Slow Cooker General Tso’s Chicken

Subscribers and frequent visitors to this site don’t come here for my take on Asian cuisine, No, as much as I love food from that part of the world, I must confess that up until recently, I very rarely prepared it, much to the joy of the local Thai, Japanese, Korean, and Indian restaurants. Now, however, there are four dishes that I prepare at home and enjoy very much. One, a chicken dish, is today’s recipe, General Tso’s Chicken.  The others can be found on blogs that I follow. The first of these, a delicious lamb dish called Karma Khorma, is from my blogging friend David’s decidedly delectable blog, Cocoa and Lavender. The second, a Korean pork dish, one of the first Asian dishes that I made with any frequency, is from Cam’s wonderful blog, Geukima, and is called Crispy Stir-Fried Pork Ribs With Caramelized Fish Sauce. The third is a very tasty Indian dish, Chicken Biryani, and can be found on The Insatiable Gourmet blog. You cannot go wrong preparing any of these and a visit to any of the 3 blogs is very rewarding. (Unfortunately, as of this writing, Geukima and The Insatiable Gourmet seem to be on hiatus. Cocoa and Lavender, thankfully, is still going strong.)  Not very long ago, the only Asian dishes I enjoyed were set before me at nearby restaurants. These days, hardly a week goes by that I do not prepare one of these four dishes. Who says you can’t teach an old dog new tricks?

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General Tso 1

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Now before going any further, it’s probably best to mention the origins of today’s dish. In my last post’s Comments section, I had mistakenly stated that the dish was created by Chinese immigrants in California. A comment from Eha got me googling its origins. Although I could not find the source stating its California origins (I should know better than to rely upon my memory for anything), I did find much to confirm Eha’s account. It is widely accepted that this dish was a creation of the Hunan chef, Peng Chang-kuei, in Taipei, Taiwan, after he had fled the Chinese mainland. Created in the ’50s, he once served it to Chiang Kai-shek. Chef Peng brought his recipe to America and introduced it in New York City in 1972 following Nixon’s trip to China. Since then, the dish has continued to evolve, in ways not necessarily pleasing to its creator. That is the simple version of the tale. You can find more information on Wikipedia or NPR or, for those who’d rather look at pictures, you can watch the movie, “The Search for General Tso“.

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The Favorite Family Recipes website is the source for today’s recipe. I was attracted to it because I love both General Tso’s Chicken and my slow cooker. I can already sense some of you thinking how much easier it would be to stir-fry this dish. Well, I haven’t a wok and I am certifiably stir-fry challenged. For me, the slow cooker is the way to go. Even so, I did make a few changes. most notably replacing the original’s pineapple juice with orange juice and its cayenne pepper with ground chipotle. In both cases, I used what I had in supply. While searching for the cayenne pepper, I came upon a seldom used container of arrowroot and used it as a thickening agent instead of cornstarch,

I did make a couple of additions, as well. When I order General Tso’s Chicken from my neighborhood Chinese restaurant, broccoli is always included. Even though the original recipe makes no mention of it, I always include some form of the vegetable in my dish. Here, there was a package of broccolini in the vegetable crisper and it ended up being sautéed in garlic-flavored oil before being mixed with the cooked rice. About the same time the broccolini was grabbed, a few mushrooms were found. They had matured into the “use ’em or lose ’em” stage of crisper life and became the most unconventional addition to the dish.

Now that’s all settled, let’s take a look at the recipe.

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General Tso 2

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General Tso’s Chicken Recipe

Ingredients

Serves 4

  • 2 lbs boneless, skinless chicken thighs, chopped into 1 inch pieces
  • 1 cup flour
  • 1½ tsp kosher salt
  • ½ tsp pepper
  • 2 tbsp vegetable oil
  • ½ cup dark brown sugar
  • ½ cup lite soy sauce
  • ½ cup orange juice
  • ½ cup white distilled vinegar
  • 3 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1 tbsp fresh ginger, grated
  • ½ tsp ground chipotle pepper
  • approx. 4 oz sliced “baby bella” mushrooms (forgive me, Chef Peng)
  • 2 tbsp arrowroot, mixed with 2 tbsp water – flour or cornstarch may be substituted
  • 4 scallions/green onions, sliced

original recipe from Favorite Family Recipes

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General Tso Rice 2

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for the rice and broccolini

  • 1 cup jasmine rice
  • 2 cups water
  • ¼ tsp kosher salt
  • 2 tsp butter
  • 2 tbs olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, smashed
  • 8 oz (225 g) broccolini, roughly chopped
  • salt & pepper to taste

Directions

  1. Place the flour, salt, and pepper into a sealable plastic bag. Working in batches, add the chicken pieces to the bag, shake to coat, and place the now-coated chicken on a plate. Continue until all the chicken is coated with the seasoned flour.
  2. Add 2 tbsp of oil to a hot, large frying pan over med-high heat.
  3. When oil is hot begin adding the chicken pieces. Do not overcrowd. It should take you 2 batches, at least. You may need to add a bit more oil between batches. Cook for 2 to 3 minutes per side. Chicken needn’t be cooked through, only browned.
  4. When the chicken is browned on all sides, remove to a plate and begin the next batch.
  5. Meanwhile, into the slow cooker, add the sugar, soy sauce, orange juice, vinegar, garlic, ginger, and cayenne pepper. Stir to completely combine.
  6. Add the mushrooms and stir.
  7. When all the chicken has been browned, add to the slow cooker and set it to low. Cook for 3 to 4 hours or until chicken is cooked thoroughly.
  8. About 30 minutes before completion, check to see if the sauce has thickened. If not, combine the arrowroot and water to make a slurry. Add to the pot and gently stir. Cover.
  9. Bring 2 cups of water to the boil in a medium sauce pan with a lid.
  10. Add salt and butter, stir, and then add the rice.
  11. When the water returns to the boil, reduce the heat to low and cover the pan.
  12. After 20 minutes, remove the pan from the heat. Rice will be ready in 5 more minutes.
  13. While the rice cooks, add 2 tbsp olive oil to a large frying pan and heat over med-high heat.
  14. Add the smashed garlic and cook until brown.
  15. Remove the garlic, add the broccolini, and reduce the heat to medium.
  16. Continue to sauté the broccolini in the garlic flavored oil until cooked to your satisfaction.
  17. Add the cooked rice to the frying pan and stir until fully combined. (See Notes)
  18. Serve the cooked chicken atop a bed of rice with broccolini. Garnish the dish with the chopped scallions/green onions.

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General Tso 3

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Notes

Although broccolini was used here, I have used broccoli and broccoli raab in the recipe. In all cases, I added the cooked rice to the pan in which the vegetable was sautéed so that the rice could absorb as much flavor from the pan as possible. Of course, you could steam the broccoli and add it to the dish however you wish.

The amount of arrowroot slurry needed will vary depending upon how much liquid is in the pot. No matter whether you use flour, cornstarch, or my oft-forgotten arrowroot, mix an equal amount of water with the thickening agent.

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It’s déjà vu all over again …

Green Tomato Relish Look Back

Very soon we’ll be coming to an end of our tomato growing season. Each of us probably has a favorite method for dealing with the green tomatoes left on the vine with no hope of ripening. My Grandpa placed them in the drawer of an old dresser on the patio where they slowly ripened. Others wrap them in newspaper, while some place the green orbs in paper bags. That’s great if you want to ripen them but what if you don’t want to invest the time, paper, or drawer space? Today’s look back will give you a totally different option Take this LINK to learn how to make green tomato relish. Your hot dogs will thank you.

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Coming soon to a monitor near you …

The Kitchens Salute Awburr-what? … Melanzane!

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70 thoughts on “Slow Cooker General Tso’s Chicken

  1. Great slow cooker recipe, John. I have only recently bought a slow cooker, but it’s now an essential piece of gardening kit i.e. I can prepare a meal and then go to the allotment knowing that when I come home hot and covered in dirt, supper will be close to readiness. The tomato relish link is also timely, and I have an aubergine coming to perfect ripeness in the polytunnel so am looking forward to further directions. You’ve covered all my bases this morning. Brilliant.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks, Tish. I bought into the slow cooker method back when I was working, With a 45 to 60 minute commute each way – on a good day! – I very often had little energy to cook dinner when I walked in the front door. I learned quickly that buying a sack o’ food somewhere along the way wasn’t the way to go. With a slow cooker, on the other hand, there was a hot meal waiting for me. They may not be good for all dishes but they certainly do serve a purpose.

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  2. Oh sugar: thank you so much for my mentions!! Just as well I passed your ‘just post’ late in the day’s path . . . !! Now, I do wonder, why on earth you people attach a name to this, not a specific Chinese dish. but perchance you feel you are comfortable in preparing and ordering . . . I may just be ‘crossing oceans’ but, Milord, I cook like this five days out of seen . . . and I shall continue following you . . .happy days . . .

    Liked by 1 person

    • Back the next morning 🙂 [And, yes, ‘seen’ should be ‘seven’ 🙂 !] John, you have chosen to prepare this slow-cooking: I always stir- fry! One does NOT need a wok: and how on earth can you be ‘challenged’ unless you accept a 10-minute phone call whilst you are meant to be tossing 🙂 !!!!! In a properly heated wok the chicken cooks in about 4-7 minutes, beef, fish etc a shorter time. To my taste not only faster but more ‘alive’!! Usually I do not use mushrooms but leeks and sugar snaps and all the Chinese vegetables at the supermarket, come what may. Capsicums finely sliced are great, mandolined carrots mandatory . . . And I oft ‘save’ on calories by not thickening at all, just cook down any liquid components. Actually I love these dishes with noodles: hokkien, udon or even soba. Just a few ideas into the pot . And some four decades of experience v your wonderful new interest . . . .

      Liked by 2 people

      • Yes, Eha, I’m aware that one needn’t have a wok to stir fry. No matter because I still overcook — even burn — the pan’s contents regardless of whether I’m using a fry pan or my now-donated wok. I’ve never prepared enough stir-fry meals to master the technique. It’s really that simple. As for serving dishes like this with noodles, I really have reduced the pasta portion of my diet. (I know, “Gasp!”) If I’m going to have noodles for dinner, they will be a pasta of some sort. Guaranteed. 🙂

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  3. Great looking version of this classic dish! I love when use-em or lose-em vegetables from the bottom of the fridge get thrown into a dish. It always makes the dish more “yours” and alot of times makes the recepie much better imho.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Laura. We’re in total agreement. Some of my best meals result from a clean-out of my fridge’s vegetable crisper. I’ll make a frittata, pasta, or top a pizza with them and love it!

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  4. This must be absolutely beyond amazing! Now, if I just had a slow cooker. Fabulous flavours and you can’t beat using a thigh. Scrumptious John.
    Have a beautiful day. I am in Johannesburg with my Pete for a few days before he heads back to Kenya and me home.
    🙂 Mandy xo

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks, Mandy. I do enjoy this dish and am sure the recipe can be easily modified for a stir fry, although that technique is one I’ve yet to master. I do hope you’re enjoying your time with Pete and have safe travels when you return home. 🙂

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    • Thank you, EllaDee. As long as I continue to lose track of vegetables in the crispers, I’ll continue to add the older ones to the pot, regardless of the dish. Mom taught me well. You just do not waste food. 🙂

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  5. Would never have thought to prepare this dish in a slow cooker! Great idea. Great dish, too — no matter where it’s from. This seems to be one of those dishes that has really evolved from the original — every restaurant seems to have a slightly different variation. All of them good. 🙂 As, of course, is yours! Thanks for this.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, John. Now that I no longer work, I have discovered a problem with slow cookers. Being home now means that I am treated to smelling the aroma of that night’s dinner all day long. It can be torture! 🙂

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  6. What a great tasty dish this is! I love it that you cooked the rice with the juices in the pan. No doubt it makes for a superior flavor.
    I thought the film was very interesting. It definitely gave me a whole new perspective and appreciation for the American-Chinese food and culture.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Like you, John, I love Asian food, but rarely make it – with the exception of a few curries (though more of a British tradition). This one (and the others you listed) sound fabulous. Time to get out the slow cooker! Thanks also for the link to Cocoa and Lavender. Looks like a great blog.

    Liked by 1 person

    • You’re very welcome, Debi. I hope you get time to cruise around David’s blog. I’m sure you’re going to love it.
      I’e always shied away from Asian cooking. It’s not that I don’t love it but it’s the prep work and wok. I know. It’s a great way to cook but, for me, it’s an even easier way to burn my dinner. And if it’s not burnt, the food isn’t at all crisp. It’s just so much easier to walk a few blocks to the neighborhood Chinese restaurant. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Oh, this looks so delicious, John. I don’t have a slow cooker, but maybe when my kitchen is finished, I should go out and buy one, if it’s only to make your General Tso’s Chicken. What a great way to honour the memory of this Chinese war hero. 😀 My husband doesn’t like broccoli, but I tell him it’s good for him, and he eats a very little of it, as though I’m trying to poison him. 😆

    Liked by 1 person

    • Oh, I do love my slow cooker! It’s just so easy to fill it in the morning and let it do its thing for the rest of the day. I was lucky to find this recipe and it is a good one. As for broccoli, I don’t know why that vegetable is so maligned but many do not like it. Your husband certainly isn’t alone. Maybe he could start up a support group. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Ooh, ooh, ooh! You know we love our Asian dishes Chez Chica and Big Man and I am very much in need of new dishes and inspiration (hence the lack of recent blogging). I have a slow cooker, or my wok for stir frying and I think I have pretty much all the ingredients to hand. Fabulous! And I love broccoli and mushrooms in dishes like this. Buon appetito 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    • Well, it has been a while since I’ve been around here and I hope you’ve had the chance to try this dish, Tanya. You’re much more adept at cooking Asian dishes and I’m interested in hearing your critique and any suggestions you might offer for improving it. I’m such a rookie when it comes to cooking anything on the other side of the Pacific. Thank heavens I live in a restaurant-saturated area — and they all deliver! 🙂

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    • Thanks, Sally, and you’re right about the timing. You do not want to let this go any longer than 4 hours. In fact. depending upon your cooker, 3 or 3 1/2 hours may be all that’s needed. I know because I fell asleep one evening while it was cooking. General Tso was apparently demoted in the extra hour it remained in the cooker. That will never happen again! 🙂

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  10. Dear John! – Great idea to share your love for Asian Food. The above recipe sounds and looks so yummi! And I love your shots of the aubergines/eggplants/melanzanes. Did you grow them by your own? This summer I cultivated some tomatoes on my balcony – I’m so proud of harvesting them piece by piece now. It’s so satisfying and comforting.
    Btw it’s nice to see your face, love your new pic (avatar?)…
    Have a great time!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hello, Irmi. It is so good to hear from you and I’m grinning from ear-to-ear. I am by no means an expert in Asian cuisine and this dish satisfies my 2 requirements: it’s tasty and very easy to prepare. Yes, those are my melanzane and I’ll be posting more photos in a few minutes. The harvest has far succeeded my expectations and I’ve been preparing them a number of ways. You’ll see …
      Congratulations on your success with tomatoes. Few things taste better than a tomato freshly picked from one’s garden. It’s definitely a highlight of my summer. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Lovely recipe John, and all the more nourishing for the addition of some greens and mushrooms. I have a very similar recipe that Is use for boneless fish fillets. Same method and saucing. I think there might be some shaoxing wine in it too in my old one.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Francesca. Your recipe sounds delicious. Have you posted the recipe? I am not skilled in Asian cuisine but I it would certainly be nice to prepare a dish with fish as the protein rather than meat. What’s the worst that can happen? 😉

      Liked by 1 person

    • Oh, Sandra, if you =only knew how many dishes I’ve ruined trying to stir-fry. Either they’re burnt or not at all crisp. I believe my problem is that I just don’t attempt to prepare them often enough to master the technique. I should really try again but, this time, not give up until I have a dish that at least resembles something edible. 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  12. John – thanks for the shout out! Very sweet. I am so glad you like the khorma so much!

    I love your use of chipotle chile for the dish. Being form the Southwest, it is a staple in our kitchen and I love the smokiness it adds to a dish. I also like how you used the crockpot. I don’t have one but borrow my neighbor’s frequently.

    One thing I miss about being from Maine is the plethora of green tomatoes (for the relish and friend green tomatoes) we would have being forced to pick them all before the first frost, sometimes in September!

    Liked by 1 person

    • You are so welcome, David. I really do prepare that khorma frequently and my home smells like my favorite Indian restaurant. Love it!
      There was a time when I would follow a recipe religiously, running to the store for a specific vinegar, for example. Now, unless I need a number of items, I’ll figure out something. Using the chipotle was a lucky stroke and I use it regularly now.
      My tomatoes did poorly this year, as did my neighbors’. With all of the heat we experienced, none of us can explain what happened. As you’ll soon see, my eggplants more than made up for them. 🙂

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  13. I absolutely love anything Asian and we are always trying new things, even when they are not authentic. I’m impressed that you know the origins of this dish and it is my type as I love the fruity dishes. Never tried chipotle, probably because I’ve never seen it to buy. Unfortunately, the term ‘slurry’ has an unsavoury meaning in British English so I always chuckle, but then we don’t actually have a description for water and cornflour….Anyway my slow cooker is almost ready to come out of the cupboard for Autumn so I’m going to try this.

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  14. General Tsao’s chicken is one of my favourite Asian dishes and your changes to the recipe click perfectly with my taste buds (cue mouth to water and it’s only 6am!). We adore slow cooker recipes too, so this one is definitely going in my list to prepare this fall. Slow cookers are wonderful particularly when there is so much garden cleanup to do, plus I love stepping inside to the wonderful aromas percolating, like someone was in the kitchen slaving all day and it wasn’t ME! Our Asian restaurants always serve broccoli as a side too, but I can’t wait to taste your garlicky take, it sounds scrumptious. JT will love this too, maybe I’ll give him the recipe for another in his repertoire! Or, I’ll be greedy and keep it for myself! Cheers.

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  15. You provided such wonderful links to other sites and very delicious recipes! And I hope I can find that movie, perhaps Netflix has it, and we can answer the question of who is General Tso! You’ve definitely sparked curiosity about its origins, but I have had this dish dozens of times and never once even thought of making it at home. I’m quite excited to give this a try! The addition of the chipotle is very much according to my taste! And I am a big fan of the slow cooker, John. Family members in my house often arrive home at staggered times and it makes it so much easier to serve something from a slow cooker when the dish can be kept warm. I’m excited about the relish, too! I have so many tomatoes that I can’t imagine waiting for the green ones to ripen. I can honestly say that I’m almost tired of tomatoes at this point in the season. I’ll be missing them in November, but for now, relish sounds like a good idea! 🙂

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  16. Firstly, you had me at slow cooker. Now that fall is approaching, I’ll be using my slow cooker more often. (As an aside, I just tried a new tomato sauce in the slow cooker, using fresh tomatoes from my mother’s garden. Heaven!)

    Secondly, this looks like a perfect meal for the slow cooker. Yum!

    Thirdly: arrowroot. I never use it, but should give it a go. I always fall back on cornstarch, but I’m going to pick this up next time I’m at the grocery store.

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  17. We will definitely have to make this. With our crazy schedule now in full swing Tuesdays may become slow cooker dinner days and this looks fantastic. I’m with you, I need the broccoli too!

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  18. I was taken by surprise about this post, John. I didn’t expect it from you. However, I am so glad that you did because this is my most favorite Chinese food. Yay! Thanks for sharing your take on this delicious Chinese food and its origin. Cooking it in a slow cooker and adding the broccolini are a plus. The outcome looks delectable; definitely great served with steamed rice. Yummy indeed! 🙂
    Nice looking eggplants or melanzane you got there. Looking forward to the recipe. I love eggplants.

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  19. John, I share your love of Asian cooking, especially Chinese and I admire your willingness to blog about it–I’ve never dared to! By the way, if you want to really get into cooking Chinese at home, I’d heartily recommend “The Woks of Life”, in case you haven’t discovered it yet. It’s a fantastic introduction to authentic Chinese home cooking, and the recipes are all really easy to follow.

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  20. I love every kind of Chinese food. “Authentic” (ugh, I know, but what else can you say?), Westernized, Americanized and every other -ized including, on the basis of this, slow cooker-ized. I love to eat in Chinese restaurants in every country we visit. It cracks me up that in France they make it into a typical 3-course meal and in Italy they have a pasta course. If you do ever decide to try stir-frying again, Fuchsia Dunlop’s General Tso’s is delicious. http://nyti.ms/2cPg3AW

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  21. O.k. wasn’t expecting to see Chinese food here. 🙂 However, as with all of your food, it looks delicious! Didn’t know the origins of this dish and not sure if I’ve ever had it. We don’t have any good Chinese restaurants here, so it’s not something I eat much of. Now I can make it at home! Thanks John!

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  22. Very clever, would never have thought of making General Tso’s Chicken in a slow cooker, but then I do not own a slow cooker. By the way, you do not need a wok to cook Chinese, use can use a frying pan or a saute pan even a Dutch oven.

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  23. What the….? Chinese food on this Italian food blog? 🙂
    I am happy to see it actually. It’s great to see what else goes on in your kitchen.
    This particular dish is a favourite of my husband and kids. I don’t usually make it because like you, I’m not very good at Asian food. This o can manage I think. I even own a slow cooker that I rarely use. It comes out once a year I think when I want to make beef nehari or haleem. This is a good reason to take mine out.
    Don’t you love David’s blog? I’m really excited because he’s coming to visit me next month. I can’t wait 🙂

    Nazneen

    Like

  24. Very timely and inspirational to come across your post as I prepare to make a chicken stir fry for our dinner tonight John. With broccolini on hand to boot! 😀 Looks like a delicious meal, packed full of flavour.

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  25. Zhao Sheng Hao! 早上好! Buongiorno John! Looks tender and delicious! I know that Asian dishes compared to Italian dishes have so many more ingredients. It is just the nature of the cuisine. I can’t wait to see what you have up your sleeve with those gorgeous eggplants. I am really hoping it is one of my favorite dishes you have in mind. The suspense… ! Wishing you a super week! Zaijian! Ciao!

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  26. Oooh, ooh, ooh, this looks so tasty! I saw this on Facebook and drooled. I do not have a slow cooker that I trust, just my mom’s from the 1970’s that I am both loathe to use and to throw away, lol! But I love this dish and so does my husband, so I may have to give it a try. I also love how you incorporated the broccoli or broccolini into the rice. Very yummy looking. 🙂

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  27. I’m having to delete LOTS of emails from my blogger friends because I’m just sooo far behind. I’m glad I came across this one before I hit ‘delete’. I adore General Tso’s chicken!! In fact, I ALWAYS order ‘E’ – which is General Tso’ chicken accompanied by an excellent fried rice and some barbecued beef on a stick.
    Guess what – there really was a General Tso. I ordered a really interesting documentary about him and his life. And learned that even in China different areas pronounce his name differently. It does seem, however, that General ‘So’ is the most preferred pronunciation.
    I love your version. I think I have to print this out… it’ll get lost if I put in in Pinterest.
    ++ I never did get to make your wonderful Panettone Bread Pudding. It turned out I had only about 1/3 left. Sometimes I see it sold at off-times, so I’ll keep my eyes peeled. (What does that mean anyway?)

    Liked by 1 person

    • If ever there was a timely reply, Cecile. I’m about a half-hour from hitting delete myself. With notifications going back to 2016, I don’t think I’ll ever get caught up unless I do. Anyway …
      Yes, there was a General Tso and in one of Life’s odd coincidences, Chef Peng, the dish’s creator, died about 6 weeks ago. By one “anonymous” account, he died a happy man, having lived long enough to see his dish hit the big time when it was mentioned here.
      Much like you, this dish is my go-to favorite when ordering Chinese and it’s how I test the restaurant. If their General Tso misses the mark, how good can the rest of the food be? No matter. I’ll never find out.
      Good luck with the panettone quest. It is kinda late but one of mine says to use before sometime in June. It’s in the freezer so I think it will be good to serve for the inaugural in 2021. Now THAT will be a party!!
      Well, that took 10 minutes. 20 minutes to go and then I begin the Great Delete!

      Liked by 1 person

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