The Spiralizer Chronicles, Chapter 2: Butternut Squash “Noodles” with Pancetta, Clams and Shrimp

Squash with Seafood 1

Although I may not be posting many recipes that rely upon my new love, the spiralizer, I continue to us it frequently. In fact — hold on to your hats — I use it more often than I do my pasta machine. I know! I never would have thought such a thing possible. Yet, here I am with about 3/4 lb of homemade pasta in my pasta basket, where’s its been for just about 3 weeks now. 3 weeks!!! This would have been unthinkable just last summer and I have butternut squash to credit — or is it blame?

As much as I enjoy zucchini noodles, “zoodles”, their texture often leaves much to be desired, They can go from al dente to unappealingly soft in the blink of an eye. To avoid this, I often serve them raw, making more of a pasta salad than a dish of freshly cooked pasta. Not so with butternut squash. Roasting doesn’t affect these noodles’ “bite” but it does add flavor to the final dish. Best of all, these noodles can be served hot, making a number of dishes possible. Today’s recipe is one such dish.

As is the case with most seafood pasta dishes, this one is easy to prepare and you’ll find that roasted butternut squash compliments seafood quite well. Truth be told, I’ve a squash just waiting for me to return home from the fishmonger with more seafood. It won’t be long now.

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Squash with Seafood 2

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Butternut Squash Noodles with Seafood Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1 small butternut squash
  • 2 tbsp olive oil, divided
  • 2 oz (56 g) pancetta, chopped
  • about 12 small clams — manila, littleneck, or cockles will do (See Notes)
  • 1 clove garlic, minced or grated
  • about 12 shrimp — no smaller than 41 to 50 ct/lb
  • 2 tbsp breadcrumbs – omit if GF (See Notes)
  • 2 tsp parsley per serving, chopped
  • olive oil
  • salt and pepper to taste

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 400˚ F (195˚ C).
  2. Separate neck of squash from the bulb end that contains the seeds. Reserve the bulb for another use.
  3. Peel the squash before using a spiralizer to create spaghetti-like noodles.
  4. Place noodles on a baking sheet, season with salt and pepper, and sprinkle with 1 tablespoon olive oil. Place in oven and roast for 15 minutes.
  5. Combine breadcrumbs, parsley, and a bit of olive oil. Mix thoroughly. Place mixture in a small fry pan over medium heat. Cook until mixture is golden brown. Set aside.
  6. Begin heating remaining olive oil in a large frypan with a lid. Add the pancetta and begin to render its fat. Do not allow the pancetta to burn. It should be fully rendered about the time that the noodles have 5 minutes to go.
  7. Place the garlic and clams in the pan with the pancetta and cover. Sauté for 5 minutes before adding the shrimp to the pan. Cover the pan.
  8. After a minute or so, stir the frying pan’s contents and cover.
  9. Remove noodles from the oven and dump them into the pan with the seafood and pancetta. Stir to evenly coat everything with the pan juices.
  10. Continue to sauté until the clams and shrimp are fully cooked — no more than 2 minutes more.
  11. DISCARD ANY CLAMS THAT REMAIN UNOPENED.
  12. Remove to a serving platter and garnish with the toasted breadcrumbs created in Step 5.
  13. Serve immediately.

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Squash with Seafood 3

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Notes

Use a brush reserved for food-prep to scrub all clams before cooking. Any that remain open after a thorough scrubbing should be discarded. Opinions vary as to whether to soak fresh clams in salt or fresh water to cause the clams to expel grit. Some feel that commercially harvested and shipped clams do not need such purging. If, however, your clams are bought directly from the fishermen or harvested yourself, they must be soaked for at least 30 minutes before scrubbing, changing the water midway through.

In Italian cooking, it is definitely not recommended to use grated Parmigiano or Pecorino cheese on a dish with most varieties of seafood. Very often, toasted breadcrumbs are substituted, just as I did above. Do you remember the stuffed calamari recipe I shared back in March? At the time, I suggested freezing the extra cooked breading mixture. They would make the perfect garnish for this dish, as well as a number of other pasta with seafood dishes. Being roasted already, all you need do is to warm them in a small frying pan. Use them as you would grated cheese, as a garnish just before serving.

I’ve seen recipes where squash noodles are boiled first, much like pasta, rather than roasted. I’ve yet to prepare them that way. If it ain’t broke …

My spiralizer is an attachment for a stand mixer. As such, it makes quick work of the “neck” of a butternut squash. Some may find this squash is too firm for their hand-cranked spiralizer. I’ve no experience with any of them and look forward to hearing from you in the Comments.

Of course, for a gluten-free version do not include the toasted breadcrumbs unless they’re GF. Garnish with chopped parsley instead.

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It’s déjà vu all over again …

Tart Cherry Frozen Yogurt with Chocolate Sauce

With September almost here, there’s no time like the present for frozen treats. If you’re like me and took advantage of the sour cherry season, stashing some of the red beauties in your freezer, well, now’s the time to set some of them free! Follow this LINK to learn how to use them to prepare frozen yogurt, as well as a tasty chocolate sauce to smother it. All that’s missing is the cherry on top!

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Coming soon to a monitor near you …

General Tso's - Preview

General Tso’s Chicken

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95 thoughts on “The Spiralizer Chronicles, Chapter 2: Butternut Squash “Noodles” with Pancetta, Clams and Shrimp

  1. Ahh John, just ANOTHER reminder I need to purchase a spiralizer! On my bucket list along with a sous vide machine. With bathroom remodels about to start and those purchases and pending purchases, those kitchen gadgets keep falling to the bottom of the list. This dish looks absolutely amazing! I really do need to go out and dig for my own clams and mussels next time I’m on the Oregon Coast. The Siletz Bay beach has hundreds of people out there on a sunny weekend doing just that. I need to get some mudboots, I suppose, lol.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Well, I love mine, Kathryn, and with it I’ve been able to lose some weight. My only complaint with this model is that it can only spiralize large carrots. Thin ones do not reach the blade. I’m not one to recommend things but Cooks Illustrated just reviewed a number of the gadgets. Their top-rated model can be purchased at Amazon for about 1/3 the price of my stand mixer attachment. You can take a look at the model HERE. Be sure to come back here if you do purchase one. I’m sure there will be plenty of comments from people offering tips. At least I hope so! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  2. This looks fantastic and will be copied soonest as long as you agree for me to use butternut pumpkin and prawns 🙂 !! Have not spiralized pumpkin and would not have thought of baking: most interesting. I’ll up the garlic and parsley: you know I’m heavyish on those. Use the socalled ‘zoodles’ an awful lot: often as part of a salad, but otherwise will put them in a small strainer and dunk them into boiling water just to say hello! Thank you for new ideas!! And I am really looking forwards to your General Tso’s chicken as neither China nor Australia recognizes the dish 🙂 !!! Methinks a very Stateside idea . . .

    Liked by 1 person

    • Using roasted squash in these recipes – and I have more – produced “noodles” that are more al dente-like and far more preferable for me. Besides, I am crazy for the taste of roasted squash. Yes, I know that General Tso is not a true Chinese dish. I believe it was created by Chinese immigrants on the West Coast, as were many of the dishes on our Chinese restaurant menus. To make matters worse, the recipe I’ll be posting is prepared in a slow cooker. I doubt that I could make a dish that was less authentic if I tried. 🙂

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      • Laughter amidst unpacking a month’s worth of groceries! Now THAT recipe I DO want to see . . . as with most of yours, I’ll probably even try it on if you do it in a slow cooker [stovetop in sturdy pot for me] . . . . deep frying being a big ‘no-no’!! Actually I believe it was a NY restaurateur who first put ‘General Tso’ on the map [the Hainanese are not amused to this day!] . . . .and would you believe at Annapolis it is served as ‘Admiral Tso’s Chicken’ 🙂 !!

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  3. I’ve given up on the spiralizer, the model I chose proved to be very wasteful. Your recipes is tempting me to give it a second chance. I’ve been looking for calamari to stuff since you posted that recipe. I can get really tiny calamari fresh, but anything bigger is enormous and frozen. The fishmonger tell me that the waters are too warm here.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, these spiralizers do have their problems. As much as I enjoy mine, for example, its blades do not reach normal-sized carrots. Really large, thick onee must be used. When I visited Michigan,I often brought a box of frozen, cleaned calamari with me. Fresh would have been too inconvenient and likely to suffer in the car ride. Still, that was always the last resort. Too bad that you cannot find fresh. That baked dish is within the top 3 of every Bartolini’s favorite dishes. Considering all that we were served, that’s really saying something. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • That’s certainly understandable, Glenda. We all have our own tastes and I bristle when someone tells me that I should try this or that when I know that I’m not a fan. Maybe you’ll enjoy my next recipe. 🙂

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  4. John, what spiralizer do u have? I have a hand-held, small one, that is efficient but small and only suitable for courgettes (or carrots) and I have been toying with the idea of getting a good one.
    + on courgette noodles: I tend to salt them first and then cook them at high heat with oil or butter, so that they retain their shape much better.
    I like the idea of pairing the sweetness of the squash with the saltiness, piquancy of the clams (another of those things that are pretty expensive here in the UK) – it does make sense (in Apulian cooking, for instance, mussels are often paired with potatoes)

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    • Hello, Stefano. My spiralizer is an attachment for my Kitchen Aid stand mixer. It is a good, durable piece of equipment but not perfect. It cannot slice normal-sized carrots, for example, only very large ones. There’s waste with it, too. Over here, there’s a subscription website (associated magazine & TV programs, too), Cooks Illustrated, that reviews kitchen equipment of all types. They recommend a hand-cranked model, Paderno World Cuisine Tri-Blade Plastic Spiral Vegetable Slicer, available on Amazon.com. Perhaps it’s available on Amazon UK?
      I do enjoy this dish, Stefano, just for the flavors that you’ve mentioned. I’ve made it several times and if clams are on sale at the fishmonger, this dish will be that night’s dinner. I am going to try your method of cooking zucchini noodles. It has to be better than any that I’ve tried. Thanks! 🙂

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  5. Another fantastic recipe – I love your enthusiasm for the Spiralizer! I could definitely do with the frozen yogurt – it’s going to be a scorcher here today.
    I’ve got the movie The Search for General Tso – I haven’t watched it, so I’d better do so before your next post. I believe it’s supposed to be good.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Bonjourno John! Missed you and all of your delicious recipes. I really need to get a spiralizer so I can enjoy all of these delicious recipes. I love the simple olive oil garlic and parsley topping just perfect here. Squash is a nice pick as we head into autumn and the weather is a bit cooler too. Thanks for your patience as I try to catch up on all of your delicious recipes. Wishing you a super week! Take Care, BAM

    Liked by 1 person

    • Buona sera, BAM. So good to see you again and I hope things are going better for you now. I’ve been using butternut squash to recreate a number of pasta dishes and all to good effect. I’m amazed by the number of dishes that lend themselves so well to squash “noodle.” I look forward to seeing the dishes you’ll create when once you get a spiralizer. What fun!
      Do take care, BAM, and don’t ever be concerned about not visiting. I’ll be here whenever you can make it back. Have a great week, Cara. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  7. I hear you. I am in love work my new one too. They give you options you might not have had. I haven’t done a butternut squash yet but I never would have thought to roast it. This recipe is perfect for that! I must try this out. I guess you need to separate the bulb or it won’t work well at all. I can do that. Enjoy!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Oh, Amanda. You’re in for a real treat! Roasting the squash brings such a great flavor to a number of these “pasta” dishes. I spiralize squash now more than any other vegetable. You’ll see. 🙂

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  8. Like Sandra (ladyredspecs), I’ve also given up on my spiralizer. I think there are so many inexpensive versions out there that waste the ends and sometimes catch your fingers in the sharp teeth if you try to push those end through. That said, I wish I had a good, hassle-free spiralizer to try this dish. The idea of butternut squash noodles sounds fabulous. I’ve also been reading about eggplant (aubergine) noodles – surely the would work better than zucchini. P.S. Loved your stuffed calamari!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hello, Debi. If I had similar experiences, I, too, would have put my spiralizer away. It’s not perfect, by any means, but these squash “noodles” really are that good! I’m leery of spiralizing eggplant and fear that they wouldn’t “hold up” during the cooking process, much like zucchini. I’ve got plenty of eggplant coming out of my garden. I really should give one a whirl and see how it goes. All I have to lose is one eggplant. Believe me, I can definitely spare it. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Love the combo of pasta and seafood! So you know I think this dish is a winner. Haven’t gotten a spiralizer yet, though, so I’m not yet into zucchini and squash “pasta,” Like the idea, though. And roasting the butternut squash pasta? Yum! Really wonderful idea — love roasting any and all veggies, and squash is among the best. Fun recipe — thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I do like zucchini noodles when prepared raw. I just haven’t hit the proper cooking method for them yet. The squash, however, is a different story completely. Love it! I’ve recreated a number of my pasta dishes with squash noodles and it’s surprising how well the flavors blend. I’ll be posting more as time goes by. Stay tuned … 🙂
      Thanks, John.

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    • You’re in for a treat, Tanya. I was so very pleasantly surprised to taste how well the seafood paired with the roasted squash. Since then, I’ve been recreating a number of dishes using squash noodles — and loved them all! I bet you will, too! 🙂
      Hope all is well with you, Big Man, and your family.

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  10. I must say butternut squash and sweet potatoes are my two top favorites – I do like zucchini too by I’ve been roasting instead of sauteeing, or serving it raw because as you said, it gets too mushy otherwise…. The other day I saw a food blog calling for cooking zoodles for 10 minutes on a sautee pan, and I almost passed out imagining the outcome 😉

    glad to see you are having fun spiralizing the world!

    Liked by 1 person

    • 10 minutes?!?!?! Sounds like a prank. I, too, love sweet potatoes I bake them, too. I’m rather glad to hear that you, too, are having problems with zucchini noodles. Love the taste but that texture leaves so much to be desired. I’m not ready to give up on them, though. I’m way too stubborn for that. 🙂

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  11. good point with the spiralizer, it’s fun to make, but they need a bit too much babysitting for my taste if I’m trying to make a hot pasta dish. Butternut squash sounds like a great solution, especially with the protein you paired it with!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m sure there’s a way to use zucchini other than raw, Mary, but I’ve yet to find it. Squash, on the other hand. is a joy to use tastes so good. I’ll get around to experimenting with zucchini some more — if ever I tire of the squash. 🙂

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  12. This looks and sounds very tasty, John. Pancetta and clams are friends and I can just imagine how well it all works together. The only drawback is yet another kitchen contraption, because I do not own a spiralizer yet. Last year in Italy we had ‘noodles’ made out of squid. Although that was served cold with a dressing, wouldn’t it be great to serve it with clams and shrimp? Only problem is I didn’t ask how they managed to turn the squid into noodles…

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    • Oh, I do know what you mean about kitchen gadgets, Stefan. I’ve put an end to all purchases, although I would buy another spiralizer if, heaven forbid, something happens to this one. I’ve been able to lose weight this year and there’s little doubt that the spiralizer had a major role in my weight loss. Now, how in the world did they cook squid noodles? I can just imagine your surprise. I’ve a feeling that I’ll be spending some time this weekend googling for a recipe. How could I not? 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Hi, Kathryn. Just try a roasted squash noodle dish and you’ll be so glad that you purchased a spiralizer. Still not convinced? Bake some shoestring sweet potatoes. They, too, are really quite good!

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  13. Veggies are so much healthier than pasta, and I really love the idea of spiralized and roasted squash. I think my new kitchen is definitely going to need one of these contraptions, John. I’m afraid we ate all the cherries I bought this summer. 🙂

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  14. Drooling over this dish has moved the kitchen aid spiralizer to the top of my “must buy gadget” list. My rinky-dink spiralizer just can’t handle the harder veggies. There is butternut squash ripening in my garden, so I better get shopping! I LOVE everything about this, John. I imagine the pancetta adds great flavor and I really like the shrimp/clam combo too. It looks so indulgent, but is actually quite healthy. Thanks for sharing another must try recipe!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hello, Nancy, and thanks. Pancetta goes so well with seafood. I knew those components would be fine. The roasted squash was the big question mark– and it was a very pleasant surprise. They’re so good together that I wonder whether someone else has tried this before. Since then, I’ve used the squash a number of times, recreating a few of my other pastas — loved them all! Who knew!

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  15. Like a couple of others here I’ve pretty much given up on my spiraliser. I don’t have a problem with the waste as I just use the cores for something else but usually I can get the results I want with a speed peeler and save on the washing up. Reading your recipe, though, is provoking a re-think. Lovely flavour combos, as ever. Lx

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    • I, too, use the veggie cores in whatever dish I’m preparing and my stand mixer attachment only has 2 parts to wash. I just wipe the rest. Even so, only the largest of carrots can be spiralized. It sure does make quick work of squash, though — and the results are delicious! I hope your speed peeler will work with squash, Linda. You’re going to love the results and I cannot wait to see how you’ll prepare them. 🙂

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  16. John – I have to say that I love that you used something other than zucchini for this dish. The richness of the butternut with the pancetta, shrimp, and clams is almost intoxicating! I don’t think I could ever give up pasta for veggie noodles, but I think adding this to my regular round up is a great idea. Okay, I don’t have a spiralizer but I am thinking I could make this with cubed butternut, or even grated. What do you think?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, David, an you’re right. These flavors go very well together. It’s remarkable that I’ve never seen them together before. I don’t know why cubed or grated squash wouldn’t work. You can always call the grated squash “orzo”. I think that roasting it may prove tricky, though. It would need to be spread out on a baking sheet to prevent clumping. Still, I’d give it a try. 🙂

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  17. Now you really have me wanting to get a spiralizer. I never thought to use it for a butternut squash. I have some plants in the garden now and am hoping they survive the late summer heat to give some some great squash. This dish would be fantastic!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Gretchen. I just wanted to make a hot vegetable noodle dish and I couldn’t master cooking zucchini. If my “regular” pasta isn’t al dente, I don’t find it at all good. Try as I might, cooked zucchini noodles just weren’t good enough. That’s why I tried butternut squash – and I haven’t looked back. I still use zucchini noodles raw in a pesto salad but I use squash noodles in a number of pasta recreations. I’m lovin’ it and you will, too!

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  18. I really need to get one of these! I’ve bought the spiralized beets from Whole Foods that they have in the paleo section and adore them roasted. Honestly, they are out of this world. Onvesting in one of these would save me money in the long run and also trips to WF to find they are out of beets! Love the combo of squash and clams. So perfect for our cool days that are starting.

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    • Yes, Mary. Sweet potatoes are very good when spiralized and roasted. I serve them just like that. Here they’re called called shoestring sweet potatoes but I’ve heard them also called sweet potato birds nest. I like them so much that I’ve not tried to do anything else with them. It’s even less likely now that I’ve “discovered” squash “noodles”. There are only so many meals in a day. 🙂

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  19. I recalled your spiralizer post months ago and then when I visited my daughter-in-law a few months ago she was loving hers! I bought mine about six weeks ago and I love it. Mine is hand-cranked, but it has been easy to use. I made carrot ribbons, so I would assume butternut squash couldn’t be much harder. I have yet to try it, but when I do I’ll let you know. i’m getting a little sick of zucchini, but we have it growing in the garden and at least trying the different attachments and “noodle” sizes has kept me from getting too bored. I think this isn’t just a very tasty dish, but it’s visually beautiful with the color of the squash just waiting for the seafood! You are so creative with your dishes, John.

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    • Thank you, Debra. I’ve got to be honest. I was getting tired of soggy noodles and that’s what I had every time I cooked zucchini “noodles”. I just haven’t uncovered the knack, I guess. Anyway, I though I’d try butternut squash and, well, there’s been no turning back. I love this dish and a few others I’ve tried. I do hope that you’ll enjoy yours. I’ve got more recipes coming. Stay tuned …n 🙂

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    • Thanks, Amanda. Pancetta and clams are meant for each other. Here in the US, bacon will often be paired with clams but I don’t care for the smoke flavoring. Pancetta, for me, is so much better. Time after time I seen where some have boiled their vegetable noodles and that’s never worked for me. The noodles are way too soft. Not squash, however. I do hope you give them a try. You’re going to love them! 🙂

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    • Hello, Mandy. I’ve only scratched the surface, Mandy. I’ve spiralized deets and apples to make a salad, as well as using roasted squash for a number of pasta dishes. This recipe is just the first. I really enjoy having one in my kitchen. I bet you will, too. Max’s kiss will have to wait till morning, He’s already in bed, probably on my pillow. Do give you furbabies a snuggle from us, though.

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  20. Every time I see a recipe with spiralized zucchini I wonder if they end up getting mushy pretty quick. Thanks for clearing that up. Now the butternut noodles is another story. Not only are they beautiful, but I’m sure they hold together better. I love the seafood combination and prosciutto sauce served with them. This looks like one very tasty dish John!

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      • This made me smile. Just yesterday, I made a quick sauce using tomatoes from my garden and some prosciutto I sliced from a “heel” I bought at my Italian market. My eyes light up whenever I see one is available. I always buy it. Always. 🙂

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    • You’re right, MJ. The timing with zucchini must be spot on. Unfortunately, I’ve yet to find that spot and have been using them raw. Squash, though, isn’t nearly so unforgiving and I think it tastes better here than zucchini every could, no matter how it’s cooked. I really did enjoy this dish!

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  21. More than the pasta maker? Hang onto your hat indeed! That does look delicious though. I may have to get Steve one of those attachments for the trusty KichenAid. Or, better yet, a new KitchenAid entirely as ours is on its last legs after all these many years.

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    • I know, Michelle. I used my pasta machine on Wednesday and it was like meeting an old friend. I have lost some weight, though, so I’m beginning to wonder if our relationship wasn’t a tad dysfunctional. 🙂

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  22. I love using my spiralizer and will have to try out your recipe as I’ve never spiralized butternut squash before, just always zucchini. What a pretty and flavorful looking dish, I bet it tasted amazing! I am going to look for the stand attachment, I only have the hand crank version. Is yours a kitchen aid?? xx

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    • Hello, Barb. Yes, once you try butternut, you’ll never go back. 🙂
      Mine is a KA but Cook’s Illustrated has rated another one better, a hand-cranked model. It’s also 1/3 the price. I like my KA but it won’t spiralize carrots unless they’re huge. You can see their top-rated model on Amazon. I will say the KA makes quick work of a squash, though. I’m not so sure a hand-cranked model would do the same. EIther way, do give spiralized squash a try. You’re in for a pleasant surprise. 🙂

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  23. I once tried using my spiralizer with a potato, and they broke into short lengths. You didn’t have this problem with the squash? I was thinking I’d try it again after perhaps parboiling a potato. But this is a beautiful and extremely appealing dish!!!

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    • I tried a potato, too, Mimi, and found that they had to be spread thinly in order to b roasted.Sweet potatoes, on the other hand, weren’t nearly so fussy — and I very much preferred their flavor. Butternut squash even more so. This has become a regular “guest” for dinner, as well as a few other pasta dishes that I’ve recreated. I really enjoy them!

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  24. I’m so glad you posted this! I see a variety of spiralised vegetables at Whole Foods but I am reluctant to buy them because of what you mentioned about the zucchini. I too find its just too soggy. You almost have to flash sauté them in a hot pan and then add everything else separately.
    Thank you for using a butternut, I’m glad this cooks well. I’ve seen sweet potato spirals and I’m thinking they’ll be similar. I’m going to try!

    Thanks John 🙂
    Oh, and this looks fabulous!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Nazneen. Yes, butternut and sweet potato are quite similar, although I only have used squash noodles in pasta dishes. I’m sure that zucchini noodles are flash sautéed but I’ve yet to do it successfully — and I hate soggy noodles. Squash, on the other hand, is a real treat and I’ve prepared a number of dishes with it. I think the trick is to find the right vegetable for the right dish. Spiralized beets and apples are great in salads. Zucchini noodles are best, for me, when served raw in a salad-type dish. Pesto makes a great dressing. Roasted squash, on the other hand, makes a great pasta-like dish. Best of all, I really am enjoying these experiments. 🙂

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  25. Oh this looks delicious! Reading this right before I get down to making something for dinner…it just won’t live up to what I’m seeing here. I don’t have a spiralizer, and am thinking there must be someone in this day and age of making things easy in the kitchen, that has started to sell ready made spiralized butternut squash. I’m going to look!

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    • Thanks, Angeline. I’m sure your dinner was delicious and I would have enjoyed it!
      Nazneen mentioned in an earlier comment that Whole Foods sells spiralized vegetables. I was in one last weekend but, once I saw the Hatch chiles, I forgot everything else. (I’ve been on a hunt for the green beauties and Whole Foods was my last resort.) I’ll probably be going back — hoping for more chiles — and will check out the spiralized veggies. I’ll let you know.

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  26. What a coincidence, we are having meatballs with zucchini noodles tonight. I usually spirilize the zucchini and then nuke them for about 30 seconds to 1 minute depending on the strength of the microwave. They never get too soft that way, but I do know what you mean. I recall the first time you used the spiralizer, I think you mentioned that you would still eat more pasta, but it is definitely addictive. And that it is not fattening, is such a bonus. I have yet to try the butternut squash version, I just have the handheld version so I’ll let you know when I do. I’d love to get the kitchenaid attachment, but since I’ve already bought than hand held, I just can’t justify it. I will report back in October when we are back from Europe. 🙂

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    • Please, Eva — and John, too — don’t think me rude BUT, forget spiralizing!!!!
      I know I posted the recipe but it ain’t gong nowhere. — and you both are. I want to hear all about your upcoming trip. The wheres, the whos. maybe a coupla WTFs. and even a few HELL NOs! I really did enjoy Spain and have many wonderful memories of my visits there — and that include a night with food poisoning. (Think twice before ordering the paella at some eateries. I didn’t. I should have.)
      So, forget spiralizing. :Let’s talk La Rambla, the Sagrada Familia, the Rock of Gibraltar, Gaudi, Seville, Alhambra, Toledo’s folk interpretation of “Carmen” — with a dancing horse, no less — the food …. oh my, the food. Late dining. Large portions. And experiences you shan’t forget. Truly, all kidding aside. I know that you’ve both well-travelled. You are going to love Spain.
      Just don’t try to order tacos cuz if they have ’em, you’re in the wrong place, to be sure. 😀

      Liked by 1 person

  27. Hey, John – great new gravatar!! We are new to the spiralizer world prompted by the abundance of zucchini in the CSA box a few weeks ago! I actually had relied on the Cook’s Illustrated article you linked to in the comments to decide on the recommended Paderno spiralizer (and purchased it from our local independent kitchen shop – go small business! — for only a few dollars more than Amazon’s listing). The cook in our house, my husband, gives it two thumbs up – just like your classic countertop manual Italian-made pasta machine, the Paderno is your basic, manual spiralizer that gets the job done. Would definitely recommend. We have the same issues with the zoodles texture (i.e. turning to mush too quickly), and I am passing on this post to my husband to try the butternut squash noodles.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hey, Kat. I’m so glad that you and your DH purchased a spiralizer. They really are great and have helped me to lose weight. (Quite a bit of weight. YAY!) I think you’ll find that using roasted squash noodles are perfect! The flavor is incredible and their texture is so much better than zucchini noodles.I’ve used them in a number of pasta dishes and loved each one. And sweet potatoes? Be sure to spiralize and bake the noodles. They make fantastic shoe-string potatoes. Love them!

      Liked by 1 person

  28. Hi John – I just had to thank you for providing tonight’s dinner. I made this dish tonight (exactly as written) and my husband and I LOVED everything about it! The roasted butternut squash noodles are the perfect base (finally acquired my KA spiralizer) for the shrimp and clams…the pancetta adds a wonderful smokiness and the toasted breadcrumbs added a great contrast of flavor and texture. It was an absolute perfect meal…thank you! Keep your delicious offerings coming….please! 😃

    Liked by 1 person

    • This is wonderful, Nancy! I am so glad that you tried and enjoyed the recipe. I have come to really love spiralized butternut squash and have used it in a few of my pasta dishes. It really does work much better than zucchini noodles and, once roasted, adds a great flavor to the dishes. Here, it really complements the seafood and pancetta. You’ve reminded me that it’s about time I make it again. Thanks for coming back to tell me how much you enjoyed this recipe!

      Like

  29. inutile dire che passando da te ci si comincia a leccare i baffi ( naturalmente per chi ce li ha , ha ha ) prima di cominciare a leggere le tue ricette straordinarie hanno un elemento che le rende ancora di più speciali: le foto! sono bellissime e rendono ancora più appetitose le pietanze che presenti
    ma tu vuoi farmi prendere dei kili in più?
    le tagliatelle da te proposte sono davvero originali!
    grazie mille amico , alla prossima abbuffata!

    Liked by 1 person

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