Stovetop Braised Rabbit

Rabbit ServedI’ve mentioned in the past that Dad was a hunter. When I was very young, he and a few friends would spend a weekend deer hunting in autumn. I don’t recall him ever being successful, though we sometimes received venison from one his friends. Whether the friend was a member of the hunting party or just generous, I do not recall.

Dad was far more successful hunting pheasants. He’d leave early in the morning and return that night, usually with at least one ring-necked pheasant. Very often, he and I dressed the birds. Because the seasons overlapped, he sometimes brought home a rabbit, as well. He skinned the animal and I remember cleaning them but not very often. I think Mom objected far more to my participation than I did. I couldn’t/wouldn’t do it today.

Rabbit Sous Chef

Flat Ruthie comes out of retirement

We enjoyed rabbit many more times than Dad’s rifle ever supplied. Grandpa sometimes brought them home from the farmers market already dressed. Dad also brought them home but I do not recall his source. Though not a regular part of our diet, it wasn’t a surprise to see rabbit served when Dad was home for dinner.

Today, I’ve a number of groceries that sell rabbit. With the exception of one butcher shop, all are frozen. If I’m going to buy a frozen rabbit, I’ll buy one that carries the date on the label and from a store I trust. As I’ve said in the past, developing relationships with your butchers and grocers can prove beneficial in a number of ways.

I rarely buy rabbit to cook for myself. I will buy one, however, and bring it to Zia. Served relatively rarely, these days rabbit is more of a treat than it ever was. With only two of us seated at the table, one rabbit is more than enough to satisfy us both. No matter which of us is cook that night, we always cook our rabbit the same way and that’s the recipe I’ll be sharing. Do take a look at the Notes section, however, for an alternative way to prepare it.

One thing to keep in mind when preparing rabbit is that it is a very lean meat. With so little fat, the meat can be tough and dry if not prepared correctly. I know because I once served my Traveling Companion probably the worst rabbit dinner ever prepared. WIth lean meats, low and slow is the way to go. Keep the heat low and take your time braising it. You’ll be rewarded with a moist, tender rabbit to serve your guests.

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Rabbit Braise Start*     *     *

Stovetop Braised Rabbit Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1 dressed rabbit, about 3 lbs 
  • olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1 tomato, chopped – 2 TBS tomato paste may be substituted – (optional)
  • 2 sprigs of fresh rosemary
  • white wine
  • salt and pepper

Directions

  1. Cut the rabbit into manageable pieces. This can be from 8 to 12 pieces, depending upon your preference and plans for serving.
  2. Season the rabbit with salt and pepper. 
  3. Heat a few TBS of olive oil over med-high in a deep frypan with a lid. 
  4. Place the garlic and rabbit pieces into the pan and brown the rabbit before flipping them over to brown the other side — about 5 – 8 minutes per side.
  5. Add the tomato (optional), rosemary, and about ¾ cups of white wine to start, and bring the pan to the boil. 
  6. Reduce the heat to a soft simmer, cover, and braise the rabbit for well over an hour — more like an hour-and-a-half. 
  7. During the braise, turn the pieces over occasionally and add more wine, as needed, should the pan begin too dry. You may substitute water or chicken stock for some of the wine. 
  8. When fully cooked, remove and discard the rosemary sprigs, place the rabbit on a platter, and serve.

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Rabbit Braising

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Notes

This recipe is the Bartolini method of braising rabbit. (Actually, it was Mom’s idea to add a little tomato, “Just for color.”) If, like me, you have a difficult time getting the braise right, you may want to try cooking the rabbit in the hunter’s style, alla cacciatore. Mom’s cacciatore is also a stove top braise but it includes bell peppers, onions, and mushrooms. They’ll keep the rabbit moist, just as they do chicken. There’s no need to go looking for the recipe. Mom’s Chicken Cacciatore is today’s “Deja Vu” dish.

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It’s déjà vu all over again …

Cacciatore with Polenta

Whether you decide to cook rabbit in this style, you really should give Mom’s cacciatore a try. The peppers, onions, mushrooms, and rosemary combine with the wine to make a very appetizing main course. Best of all, the aroma will fill your kitchen like only the best comfort foods can. You can see how it’s prepared by clicking HERE.

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Coming soon to a monitor near you …

Strawberry Pie Preview

Mom’s Strawberry-Banana Pie

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136 thoughts on “Stovetop Braised Rabbit

  1. I think we had rabbit once, although I don’t really recall. I’m 90% sure. Certainly never made it though. I wonder if the sous chefs would be brave enough. Really though, what I’m stuck on is the strawberry banana pie!!! Now that sounds amazing. Happy New Year John! Here’s to an amazing year! Much love my friend!

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  2. Great timing, John, as I will do a post about rabbit tonight or tomorrow. You are so right about how difficult it is to get braised rabbit right, and that low & slow is the way to go. With frozen rabbit the risk of dryness is even higher. I like the flavors you use, rosemary is great with rabbit.
    PS the term “dressed rabbit” in English seems funny to me, as it is more like UNdressed to me! 😉

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    • Loved your recipe for rabbit, Stefan. I may spring it on Zia sometime. For me, the best part of this dish is the aroma of rosemary, wine, and garlic that fills my kitchen once the braise starts. it’s positively intoxicating.
      Yes, dressed, meaning to clean an animal or fish, is another of our expressions that doesn’t make sense, like jumbo shrimp. 🙂

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  3. When you write about grocery stores selling rabbit in Chicago I feel peagreen [again!]. Here in the country we have difficulty getting decent ones at the butcher’s never mind the grocer’s even tho’ the animals are considered pests! And I love the lean, healthy, slightly gamey meat . . . like your garlic/rosemary/tomato combo: beautiful with a quality animal. As I usually have to > from frozen I tend to use stronger mustard or red wine sauces and have even tried Indian fusion: it does work but is not a gentle classic like this!!

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    • It’s a funny thing, Eha. Up until about 2 years ago, I only knew of 1 place that sold rabbit other than the live poultry shop. About that time, one of our largest grocery chains left Illinois and other stores rushed to take over the empty stores throughout Chicago. For whatever reason, they have all stocked rabbit. And in a bit of irony, the original store from which I always bought my rabbit has been sold and gone out of business. Perhaps rabbit sales kept them in business. Once they no longer controlled the supply, they had to close. 🙂

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      • *smile* Well, I knew precious little about FR also: but was lucky as a click on the ‘real’ Ruth began the beginning of the tale and then Mr Google with his usual flair had so much interesting to explain !!! Fun!!

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          • Read and thoroughly enjoyed! Learnt something besides FR’s ‘golden touch’: could have sworn I had discovered you by August 2012 but tho’ many now well-known names and photos there ‘my time’ seemingly was yet to come?

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          • I’ve just returned, having taken a trip in my time machine through my vast comment archive. You are correct, kinda, Eha. Your first comment appeared on this blog on July 25,2012. Your next comment was about 1 week later on August 1st of that same year. You disappeared, however, missing my wonderful FR posts among others, and returned on September 4th. Was it something I said? 😀

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          • Oh John: what did I or do I even now know about baseball 😀 ?? I would have sucked my thumb, shrugged my shoulders, wondered where FR fitted in [explains why she looked familiar 🙂 !!] and felt I could not make more of a fool of myself than I probably already had . . . I did not have my own blog . . . perhaps still felt a wee bit of a stranger! But, Milord, your bookkeeping is marvellous!!!

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        • You kinda ‘promised’ it once before. . . . hi dearHeart: now I’ll somehow ‘hold you to it’ 😀 !! Sheesh – ‘just you wait, Mr Higgins, just you wait’ . . . I’ll make it yet is spite of the horrid prairies’ weather . . . and else . . .

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    • An absolute dream for which to aim! Yes: CAN do [or should I say WILL do!!!!!] Do hope the poor darling Kiwi will think it will be as much as fun as I know it will be . . . [Oh, have we broken some ‘length’ records and will the Powers-Above now ticke us off 🙂 ?] Oh cheeky me still wants to go pat Boo also . . .

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  4. Every time I hear about rabbit dishes, I remember a nostalgic childhood event. I don’t know if it is still done, when I was growing up in Japan, 2nd or 3rd graders were taken on a rabbit capturing field trip. Teachers divided us in teams and we were to plan a strategy and go capture rabbits (by hand). My team did not catch any. At the end of the event, we were served rabbit stew for lunch. 😀 ))) I have not had rabbit for many years. This fine recipe encouraged me to try it soon. Our local Whole Foods does carry rabbit meat.

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  5. We really enjoy rabbit and are lucky enough to be able to get hold of it in both Spain and England. The recipe is lovely, a classic! I enjoy rabbit both stewed and done very quickly (when they’re the little rabbits we’re gifted in Spain) on the bbq. Happy New year John!

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    • Ooh, grilled rabbit! I’ve not thought about that in ages, Tanya. My Dad roasted rabbit on the barbecue and it was very good. I’m not nearly as skilled as he was and fear another rabbit dinner fiasco that would rival the one I served my Traveling Companion. That very well might be the worst dish I’ve ever made — and I served it to a friend — a fact he never fails to remind me. 🙂

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    • So good to see you again, too, Barb. Rabbit in this area’s groceries is usually in the area that has duck, geese, or at one store, among the ground camel, ostrich, boar, and crocodile. I’m working my way through that section.
      I hope you and all of the Smidgens much happiness and good health in 2016.

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    • You’re certainly not alone. In fact, i’m surprised that more haven’t shared your opinion. Don’t worry. There won’t be any similar recipes to be found here. And yes, that pie was always my favorite. 🙂

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  6. This looks spectacular. I have a rabbit in my freezer and have been waiting for the right recipe. I may try your mom’s method first since it combines my favorite flavors. Mine is all in one piece so I’ll have to butcher it. I need a night where I have courage and time flour this one. Thanks for sharing. I like rabbit and pheasant and appreciate the lifestyle that brings these to the table. Happy New year!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Amanda. Happy New Year!
      I think what you’ll find most enticing about this recipe is the aroma that fills your kitchen during the braise. I find it irresistible and it make me so very hungry! I’ve not enjoyed pheasant in decades and only recently found it here. It is quite expensive but I may get one, though, and surprise Zia with it. Love doing that. 🙂

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  7. Just the other day the family was recounting FR and her travel adventures. I knew Flat Ruthie was working in Spain with Darlene, I believe as a bookmark! She’s been on hiatus but good to see her resurface in Chicago with you, John. Will try to reblog on cardboard me if it’s still there.

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    • Actually, Ruth, that photo was shot at Zia’s when we prepared rabbit for the book. She was in a side pocket of my suitcase and I’d forgotten all about her being there. I was looking for a recharging device — which I had left at home — when I came across her. Of course, I had to use her if, for no other reason, than to surprise you. 🙂

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  8. My husband is a hunter (opposites attract LOL) and the reason we visit Texas each January is for the duck hunting. I might try something similar with duck medallions making sure I don’t overcook them. Wild game is always a challenge for me.

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    • Thanks, Ingrid. Wild game is a challenge for everyone, I imagine, but I bet you’re under-selling yourself. I think that part of my problem is that I don’t cook game often enough to develop a proper method. I don’t know how I’d fare with wild duck or even venison. I certainly wouldn’t feel comfortable trying to cook either for the first time.

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  9. I – once – found frozen rabbit in one of my local grocery stores and cooked it up with a red wine laced spaghetti sauce – just like I used to enjoy when we lived in Malta. Malta is VERY Italian-influenced, so I’m sure the recipe originated in Italy. IF I find another rabbit – frozen or otherwise – I’d love to prepare it this way. As always – love the recipe and love reading your stories!!! ; o ) (Actually, I’m going to do a computer search to find out where I can find rabbit locally!)

    Liked by 1 person

  10. I love rabbit! Never make it though — the couple of times I did, Mrs KR would moan about “Floopsie and Moopsie” and “little fluffy bunnies.” And just move the food around on her plate. I took the hint, so it’s a restaurant-only dish for me. When i was a kid, you could buy frozen rabbit in any supermarket (I think the Pel-Freez (or something like that) brand was the one I always saw Never see it these days — sometimes at farmer’s markets or ethnic markets. And it’s everywhere in France and Italy. Anyway, great dish — thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yeah, Mrs KR echoes my sibling. ((sigh))
      Here things are just the opposite of your experience. John. For years, there was only 1 grocery that carried rabbit besides the fresh poultry shop. Then one of our leading groceries left town and there was a stampede to fill its 100+ newly emptied stores.These stores pretty much all stock rabbit now. It’s an embarrassment of riches but it comes with a price. The original “rabbit store” has recently closed for good. I had no idea that so much of their revenue was rabbit-based. 🙂

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  11. Rabbit is a specialty dish in our family and our choice of meat for most celebratory meals. I was never able to replicate my mom’s recipe and your slow braise alternative sounds just like hers including the white wine. Will most definitely give it a go! Thanks for sharing 🙂

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    • Hello, Marissa. I love to hear that one of our recipes is reminiscent of another family’s. Mom would have been thrilled to read this, just as her sister, Zia, will be when I tell her. Thank you so much for taking the time to comment. 🙂

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  12. I’ve eaten rabbit twice, once in NYC and once here in ATL, both times part of a delicious risotto dish. I hardly ever see it on menus anymore. Both times I had it, I really enjoyed it in spite of some trepidation about eating a bunny. Probably will never cook it, but I will say yours looks very appetizing, John. Happy New Year to you and yours!

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  13. Nope, no rabbit to be found in my small neck of the woods in the PNW… I’m pretty sure my husband used to eat it growing up in the backwoods of Vermont. However, I bet your slow-braised version is delightful! And I am sure there is a great back story on Flat Ruthie that I have missed in the past. 😀

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    • Have you tried the ethnic markets/butchers? A good Italian butcher — is there any other kind ? — could at least tell you where you might find rabbit. i hope you’re successful. It really is a great dish. On the other hand, if you cannot find rabbit, you can cook chicken like this or like Mom’s cacciatore Either way, you can’t go wrong.
      Flat Ruthie is the alter-ego of a blogging friend, Ruth, who is a recently retired teacher. She created Flat Ruthie for her students. They would take FR with them on vacations and trips, taking photos of her along the way. At one time, FR had her own blog chronicling her travels — and, boy, did she ever travel! I was visiting Zia when I found FR tucked in my bag’s pocket. I couldn’t resist “using” her and surprising Ruth, at the same time. Worked like a charm! 🙂

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      • A friend told me sometimes Whole Foods carries rabbit, which we do have in my town. But I don’t get to that store often. You have to realize I’m in a small town in the middle of Oregon and nary an ethnic market or Italian butcher to be found. Now that Flat Ruthie story is just priceless! What a wonderful surprise! 🙂

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  14. we have access to wild rabbit here on my island – cape breton island, nova scotia, canada. my hubby and all of our friends hunt and we are constantly being given fresh-caught, wild rabbit, sometimes dressed, sometimes not. here is a link to our food blog (which i have let lapse for years now…sigh), and has my recipe for roasting rabbit in the oven. it is very delicious served this way. i thought you or your readers might like to take a look.

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    • It is a great dish.I share your love of game meats but cannot get most of them here unless the meat is already ground. That really does limit your options.
      Thanks for the visit and for taking the time to comment.

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  15. Pingback: Rabbit in Piquant Sauce, Stovetop Braised or Sous-Vide (Coniglio in Salsa Piccante) | Stefan's Gourmet Blog

    • Hello, Norma. I’ve a sibling that could have easily written your comment. If you like the cooking method, you can try it with chicken pieces and it will be every bit as good. Best of all, no bunnies will have been hurt in the making of your dinner. 🙂

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    • Thanks, Jasline, for the New Year wishes and I hope your 2016 is a very happy and healthy year for you and yours.
      Rabbit has a slightly gamey taste but not at all like. say, venison. It is much milder and really takes to this braise very well. I bet you’d love it. 🙂

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    • Sorry I was a bit in a hurry. – I had a few reflections on that subject now. Here rabbit is sold more often now than some years ago. I never bought one (I’m living and cooking “single”) but do not know whether I would though. Unless I’ll find a butcher whom I could really trust. I’ve read shocking stories about the lifestock breeding of rabbits – should be the same as with our poor chickens. No ethical husbandry at all. Unless you find organic raised ones. But have not seen any yet. – Well there are also the ones you are talking about: Game. Called hares, no? As cognilio vs. lepre in Italian. But they might be different in taste, I think. I’ve heard of wrapping the meat in slices of very thin cut lards to keep it moist or juicy…
      Nice to read your memories on the rabbit side. – But who – please – is Flat Ruthie? Is there a background story you can tell? Does she supply some special skills? 🙂

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        • Rabbit is more popular here, as well, Irmi. Years past, there was only one small independent grocer that carried it besides a local live poultry shop near my home. I was there when they butchered a few rabbits and vowed never to buy them there. We have a major labeling problem here and know very little of where our food is produced or how it is butchered. Thankfully, there are a few stores that are now claiming that the meat they sell is humanely raised and butchered. It is more expensive but a guilt-free dinner is worth it. I just don’t eat it as often, that’s all.
          I just wrote a description of Flat Ruthie for another commenter. I hope you don’t mind my copying that part of my reply here. Why re-invent the wheel? Before I do, I just want to thank you for your thoughtful, as always, comments, Irmi. 🙂
          “Flat Ruthie is the alter-ego of a blogging friend, Ruth, who is a recently retired teacher. She created Flat Ruthie for her students. They would take FR with them on vacations and trips, taking photos of her along the way. At one time, FR had her own blog chronicling her travels — and, boy, did she ever travel! I was visiting Zia when I found FR tucked in my bag’s pocket. I couldn’t resist “using” her and surprising Ruth, at the same time. Worked like a charm!”
          I hope this clears things for you, Irmi. Have a good week! 🙂

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    • You are so right. You could feed me tennis shoes alla cacciatore and I’d be asking for second helpings. Love your idea of tossing red capsicums and leeks into the pot. Both bring a lot of flavor to a dish. I just may borrow this … 🙂

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  16. Great, great dish, John! Your rabbit looks and sounds delicious! Stefano loves rabbit. It is very popular in his hometown but unfortunately it is impossible to find locally where I live. I guess I will have to keep trying and hoping! 😉

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    • Thanks, Francesca. Rabbit wasn’t easy to find here until about 2 years ago. Now it is very easy to find and I’ve just learned that it is available at some Whole Foods stores. I think I’ll take out a 2nd mortgage and check it out. 🙂

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    • Oh, your idea of a game-filled pie sounds so very good! Perfect for a cold winter’s day. I do hope you’l try my family’s recipe and enjoy it. There’s nothing like a kitchen filled with the aroma of a braise with rosemary, wine and garlic bubbling away. 🙂

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    • Thanks, Gretchen. Raising rabbits for my own table would be tough for me to accomplish. I could raise and sell them. Just couldn’t do the “harvesting”. i doubt that i could dress a rabbit now even though I did it as a boy. I do know where our meat comes from. I just don’t need to play an active role in the process. I paid my dues. 🙂 On the other hand, if you do go into the rabbit business, I’ll be among your first customers.

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  17. I would like to try rabbit sometime, and your method of cooking it sounds perfectly delicious to me. I enjoyed your memories of your Dad’s love of hunting, whether successful or not. I suspect the allure may have been getting out in the fresh air with some friends more so than bringing home dinner!

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    • Thanks, Mar. It is hard to mess up when you braise a dish in rosemary, garlic, and wine. The scent alone is unbelievably enticing. I’ve said elsewhere that you could braise tennis shoes in this combo and I’d ask for second helpings. It really is a delicious way to prepare rabbit … or chicken … or pork chops … or tennis shoes. 😉

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  18. We had rabbit numerous times growing up, sometimes from hunting sometimes from the rabbit cage out by the barn. We only ever had it one way though — fried — which is probably why I liked it so much. I did have to chuckle when I saw your recipe included a single 3 pound rabbit … ours were far skinnier, I can’t imagine them being more than a pound each dressed out (more bone than meat really). I’ll have to see about trying it another way other than fried, though I will miss the white country gravy that went with it, which is probably just as well.

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    • I must admit, Judy, that a number of commenters have mentioned ways to prepare rabbit. You are the only one to mention frying it and does that ever sound good. Even better when served with country gravy! This is a dish I best not attempt. I know I’d be hooked and I’ve already got a pasta addiction to deal with. 🙂

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    • How I would love to get rabbit at the farmers markets here! It would be like taking a time machine ride back to my youth, spending Saturday mornings with Grandpa at Detroit’s Easter Market. Very often we came home with a pair of dressed rabbits. I remember your NYD post, Michelle. You cook a mean rabbit. 🙂

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  19. I’ve never eaten rabbit and never cooked it! I do however, have a very good butcher within walking distance of my house and he sells rabbit. I’ve always been interested in how it’s cooked. I agree long and slow is the best way to go as I’ve heard the meat is very lean. I don’t know if you ever saw the show, ‘Two Fat Ladies’? I loved that show and several times I saw them cooking with rabbits which I found fascinating xx

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    • Yes, Charlie, it is incredibly lean. In fact, in the days of mountain men in the Old West, these guys were practically hermits and were snowed-in for all of winter. The only food readily available to them was rabbit. Their chances of getting other game were pretty slim. One thing they needed to stock before the snows hit was fat, be it lard, bacon, or whatever. If their diet was too heavily dependent upon rabbit, they could develop “rabbit starvation“. It’s from a diet too high in protein with very little fat. As if they didn’t have it hard enough. They had to worry that the only fresh meat they could get could kill them.

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  20. I’ve never tried rabbit – either tasting or cooking – but it’s good to know it’s not fatty & to cook it at a lower temperature.

    I have a double standard when it comes to meat. I have no trouble with cow or elk or chicken, but if an animal is “cute”, I can’t do it. It makes no sense, I know. The last time I made cornish game hens (and it was the *last* time), I found I couldn’t eat them because they looked so small and helpless.

    However, you just never know about life and if I’m ever going to prepare rabbit, I shall refer to your recipe. 🙂

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    • You’re certainly not alone, Ruth. I’ve a sibling who feels very much like you do. This is such a great way to prepare meat, though. You can use the method to cook chicken thighs and you’d find it very satisfying. Don’t forget Mom’s cacciatore, too. That’s another great dish. It’s the aroma of rosemary, garlic, and wine. I just cannot resist it. 🙂

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    • This has been such a great post, Celi. I’ve learned of so many great ways to prepare rabbit, from fried with country gravy to bacon wrapped. Much to the chagrin of the Mid-west rabbit population, I intend to try them all. Yours will be one of the first. How can i resist bacon and rabbit? We will be talking about this. 🙂

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  21. It’s so true that as children we do things without thinking it over while as adults it’s harder to butcher an animal without thinking it over twice. My father was also a hunter and I easily got involved into his activity.
    I’m liking rabbit more and more and I have to say that yours looks so perfectly coloured and juicy that I wish I had some in my fridge for tonight 🙂

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    • Thank you for the kindly words. Yes, I can’t even watch them being “processed” prior to getting dressed. I sometimes look back at those times and wonder how I could do it. If you do cook a rabbit, just remember low and slow. You’ll be rewarded with a great meal. 🙂

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  22. I haven’t had rabbit since I left Louisiana 40 years ago. My uncles were hunters and I had one uncle that raised rabbits for food. Right before we left, he gave me two and I smothered them in a fatty creamy sauce. I wish I had had your recipe. It’s not just healthier, but looks a whole lot tastier as well. I know what I’ll be making if I ever can get my hands on rabbit again. Great recipe John!

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    • Thanks, MJ. Your words are music to my ears and will be to Zia’s, too. For years, I tried to convince Mom and Zia that they were far better cooks than they thought of themselves. Statements like yours are a validation of their skills — and proof of what I’d been saying all along. We mustn’t forget that last part. I was right! 😀

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  23. I haven’t had rabbit since I took one of La Tavola Marche’s online classes. This looks really wonderful, John – as does your mother’s cacciatore. Thanks!

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    • You’re very welcome, David. I’m glad that you enjoyed both. I get a kick out of seeing similarities between La Tavola Marche recipes and those of my family. Mom’s family, the Bartolinis, were from Marche but Mom & Zia were born here. Seeing similar methods is a validation of their cooking skills, something I’ve been saying for years. 🙂

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    • Happy New Year to you, too, my friend.
      Now that was a nice friend to have and I know my childhood friends said much the same about my Mom. As for this recipe, you could very easily use the method to cook chicken, too. You’ll find the aroma intoxicating. Enjoy your week!

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  24. We used to eat rabbit quite often when I lived at home. My dad was a hunter too and you know it was either venison, muskrat, fish or the occasional rabbit that hit the cooking vessel at home. I love how tender and delicious your dish looks with simple ingredients. I don’t think I can find rabbit in Asia… heck as a matter of fact, I have never seen any wild animals except snakes, wild boar and buffalo kind of animal. Yep, no kidding a wild boar was sited just outside our local grocery store on the HK island. I can’t believe why wasn’t thing in someones wok or hot pot. LOL Wishing you a super weekend.

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    • Buona sera, BAM! I agree. A wild boar is an awful lot of meat to let wander about. Your story reminds me of Dad, the Great Hunter. Shortly after he and Mom moved to their retirement home next to Zia’s current home, a large buck entered the woods at the back of their property. It was deer season and Dad hurried and got his gun. The buck stayed put, munching on fallen apples. It looked up at Dad just as he took aim. Dad put the gun down and never again fired a shot. He just couldn’t “kill such a beautiful animal.” We kidded him about it but, I must admit, we were all rather proud of him. 🙂

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  25. Wow Rabbit has been a very popular post John!!. Rabbit can be so bad if cooked incorrectly and so lovely if coked just right. i must admit it is not something i cook at home and i don’t know why really. i have cooked it in restaurants and the occasional road kill presentations whilst living in England out in the country ( don’t tell anyone) but I love this version of yours. It has great simple flavours , rosemary would be very nice with rabbit.

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    • Believe me, Tania, I’m all too familiar with poorly cooked rabbit. Ewwww! This braise is used for a number of meats by my family. Pork chops and chicken immediately come to mind. It is, however, particularly well-suited for rabbit. The meat responds very well to a low and slow method and rosemary makes the best air freshener. (BTW, your secret is safe with me. 🙂 )

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    • That’s wonderful, Michelle! I think you’ll find that the aroma of the rabbit braising in a bath of wine, garlic, and rosemary will fill your kitchen. It’s intoxicating. I do hope you’ll enjoy the dish. Buon appetito!

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  26. I have great foodie memories of my grandmother’s rabbit “stew” which these days would be termed casserole or braise, on their farm the meal had double benefit of reducing the rabbit population and cheaply feeding the family and visitors which could sometimes have matched the bunnies in numbers. I tried cooking it myself many years later and may as well have attempted to eat the baking tray, the meat was so tough. Most recently I’ve eaten rabbit in pie, and it was wonderful.

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    • Yeah, I served a rabbit like yours once — and only once, thankfully. That was truly bad and.after that, things couldn’t help but go up. I must admit, though, that rabbit in a pie sounds really good. I think I’ll let someone prepare it for me first. 🙂

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