Another of the Bartolini Crown Jewels: Cannelloni

Cannelloni dei Bartolini Serve Cannelloni

With St. Joseph’s Feast Day fast approaching, I’m going to take a break in our fish recipe series and share yet another of the Bartolini Crown Jewels, Cannelloni. St. Joe, after all, deserves no less.

Cannelloni are another of Italy’s stuffed pastas, though these are more in the style of manicotti (see Notes) rather than ravioli or agnolotti. As much as we all loved them — we kids called them “cigars” — cannelloni weren’t served for dinner very often. Unlike ravioli or cappelletti, which were “assigned” holidays, cannelloni were served when Mom or Zia found the time to make them. Remember. There were no freezers so a cannelloni dinner meant that they would have been up at dawn, rolling out pasta dough. As a result, though it wasn’t a holiday, a cannelloni dinner was a special occasion, to be sure.

Now, when you look at the recipe, something may seem a bit familiar. Déjà vu, perhaps? No, that’s not until the end of this post. It’s the filling. We use the same filling here that we used when we made cappelletti a few weeks ago. It is not unusual for Italian households to use the same fillings, condiments, marinades, etc., in a number of dishes. Our breading mixture is the perfect example of this. There are other examples but I’ll save those for another day. No sense spoiling the surprise.

Although the filling recipe is rather straight-forward, preparing the dough needs some explaining. As many of you know, I use either a hand-cranked pasta machine or a roller attachment for my stand mixer to roll my pasta dough. The result is a long sheets of pasta, about 2 to 3 feet long and about 6 inches wide Before doing anything else, you Cannelloni Sheetsneed to determine how wide each of the cannelloni will be. Ours are usually about 4 inches long, allowing 2 rows to be placed down the full length of the baking dish. Some prefer larger cannelloni. No matter which size you like, measure the inside width of your baking dish’s bottom. To allow the pasta to expand during cooking (see image for comparison), subtract at least half an inch from the measurement. If you want large cannelloni, this is the width of the dough sheet you’ll need. For smaller cannelloni, divide the measurement by 2. Keep this measurement in mind. (For example. My baking dish is 8 inches square, though, at the bottom, it is 7.5 inches. I wanted to place 2 rows of cannelloni into the dish so I cut my dough sheets at 3 inches.)

Once you’ve made the dough and allowed it to rest, roll it into long sheets. If your machine or rollers are at their widest when set to no. 1, roll and re-roll the dough up to and including no. 5. If your machine or rollers are at their widest at no. 10, then roll and re-roll the dough up to and including no. 6. Once the dough sheet is rolled to the specified thickness, lay it flat on a lightly floured surface. Using a straightedge, move down the full length of the dough sheet, marking it according to the measurement gained above. Use a pastry cutter or sharp knife to cut the sheet into smaller sections. (My sheets were all 3 X 6 inches.) Lay the newly cut sheets separately. Do not stack.

This is where things get interesting. It has been quite sometime since either Zia or I made cannelloni. So, when I asked if we par-boiled the pasta before filling it, she drew a blank. Obviously, so had I or I wouldn’t have asked the question. After some discussion, she leaned toward the side of no par-boiling was required, while I thought it was. I was left with little choice, so, off to the test kitchens I went. That afternoon I made side-by-side dishes of cannelloni, one with noodles that had been boiled and the other with noodles that were raw. Once finished baking, a taste test ensued. After all that, the difference was minimal. Yes, I could tell the difference, tasting them one right after the other. I’m not so sure, however, that I could identify one if eaten alone — although I’d have a 50-50 chance if I guessed. Even so, there was a difference,  no matter how slight, and I preferred the cannelloni prepared with par-boiled dough sheets. I guess I’ll be doing that from now on.

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Cannelloni Bite

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So, if you chose to par-boil your noodles, place them, in batches, into rapidly boiling salted water. Remove after 60 to 90 seconds, and place in an ice bath. Treat carefully because the noodles are delicate and may tear while being moved or handled. Continue with batch after batch until done. When you’re ready to fill them, you may find it easier if you pat dry each sheet before attempting to fill and roll them.

If you choose to use raw noodles, you must work quickly lest the dough sheets dry. This will cause them to crack when you attempt to roll them. To avoid this problem, once you’ve measured and cut the individual sheets, fill them all and put them aside before starting another piece of dough through the rollers. Follow this method and you’ll have no problems with cracking dough sheets.

Be sure to read the Notes section below for freezing suggestions.

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Bartolini Cannelloni Recipe

Ingredients

for the filling

  • 1 1/2 lbs. ground pork
  • 1 1/2 lbs. ground veal (chicken or turkey may be substituted)
  • 2 – 3 tbsp butter
  • 1 pkg (10 oz, 283 g) frozen chopped spinach (cooked and well-drained)
  • 1 pkg (8 oz, 227 g) cream cheese
  • 1 cup grated Pecorino Romano — Parmigiano may be substituted
  • 2 or 3 eggs slightly beaten — depending on size
  • ¼ tsp ground nutmeg
  • zest of 1 lemon, more if you like

for the cheese sauce

  • 2 – 3 oz (57 to 85 g) cream cheese, softened 
  • 2 – 3 oz (59 to 89 ml) milk

for the cannelloni

  • Mom’s pasta dough
  • 1 quart tomato sauce, with meat or without (See Notes)
  • cheese sauce
  • an 8 oz ball of fresh mozzarella
  • 1/2 cup grated Pecorino Romano cheese

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Directions

for the filling

  1. Sauté meat in butter. Season lightly with salt.
  2. Use meat grinder to process the meats. Add all the ingredients into a mixing bowl and mix until well-combined.
  3. Cover the filling and refrigerate for a few hours or overnight.
  4. Once the filling has rested, you can begin making your cannelloni.

for the cheese sauce

  1. Combine equal amounts of cream cheese with milk.
  2. Whisk and set aside. 

to make the cannelloni

  1. Shape 2 to 3 tbsp of filling into a small log, about as thick as your index finger. More or less filling may be required depending upon the size of your cannelloni. Do not over-stuff. Filling should leave a 1/4 inch (.6 cm) border on either side of the dough sheet.
  2. Place the filling on the edge of the dough sheet and roll as one would if making a cigar.
  3. Set aside, seam-side down.
  4. Repeat Steps 1 through 3 until all the filling or dough sheets have been used.

assemble the dish and bake

  1. Pre-heat oven to 350˚ F ( 177˚ C).
  2. Liberally butter a baking dish.
  3. Coat the bottom of the dish with 1 to 2 cups (237 to 473 ml) of tomato sauce
  4. Place cannelloni, seam side down, in 2 rows, until dish is filled. Do not over-crowd.
  5. Spoon cheese sauce over all the cannelloni.
  6. Add enough of the remaining tomato sauce to completely cover the dish’s contents.
  7. Sprinkle the top with the grated mozzarella and Pecorino Romano cheeses.
  8. Spray one side of a sheet of aluminum foil with cooking spray and use it to cover the baking dish, sprayed side down.
  9. Bake in pre-heated 350˚ oven for 20 minutes. Remove foil and continue baking until cheese topping is cooked to your satisfaction. Over-cooking may result in dry cannelloni.
  10. Allow to rest 10 minutes before serving.

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Cannelloni 7

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Variations

If you have a favorite ravioli filling, you can easily use it here. In fact, I’ve used our ravioli filling to make cannelloni several times. The truth is, you may find it easier to make cannelloni than it is to make ravioli, at least initially, so, why wait? Go ahead and use these instructions to make cannelloni with whatever filling you prefer. There’s sure to be a great dinner in store for you, if you do.

Although never served in my family, there is a version of cannelloni that uses crespelle (crêpes) rather than pasta dough sheets. One day I’ll give them a try — once I learn how to make crespelle, that is.

Notes

If you choose not to par-boil the dough sheets, add about a 1/3 cup (80 ml) of water to the tomato sauce before using and stir well. The extra water will be needed by the raw sheets as the cannelloni bake.

I recently made a half-batch of filling with a whole batch of Mom’s pasta dough. Combining the 2, I made 32 cannelloni, enough for several dinners. Your results may vary, however, depending upon how large you make your cannelloni. If you make an entire batch of filling, you could use half to make cannelloni on Day 1, as I did, and use the rest of the filling on Day 2 to make cappelletti. On Day 3, open your freezer and smile, secure in the knowledge that there are some very good dinners in your future.

Cannelloni can be frozen easily.  

  1. Once fully assembled, cover the baking dish with foil and freeze. To heat, leave covered with foil and bake in a pre-heated, 350˚ F (177˚C), oven for 45 minutes. Remove foil and continue baking until cheese is to your liking.
  2. I find it easier and more convenient to freeze the cannelloni individually on a baking Cannelloni for the Freezersheet covered with foil or parchment paper. Once frozen, place them into a hard-sided container and store in your freezer. When it’s time to serve them, you can use as many as needed to assemble your dish, rather than cook a dish you prepared the week before. Follow the same instructions for baking as in the preceding step.
  3. Even if you follow my cooking instructions for frozen cannelloni, you’ll need to test for doneness before removing them from the oven. To do this, place the tip of a metal skewer or sharp knife into one of the cannelloni in the center of the dish. Hold it there for 5 to 10 seconds. Remove and use it to touch the inside of your wrist or just beneath your lower lip. Continue baking until tip is hot to the touch.

If you can, try to use fresh mozzarella to top off this dish, for it tastes so much better. I prefer not to use slices here, though. Since the slices take longer to melt and brown, you run the risk of drying out the cannelloni while it bakes. Fresh mozzarella will melt faster but it can be a mess to grate at home. To make it a bit easier, open its packaging and place it all in your freezer for about 30 minutes before needed. You’ll find the cheese to be firmer and, therefore, easier to grate. If it is too firm, just leave on the counter for a few minutes.

I’m not certain if these definitions are “official”, but in our family, cannelloni were meat-filled and manicotti were filled with a ricotta cheese mixture. You now have our cannelloni recipe. Soon you’ll have our manicotti recipe, too.

It’s déjà vu all over again … 

tricolor-risottoFor today’s Blast from the Past, we’re going to continue to celebrate St. Joseph’s Feast Day with risotto, a dish that’s Italian, through and though.  This is no ordinary dish of risotto, however, as you can see on the right, for its colors are those of the Italian flag. You can learn how to prepare this dish by clicking HERE.

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Coming soon to a monitor near you …

Spaghetti with White Anchovies and Capers

Spaghetti with White Anchovies and Capers

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205 thoughts on “Another of the Bartolini Crown Jewels: Cannelloni

  1. We love cannelloni in this house and its been years since I made some so I totally understand why you didn’t eat them often. They are hard work! I can’t believe you made two batches in one go, that’s dedication. Unfortunately, my husband lost my pasta machine in the move to CO, I’m still not happy about it.
    Looking at your most fabulous cannelloni, I so miss my machine 😦 . I guess I can make them with crespelles since they are more of a poured batter rather than rolled pasta. Or, I’ll make him get me one for Mothers Day.
    Thanks for the tasty reminder John, great looking cannelloni.

    Nazneen

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    • Thank you so much, Nazneen. I bet you just about cried when you noticed your pasta machine was missing. It would have almost killed me! I can do without a lot of things in my kitchen but I must have a pasta machine. I hope you get a replacement on Mother’s Day. Fingers crossed …

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  2. Ah cannelloni! When I was a kid my mamma and my nonna used to make them all the time.
    Unfortunately, during the last few years, this dish has gone…”out of style” in Italy. Restaurants, especially the fancy ones, do not put it on their menu anymore and even in the households moms of my generation do not have either the time or the energy to go through the cooking process. It is such a shame because this is such an extraordinary dish of the Italian gastronomy. It is so rich and complete and the texture is unique. The pictures of your cannelloni do absolutely justice to the beauty and the tastiness of the dish. Thank you, John, for bringing back such a lovely memory. I would love to sit down with your zia, eat her cannelloni and chat about memories. Buona notte.

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    • Thank you so much, Francesca. It’s a shame to read that cannelloni has gone out of fashion. You’re right. It is a classic Italian dish and it was a real treat for me to prepare it for this post. It’s been quite a while. Luckily, I now have plenty in my freezer for future dinners.
      If it were possible, Francesca, my Zia would absolutely love cooking and chatting with you. It would please her no end, as it will when I show her your lovely comment.
      Buana notte.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Outstanding post, John! I understand why these were made for festive occasions. In fact, having these cannelloni for dinner would turn any day into a special occasion.
    There are bloggers who cook every recipe in a famous cookbook such as Julia Child’s. I think I just may have to cook every recipe from the Bartolini family jewels 🙂 Perhaps I should break down and try the cream cheese 😉 Do you use Philadelphia for that?
    I like the very detailed instructions on every important step, including freezing.
    I’ve made cannelloni only once using Biba’s recipe but I should make them again!

    PS in the ingredients you mention both cheese sauce and white sauce, but in the instructions use only the cheese sauce

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    • Thanks, Stefan, for being so complimentary.
      Zia will get a kick hearing that someone might prepare all of the “Crown Jewels.” She was a fan of “Julie and Julia”, so, the comparison to the film won’t escape her. Too funny!
      I always use Philadelphia Cream Cheese and I don’t recall either Mom or Zia using anything else. I suppose, though, that any would do, even neufchâtel wold probably work. All the cheese sauce does is give just a touch of richness to the cannelloni. To that end, you may want to add more cheese sauce than what I indicated. Speaking of the cheese sauce, thanks for pointing out my error. It’s all better now. 🙂

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  4. Bellissima! Love your family recipes. I am so glad reviewed the options for cooking with fresh and dried cannoli. This pasta is very delicate so appreciate those tips for success. When you start the recipe by saute your meat in butter, you know it is going to be good. Take care, BAM

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    • Thank you, BAM. What I so enjoy about this dish are the details, like sautéing the meat in butter or adding the cheese sauce. If you skipped either step, no one would really notice. Still, when you include them, there’s a bit more richness to the dish. Have a great day, BAM.

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    • Thank you, Glenda. You’re so right. Cannelloni will keep you busy and feed you well when the cold winds & snow blow outside your door. And what better meal for a wintry day? You may not have our cold but it works for a rainy day, too. 🙂

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    • Thanks, Roger, but don’t feel bad. I cannot remember the last time I made cannelloni. As much as we all enjoy the dish, it just doesn’t make it to the table. At least now, though, I’ve got a nice supply in my freeze. Yay!

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  5. I can see why this dish was prepared for special occasions or once in a while John — especially given that you didn’t have a fridge to store some pre-made sauce. It is a dish that is clearly lovingly prepared for friends and family given the number of steps involved! It would be met with great cheers in this household I can tell you. I am inspired to pull out my old pasta machine and get to work….but it will need to wait as I am still in vacation mode (we just got back from Jamaica) and I am not up to cooking yet. Another great post!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Just back from holiday? Welcome home! You do not need to tackle this recipe yet. Ease back into your life, Barb. Perhaps a little jerk chicken for supper with a fine rum cocktail, little umbrella included, of course. When you’re ready, I’ll be here to help you make cannelloni. 🙂

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      • Thanks John! You read my mind…I’m trying to come up with a good jerk chicken recipe to write about since everyone I talked to in Jamaica just uses the bottled stuff. I bought some Jamaican pimento (all spice) so I’m all set. I’ll definitely be back for the cannelloni though. The list of things I want to make from your site is getting pretty long. I’m thinking about making your easter bread for the holidays….it’ll be a big step for me.

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        • Hi Barb, welcome back. If you make anything from John’s site, I would STRONGLY suggest the Easter bread, it is worth the carbs and calories (mind you, if you eat it standing up, doesn’t that cancel out the calories?) I’ve made that bread several times and will again for Easter. It rises beautifully, bakes beautifully and tastes absolutely wonderful. I cannot say enough great things about this bread.

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  6. Yet again, a tempting creation. Your detail and diligence at testing and making sure everything is just so is amazing, and amount of work you put into the meals, and posts is very evident. I’m longing to try so many of your recipes. I’ll add this one to the long list 🙂

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    • You’re so kind, EllaDee. Thank you. When I make these old recipes, I can feel Mom’s presence, looking over my shoulder, making sure I’m doing it right. And if I veer from the “old ways”, I swear I can hear her, Oh! So that’s how you do it.” Of course, I correct course and go back to the way it should be done. You can easily see, then, why everything is “just so.” Mom won’t let me do anything less. 🙂

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    • Thank you and how I know what you mean. I first started cooking these recipes after I moved away from home because it was the only way I could get them. I really couldn’t expect Mom to cook for days in advance of one of my visits. It wasn’t long thereafter that I realized that few others in my family were preparing these dishes. That’s when I began to learn as many of the old recipes as possible. And yes, time is the biggest hurdle to learning and making many of these dishes.

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  7. Pingback: Cannelloni: recipe, variations and more | Le Marche and Food | Scoop.it

  8. Pingback: Cannelloni: recipe, variations and more | goodthingsfromitaly

  9. This reminds me of my childhood, because it reminds me of going to the great Bronx Italian restaurants where wonderful old-school dishes like this were made from scratch with love and pride. I am really looking forward to trying this one.

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    • Thanks, Susan. We make this dish so rarely that there’s a lot of nostalgia associated with it for us, too. I can’t tell you how great it is to open my freezer and see 20+ cannelloni in a container, nostalgia having been replaced with thoughts of gluttony. 🙂

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  10. Italian women certainly aren’t lazy – fancy working all day to put a meal on the table that night! I love this type of pasta and I would have thought it would be better to par-boil the pasta so I’m glad that turned out to be the option you went with. That’s a lovely filling. I would love to re-create this dish xx

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    • What I find amazing, Charlie, is that both Mom and Zia made dishes like these and each had 3 kids running around. I’ll never know how they did it. For me, I find it easiest if I make the filling the evening before. The rest may sound like a lot to do but, in reality, it’s pretty simple. After seeing those gorgeous cakes you bake and decorate, making cannelloni will be a snap for you. 🙂

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  11. Outstanding! I am in awe that you made them both ways and taste-tried it for us! I imagine that the parboiled would be better, and actually think I would get in serious trouble trying to roll the raw pasta, knowing myself… 🙂

    very beautiful dish, John!

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    • Thanks, Sally. Last week you said you were waiting for this dish, so, I’m glad it didn’t disappoint. I was surprised that there really was so little difference between the 2 pastas. I fully expected one to border on being inedible. Even though I intend to always boil the noodles first, it’s good to know that if I’m in a time crunch, I can skip the boiling and not be at all concerned about the end result.

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      • Indeed, it’s good to know one can take a short cut. I once did homemade lasagna but I parboiled the noodles and it was outstanding! I was tempted to use raw, but had no idea if it would work with homemade pasta. Now, thanks to you, I know… and knowledge is power! 😉

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  12. Pingback: Cannelloni: recipe, variations and more | Food in all its guises | Scoop.it

  13. All I know is that you grew up eating some amazing food! I don’t have a past making attachment, so store bought will have to do (although I know the taste would suffer). I really love your filling! I like that you used cream cheese instead of ricotta.

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    • You know, Tanya, it wasn’t until we kids grew old enough to eat at friends’ homes did we realize how special our dinners were. If all you’ve ever seen are diamonds, it would take a glimpse of mud to offer perspetive — not that I’m saying my friends ate mud…. well, I wouldn’t say that now, anyway. 😉
      That cream cheese was totally Mom and Zia’s concoction. I certainly like it over ricotta, and I’m a ricotta lover. Cream cheese is a better binding agent and offers just a bit more flavor. A win-win for me.!

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  14. Oh i think I can manage this one! My daughter makes a wonderful cannelloni. When my kids were growing up each of them learnt and perfected a signature dish,( everyone cooked at least once a week, with or without mama’s help) and sophie was the cannelloni girl. – and the sweet and sour pork girl -. she has always been very international! But we never made our own pasta in those days. I shall send her this link and then proceed to practise making these myself using your lovely filling. She will be astounded! have a lovely day john though I have to say it is snowing and blowing and generally murky and dreadful down here. Though I work very hard at remaining positive i can confess to you that i have about had enough of this weather! we need SUN, cold sun will do, just SUN! .. c

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    • You certainly can do this, Celi, and it needn’t take a day, either. Make your sauce on one day and stick it in the fridge. Once it is simmering, you can make the filling, or, make the filling on Day 2. The next day, make the pasta sheets and roll your cigars. If you break it down into 3 steps, it really goes quickly and you’ve plenty of time to clean the mess left after each step. The mess is the worst part of doing it all in one day. By the time I’m finished, my kitchen looked like it had been bombed!
      We finally had some sun today and it was so nice — still cold but nice. I got started with a little yard work out back and though I’ve plenty more to do, it was nice to get it started. I’m sure some sun would really help to clear up some of that mud of yours. As it is now, just walking back and forth to the barn must be so much more tiring. I’ll try to send a little sun your way tomorrow. 🙂

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  15. Pingback: Cannelloni: recipe, variations and more | FiveIron's Foodie Page | Scoop.it

  16. Hi John, I can honestly say I was licking my lips when I read this post. I’m seriously trying to drop a few pounds so I’m particularly craving carb laden dishes, like this. It’s absolutely mouth watering. And thank you again for the detailed instructions. I took my hand operated pasta maker to the cottage because at home I tend to use my stand mixer attachment; as I recall 5 is a fairly thin setting, but it looks like you have several layers rolled up which would provide the exact bite one would look for in a home made cannelloni.
    I hope you have been able to dig yourself out of the snow; in Toronto the temperatures warmed up and most of the snow has melted (although the piles on our front lawn are persisting because they were about 6 feet high at their peak!). But that hasn’t stopped the hyacinths from poking up, so I’m hoping they won’t freeze. I’ve noticed that the trees are also starting to bud…fingers crossed that spring is almost here. Do you guys do the daylight savings time? We went on it last weekend and it’s so depressing to wake up when it’s dark outside; but at least it doesn’t get dark until around 7pm. I can hardly wait to get our patios open.

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    • Thank you, Eva, though this isn’t probably the best post for you to be reading if you’re dieting. It certainly isn’t carb or fat-free. Our snow is just about gone, except in spots sheltered from the sun or where plows had piled it high. I did a little yard work this afternoon and noticed a couple of the roses had buds starting to appear. Spring is coming fast and I’ve got plenty of work to do before it gets here. Yes, we “sprung forward” last weekend. I really don’t mind. Max get up with the sun, so, for a few weeks, I get to sleep till around 7. Unfortunately, by June he’ll have me up at 5:30 again but, for now, I’m living the dream! 🙂

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  17. No wonder your blog is so very popular – your recipes are amazing. And “your voice” truly comes across in the way you write!! Years ago, I learned to make lasagna from my neighbor Amelia Vassallo. And now I’m learning how to make lots of wonderful Italian dishes thanks to you!!

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    • You’re so kind, Cecile, thank you. I hope one day you’ll share that lasagna recipe. I’ve posted 2 and have a 3rd one to share. One can never have too many lasagna recipes and I love trying new ones. 🙂

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  18. John, once again you have given us a time-well-spent recipe, aka “Crown Jewel Cannelloni”. Veal? Yes! Pecorino Romano? Oh, yes please! Fresh pasta dough? You bet! This is food of love and while I imagine the first time putting it together may seem daunting, the more familiar we become with a recipe, the easier it gets. And to have it ready in the freezer is the real treat because you are ready to serve it for dinner anytime–in my book, that is time saved not spent. 🙂 Absolutely a jewel!

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    • You’re right, Judy. Making cannelloni for the first time can be a bit daunting. I suggest breaking it up into more manageable parts. Make your sauce one day, the filling the next, and then make and fill your pasta on the 3rd day. It’s so much easier that way and your kitchen won’t look like a disaster when you put that tray into the oven. In my freezer in the basement, I’ve ravioli, cappelletti, and now cannelloni. I feel like I’m sitting atop Fort Knox! 🙂

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  19. John – Clearly, you never shy away from a challenge. This is easily a day’s work – if you include making the sauce and pasta. But it looks fabulous and well worth the time.

    I like the idea of freezing the individual stuffed pasta. That would make the preparation so much easier after your initial effort. And I would definitely go with the veal rather than chicken. Anything that requires this much love and effort is worthy of the best ingredients!

    Thanks for sharing this family treat 🙂

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    • Thank you! You’re right, this is a day-long job but I split it up. I make the sauce on one day and the filling the next — or later that day. I make the pasta and fill it on the next day. Each job takes no more than 2 hours, often less. And best of all, I can keep my kitchen relatively clean. Do it all in one day and my kitchen looks like it was bombed.
      Mom added chicken as a possible ingredient after she and Dad retired and moved to rural Michigan. You just cannot get veal in the stores up there. In fact, I just spoke with Zia and veal is now on my shopping list of things to bring with me when I visit her next. My groceries an markets have spoiled me.

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      • I know the routine well. Even in SW Michigan (not quite so rural), there are many food I can’t find and need to haul from Chicago – mostly meat and fish. In the summer, the produce in Michigan is fabulous, as I’m sure you know.

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        • Oh, yes! In late June, I’ve made a quick run to the other side of The Lake to get bags of tart cherries for my freezer and for my neighbors. Much of our farmers markets wares come from Michigan and I never return to Chicago from a visit back home without a trunkful of veggies & fruit.

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  20. I too have a folder where I save your recipes John.
    For those without a pasta machine, would fresh eggroll skins from the food market work?
    It is getting close to lunch time and a large plate of your cannelloni would be so welcome.

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  21. As usual, wonderful post! I love how thorough you get, and how you test everything. For example, as I was reading about whether to parboil, I was coming down on the side of definitely doing it – for much the same reasons you describe. And of course when I make lasagna with fresh pasta I always parboil, so there’s that habit. Anyway, I so rarely make cannelloni, which is odd – as you say, it’s easier than ravioli and somewhat similar. Thanks for sharing with us.

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    • Thank you so much, John. I made cannelloni a couple times these past few weeks, getting ready for today’s post. And all the while, I wondered why I haven’t made these in years? If you make the sauce and filling the day(s) before, making the pasta dough and rolling cigars is a snap! I am glad I tested the pasta with and without par-boiling. I really thought the cannelloni using raw dough would not be good at all. I was far from wrong. I’ll still par-boil the sheets. It’s just good to know if I’m in a time crunch, I can skip the boiling and few will notice.

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  22. You talk about everything with such love. And how nice to have a Zia. And I never knew the difference between manicotti and canneloni. And I wonder too, about Norma’s question. An eggroll wrapper? It wouldn’t be the same but maybe it would convey the love. I’ve heard about using wonton wrappers for ravioli…

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    • Thank you, Abbe. It is a nice feeling for me to pull out these old recipes and make them again. It’s very pleasant experience.
      I’ve used wonton wrapper and eggroll wrappers for a few of these stuffed pasta dishes. I’m going to get together a “how to” post for everyone. I’ll get people making these pastas one way or another! 🙂

      Like

  23. I can certainly see why this recipe earned its way into the Crown Jewel hall of fame. You’ve really got my stomach rumbling looking at those photos. I would not complain if someone set a plate down in front of me right now.

    Like

    • Thanks, Diane. This is a great dish and if you can find the time, it isn’t at all difficult to make. Best of all, a cannelloni dinner is one great meal, few can compare.

      Like

    • Oh, yes! You must find yourself a pasta machine. I’d be lost without mine and it makes so many classic Italian dishes “doable” in the home.
      Thanks for the visit and for taking the time to comment.

      Like

  24. Well, it certainly was worth the wait to read this post, John. These look like the best of the best, and worthy of the Crown Jewel designation for sure! I love how thorough you were about option and the measuring of parboiled versus dry, etc. I also love that the filling has spinach in it, so we can feel so healthy while eating our cannelloni. 🙂 I’m pinning this one! Love your tri-colore risotto, too.

    Like

    • Thank you, Betsy.I realize that many have no experience with dough sheets, of any size. I wanted to make sure everyone avoids the mistakes that I’ve made — like having the sheets expand and not fit the dish. And yes, that spinach does make this a very healthy dish. I used organic so it was doubly healthy. 🙂

      Like

  25. It took me a while to stop staring at that first photo. I’m a sucker for pasta, especially when it’s homemade. So…what do I have to do to earn a spot at your dinner table?? 🙂 haha. and what a delicious filling…mmmm!

    Like

  26. I am really excited about this recipe, John. It takes a little work and since I’m inexperienced I will need to find a day when I can devote enough time, but this WILL be made! Your instructions are so incredibly detailed, thus really helpful. I haven’t yet purchased the pasta attachment for my mixer, but because of all the great recipes you share I’ve really been thinking it a good investment. I’m on my lunch hour at work and suddenly my meager lunch isn’t all that appetizing. 🙂 And the risotto is a great bonus,too. I’m really quite happy with that, too!!

    Off topic entirely, but as I just heard the announcement from the Vatican, and sneaked a peek on my computer terminal, the first person I thought of–sincerely–was Zia. After you shared the wonderful story of her previous opportunity to be blessed by the Pope, I have thought of her often in this interim period, wondering what she thought. At her age she has seen a lot of changes in the Church. I hope she’ll be happy with the choice in Pope Francis. 🙂

    Like

    • Thanks, Debra, I’m glad that you enjoyed today’s recipes. Making cannelloni can seem a bit daunting but it needn’t be. Just break it down into 3 stages. The first is to make the sauce. That you can do anytime and, if it’s very early before “cannelloni day”, freeze it until ready to use. The filling should be made the day/night before, to allow the flavors to blend. With those 2 stages out of the way, all that’s left is to roll out the pasta, cut it, par-boil it, and roll the cigars. It sounds like a lot but, once you get started, you’ll see that it is really quite simple and moves quickly, Now, if yo try to do it all on the same day, it is a different animal and your kitchen will probably qualify for FEMA assistance.
      I spoke with Zia just after the new Pope was named. She’s pleased with the selection. I can tell you, though Debra, no Pope will ever take John-Paul II’s place in her heart. After our “meeting”, Zia took very seriously ill and credits him with pulling her through. She has since adopted him as her Patron Saint and unless one of these New Guys makes a pilgrimage to her home, John-Paul’s place is pretty secure. And, as the one who made possible the meeting, so is my place with her — as I constantly remind her sons. 🙂

      Like

    • Thank you, Anne. The homemade pasta really does add so much to these dishes. It’s always an eye-opener for friends who’ve never had lasagna or cannelloni made with homemade pasta. It takes a great dish and makes it even better .. far better.

      Like

    • The Rufus Guide is a great blog to follow. Theirs is one of the most prolific blogs around, posting a recipe a day, without fail. And each recipe is a keeper!
      Thank you, Cecile, for the shout-out. You’re very kind.

      Like

  27. John, my mouth positively dropped when I saw the first picture! Glorious gems I must say! Yes, this is a special occasion meal and I am salivating over how delicious it looks. I only can imagine how wonderful the veal and pork taste within the pasta, sauce and cheeses! One more thing, you are amazing with the cream cheese additions! One of these days I will try it 🙂

    Like

    • You’re too kind, Judy. Thank you. I hope you do give it a try. More than anything, I’d love to hear what kind of cupcake you’d create for dessert. Now that would be a celebratory meal, if ever there was one!

      Like

    • Thanks, Michelle.You’ve enough pasta-making experience that this would be a snap for you to make. And it is so nice knowing that there are a couple dozen cannelloni in the freezer, just waiting for a special dinner.

      Like

  28. What a story of love! Of respect and understanding of the old traditions especially those you learned at your Mother’s and Zia’s knee! A wonderful detailed description I so loved to read! Thank you . . . Methinks yesterday you mentioned on a HK blog that you appreciated the Japanese ‘dessert’ described but would in all probability never make it yourself 🙂 ! In the same thus manner I have and will again enjoy what you have written, but since I do not use white flour at all nor as much in the way of cheeses, this will just be just a learning experience. I have and do make variations of your ‘crespelle’ recipe so very popular in N Europe and I did enjoy your tricolour risotto 🙂 ! That is one of the few occasions I pretend not to be a nutritionist and love mushroom or pumpkin etc variations of the dish . . . .

    Like

    • My congratulations on the election of the new Pope – Pope Francis – having been so speedily solved. I am a Buddhist but fully respect all faiths. I am happy he comes from the New World and seems to have worked for those in need. I daresay I cannot have hoped he would think like me regarding many other sociological issues in which I believe . . . .

      Like

      • Yes, it’s the other social issues that concern me. I don’t know enough about him to say anything, one way or another. I’m sure his prior sermons/speeches will all be read very closely for statements he’s made in favor of this or against that. No matter what they may find, I hope he remains unscathed by any of the Church’s current scandals. Only time will tell …

        Like

    • That’s kind of you to say, Eha. Thank you. I know there are many who will not try this recipe, for a variety of reasons. To be honest, I know there are members of my own family who will never attempt this dish. That’s the way it works sometimes. I am glad you liked the post and appreciate the traditions behind the recipe. One day maybe you can each me how to make crespelle. I need a few lessons, to be sure.

      Like

  29. Oh my the cannelloni of my dreams! With bonus clearly detailed instructions so I can attempt it in my own kitchen. In fact, years ago i made cannelloni for a big brunch party, and while they went over well I see now that my recipe is a mere shadow of the master’s! I must admit, I can’t quite reconcile myself to using cream cheese in a savoury recipe, but if you use it then it must be delicious!

    Like

    • Thanks, Mar, but I’m sure your cannelloni were every bit as good as these. I spoke with Zia yesterday afternoon and we talked about her Mother who used ricotta in place of the cream cheese here and in our ravioli & lasagna recipes. The cream cheese was Mom and Zia’s innovation. I find cream cheese is a better binding agent and give a bit more flavor than does ricotta. Best of all, though, is that no one that I know of, uses cream cheese in these dishes. It certainly makes ours unique.

      Like

  30. Crown jewel is right! Precious and delicious.
    And I like your photo gallery layout, too. Hope you have a wonderful St. Joseph’s Day. My father, son and grandson’s middle names are all Joseph. Your food looks better and more delectable than any available in any restaurant I know. Your patriotic risotto is festive.
    What amazes me most, though, is your making time to respond to each and every commenter on your blog. Astounding!

    Like

    • Thanks, Ruth. The photo gallery layout is available with the WordPress theme that I upgraded to, Twenty Eleven. Thanks for noticing.
      That’s a lot of Joseph’s! Most of the men in my family have my Grandfather’s name as their middle name. I say most because mine is different, for some reason. Tell them all that Chicago wishes them a happy feast day.
      Yes, I’m currently responding to all but that is going to have to change. The number of comments continue to grow and, with Winter ending, I’ve got plenty to do around here and just won’t have the time to spend on the blog, as I have all Winter. I have to figure out something and will, in the weeks ahead.

      Like

  31. Drooling once again at those gorgeous pics. I love cannelloni! You make it look so easy. Maybe one day, before it gets too hot for baked pasta with tangy tomatoey sauce & caramelized cheese. Drool.

    Like

    • Thanks, Cam, but it is easy. Just don’t attempt to do it all in one day. Make your sauce and filling beforehand. If already prepared, the last day is just about making, cutting, and rolling the pasta cigars. Easy peasy! 🙂

      Like

  32. Lordy lord…a strong contender for the main Jewel in the Corwn here John! Am seriously impressed as you made the pasta shells too…well, I would have expected no less from you and Zia! It was a rare treat for us too to have cannelloni but I am sure my godmother never made the pasta for them and bought the shells ready made. Someone mentioned above that they seem to have fallen out of fashion and now I think about it, it’s true…we don’t see them so often on restaurant menus. A shame, but at least now we can follow your recipe to enjoy them! I made your lasagne a few weeks back….a huge success so thank you 🙂 How do you and Zia feel about our new Pope? Exciting that he’s from Latin America (who knows, he may be a long lost relative of Big Man whose father was Argentinian!)

    Like

    • Thanks, Tanya. Yes, I don’t know why but cannelloni aren’t at all popular anymore. I have seen them, filled with seafood, and served as a primo piatto — but that’s a rarity. We used the pre-formed shells for manicotti and filled them with ricotta. Now, though, I roll manicotti, too. I’m too hooked on fresh pasta to use manufactured tubes anymore. I’m glad to hear that you enjoyed the lasagna. Zia will be thrilled to hear this. We spoke yesterday, once the Pope was announced. She’s excited and has a positive outlook for him. Let’s be honest, though, Tanya, he will never come close to John Paul II in her heart. She shook his hand and that left a mark on her that no one else will erase or replace. 🙂

      Like

  33. Pingback: Another of the Bartolini Crown Jewels: Cannelloni | Le Marche - Appassionata Style! | Scoop.it

  34. That…there just are no words…if I could eat only one meal for the rest of my life, this might be it.

    Your notes on figuring the size, post-boil, reminded me of the first time I ever made lasagne. I carefully laid out the dry noodles in the pan to see how many I would need to cook, then popped them into the hot water…When it came time to assemble the dish, I had too much! Never occured to me they expanded THAT much!

    Like

    • Thanks, Maire. This is a fantastic meal and I’ve been in heaven, “testing” them for a couple weeks now. Blogging is tough!
      Isn’t it amazing how much they expand? I’ve had similar problems as your did with lasagna — haven’t we all? — and I wanted to show the comparison for the new cooks, otherwise their baking dish of cannelloni will be a mess.

      Like

  35. This looks incredible!!! I am looking at this while eating my breakfast and I am already ready for lunch. Please send some my way 🙂

    Like

      • I know what you mean. I have never made my mothers Hungarian cabbage rolls. I have her make it every time she visits me (once a year) I freeze a bunch to have until she visits again. I should do the same as you and make her recipes myself. 🙂

        Like

    • What fun is that? Everyone should feel the sense of accomplishment you get when you pull that dish of cannelloni out of the oven and onto the table. I wouldn’t want to deprive you of that. 😉

      Like

    • Hello, Elaine! I take it you’re on holiday so your taking precious time to comment here is extra special. Thank you. But, you’re further South? If you go much further South, won’t you fall off?
      I hope you’re enjoying yourself, wherever you are. 🙂

      Like

          • I once made the little crepes you were talking about – the crespelles, I think you called them. I’m French Canadian descent, so I make crepes all the time. The crespelles were super easy. And they were sooo delicious!! I filled them with some smoked chicken (I lived in Malta at the time. I don’t know if they have smoked chicken where you live.) I made a white sauce with some cheese. Actually – I might be able to find the recipe! If I do – I’ll sent it to you! (I don’t know if the recipe I used for the crespelles is authentic – but it was in a general cookbook and was a recipe for Manacotti.)

            Like

    • Thank you. You know, you could make a dishful of cannelloni, put it in the oven, go for a speed hike, and then sit down to a great meal without worrying about messing with your targets. 🙂

      Like

  36. Pingback: Cannelloni: recipe, variations and more | Rachael Ray Cookwares Tips | Scoop.it

  37. Here’s the recipe I used for the Manicotti – They were delicious!! I wonder how authentic this recipe is ….??? Did you Zia and your mother make crespelles?
    Whisk together:
    1 cup all-purpose flour
    4 eggs
    1 Tb. salad oil
    1 tsp. salt
    1 cup water

    Heat skillet over medium-high heat. Brush with a little oil. Put in 3 Tbs. of batter and swirl pan to form circle. Cook until top is set and dry and underside is lightly brown. You only cook one side AND you don’t want too cook them too much, as what you are really making is “pasta”. As each one is done, place it on a plate. Continue until all batter is used.

    Like

    • This looks similar to the recipes I’ve seen, Cecile. My family has no recipe for them nor, to my knowledge, were crespelle ever prepared and served. Looks like it is my duty to introduce crespelle to the Bartolini Clan! Thanks for lending a helping hand to this ever-so-worthwhile endeavor. 🙂

      Like

  38. Quick one – I just printed the recipe as I had it in my recipe file in my computer… So the directions are for the general public…. not an expert like yourself. Hence the “you are really making a “pasta” comment.

    Like

  39. It’s quite clear that the Bartolini crown is Encrusted with Jewels! (and a good bit of melting cheese!) I don’t know how a Bartolini royal such as yourself could even manage to hold your head upright any longer! I really like cannelloni, but I’m saving myself for your spaghetti with anchovies and capers! (and perhaps a bit of diced preserved lemon.) 🙂

    Like

    • Thanks, Spree, for such a nice compliment and giving me a good chuckle, too. I, also, want to thank you for the suggestion of adding the preserved lemon to the anchovy pasta recipe. That post is already written but I’m going to add a note with your suggestion. Sheesh, Spree! It’s 1:00 am and now I want pasta. Too bad there isn’t an all-night white anchovy store in the neighborhood. I guess this craving will have to go unfulfilled until morning. Life is so hard. 😉

      Like

  40. Having sampled a Bartolini Kitchen cannelloni (or two…or three), I know how scrumptious this recipe is firsthand.

    Like

  41. Your dish of cannelloni look delicious and I’m sure I would eat more than I should if I was at your table. You definitely have to try them made with crepes sometime. I had them one time when I was a guest at a dinner party…they were incredibly light.

    Like

  42. John where was my invitation to taste test? Got lost in the post again I think! Interesting reading as ever and I’m ready and waiting for my spagetti, anchovies and capers – I realy am waiting!!

    Like

  43. John, you have certainly gone and done it this time. Canneloni is my all time favorite Italian dish. I am salivating at the screen right now (TMI?…perhaps). I have to get myself revved to up make this seemingly detailed dish. I know though that with your recipes and step-by-step instructions, that I am in very good hands and likely produce great results. Thanks so much for sharing this particular family favorite. My birthday is next month…I will consider this an early present! 🙂

    Like

    • Every one has her/his pasta, Geni, and I aim to hit each one of them. Judging by the comments, I hit a bulls eye with today with quite a few people. I hope you do make these, Geni, you certainly have more than whatever skill is required. Just don’t let the number of step deter you. My advice is to break the process into 3 major steps. Making the sauce. Making the filling. Making the cannelloni. Don’t try to do them all in one day the first time you make cannelloni. You’ll feel swamped and your kitchen will be a disaster area. Depending on how much time you have, I suggest you make the sauce on the first day; the filling on the second; and assemble the cannelloni on the third day. Another way would be to make the sauce and filling on one day and the cannelloni on the second. Either alternative will make it far less stressful than trying to do it all in one sitting. Once you’ve been successful and know what to expect, the next time you make cannelloni, you can do it all in the same day, if you like.
      I can guarantee, though, once you make it and enjoy the meal, you won’t think twice about making them again. The first time is the most daunting. You can do this and it will make a wonderful birthday dinner.

      Like

  44. I swear I could almost smell this cannelloni. Mmmm! And look at that lovely homemade pasta. Your rolled cannelloni looks absolutely fab.

    My family is getting together for Easter and my sister is making homemade ravioli, but after reading your post I might convince her that cannelloni is the way to go…

    Like

    • Zia and I were talking about this very thing the other day. We both agree that it is easier to make cannelloni than ravioli. Once the filling and sauces are made, I roll out the dough sheets and cut them into little rectangles. When they’re done, I par-boil about a half-dozen at a time, and then roll ’em up. Another way to look at it: depending upon the ravioli mold used, I can get a couple hundred ravioli from a batch of filling. For this post, I got 32 cannelloni from a half batch of filling – and it is so much easier rolling a cigar than cutting ravioli. Offer to help your Sister, bring a bottle of wine, and have a good time together. Mom & Zia spent many an afternoon making pasta together. 🙂

      Like

  45. Mouthwatering, John! We always parboil out pasta first in this sort of recipe, but we sometimes cheat and use bought lasagne sheets! Occasionally we do make our own – it took us a while to figure out that we didn’t need to roll it to wafer thin, so it’s great that you put that point in your post! xx

    Like

    • THank you, Celia. Everyone has their preference, I imagine, but we never went the paper-thin route. That dough is just too fragile after par-boiling and will tear too easily as you try to fetch it out of the ice water for filling. It is so uch easier to handle if a little bit thicker.

      Like

  46. John, this is a totally awesome post! Cannelloni will put a smile on the face of any kid any time, I remember eating them when I was little. I really appreciate you taking the time to go over water absorption and the size of the pasta sheets, and the water content in your tomato sauce depending on par boiling or cooking the pasta as it bakes. Awesome tips!

    Like

    • Thank you, Paul. It was always such a treat when, as a child, Mom put a big platter of cannelloni down in the center of the table. It’s a shame that cannelloni aren’t as popular as they once were. Kids today don’t know what they’re missing! 🙂

      Like

  47. I think I am keeping track of how long I’ve followed your blog by the number of St Joseph’s feasts I’ve seen.. because I didn’t know about this holiday before meeting you and your blog:) What a feast, indeed! I love Canneloni, I’d have to say it’s probably my number one favorite dish to order in a restaurant.. the idea of being able to make my own is just too good to be true. This is now on my ever growing list of Bartolini recipes I want to try.. maybe before the ravioli? I think I would go the route of par-boiling first.. And the idea of having a panful in the fridge for another evening sounds just perfect!! I didn’t know you could freeze the cheese for easier grating.. does that go for all cheeses then?? I hope you’re having a great weekend!

    Like

    • Thank you so much, Barb. This post really did strike a chord with a number of people. I’d no idea that cannelloni were so popular since, as a number have noted, it seems to have fallen off the menus. BUT, you could be part of the movement to bring cannelloni back, Barb. All you need do is make a batch, serve them to family & friends, and watch the interest grow. C’mon, Barb. Join the movement!
      If you truly are considering making these and ravioli, I would suggest making cannelloni first. Not only is it easier to make cannelloni, but you’ll get some valuable experience making the filling and working with pasta dough. Your ravioli making will greatly profit by the experience. And as I just mentioned to Geni, separate the cannelloni process into 3 steps: make the sauce; make the filling; and make the cannelloni. Whether you make the sauce and filling on separate days or on the same one, save making the cannelloni for its own day. It’s much easier and far less daunting to do it on separate days. Once you’ve made cannelloni, the next time you make them, if you want to do it in one day, you’ll know better what to expect and it won’t seem nearly as intimidating. You can do this, Barb, and you’ll be very happy you did.
      I’ve not tried the freezing technique with other cheeses, Barb, but I don’t see why it wouldn’t work. Fresh mozzarella is so soft because of its high water content and trying to grate it, as-is, can result in more mess than grated cheese. Sticking the cheese in the freezer for no more than 30 minutes won’t freeze it hard but it will make it firm enough to grate easily. It works every time. I hope you, too, are enjoying a great weekend!

      Like

  48. John, yum this is one of my favorites. You’re so professional in your blog and the pictures are wonderful. I always have the urge to tie a napking around my neck and pull up to the table when I tune in here.

    I like recipes that freeze well because with two of us there are always leftovers when I cook Italian food.

    Like

    • Thank you, Susie. The great thing about making your own cannelloni, as well as stuffing shells, is that you can freeze them individually on cookie sheets. Down the road, you can make as many as you need for a particular meal and not be stuck baking a frozen 9 X 17″ panful. And I smile every time I open the freezer and see them stored in the back. Like money in the bank. 🙂

      Like

  49. WOW – this is definitely one of the crown jewels! It’s interesting that you used cream cheese in the cream sauce. I don’t remember having seen that before in such dishes. I bet it add a different flavor and texture that what I normally see – lots of mozzarella. That’s for all these wonderful Bartolini specials!

    Like

    • Thanks, MJ. The cream cheese is something Mom and Zia came up with years ago, well before my memories begin. They’d grown tired of ricotta and weren’t impressed with besciamella sauces, so, they tried using cream cheese in their lasagna and, later, with cannelloni, too. It works for me!

      Like

  50. So I was all set to make homemade pasta over the weekend and put some of your inspiration into practice. However, When I got the old machine out we realize that the handle was nowhere to be found. Not a good thing at all. So until it’s found Liz and I will just have to live vicariously through your wonderful posts my friend…another Crown Jewel indeed here!!

    Like

  51. We made cannelloni for a daring cooks challenge once and I have to say that making cannelloni from scratch can be time consuming but the flavor difference is more than worth it!
    I can’t wait to try your recipe John because I know it will turn out perfectly as all your recipes do

    Like

    • Thank you, Sawsan. I’ve mentioned to others, especially for the uninitiated, that it is best to break the process into 3 steps. Step 1 is to make the sauce. Step 2 is to make the filling, and step 3 is to make the pasta, par-boil them, and fill them. If you prepare one step a day, the process isn’t so daunting. You’ve made them so you know what is ahead. You can, and will, make them based on you experience. Others aren’t so lucky and I think a 3 step approach may help them.
      I need to go through your archives to find the post in which you made cannelloni. I’d love to see the filling you used.

      Like

  52. This looks incredible – I can see how it seems a little bit of a fiddly task but I can only imagine how worth it the final product would be.

    Like

    • Thanks, Sam. It is a bit of a challenge, particularly if you’ve not attempted to make them before. I just suggested to the next commenter to break the process into 3 steps. You can do each step on a separate day or steps 1 & 2 on one day. Just leave step 3 for it’s own day. The process is much more manageable that way and you’re not so stressed.

      Like

  53. I love your detailed explanation of the dish, it’s a pity I don’t own a pasta roller yet, I’m hoping to get it with my mixer when I get mine (in the near future). So im bookmarking the recipe until I’m making this. It looks tedious but I believe the effort’s worth it, your dish looks incredibly delicious!

    Like

    • Getting the roller attachment for a stand mixer is the best possible thing to get. It really will make rolling out the dough so much easier. In the prior 2 replies, Jasline, I’ve suggested breaking the process into 3 steps. Check them out when you’re ready to try your hand at this recipe. This job can easily be broken up, with different steps taking place on different days. The process doesn’t seem nearly as daunting and you won’t be nearly as stressed. And, of course, I’m here to answer your questions.

      Like

  54. Pingback: Spaghetti with White Anchovies & Capers | from the Bartolini kitchens

  55. I missed this post — yum! Definitely pinning for future reference (I, of course, will have to substitute for veal as I am one of those folks who has an issue with eating baby cow . . . and, yes, I know some of the other choices I make are probably as bad or worse, but working on it!) Did find of interest your white anchovy fillet post and will have to pass on to my husband, to see if it is mild enough that those of us who turn our noses up at anchovies typically could find a happy compromise here!

    Like

    • I’ve friends who feel the same as you do about veal. Chicken makes a fine substitute here. I think the white anchovies will surprise you for they are not nearly as strong tasting as the brown version. They worked out fine in this pasta and I’m looking for new ways to use them. Stay tuned!
      Thanks for visiting and taking the time to comment.

      Like

  56. I would have been happy to come by and help you test these recipes! I don’t see myself delving into this one anytime soon. I’ll need a whole afternoon to tackle this one. That said, I know I would LOVE it! So I will have to make it one of these days. I’m still drooling over your lasagna (which will now be our family favorite too after its rave reviews), so I know this will be a hit too. I could just stare at the pictures all day long. 🙂

    Like

    • Thank you, Kristy. If I lived nearby, you all would have tasted cannelloni ages ago. 🙂 It’s good to hear that our lasagna is still a family favorite.
      If you do decide to make cannelloni, don’t do it all in one day. Make the sauce one day and the stuffing either the same day or the next. Make the pasta sheets and stuff them on their own day. This way, no stage takes more than a couple hours and you’ve time to clean up the mess. Believe me. Doing everything in one day is not only a lot of work but it leaves your kitchen looking like a disaster area. For your first time — especially for your first time, break it down into steps and days. Once you’ve made them and know what to expect, then you can decide to do it all in one day. Me? I’ll take 2 afternoons, thank you. 🙂

      Like

  57. Dear Friends! I am Italian ans cannelloni, fried calamri, lasagne etc… are in my blood…pleae don’t teach me the receipts…..our people are very proud of it!
    I can post some receipt for you my dear… I live in the centre of Italy, Marche Region, Recanati is my birth place…bye, bye….

    Like

    • Thank you for visiting and commenting. My Mother’s Father came from Corinaldo, and other family members were from Ancona and Fabriano. My father’s family lived in San Marino. We’re neighbors! I look forward to seeing your recipes.

      Like

  58. Pingback: Cannelloni: recipe, variations and more | Food - Recipes | Scoop.it

  59. Pingback: Where East Meets West: Wonton Wrapper Pastas | from the Bartolini kitchens

  60. Pingback: We’re Celebrating St. Joseph’s Feast Day with a Sicilian Strata | from the Bartolini kitchens

  61. This looked so fantastic that I had to Pinterest it save it for later when I have time to tackle it from scratch. I’ve made Cannelloni a couple of times but never at this quality.

    Like

    • Thanks, Shanna. There’s hardly ever any leftovers. When we make them now, we make plenty extra and freeze them individually on baking sheets. Once frozen, we pack them in bags or containers. That way, we can have a cannelloni dinner just about whenever we want. All we need to do is add sauce and bake. 🙂

      Like

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