Where East Meets West: Wonton Wrapper Pastas

Today’s entry is the fulfillment of a promise that I made to Norma in the Comments section of the Bartolini Cannelloni recipe post of last March. (Norma, by the way, is a cookbook author whose wonderful blog, Garden to Wok, is filled with tasty recipes and gardening tips.) She asked if egg roll skins could be used in place of pasta dough to make cannelloni. Well, Norma, it took 2 months and I used wonton wrappers but here’s the promised post.

Back before I started buying ravioli molds but after I learned I was unable to use Mom’s tiny cappelletti mold, I saw someone on a cooking show use wonton wrappers to make ravioli. That’s all I needed to see. Before long I was making ravioli and tortelloni using the wrappers without any problems. In fact, I’d probably still be using wrappers if I hadn’t seen another TV cook use a large ravioli mold one day. Soon I was making ravioli and cappelletti of all sizes and I never bought another wonton wrapper.

When I’ve shared our ravioli recipes, some have mentioned that the process seemed difficult and time-consuming. Using wonton wrappers eliminates one of the more difficult elements, that of making and rolling out the pasta dough. With that out-of-the-way, the rest of the process is a snap and this post will show you just how easy it is to use wonton wrappers to make stuffed pasta. Along the way, we’ll make round ravioli, manicotti, square ravioli, and tortelloni, all of which are pictured in the unfortunate photo above. It’s a long post but the method for preparing each pasta will “stand on its own” so that you need only reference the section(s) that interest you.

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How to make Jumbo Ravioli (Ravioloni)

  1. Place one wonton wrapper on a floured work surface.
  2. Place about a tbsp of filling in the center of the wrapper.
  3. Use your fingers or a brush to moisten the 4 edges on the wrapper.
  4. Place another wrapper on top.
  5. Use your fingers to remove as much air as possible while pressing to seal the edges.
  6. Use a pastry wheel or sharp knife to trim uneven edges.
  7. Use a fork’s tines to press and further seal the 2 wrappers.
  8. Reserve on a lined baking sheet for later cooking or freezing.

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These ravioli are about 3.25 inches (8.9 cm) square, after trimming. Remember that when cooked, they will expand a bit more.

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How to make Ravioli

  1. Place one wonton wrapper on a floured work surface.
  2. Use a pastry wheel or sharp knife to cut the wrapper in half.
  3. Place about a tsp of filling in the bottom half of each part.
  4. Use your fingers or a brush to moisten the top half of each part.
  5. Fold the top half and cover the bottom half of each.
  6. Use your fingers to remove as much air as possible while pressing to seal the edges.
  7. Use a fork’s tines to press and further seal the 2 ravioli.
  8. Reserve on a lined baking sheet for later cooking or freezing.

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These ravioli are about 1.6 inches (4.0 cm) square.

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How to make Large Round Ravioli

  1. Place one wonton wrapper on a floured work surface.
  2. Place about 2 tsp of filling in the center of the wrapper.
  3. Use your fingers or a brush to moisten the wrapper area around the filling.
  4. Place another wrapper on top.
  5. Use your fingers to remove as much air as possible while pressing to seal the edges.
  6. Carefully place a large biscuit cutter over the covered filling. Make sure that the cutter surrounds the filling without touching it.
  7. Press down on the biscuit cutter hard enough to sever the wrappers.
  8. Remove excess wrapper from around the cutter.
  9. Remove the raviolo from the cutter and reserve on a lined baking sheet for later cooking or freezing.

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These ravioli have a diameter of 2.5 inches (6.4 cm).

To make Small Round Ravioli use a smaller biscuit cutter. Mine was 2 inches (5 cm) in diameter.

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How to make Tortelloni

  1. Place one wonton wrapper on a floured work surface.
  2. Use your fingers or a brush to moisten 2 adjoining sides of the wrapper.
  3. Place a little more than a tsp in the corner opposite the moistened sides.
  4. Fold the moistened half of the wrapper to cover the other.
  5. Use your fingers to remove as much air as possible while pressing to seal the edges.
  6. Use a fork’s tines to press and further seal the 2 sides.
    1. At this point, you’ve created a triangular-shaped raviolo. You can stop here or continue and make a tortelloni. 
  7. Use you finger to make an indentation in the center of the triangle’s hypotenuse. (And you once thought you’d never use geometry in real life, didn’t you?) 
  8. Bring the two opposing corners together, moisten one, and press together to seal.
  9. Bend backwards the remaining corner.
  10. Reserve on a lined baking sheet for later cooking or freezing.

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Although it’s not possible to give the exact size of your tortelloni, it’s safe to assume that these would be too large to be used in soup. Any stuffed pasta used in soup should be bite-sized so that the diner needn’t cut them before eating.

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How to make Manicotti/Cannelloni

  1. Place one wonton wrapper on a floured work surface.
  2. Place about 1.5 tbsp of filling along the bottom edge of the wrapper.
  3. Use your fingers or a brush to moisten the opposite or top edge of the wrapper.
  4. Carefully and tightly roll the wrapper and filling towards the moistened edge.
  5. Place the finished manicotto/cannellono, sealed-side down, on a lined baking sheet for later baking or freezing.

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In my family, cannelloni are meat-filled and manicotti are cheese-filled. These manicotti/cannelloni are about 3.5 inches (8.9 cm) wide, perfect for creating a double row in many baking dishes.

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Variations

The size and shape of your pasta is limited only by the size of the wonton wrapper. If you haven’t a biscuit cutter in the size you want, try using a glass or jar to cut your pasta. I’ve never used egg roll wrappers but imagine that the processes would be the same, only much larger. Frankly, I’d never use an entire egg roll wrapper to make a single stuffed pasta. Instead, I’d cut it into halves or quarters before using.

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Notes

No matter what size or shape of ravioli that you make, be sure that there is no filling along the edge where the dough is to be sealed. It will only interfere with the seal and the pasta will probably open up during cooking. Equally important is to make sure that the pasta edges being sealed are moistened with water. Mom, Zia, Lidia Bastianich, and Mario Batali all agree: egg or egg wash is never used to seal pasta for it can harden during the cooking process, making the edges of your pasta pillows unpalatable.

As you may have noticed in the photos, I used a cheese-based filling when making each stuffed pasta. The recipe for that filling, porcini mushroom, leek, and goat cheese can be found HERE. If you don’t wish to use that filling, you may prefer to use either of these 2 fillings: the traditional Bartolini ravioli filling or the Bartolini sausage ravioli filling.

At the very beginning of this post I stated that my objective was to show how simple it is to make wonton wrapper pasta. As you’ll see next week, the filling I used here is flavorful yet, also, uncomplicated and easy to prepare. The same holds true for dressing the cooked pasta. Although you can certainly use any sauce you wish to dress your ravioli or tortelloni, you needn’t complicate matters. The large ravioli pictured above were dressed with melted butter and garnished with Parmesan flakes and fresh parsley. You could just as easily use olive oil in place of the butter, and, grated cheese in place of the Parmesan flakes. By keeping it simple I hoped I’ve demonstrated just how easy it is to prepare a homemade stuffed pasta dinner using wonton wrappers. In short, yes, you can do this!

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 It’s déjà vu all over again … 

Fazzoletti PastaSince today’s post used square wonton wrappers, I thought I’d stick with the theme and send you back to the post where we made fazzoletti, little handkerchiefs, pasta. Nothing more than pasta squares, these are among the easiest of pastas to make at home. You can see how they’re made simply by clicking HERE.

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Coming soon to a monitor near you …

Porcini mushroom, leek, and goat cheese ravioli filling.

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188 thoughts on “Where East Meets West: Wonton Wrapper Pastas

  1. A lovely fusion indeed! This may make a busy [surely not lazy 🙂 !] gal make these tasty morsels more often. Get the idea – now waiting for your filling: the Italiano part! Hope WordPress decides to send me this blog to ‘study’ as I am on Mr Google at the moment: one whole page of my subscriptions had been wiped out during the past 2-4 days and, dear Chgo John, I have just had to resubscribe to you!!! Thank God Celi diagnosed the problem! Meanwhile back to happy pasta making 😀 !

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    • Sorry to read that you’re having problems with WP, Eha. You’re certainly not alone. 2 – 3 weeks ago all of subscription notifications were turned off. I finally realized and corrected the problem but have been hopelessly behind ever since. I hope you got it resolved. No matter which pasta you choose to make, the first few will take you a bit to become acquainted with the process but, after those, it’s a snap. I’ll have you making pasta and creating your own fillings in no time. 🙂

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      • I’ll keep you to that promise, kind Sir 🙂 ! Don’t think I’ll have too many problems as I have made Shanghai dumplings etc et al for decades and it’s pretty much a similar principle 🙂 ! Am very interested in your fillings tho’ and I don’t think I am the only one!! The WP is far worse ’cause after three years I am still a dunce on the computer: have to find at least 20 more blogs which seem to have disppeared during ‘my one chance to have time off’!!!!! Anyways now I know why you were noticeably absent from common sites: I thought you had fallen . . . 🙂 !

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    • Hello, Maria. Wonton wrappers arfe great if you haven’t the time — nor inclination — to make pasta dough. Just make you rilling, grab a pack of wrappers, and get busy. It really is that easy. I hope you do give it a try. Please let me know if you do. I bet you make a mean filling! 🙂

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  2. Terrific visuals- like an HD television. The very first photo alludes to a Wayne Thiebaud painting, though. Nice. You and I both know I am not going to make ravioli, jumbo or otherwise but there is absolutely no reason I couldn’t do it, if I followed your precise and thorough instructions. A wonderful post, John. Delicious. Thanks for making time to read and comment on my blog, too. My readers look forward to your insight and wit.

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    • Thanks, Ruth, for leaving such nice compliments. I realize that many, like yourself, haven’t the time to make these pastas. Still, I wanted to show everyone how easy it is to make them. And who knows, Ruth? You may find yourself with a free afternoon and next thing you know, you’ll be making ravioli for that night’s dinner. 😉

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    • You, too, can make pasta from scratch but we’ll save that argument for another day. For now, just get yourself some wonton wrappers. Once the filling is made, in one hour you can make enough jumbo ravioli for a dinner for two. 😉

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  3. John, another masterpiece of a post! I am pinning this one! You know, I’ve made ravioli using wontons once years and years ago, totally forgot about it. Glad you reminded me!

    there was a wonderful recipe in David Rosengarten’s old show about making one or two large ravioli (using the full square of wontons) and enclosing a quail egg inside – I tried that once, also a long time ago. It was visually quite appealing, and for people who appreciate a very runny egg yolk acting as the sauce, a great recipe!

    great post!

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    • Thank you, Sally. This is a great way to get homemade ravioli without the hassle of making your own pasta dough. Personally, I don’t mind making the dough but I have the time. That’s a luxury not everyone shares. Ravioli with egg is called ravioli al’uovo. I’ve yet to make them though my blogging buddy, Sarah, did and she blogged about it. I’ve yet to give it a try. Here’s the link to her post: http://itssarahsplace.com/2012/01/13/raviolo-aluovo-ricotta-nestled-egg-yolk-recipe-2/

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      • Thanks, John… will take a look at her version. You are right, time is a problem with the home made pasta dough, and something I struggle with at the moment. I never thought I would be so busy at this stage in my life, but moving to a new university really changed things quite a bit. Exciting, stimulating, but hectic 🙂

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  4. I love how ravioli can be made using Asian ‘pasta’. It’s such a great way to cheat on what could otherwise be a more lengthy process. This is such a thorough and well-done post. Looking forward to the post on fillings xx

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    • That’s it exactly, Charlie. Unfortunately, though, these aren’t GF nor carb-free. Your 2 oldest won’t find them very appealing. That just means more for you, Carl, and Alfie. 🙂

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  5. Loving the slide shows! Very high techy! I’ve made pasta before but never with wonton wrappers. You make it look easy enough… now to have enough forethought to buy the dang things….Like most of my dinners, even making pasta is a last minute thought.
    I too love simple sauces on my pasta, I want to taste the pasta and not the sauce. I also love your simple filling, just perfect for home made pasta.
    Thanks for the informative post, my friend. I can do this!

    Nazneen

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    • Thank you, Nazneen. We are very similar when it comes to “planning” dinners. I don’t do it. 🙂 Even when I make ravioli, they’re rarely for that night’s dinner. Usually they go into the freezer for some special dinner. Heaven only knows what I’ll have for dinner on the night after making ravioli all afternoon. As for the sauce, depending upon the pasta, less is very often more. 🙂

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    • Hello, Maria, and you’re welcome. Wonton wrappers make it possible for many who’ve little spare time to make and enjoy homemade stuffed pasta. I do hope you give them a try. I can’t wait to hear what kind of filling you’ll make.

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      • John! you should know by now I only have one filling and that’s the Bartolini sausage filling. We have it stored in two freezers – I am not messing with that recipe!! I love the idea of the wonton as its a good reserve. As at the moment my pasta machine travels in the back of the car as I am too mean to buy another one.

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        • Well, that’s certainly an honor, Maria, to knowing that you use our ravioli recipe. And as for your traveling pasta machine, I take mine with me to Michigan all of the time — along with my Kitchen Aid mixer, the past attachments, and my ravioli molds. I’m a traveling pasta factory. 🙂

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  6. John, when we owned our restaurant every Friday night along with the other specials we offered a different filling in our ravioli. Other than the pistachio crusted scallops, also a Friday special and why I got up in the morning they were so good, these raviolis were my favorites. “Friday ravs” as we called them, were wrapped in wonton wrappers. They were quite a good size, and absolutely delicious. We learned after the first weekend to have plenty on hand. I always asked the chef to hold out a plate if he could and when the sign was turned to closed for the night I’d sit at the bar and enjoy.

    These look wonderful as always. As I said I have never made pasta from scratch, so will have to attempt that one of these days as well.

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    • Had I known you during your restaurant days, Susie, I surely would have been a regular on Friday nights. A different ravioli every week sounds like heaven to me! Your kitchen must have worked their tails off making enough raviol for the masses. That’s a lot of work! You have so many irons in the fire right now. Why not think about making homemade pasta some other time? 🙂

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  7. My youngest granddaughter is participating in an after school cooking class and it just dawn on me that I should be forwarding your post to her to learn from and hopefully pass on to her high school classmates. This is another great post and now the entire Gassette family will be taking lessons from you.

    BE ENCOURAGED! BE BLESSED!

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    • Thank you so much, Francine, I’d be honored that you would think to mention this blog to your Granddaughter. If she ever has a question about anything here, please show her the Contact page so that she can send me an email. I’ll get back to her ASAP. 🙂

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  8. A brilliant idea using wonton wrappers — an easy way to begin/practice before making the dough from scratch. Porcini mushroom, leek, and goat cheese ravioli filling? Waiting (somewhat) patiently for this recipe!

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    • Thanks, Judy. Wonton wrappers were my entry into ravioli making and I’m certain they will be for others, too. I hope you’ll like the filling recipe. I’ve another planned in the weeks ahead, taking advantage of our reopened farmers markets.

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  9. Hi, John–We only started using wonton wrappers this past year, and I have to admit, I’m still more comfortable using them of Asian-inspired recipes than Italian ones. On the other hand, if you’ve got a filling and not much time… Great post. Nice instructive slideshow. Ken

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    • Thanks, Ken. Mom and her pasta dough spoiled me. No pasta tastes as good to me as that made with her dough. I’m lucky enough to have the time to make dough whenever I like. As you say, though, if I haven’t the time, I’ll make do with the wrappers.

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  10. Excellent! It had never occurred to me to use a round pastry cutter (no idea why). That really simplifies things – great tip and, of course, the Wonton Wrappers 😉

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  11. Great post! I’ve actually done this before (well, just large square ravioli – not the other shapes). In fact I’ve made ravioli more this way than I have using pasta dough (but I’m working on perfecting that method). What I like about this method is all I need to do is make the filling and don’t have to worry about the dough, so it’s easier to make spur-of-the-moment ravioli. I’m really looking forward to your fillings. We have vegetarian friends coming for dinner next weekend, and I was already planning to make ravioli. Definitely want to check out your fillings, and perhaps use one of them! Really an excellent, detailed, instructive post – thanks so much.

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    • Thanks, John. For a while, these were the only stuffed pastas I made. I preferred using Mom’s dough but I lacked the knowledge and equipment. That all changed and I’ve never looked back. Still, though, I have advised friends and family members to use wonton wrappers if they want a special filling but haven’t time to make and roll out dough. Wrappers will do in a pinch. I hope you’ll enjoy this week’s filling recipe. I kept it simple to go along with this post. I hope to convince people to give wonton pasta a try.

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  12. These look great as always! I’ve def. used wonton wrappers when I didn’t have the time to make the dough for ravioli and tortellini (never thought to use them for manicotti . My eldest sister is visiting this weekend, and we were talking about making butternut squash ravioli, but we’ll be at a winefest all day before that… so we might be buying a package of them instead. 🙂

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    • That’s using wrapper to full advantage. Personally, I like homemade past dough better but, if in a time crunch, wonton wrappers will do just fine. I hope you enjoy your sister’s visit. A winefest and then ravioli making? Sounds like fun!

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    • I’m glad you enjoyed the post. I’ve a feeling you wouldn’t be satisfied with the wrappers as pasta. They aren’t the same dough as most pasta doughs and for someone who makes their own stuffed pastas like you do, the differences between them may be too great to overlook.

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    • Thanks, Kay. This is a shortcut for making ravioli and great for beginners. Once you get a few ravioli dinners out of the way, though, you may wish to try making your pasta the more traditional way. And I’ll be here, waiting for ya! 🙂

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  13. Great post, John! I will continue to make my own pasta dough from scratch, but I hope this will inspire others to make their own stuffed pasta! I like how you explain the different shapes in detail.
    PS This post did not show up in my reader.

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    • Thanks, Stefan, and we’re in total agreement. Now that I can easily make ravioli with my own pasta dough, I’ve no reason to use wonton wrappers anymore. Still, as you say, this may convince some to try their hand at making ravioli and that’s a good thing.
      I just checked and your post for fennel sous-vide was in my reader. I hope WP figures out what’s going on — and the sooner the better!

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  14. You weren’t kidding when you said I would enjoy the next few posts! You have made my day. Oh how fun will this be!!!! The kids will love it too. I can just see them getting into this with me. While I love making fresh pasta dough, the time it requires is not something I frequently have…this will definitely do the trick. Can you tell I’m just a little bit excited about this?! Your stuffing sounds right up my alley too. Mike and the kids aren’t big on goat cheese, but that’s okay. With ravioli this easy, I won’t mind making a variety of fillings. 🙂

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    • Well, I have to keep my favorite family happy and, to paraphrase, happy Mom, happy family. 🙂
      Wonton wrapper pasta is certainly something you can do with the SousChefs. They are more than qualified to make any of them. And as for the goat cheese in next week’s filling, you can easily substitute ricotta and everybody wins. 🙂

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  15. Oh yes, yes, YES! I really CAN do this! Wonderful instructions and slide show as always, and I am one of those that will be inspired to make my own stuffed pasta from this post. Thank you! 🙂 One question: How long does it take the wonton wrapper pasta to cook? Is it the same as whne using traditional pasta dough? Okay, that’s two questions.

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    • Now that’s the spirit, Betsy! You can do this and you’ll surprise yourself. Cooking times will depend upon whether they are freshly made or frozen. If they’re raw, they should me ready in 4 or 5 minutes, depending on their size. Place them into a pot of salted water that’s boiling hard. Give the pot a gentle stir and once the boil returns, turn the heat down to a soft simmer. Once the ravioli float to the top, give them another 2 minutes and strain them. If they’re frozen, it will take another 3 or 4 minutes. Whatever you do, don’t thaw the ravioli before cooking. Dump them into the boiling water fully frozen or they will not cook properly. I hope this answered you question, Betsy. I’m here if you need me. 🙂

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      • Thanks, John! I will keep that in mind. 🙂 I still need to try making the bolognese as well, and was just discussing that with my husband last night, along with this stuffed pasta post. He was all over it, so now the pressure is on! 😉

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  16. There is so much to love about this post: the slideshows, the before & after photos, the ideas… and the feeling I could do this… I will wait for the filling recipe & an opportune time… 🙂

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    • Thank you so much, EllaDee. It’s like music to my ears to reas that you and others are going to give wonton wrapper pastas a try. Once you all do, I’m sure it won’t be long before you create your won fillings. That I can’t wait to see! 🙂

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  17. Many thanks John. Agree with Betsy, “wonderful instructions and slide show”. Also agree with your note to make sure that there is no filling along the edge where the dough is to be sealed and that the pasta edges being sealed are moistened with water.
    Did you use the thin wonton wrappers or the thick wrappers?
    Thanks also for the mention and link. Norma

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    • You are very welcome, Norma. To paraphrase, “This post’s for you!”
      I checked my photos and couldn’t see whether these wrappers were thick or thin. It’s not on the packaging but they certainly didn’t seem thick to me. I’ll check again the next time I go to that market.

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  18. I am looking forward to the filling details – some of my favorite flavor combinations! Goat cheese took awhile to grow on me but now I love it – recently made some prosciutto, arugula and goat cheese roll ups as a small bite/appie and ate more than my fair share.

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    • Thanks, Kat. I, too, love goat cheese and it works great as a filling. Still, if someone doesn’t care for it, you can swap it for ricotta. Those roll-ups of yours sound delicious. Have you posted that recipe? I’d love to see it. 🙂

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  19. You are like the icing on the cake! This is perfect. I have done this but not quite so precisely as you. Mine were messy and quick. Yours look clean and perfect and outstanding. Thank you for all the perfect instructions. You are so good to your devoted followers !

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    • And you are always so kind in your comments! Mine look so good because there was a camera running. When I used to make wonton pasta for dinner, they did not look nearly so perfect. In fact, I bet yours looked better than mine did. 😉

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  20. I’ve heard of using wonton wrappers for ravioli but have tried it. You make it look so easy. thanks for all of the pictures. I really like the little square ones and the idea of make tortellini. Now I think I can do it successfully!

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  21. I’m genuinely very excited about the wonton wrappers. For one thing, they’re always handy, but I also think I’d enjoy including my granddaughters in the kitchen with these. I can’t wait for the filling you’re promising for next week. I love mushrooms, leeks and goat cheese. Fantastic! This will perhaps keep me in good stead until I get a pasta maker–which I’ve been researching! I could easily live on pasta, and your recipes are very inspiring! 🙂

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    • I’m so glad you enjoyed this post, Debra, and I’m certain you and your Granddaughters could tackle one of these pastas one afternoon — and have a fantastic time doing it. Can’t wait to hear you’ve bought a new pasta maker. That’s when the real fun starts! And I’ll be here to help in whatever way I can. We pasta makers need to support each other! 🙂

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  22. Interesting “detour” from the tradition, John! 😉 The title of your post captures the spirit of your recipe really well. And it is true that making and rolling out pasta dough requires a lot of dedication! Thank you for sharing this “fusion” dish! 🙂

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    • You’re welcome, Stefano, and thank you for commenting. I was spoilt as a boy by Mom’s pasta dough and nothing today can compare with it. Wonton wrappers, though good, are not the same. They are good enough, especially for those who haven’t the time or experience making pasta dough.

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  23. Bonjourno John! Finally you come on over to other side…Asia. I love your little step by step photos great instructions. Your wrappers are Asian but that filling looks phenomenal. I know that wrappers don’t have the same taste as fresh pasta rolled but it does work and for those that are strapped on time it is a great alternative. Great post John. Wishing you an awesome weekend. Take Care, BAM

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    • Buona notte, BAM. Your comment summed up the post perfectly. The wrappers aren’t as good as homemade pasta but if you’re strapped for time, they’ll work beautifully. And, really. if the filling is good, few will notice the dough. 🙂
      I hope you’re having a great weekend, too!

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  24. You are just something else. And you sure did A LOT of work ! We we all appreciate so much – can’t wait to try one of these. (Pinning this, of course, so others can enjoy this post.)

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    • Thanks, Cecile, for your gracious comment and for “pinning” me. 🙂
      I do hope you give this a try. I bet you’ve some wonderful filling recipes/ideas from your time on Malta.

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  25. Well done as always John! I’ve used wonton wrappers myself have not been super pleased with the result. the texture just isn’t as silky. The slide shows are Brilliant!

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    • Thanks, Dave, and you’re right. There is a difference between the doughs. I’m spoilt and very much prefer Mom’s pasta dough recipe. Still, for many — whether due to a lack of time or experience making pasta dough, wonton wrappers are a way to experience homemade stuffed pasta. They certainly worked for me when I first started making ravioli.

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  26. How interesting! Just a few days ago a friend was telling me about her smoked salmon wonton ravioli’s she prepared and I had never heard of that before! You just encouraged me to go ahead and give it a go!

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    • Thank you and I’m glad to hear your going to try some for yourself. You’ll see they’re not hard to make and you’ll have a wonderful dinner that night. Good luck!

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    • Thanks and no, not too thin at all. In fact, some recipes for ravioli suggest rolling the dough to the thinnest settings on the machine. Wonton wrappers are thicker than that. Good luck when you try this.

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    • Thank you, Celia. There is a definite difference between the two. Mom spoiled me and there’s no dough that compare, to my palate. Wonton wrappers do not have the same “bite”, for lack of a better word. I’m sure you’ve had tortellini en brodo, as well as wonton soup. If you remember the texture of each pasta, you’ll understand what I mean.

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  27. Wow, another great post John! I smiled all the way through it. I’ve used wonton wrappers to make wontons (strangely enough) many times, but never pasta. My boys love making wontons, and I know they’re going to adore making ravioli. Love the idea of using a round serrated biscuit cutter. Looking forward to the porcini mushroom filling recipe too!

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    • I’m so glad you like this post and I think it a great idea getting your boys to help make them. This is a good way to get them interested in food preparation. I need to post a gnocchi recipe. That’s a good one, too. Mom had us making gnocchi when we were very young.

      Like

  28. Love the slideshow photo tutorials. Your instructions are usual are so clear, it’s like being guided step by step. Your wonton wrappers look very moist and fresh, fresher than the ones at my Asian markets which is sad since they use local brands so you’d think they’d be really tender. Looking forward to the porcini, leek, and goat cheese filling!

    Like

    • Thanks, Cam, for you kind words. I’m so surprised that you canot find better wontons. There’s certainly nothing special about these, that I know of. I just keep them under a wet towel as I work and have little problem. i do hope you give this a try. I bet you’ll come up with some fantastic fillings. 🙂

      Like

  29. Aha!!! Lights flashing and bells ringing in my head! I can do this too!! This is super idea and does open up a world of possibilities, now i shall go back and study your methods more carefully.. this is excellent! Have a lovely evening!! c

    Like

    • Thank you for commenting. I have visited your blog and liked what I saw. Is there a way to subscribe to receive email notifications of your new posts? I couldn’t find one. Thanks.

      Like

  30. Santa Cleopatra John! I cannot begin to express how impressed I am with your stuffed pasta-making!! They look beautiful!! And what patience you must have… if Chicago weren’t so far away, I would be constantly stopping by your place. You know, just to say hi! 🙂

    Like

  31. What an informative post John, and the level of detail is exemplary, as usual (I’ve come to expect no less). I wonder if the texture of the wonton pasta is thicker and denser than regular pasta dough (personally I find making pasta dough from scratch comes together very easily, and with the stand mixer attachment, it’s fairly effortless to roll out). I love the idea of the larger ravioli, plating one or two as an appetizer — so elegant. And the simple butter sauce and gorgeous Parmesan flakes really elevate the elegance of the dish. I have a nice round ravioli maker (just makes one at a time) that I bought in Little Italy in NYC, you’ve definitely inspired me to dust it off for our next dinner party.
    Hope you have a great weekend, it’s our first ‘summer’ holiday weekend with Victoria Day on Monday (and our 27th wedding anniversary on Sunday — yes, I was a child bride ;-)!) and so far the weatherman is predicting lovely weather all weekend. We’re heading up north for Cottage opening and it’s always nice when the weather cooperates!

    Like

    • I’m so far behind on my blogging duties that by now you’re probably eyeing the trip home. I hope you’ve had a great time and that the weather was as good as promised. I do prefer homemade pasta to wonton wrapper but I’ll be the first to admit I’m spoilt. I prefer the “bite” of homemade. If you can, compare the texture of a wonton in soup to that of tortelloni in soup. I like the tortelloni better. Still, if you’re very short of time, the differences aren’t that great and wonton wrappers will do. You’re right about 1 or 2 large ravioli making a great appetizer of primo piatto. It becomes quite special dish when the filling is something rich like, say, lobster. If you don’t want to use wonton wrappers, you can roll out your own dough and cut squares in the size you want for you ravioli. Easy peasy!

      Like

      • No worries, I’m behind too. We’re at the cottage on opening weekend and even though it’s always so busy I’ve complicated it even more by a renovation! We’ve painted the walls of our 1960’s wood paneled cottage! Finally! 2 coats of thick primer and 1 coat of primer/top coat combo. Yay! Phase 2 will be the floors. I’m aching all over, but then again it’s a good ache.
        I sure could have used some extra carbs for all the hard work this weekend. Lobster ravioli would have been the ticket!

        Like

  32. FanTastic John! If I hadn’t already met and fallen in love with your pasta dough and the ravioli it makes, I’d be rushing out for wonton wrappers. Now that I’m SPOILED I may never. But I WILL be following your instructions for tortellini and manicotti (with their SO helpful little slideshow presentations!) (I’m whispering this part to you only – my birthday’s next Tuesday, fingers crossed for pasta roller attachment for Kitchenaid – and then, as if by fate and the confluence of all good things – your recipe for mushroom, leek and goat cheese filling the very next day!) 🙂

    Like

    • Thank you, Spree! I know, I know. Once you get accustomed to the “real thing”, it’s not easy dealing with substitutes. I should have warned you of the ill effects of ravioli making. You’ve already mentioned the being spoilt. Soon you won’t be able to order ravioli in restaurants, preferring you own fillings over all others. Sad but true. 🙂
      I hope you have a fantastic birthday and getting that pasta roller is part of the experience. It really does speed up pasta-making. You’ll be amazed!
      Happy Birthday!

      Like

  33. John, you need to start an internet “restaurant”. You could make a mint selling all of your delicious pastas. And your home made ice cream, and your marinated and stuffed meats, and your sauces….and, and, and! 😉 I LOVED the how to pictures!

    Like

    • Thanks, April, that’s very kind of you to say. Considering that so many of our recipes have already been posted, I think the money-making window is closing rapidly. 🙂

      Like

  34. Wonton wrappers – on the list immediately. I’m so glad you posted this because I’ve been seeing all sorts of ideas for filled wonton wrappers – but of course yours do seem the most tempting.
    I really like how you did that slideshow demo – excellent visuals.

    Like

    • Thanks, Diane. There are hundreds of ways to fill pasta. THe only rule to follow is that the pasta tastes good.
      I was afraid that if I posted individual photos of each step for every pasta, the post would go on forever. Creating slideshows condensed the entry greatly and no one need look at photos that are of no interest. It did prolong the pasta making process, though. I was definitely glad when the last photo was snapped.

      Like

  35. Wonderful—especially if you can get people who wouldn’t otherwise do it to make ravioli. Soon, they’ll be referring to your homemade ravioli recipes! And it makes total sense. Steve uses basically the same recipe for Italian ravioli and for dim sum wrappers. So who knows? Maybe those Marco Polo myths were based on some kernel of truth.

    Like

    • Thank you, Michelle, and you nailed it! Whether the reader is a family member or web surfer, if it’s time that’s preventing her/him from making ravioli, this is a way to do it in half the time. There certainly is a difference between homemade pasta and store-bought wonton wrappers, just as one would expect — and I prefer homemade. (No surprise there.) I never thought about making wonton wrappers but it makes sense to do so and to use one’s favorite pasta dough recipe. Even so, I think I’ll stick with ravioli and leave wontons to the experts, like Steve. 🙂

      Like

  36. Now I have the wonton wrappers ready (good for a lazy person like me) I never imagine I could ever make pasta dough from scratch (I could make the dough but rolling skills are wanting), but I shall wait for next week when you post the Porcini mushroom, leek, and goat cheese ravioli filling, it sounds very delicious. Thank you so much for sharing this detailed post. Have a great weekend. And thank you for popping by my blog on a regular basis. You know how much I appreciate!

    Like

    • And thank you, Liz, for dropping by and always commenting. If the reason you don;t make ravioli is at all pasta dough-related, then wontons are for you, They really do eliminate any dough handling/rolling altogether. Once you make a few and get comfortable with the process, you’ll develop a rhythm and really knock them out. You’ll have enough for a dinner in no time.
      My weekend was a good one, spent mostly in the garden. I hope yours was a good one, too. Have a great week, Liz.

      Like

    • Sorry I’m so late getting back to you, Maureen. By now I hope you’ve recovered. Congratulations for your team’s victory! How exciting! I cannot wait to read your posts about the Festival.

      Like

  37. What an amazing post John – will have to send this one to my mum as she is now finally connected and I think she’d enjoy this and all your other posts! We arrived home late last night so alas no wonton wrappers here for me. However, one of the first things I unpacked was my new ravioli cutter (yay!) so I’m going to be making some of your real pasta ones very soon 🙂

    Like

    • Thank you, Tanya, and I really am honored that you would send a post of mine to your Mum. I hope she likes what she sees. 🙂
      Congratulations on the new cutter! I can’t wait to see what you’re going to make with it, Tanya. Who knows? Zia and I may spend part of our next Ravioli Day making Ravioli alla Chica. 🙂
      Welcome home! You were missed.

      Like

  38. Wow, what an incredibly instructive post, John. The slide shows for each different type of ravioli are so helpful. Next you’ll be making videos with spoken word and background music, and after that I expect to see you on Food Network!

    Thank you for making these delicious pastas so accessible to those of us who did not grow up in Italian households!

    Like

    • You are so welcome, Mar, and thank you for always being so kind and encouraging in your comments. I hope that this post showed how easy it can be to make these pastas at home — and one needn’t buy a lot of equipment. A pack of wonton wrappers, some filling, and a biscuit cutter or small glass is all you need to create ravioli for dinner that night. It really is that simple.

      Like

  39. John, this is a great post. Hat off!!! I have to admit that I’m a little bit lazy when it comes to homemade pasta (Shame on me!!!) Your post is so inspirational. I’m bookmarking it. Thank you for sharing.

    Like

    • Thanks, Francesca. When there’s a child to raise and house to run, there isn’t time to make pasta. That’s not being lazy at all. When your daughter is old enough, the two of you can take a pack of wonton wrappers and make ravioli for that night’s dinner — and have a very good time together doing so. 🙂

      Like

    • You are very welcome and thank you so much for honoring me with a nomination. I don’t participate in awards any more but that doesn’t mean I appreciate your gesture any less. I’m very grateful.

      Like

  40. Love, love, love the post (you get the picture). I got the picture. I have used won-ton wrappers (because I can be a notorious lazy-bones) and thought them awfully heavy in my stomach. I probably used too much. I shall try again. Pasta dough vs. wonton wrappers. Looking forward to the porcini filling. Porcini. Goat cheese. And you know – it’s morel season here. That would be a great filling.

    Like

    • Thank you, Claudia. Norma mentioned that there are 2 types of wonton wrappers, thick and thin. I’d no idea and perhaps you used thick ones? Now that I’e become adept at using the ravioli moulds, I’ve no need for wonton wrappers. Still, for those lacking time, they are a substitute. Yes, I know it’s morel season and I’ll be heading to Michigan. WIth luck, we’ll have some for we know of a patch. Still, I’m bringing some dried, just in case. Recipe forthcoming … 🙂

      Like

  41. This is very helpful. I like making pasta, but I like saving time even more. I NEVER would have thought to use wonton wrappers had you not posted about them, and once I get started there’ll be no looking back. Thanks!

    Like

    • I’m glad you find the post useful. For some time, I used wonton wrappers and was happy to do so. Then I learned how to use ravioli moulds and that was a game changer. Who knows? One day you may do the same. First though, get some wrappers. 🙂

      Like

  42. How does the wonton dough taste compared to the traditional pasta dough used to make raviolis? Are wonton wrappers made the same as pasta? I had no idea you could do this, it’s a really good idea for time constrained cooks to use for a quick meal. Thanks for the tip!

    Like

    • I’m so glad yo stopped by, Laura. I’m having trouble receiving email notifications of new posts and your Mother’s Day post was “lost in the mail.” I saw this comment and went straight to your blog. Sorry to have missed your post.
      THere is a difference in the two pastas, much like there’s a difference between homemade pasta and store-bought. I find homemade has a bit more “bite” to it and I prefer it over the wrappers. Frankly, Mom spoiled me for homemade pasta. Still, if one is strapped for time and wants to prepare a ravioli dinner, wonton wrappers are certainly good enough, especially if you’ve a great filling and sauce. Thanks for commenting, Laura.(By the way, your daughter is a real cutie!)

      Like

  43. Brilliant! A shortcut that has the approval of the Bartolini Kitchen – that’s good enough for me 🙂 Speaking of your Mother’s cannelloni recipe, I remembered she used a fantastic shortcut for her cheese sauce, and since I’ve no flour (here in my temporary digs), I borrowed it to make a cheese sauce for my primavera in the tropics for lunch yesterday! 🙂

    Like

    • Homemade pasta is always better but the time require to make it is a luxury for many. Wonton wrappers is a way around the problem. I hope you enjoyed that primavera. 🙂

      Like

  44. Shortcuts for Pasta Dummies 101 ~ thank you so much, CJ! I needed this. Wonton wrappers I could handle. Can’t wait to see the recipe for the cheese-based filling that you said is coming up. Well done. (and ~ thanks to bitsandbreadcrumbs for the question on cooking times)

    Like

    • If you haven’t the time nor inclination to make your own pasta, wonton wrappers are the way to go. I hope you’ll enjoy the filling recipe, It was just posted.

      Like

  45. A most wonderful fusion indeed! My mother would spend hours in the kitchen making Mante, a traditional Armenian dumplings till she got word of Wonton wrappers. Now I don’t know exactly when she made this discovery because we could never tell eating Mante that she was technically cheating. She never told a sole until we discovered her secret stash of wonton wrappers!!

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    • You’re welcome, Marianne. I don’t know what’s going on with WP. I no longer get notifications if someone replies to my comments. I don’t know what to make of it.

      Like

  46. Its such a great shortcut to pasta isn’t it?. We make these as you have in my pasta addicted house. I love your pictures and descriptions, to such a great timesaver. Perfecto

    Like

    • I have to admit I prefer homemade pasta but not everyone has the time needed. You’ve used them so you know how much easier — and quicker — these wrappers are to use. Thanks for dropping by and for not finding any errors in my methods. 🙂

      Like

    • You’re welcome, Jasline. With your talent in the kitchen, I can’t wait to see what kind of fillings you develop, not to mention the sauces you’d use to dress the pasta. 🙂

      Like

  47. What a great tutorial post! I really appreciated the slide shows demonstrating the process for each. I have tried making fresh pasta in the past and mine tends to come out a little thick since I don’t have a pasta machine—or maybe not enough practice! 🙂

    Like

    • I’m so glad you found this post useful. I’d guess you haven’t had enough practice rolling pasta dough but, then again, how could you possibly with children to care for? Your time is better spent elsewhere and wonton wrappers were made just for you! 🙂

      Like

  48. I always wondered it if you could do it like this – seeing as you are Italian I will take your word as gospel! Thanks John. Looks delicious!

    Like

    • Thanks for the vote of confidence! I think you’ll be amazed at how really simple this is to do. Sure, the first couple may be a little difficult but then you’ll learn the process and you’ll be off and running. 🙂

      Like

    • Thanks for commenting, Karen. A previous commenter, and former restaurant owner, said that Friday nights were wonton ravioli night at their place. I never order stuffed pasta on this side of The Pond so I’d have never known. I’d no idea.

      Like

  49. Okay, I’m gonna have to try one of these, John. It looks like a lot so much fun to make them. And boy, they look delicious. I need a day that I can spend making one or more of these. I need the practice, right? Hmmmmmmmm.

    Thank you for this post, John!

    Like

    • It won’t take you a day, Sarah, that’s for sure. You;ve made your own pasta dough so you may not care for this as much. It’s a great substitute when you haven’t the time or inclination to make pasta dough — but homemade is better, not by a lot but still better, nonetheless.
      Good to “see” you, Sarah. Have a great week and holiday weekend.

      Like

  50. Pingback: Porcini Mushroom, Leek, and Goat Cheese Ravioli Filling | from the Bartolini kitchens

  51. How on earth did I miss this post! Unacceptable I tell you! Thankfully you mentioned it in your post today which I am heading back to read right now!
    The last time I used wonton wrappers was when we were living in Mauritius – after reading this, definitely time to get some again!
    🙂 Mandy xo

    Like

    • No problem, Mandy. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve missed someone’s post. It happens to us all. So, you know about wonton wrappers? No excuses now. I expect to hear about your wonderful, homemade ravioli dinners. And soon! 🙂

      Like

  52. Great post, John. I seemed to have missed it when you published it. Hmmm…. I have yet to buy the ravioli molds and the only way I have ever made ravioli is with wonton wrappers. 🙂

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    • Seems a number of people are having problems with WP, Richard. I hope they’re not planning an upgrade. Once you get and master a mold, Richard, you’ll never go wonton again! 🙂

      Like

    • I’m honored to be your favorite. Thank you. I think we ‘d be surprised to learn how many people and restaurants “cheat” and use wontons wrappers. If the choice is store-bought ravioli or homemade wonton wrapper ravioli, I’ll choose wonton every time. They may not be as good as Nonna made but they are plenty good.

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  53. seems your posts have been slipping by me, John. Not sure how I’ve missed them 😦 Ah well–better late to the party than absent. Great step-by-step here. Love the east-meets-west thing.

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    • Sorry you’re having WP problems. You’re not alone and it’s getting worrisome. I hope they aren’t messing with the system. ‘m truing to encourage people to make pasta at home. Wonton wrappers certainly does help to make the process more accessible. Glad you like it.

      Like

  54. You’ve been so busy while I was away.. such wonderful slide shows to educate us in the different techniques (and spellings) of these east meets west pasta dishes. You’ve really made the steps in the process so simple with these photo series.. it gives me courage to try making pasta as well. Since being in Italy, I have been looking at Finally (grin) trying my hand at pasta making. Of course, I will come here first because no one details the small important steps like you do:) So glad to be back here!! xx

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    • So glad to have you back, Barb! I wish we lived closer together. I’d love to hear all about your trip. I’m sure it was fantastic and you’ve a wealth of lovely memories to cherish.
      I do hope you do try your hand at making pasta at home, Barb. Wonton wrappers are the easiest way to do it and a confidence builder. Before long, you’ll be rolling out dough sheets and making ravioli like a pro. 🙂

      Like

  55. Pingback: Be everywhere, do everything, and never fail to astonish the customer. – Macy’s Motto and Raspberry Whipped Cream | Susartandfood's Blog

    • It really depends on how much time you have, Amber. I’ve got the time so I can make the pasta dough. If you don’t have the time, then wonton wrappers are a good substitute. Either way, you’ll end up with ravioli that are far better than anything you’ll find in a grocery store. 🙂

      Like

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