto the fence of the dog run and that protected the other 2 roses in its path. This rose was taller than the fence so it got hit. Its first blooms of the season are almost all gone but it is so early in the year that it should recover with no problem. This rose is a real stunner. It has as many as 18 or 20 large red blooms at once all Summer long. I would recommend it to anyone shopping for a red rose.
      Considering that at the start of 2012, I only had acces to frozen and previously frozen fish at my supermarket, having access to all of the seafood I have now is really nice. Armed with my Seafood App I can get good fish pretty much when I want it.
      Zia’s pasta basket is about 13″ X 10″ (33 cm X 25 cm). i know she has kept pasta in that basket for weeks, maybe months. I know some might be appalled seeing egg noodles left out to dry but, as long as they dry quickly, there’s no problem. If you’ve got damp noodles sitting around for 24 hours, they’re going to spoil. On humid days, we put a fan near the pasta to quicken the drying process. Just don’t let it blow too hard or you may blow the pasta off the table. 🙂

      Like

  41. This sounds like a wonderful recipe for sea food beginners like me. One of my major problems with fish is their texture. The added crunch from the breading would make fish much more appealing!
    Thank you for sharing this John

    Like

    • My pleasure, Sawsan. Haddock is a good fish to start with, too. It’s mild tasting and flakes easily when cooked so you can easily check to see if it’s done. I hope you do give it a try and if you’ve questions, be sure to ask and I’ll get back to you.

      Like

  42. Oh dear, I didn’t know about your poor rose getting smacked by the vine. I do hope it will recover…you have the most amazing roses, John. This haddock looks wonderful and the crispy breading just has to be a perfect foil for the moist fish. I need to look for haddock and see if we have any around in this fish challenged city!

    Like

    • Thanks, Betsy. It is so early in the season that I’m sure the rose will bounce back. Many of the new buds and stalks were inured but the old canes are all intact. It will be fine. You’re right about the breading. Mom and Zia cooked almost all fish using it, as well as a number of other dishes. It adds nice flavor and texture to the fish, while helping to protect it from drying out while baking. If you cannot fine haddock, you could easily use this breading with cod, for almost the same flavors or, say, salmon for a completely different taste. I hope you do find a good fishmonger. There has to be one. Where do the restaurants get their fish? 🙂

      Like

      • Our restaurants all seem to have a direct supplier(s) from the lake and coastal areas for fresh fish and seafood. Our farmer’s market is international and they have fish, but they are from all over the world and not necessarily wild caught, sustainable or mercury free. I do occasionally buy my fish from whole foods where I can at least see where it came from…but they are expensive. Still, you’d think there’d be a good fishmonger in a city this size…I need to research more! 🙂 Glad your rose will recover!

        Like

    • I remember that salmon recipe, Greg. It looked good to me then, too. And as you know, i’m a big Lidia fan, too. It used to please Mom — and now Zia — to see Lidia or any Italian chef prepare something that was close to one of our family recipes. It was validation, of a sort.

      Like

  43. What a nicer and much more gentle way of cooking the fish in the oven instead of frying it. A lovely crunch from the crumbs instead of batter. Yummo!

    Like

  44. Looks fabulous John! I am most fascinated with your breading mixture. Wish I had read your post a few days ago as I made breaded chicken breasts in the oven and it was pretty much just o.k. Will definitely give your a try. If you’re in the mood for an interesting read on Cod, I have the cutest little book by Mark Kurlansky called “Cod”, A Biography of the Fish that Changed the World. By the way, one of my favourites is Bacala Salad, which I haven’t had since my dad passed away 13 years ago. You just gave me an idea!

    Like

    • Thank you, Lidia. I don’t recall Mom or Zia using this breading for chicken but I don’t see why it wouldn’t work. It certainly works for fish and vegetables. Isn’t baccalà salad good? I’ve had the recipe to post for some time now but it keeps getting pushed off the schedule. I bet your family’s version is very good.
      Thanks for the book recommendation. It sounds like a good one and I’ve added it to my reading list.

      Like

  45. The breaded fish looks wonderful and will certainly make it on our dinner menu in the near future! My husband has starting using a net to catch fish from the lake just across the street. It looks like perfect summer food that is not too heavy to weigh you down!

    Like

    • Thank you. It is a lighter way to prepare fish and healthier than deep frying. How lucky for you to be able to catch fish right across the street from your home. You cannot get anything fresher than that! Good for you!

      Like

  46. This looks delicious John! I am thinking that during my summer break I should try out some of these recipes you have shared with us. Ever thought of publishing them all in a book?

    Like

    • I’m glad it’s gone, too! Now I can go back to fretting about the bald spots in the lawn. You needn’t tear up a walkway. You can use any heavy object. A cast iron pan will work great, too! Unfortunately, you’ve another week to wait for that recipe. I goofed. 😦

      Like

  47. I’ve been out of town so I missed the vine situation. Sounds like it wasn’t a very pleasant deal. Glad to hear you’re getting it taken care of. Haddock is a fish that I haven’t had much of. You don’t see it here in New Mexico, but that’s not to say that another fish wouldn’t work with this recipe. I do love a breaded fish and this looks delicious!

    Like

    • Yes, the vine is gone, MJ, and peace reigns once again! Haddock is an Atlantic fish. If you were to get it fresh, it would probably be quite expensive. You could just as easily use cod for a very similar result, or, go for something completely different like salmon. This is a great way to prepare fish and we all love it.

      Like

  48. Great recipe! I love that your family’s breading goes well in so many dishes. I made sole a while back and found the breading tasteless. I’ll have to try again using your recipe!

    Like

    • Thanks again, Amber. I like this breading because, though it’s flavorful, it doesn’t overpower the fish that it’s meant to compliment. I hope you’ll enjoy it, too.

      Like

  49. I love seafood but pretty much stick to three recipes and to salmon when I cook it at home, I tried to make haddock once and it did not come out very good, I think I may have overcooked it. This looks like a great easy recipe to retry haddock and actually expand my seafood recipes, thank you for sharing 🙂

    Like

    • Thank you. The breading used here is commonly used in my family’s dishes. I’ve used it on just about every fish, save tuna and salmon. They both do better without it. The breading helps to keep the fish steak or fillet moist as it bakes. And it tastes pretty good, too. 🙂
      I hope you will try it and enjoy it as much as we do. Good luck!

      Like

  50. Pingback: Ginger-Soy Glazed Haddock - Platter Talk

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s