Honey? Mustard!

The year’s last visit with Zia went very well, though I doubt I’ll ever drive North again when there’s a Polar Vortex rolling South. Once there, we cooked up a storm and 4 of those dishes will make their way on to this blog over the next few weeks. My Cousin, also, came up for a few days and he and Max were off roaming the countryside. With deer season just starting, however, the sound of distant rifle fire kept them both closer to home than normal. I do think he minded more than the dog. Max just wants to be at my Cousin’s side, no matter where that happens to be. Me jealous? Nah! It’s good to “pass the baton” every now and again, giving Zia and me time to make our pasta in peace.

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Honey Mustard 3

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With November now behind us, Christmas will be here before we know it. Today’s recipe is a perennial favorite of my Christmas gift baskets. (They’re bags actually because I can never find gift baskets.) But I’m getting ahead of myself.

Some 3 years ago, I began making ketchup following a recipe on Tanya’s fantastic blog, Chica Andaluza. About the same time, I made Guinness-based whole grain mustard from a recipe I found on Mandy’s wonderful blog, The Complete Cookbook. I honestly cannot recall which came first, the Chica or the keg, but that Christmas my friends and family got a jar of each in their “baskets” — well, almost.

I’ve friends and family members who follow gluten and alcohol-free diets. A mustard made with Guinness just wouldn’t do and so began my experiments with making honey mustard. Today’s recipe is the latest incarnation and is easy to prepare. It’s easily modified if you’d prefer it more or less spicy (see Notes), or, if there’s a particular flavoring you’d wish to include. Before we get to the recipe, however, there are a few things you need to know.

Though there are over 3 dozen types of mustard seeds, yellow and black/brown seeds are most readily available in these parts. Of the 2, yellow mustard seeds have the more mild flavoring. Keep this in mind when you prepare mustard at home. The hotter the mustard, the more brown/black seeds you’ll need to add to the mix. No matter which type of mustard seed you use, though, all will become milder if exposed to heat. That’s why today’s recipe is not processed in a boiling water bath for canning purposes. Just remember to keep it cold if you want it hot. Be advised, too, that this recipe also relies on oil as an ingredient. Canning when oil is being used is, at best, a risky endeavor. Be sure to check with a far more authoritative source than this blog before attempting to preserve this recipe’s mustard.

Because this mustard is not processed, it must be kept refrigerated at all times. Be sure, also, to use jars, lids, and utensils that have been cleaned and, when possible, sterilized before use. The object is to reduce as much as possible the risk of contamination. Do so and your mustard will last for 6 months in your fridge. In fact, I just finished the last of a batch I made for Christmas last year.

Mustard seeds are surprisingly tough little devils. Soaking them before use softens their husks, making them easier to grind. A couple of years ago, in my rush to get the gift baskets made, I ruined my food processor and then broke a part on my blender when I tried to grind mustard seeds that weren’t fully soaked. A word to the wise …

Though I prefer my mustard to be on the grainy side, you can make your mustard as smooth as you like. Be sure to keep an eye on your blender or food processor, however, if you’re making super-smooth mustard. Some models may overheat (see above) and you should give it a rest if the machine’s body feels too warm to the touch.

Lastly, once prepared, stick your mustard in the fridge and forget about it for at least 2 weeks before using, though I wait a full month. This is to allow the flavors to blend and the mustard to mellow. Taste it beforehand and you’re sure to be surprised by its bitterness.

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Honey Mustard 2*     *     *

Honey Mustard Recipe

yield: approx 7¾ cups (1830 ml)

Ingredients

  • 200 g black mustard seeds
  • 250 g yellow mustard seeds
  • 1 cup cider vinegar
  • 1 cup tarragon vinegar — leaves, if any, removed (See Notes)
  • 3/4 to 1 cup honey
  • 6 cloves garlic – roughly chopped
  • 1/3 cup kosher salt
  • 1/4 cup grated ginger
  • 1/8 tsp ground cloves
  • 15 tbsp olive oil

Directions

  1. Place mustard seeds and vinegar into a large container, cover, and set aside at least 8 hours or overnight — the longer the better. If need be, add more vinegar or water by the quarter cupful, to make sure none of the seeds remain dry.
  2. Place the now-soaked seeds, along with all the remaining ingredients, into the bowl of a food processor or blender.
  3. Process/grind the ingredients until fully combined and the mustard is the consistency you prefer. Remember to check the machine’s housing for signs of over-heating.
  4. When ground to your liking, place the mustard in clean, sterilized jars and refrigerate at least 2 weeks before using.

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Honey Mustard 1*     *     *

Notes

This recipe will yield a relatively mild mustard. For a spicier condiment, go to a well-stocked Asian market and look for Chinese mustard seeds. These are a little bit darker and smaller than our “normal” yellow seeds but do they ever pack a punch and will definitely add some heat to your condiment.

If it’s too late to add more brown/black or Chinese mustard seeds, you can make your mustard spicier by adding red pepper flakes, cayenne pepper powder, or your preferred hot sauce.

Avoid using fresh herbs and/or fresh chilies when making this mustard. They could be a source for contamination and the mustard’s shelf-life could be affected.

If you cannot find tarragon vinegar, feel free to substitute whatever type of vinegar you prefer, flavored or not.

You can use this mustard to easily make a mustard dipping sauce. Just add a few tbsp of mustard to about twice as much mayo — more or less to taste — and stir well. Season with salt, add as much honey as you prefer, and, if you like your dipping sauce spicy, add a touch of cayenne pepper or hot sauce. Refrigerate until ready for use.

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It’s déjà vu all over again …

Baccalà PreviewThose who have followed this blog for some time know that many Italians follow the custom of serving seafood for their primary meal on Christmas Eve. To that end. I’ve shared a number of seafood recipes that family members have served for that special meal. Today’s look back features a recipe that was prepared every year “Upstairs”, in Zia’s home. Stewed in a rich tomato sauce, the aroma of salted cod, baccalà, being served was sure to draw me to their table like a moth to a flame. You can learn all about the preparation of baccalà simply by clicking HERE.

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Coming soon to a monitor near you …

Agnolotti del Plin Preview Agnolotti del Plin 

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131 thoughts on “Honey? Mustard!

    • My pleasure, Mandy. I still make the Guinness mustard. I just don’t give it away. It’s just as well, I guess. With none to give a way, I make less, meaning more Guinness in the fridge for me to drink. 🙂

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    • Hope you like it. The best part of this is that you can modify it any way you like. You’ll soon have a mustard that’s perfect for your tastes. If you’re at all like me, a roast ham won’t be far behind. 🙂

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  1. This looks excellent, John. And, what a great savoury gift to make for Christmas. I may experiment a little – substituting the vinegars for wine vinegar + my homemade verjus, though I do like the tarragon-mustard combination. Hmm… maybe more than one experiment is in order. Thanks for the lovely ideas you’ve sparked!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks. By all means experiment with the recipe. being it’s not being preserved, there’s no worries about acid or oil content and you can pretty much do as you please. I cut the ingredient amounts, though, when I experiment otherwise I’d be swimming in mustard after 2 tests. 🙂

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  2. Morning John and thanks for the tutorial on home made mustard. Looking at the ingredients I see a generous amount of ginger which will also add lots of warmth. I have a wall mounted grinder and can get spices from dry to a good fine grind. I think it’s my favourite kitchen implement

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    • Hello, Claire. So good to see you. That grinder sounds like a real treasure. I’m always on the lookout for something similar when I go to antique and second-hand stores in rural Michigan. I may get lucky one day and find one.

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  3. Hi John and thank you for the lovely mention – how lovely that your gifts included things made from our blogs 🙂 I bought a jar of mustard the other week when I made the chicken with mustard and cider, but now I know that when we get to the bottom of the jar, or a few weeks before so that it’s ready, I’m going to make my own! Stay warm, the temperatures are dropping in England but I know you’ve got it much worse 😦

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    • Hey, Tania! I had to mention your tomato sauce. My friends all love it and it would be the favorite thing in the gift bags but I, also, include some flavored liquor(s). In my crowd, booze wins any favoritism contest, hands down. 🙂

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  4. How nice it is to wake up with Chicago John! First, you set up that brilliant chica-or-keg pun to stir up my ears. Then my eyes widen and my papillae waltz as I read the ingredient list: garlic? ginger?? cloves??? “Never mind the roast, dear, just hand me the mustard and a spoon.”

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    • Ding, ding, ding! You are the only person to have caught that — or brave enough to ‘fess up. I knew you’d see it.
      Don’t pass on the roast. Grab some bread, slather on the mustard and add a couple of slices. I do it all the time. There’s nothing like a good sandwich in my book and a fine mustard goes a long way to making it happen.

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  5. What a fantastic present for your friends!
    I can’t speak with any authority on mustard preservation, but I believe it can last for years. I recently discovered a jar of my favourite mustard, Moutarde de Meaux, hidden away at the back of a cupboard and I’m certain it’s at least 8 years old! This mustard isn’t canned – it comes in an earthenware jar with a plastic stopper. Once opened it looked and smelled perfect and possibly tastes better with age. One would imagine that most of the preserving is done by the vinegar – I’ll have to consult McGee to see if mustard seed itself has any preservation properties…
    The Romans definitely ate mustard and are probably responsible for its spread to Northern Europe, but it predates Rome and was popular with the Ancient Greeks and Egyptians 😉

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    • You’re probably right about mustard’s shelf-life, MD, but I’m leery of posting that something will last for years. I do know that I’ve kept a jar of this stuff for a year and it was fine, though it was in the fridge the entire time. Thanks for the history lesson. I probably should have checked into it myself but, knowing me, my research would have ended with the Romans. There is such a thing as too much information, after all. 😀

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  6. A welcome notice from WP- after all this time! A blog post from the Bartoloni Kitchens is up. Hooray.
    I used to have a little mustard seed in a clear glass bead necklace.
    Sharing your post will be easy today, John. And what a smart Cousin to be wary of eager hunters.
    Thanks for your visits snd comments on my blog. I sent a reply to your Thanksgiving greetings email but perhaps it got lost in the pile.
    Your preparing for Christmas gift baskets prods me to think of my own neglected preparations for the day.

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    • It is good to be back, Ruth, thank you. With Winter setting in, there’s little chance of me traveling anywhere, so, I’ll be around for a while. 🙂
      Surprisingly, I’m way ahead of the game, as far as the gift bags are concerned. In fact, I may have overdone it. I took inventory last weekend and had forgotten about some of the things I had canned at Summer’s end. I may need to switch out the bags for re-enforced boxes. 🙂

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  7. This was an interesting post, I like reading about other people’s experiments with making our basic ingredients. Not that your mustard is basic in any way but I hope you know what I mean. I have not used fresh chilli but noted your point that it could contaminate the mustard. As always John your posts are always so well researched and tested. Max by all accounts had a great time too.

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    • Thanks, Maria. When I write recipes, I keep in mind the young cooks in my family. For something like mustard, which will be around longer than a few days, I want them to be aware that seemingly innocent additives can really affect things. Better to be safe than sorry.

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  8. John, as you might remember, I am afraid of canning. Never did it, and have resisted the idea for decades… I am in awe of everything you do, and a little jealous of the recipients of your “bags” ; homemade honey mustard, home made catchup, you are THE MAN!

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    • Thank you, Glenda. I’ve waited to share this recipe because I never wanted to spoil their Christmas surprise. Now, though, it’s a given that they’ll be getting mustard and ketchup every year. The rest of the bag, though, is still secret. I will say that you and Rick Stein played a role for one of the items. Mum’s the word. 😉

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  9. While dining on Thanksgiving leftovers, my family got into a “conversation” of the virtues of mayo versus miracle whip…which, of course, led to mustard. A peek at the ingredients (on the back of the jar) led to, “we could make our own”! And then, YOU show up with a recipe…Thank you! You have delighted my 25 year old, mustard connoisseur son and my love of sharing food gifts for Christmas. 🙂

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    • Thanks, Nancy. Glad to be of help. 🙂
      The good thing about making your own mustard is that you can change it as much as you like without worrying about messing up the acidity for canning. I hope you and your connoisseur have fun experimenting. Good luck.

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    • You;ll be amazed, Ingrid, at how simple it is o do, especially without having to process it in a hot water bath. It’s great, too, that you can easily modify the recipe to suit your own tastes. Just be sure to let it sit for at least 2 weeks before using. It really will mellow.

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  10. Glad you had a great trip up north! Polar vortex and everything. 😉 I’m really beginning to dislike the polar vortex! Anyway, great mustard. I’ve made a few varieties, never honey mustard though. So I’ll have to try yours! Lovely gift idea, too. thanks.

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    • Hey, John. I’m doing my best to refrain from revealing my true feelings about the upcoming Winter for fear that The Fates may hear. Who needs that?
      Mustard is one of those things that once I made it, I stopped buying it altogether. Homemade is so much better and really quite easy to do. And, for me, filling a gift bag is so much better than entering a mall during the next few weeks. 🙂

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  11. Hi John, As you know…canning is not my thing, so this is soo perfect for me to make! I really like this idea for Christmas gifting and hostess giving!
    How nice that you and your Aunt can get together and cook. Those are very special and precious moments for both of you to share.

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    • You’re right on all counts, Linda. Any mustard, whether this recipe or others, is pretty simple to make, especially with canning not possible. People really do enjoy receiving a jar as a gift, too. I really do enjoy my visits spent with Zia. This time, I was able to surprise her with a couple new dishes. More about them in future posts Stay tuned … 🙂

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  12. Another great post, John, and very inspiring as well. I’ve thought about making my own mustard for ages, but have never actually done it. It sounds so easy and will probably be a lot better than the mediocre store-bought stuff I can find. Think I will start with a more straightforward mustard.

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    • Thanks, Stefan. Once you make your first mustard, you’ll never buy it again. It is so ridiculously easy to prepare and the ingredients are common and easy to find. It’s certainly no problem changing the flavoring, which makes me eager to see what you’re going to make. It’ll be good, that’s for sure.

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  13. Oh, I got so excited when I saw your post in my inbox. First of all, it’s just nice to see you posting again but secondly, I love mustard! All kinds and honey mustard is even better. I never thought about making my own, I usually look for this fancy ones with French names 🙂
    It doesn’t seem very hard at all, so I will make this for myself.
    My husband and I went to dinner for our anniversary a couple of weeks ago to our favourite restaurant, an American farm to table kind of place. I love it, and I ordered a chicken dish that came with spatzle in a mustard sauce. OMG, that mustard sauce. I am trying to recreate it. Maybe I can use this?
    Can’t wait to see more of your recipes with Zia. You guys always have the best time. You are a good nephew.

    Nazneen

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    • Thanks for the warm welcome, Nazneen. It’s good to be back.
      I think you’ll be surprised once you make your first batch of mustard.It is so very easy to make. Once you’ve soaked the seeds, all that’s left is to put the ingredients in the machine and let it go. In a few minutes, you’ll have all the mustard you want. The only “difficulty” is that it has to mellow before you really know what it tastes like. By then, it’s pretty late to be adding more mustard seeds. Still, you can add more honey or hot sauce/cayenne pepper to get it closer to what you want. Easy-peasy. Looking forward to hearing about your efforts. Good luck!
      Yes, we do enjoy our time together but, this time, I was able to surprise her with a couple dishes, too. Now that was fun! 🙂

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  14. Another awesome recipe. Hubby and I are huge mustard fans and have been known to have A LOT of jars of different varieties in the fridge. I recently began experimenting with homemade versions and will add this to my list to try.

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    • Oh, yeah. If you’re mustard fans, then you really should be making your own. This recipe makes a large batch so you may want to cut the ingredient amounts until you find the right mix for your tastes. It’s easy enough to modify, though, and you’ll be surprised how simple it is to make. Soak the seeds, gather the ingredients, and grind. It doesn’t get much easier. Good luck!

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  15. Every Christmas I buy a ham which (not being Italian) I glaze and bake and serve on Christmas Eve as a special family dinner. I always like to have a honey mustard to serve with the ham but have never made my own. I wonder if I could pull this off this Christmas! What a timely recipe. And as for all those gun shots – I’m so glad I’m not a deer! xx

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    • I’ve seen photos on your blog, Charlie, of the hams you’ve baked and they look fantastic! The thing about this recipe is that if you wait a few weeks and still want to adjust the flavor, you can just so long as you don’t add more mustard seeds. Those will make it more bitter and you’ll have to wait a few more weeks for the flavor to mellow again. Instead, add more honey for sweetness and/or your favorite hot sauce for heat. Give it a good stir and you’re set to go. 🙂

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    • Thank you, Margot. As someone mentioned earlier, too often it’s jam, jam, jam as gifts. Few hand out condiments — except me. 🙂 You’re right, too, about the dipping sauce. I really enjoy it with chicken. Yum!

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  16. I think this honey mustard would be amazing. I have never thought to make mustard before but this is an intriguing and definitely full flavoured version. One to file for the weekend, before Christmas. Isn’t it wonderful to get together with family and cook, sharing special times and creating fabulous dishes + memories. P.S. your baccala dish looks wonderful too 😀

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    • You’ll be surprised at how simple mustard it to make and how easy it is to change the recipe to suit your tastes. i was left wondering why I hadn’t tried it before.
      I am very lucky to have my Zia to visit and spend time with in the kitchen. She is the “recipe vault” of most of my family’s recipes and I’ve learned so much from her. Some recipes, like that baccalà, haven’t been prepared in ages. We made it together so that I could post the recipe here. That was a wonderful evening. 🙂

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  17. Wonderful inspiration. In coming years I will be eschewing bought Christmas gifts (actually any occasion gifts) for made. The mustard and ketchup (tomato sauce in Australia) will be wonderful to include in my repertoire 🙂

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    • Thanks, EllaDee. The giftees enjoy these gifts and I enjoy making them. None are hard to do, and making them keeps me out of the crowded stores during the holidays. By the way, I, also, include a jar of green tomato relish. 🙂

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  18. Thanks for the primer on making your own mustard, John. Who knew mustard could be so tough, literally! I’m glad you had a good time with Zia this trip and were able to get lots of pasta made without any distractions. 🙂

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  19. Can’t wait for the agnolotti recipe. 🙂 Just made the porcini/goat cheese/leek ravs ~ made me swoon. Thought of you while shopping at the Italian store. Lots of tempting Bartolini products on the shelves. From Italy. Any connection? Toni

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    • I am so glad to read that you enjoyed the ravioli, Toni. I’ve been experimenting with a number of fillings but that one remains a favorite. It’s the goat cheese. I love it!
      I know of the Bartolini products. In fact, a blogging friend sent me some. To my knowledge, we are not related, though I do get emails asking about this or that of my “products”, on occasion. 🙂

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    • Go for it, Ruth. It is far easier than you have imagined. Do keep in mind that it will take weeks to mellow. It is mighty bitter before that. Once you’ve waited, if you do not like it, you can adjust it. Add some honey, maybe some hot sauce or cayenne. Just don’t add more mustard seeds because they’ll take more weeks to mellow. I suggest making small batches — halve or quarter the ingredient amounts — until you find the recipe that you like best. As a mustard lover, I bet your favorite husband will thoroughly enjoy your experiments. Good luck!

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    • As I’ve told others, Didi, once you make it, you will be surprised how easy it is. Make a small batch, at first, and adjust the seasonings for the 2nd batch. Just be sure to wait at least 2 weeks before tasting. It really is bitter when first made. Good luck!

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  20. I have to admit that I’m not a big fan of most mustards, but I do love a good honey mustard dressing. After looking through your recipe, I do believe that this is a mustard that might just change my mind about mustards. Sweet and made from scratch with two types of mustard seeds? Great recipe John! Glad you had a nice trip north, but I bet it was COLD!

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    • Thanks, MJ. Before I forget. I’ve learned of a spice shop nearby that deals primarily with chilies. I cannot wait to investigate. 🙂
      Being mustard isn’t cooked or even heated, you can adjust the flavors later in the game. After you’ve waited a few weeks, Make a small amount of dipping sauce. if you don’t like the result, it’s too late to add more seeds — they’d be bitter — but you can add honey or hot sauce/chili pepper to the mustard to get it where you like. The recipe is very forgiving. Good luck. I can’t wait to hear about your mustard. 🙂

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  21. Almost unfair to comment after all the very competents ere me – well, none of you would have liked all those lightning strikes during the past fortnight knocking out normal life !!! Love, love, love the mustard . . . a recipe I shall actually follow ere we say ‘Merry Christmas’ !

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    • Lightening strikes? That doesn’t sound good at all, Eha. I hope you and your property didn’t suffer any damage — that goes for power outages, too. In warm weather, an outage can mean plenty of spoilt food. I hope you’ve no recent firsthand knowledge of that.

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      • Every day for seven past, ostensibly the worst today and at least another three days. Phone exchange: direct hit . . . got my computer back yesterday ’cause am under a special scheme and they patched me in somewhere else but still no phones! All Christmas plans shot for most of us . . . power outages: an everyday affair at the moment 😦 !!! BUT the fear of bushfires has decreased because of daily rain!! AND the mustard IS lovely John!!!!

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        • That doesn’t sound good at all, Eha. Daily power outages? This cannot be good. So sad that Christmas plans have already been ruined. Glad that the brushfire threat has lessened and at least you’ve your computer back. I know it isn’t much, in the grand scheme of things, but a PC does provide some distraction from the storms overhead. I hope the storms clear and the damage is repaired far sooner than expected. Good luck.

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  22. Oh yes, Christmas Eve at Grandma Levia DiNardi’s house was always pasta and seafood. She made the Pasta Puttanesca sauce with olives and tuna. She also made Aglio Olio. Looking forward to those latest recipes from you and Zia.
    P.S. If you’re so inclined, say a little prayer for my Max (dog). He’s not well.

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    • Now that sounds like a feast suitable for the occasion! How you all must have enjoyed that meal — and the company, of course. That sounds wonderful.
      So sorry to read that your Max isn’t well, Lori. We are so accustomed to our companions so bright and energetic that it’s quite hard to see them in poor health. I hope and pray he recovers fully.

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  23. “The Chica or the keg”…I’m still chuckling over that line! 😀 Your mustard looks fabulous and if I were on your list I’d be thrilled to get some bagged, tagged, basketed or just handed to me! This year I am unable to make my usual gifts of food due to work deadlines…though I have made some pots! Am missing that process. So glad you and Zia had a lovely time together and a lovely visit, and that her birthday was extra special. Plus your gift was truly something great to give “the person who has everything!” I’ll remember that.

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    • Hello, Betsy. You’ve been missed but it’s good to know that you’re off doing something that you love, like pot-making. From what I’ve seen, your time is being anything but wasted. I’ve really enjoyed seeing your work.
      My gift to Zia is the talk of the family. No one understood it until I explained how Celi was trying to find ways to pay for Sheila’s upkeep. I was more than happy to oblige. My gift brought a smile to Zia’s face and helped keep a roof over Sheila’s head. A two-fer!!! 😀

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  24. Oh I love honey mustard but it’s another one of those things that I’ve never thought to make. You’ve come up with a few of those where I’ve said to myself “you can actually make that at home?”. I love all of your warnings and tips and I’m glad this is something that I can just keep in the fridge rather than canning (my mother put the fear of God in me to never go near her pressure cooker and an aunt used to tell me horrible tales of food poisoning from canned goods). I wonder why though that oil and canning don’t mix. That’s an interesting tidbit that has me curious.
    Terrific gift idea though and I’m sure it’s appreciated by the recipients.
    (You really don’t mind Max spending quality time with your cousin? Not even a little bit?)

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    • Some of these homemade items are eye opening. I never would have dreamt that mustard wold be so easy to make. If you try it, you’ll see. And the mustard is so much better than anything you might buy. I know what you mean about canning, My freezer has at least a half-dozen jars of canned goods that I’m just not too sure whether the processed correctly. So, into the freezer they go until I need more jam, apple sauce, or whatever.
      No, I do not mind in the slightest that Max is enamored with my cousin. He can take Max over terrain that I can no longer cross, so, Max gets a great deal of exercise. THe more exercise he gets during the day, the more peaceful a night we all share. 🙂

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    • Thanks you for your kind words. My friends and I are at a point in our lives where we’ve all that we really need and, if we want something, we go get it. They all like receiving gifts from my kitchen and I certainly like preparing them and giving them. It works out rather nicely. 🙂

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  25. That reminds me that I too have a batch of home made mustard in the fridge; we’re still trying to get through some duplication condiments I had at the cottage. Adding honey sounds fantastic John and I bet it’s delicious on a frank or sausage. What a lovely Christmas gift.

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    • Thank you, Eva. It’s nice to keep some things at a cottage — until end of season. Then you fridge back at home begins to look a bit strange, with doubles of condiments and the like. You’re right about his mustard going well with burgers and dogs. I really enjoy it with leftover baked ham slices in a sandwich. It’s the best! 🙂

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    • Yes, no alcohol, Mimi. Thank heavens I’ve avoided that one!
      I use a Marcato “Atlas 150” pasta machine. I chose this one because the cutting rollers can be detached and another used in their place. They’ve even got a motor that you can attach to it if you’re tired of hand cranking the rollers. The machine and its attachments are readily available and the prices are consistent. I’ve, also, got the pasta roller attachment for my stand mixer. I use them to roll out my dough and the Atlas to cut them into noodles, if I don’t cut them by hand. Hope this helps, Mimi. Have a good week.

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  26. Holy mustard seeds, Batman! I had no idea those little babies could wreak havoc on some of my favourite kitchen appliances. I’m a big fan of whole seed mustard and was immediately drawn to your post. Thank you as always for the comprehensive instructions, and especially your concern for sharing food safety knowledge. I bet your mustard tastes wonderful!

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    • Believe me, Mar, I had no idea either and it was quite a shock. I had just started making my Christmas gift baskets and in 5 minute I lost both blender and food processor. Thankfully, Amazon carried the part I needed for my blender and after sacrificing an arm to pay for next day shipping, I fixed the blender and got back to work. Later, I purchased a heavy-duty food processor and I’ve had no problems since. Fingers crossed. 🙂

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    • Hey, Lisa! Hope all’s well with you. Yes, you really should give this a try. It’s a much “cleaner” product and you can adjust the seasonings until you get a mustard just the way you like it. And it couldn’t be easier to make. 🙂
      In case we don’t “see” each other, wishing you and yours a most memorable Christmas and a New Year filled with every happiness.

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  27. Honey mustard is a fan favorite in our house. Pretzels, veggies, pitas are all dipped in it. It’s a great way to get the kids to eat veggies. I’ve never made my own honey mustard version. I did a raspberry jalapeño mustard over the summer. I still have some frozen for this winter, but no honey mustard. That has to change!

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    • I love it, too, Kristy, and with a fresh batch in the fridge, I’ve been putting mustard on or in everything. Today’s grilled cheese sandwich for lunch included a thick dab of it. I cannot help myself. Your raspberry jalapeño mustard sounds great. Have you blogged it? I’m already thinking of next year’s gift baskets and that would make a great addition.

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      • I did blog it. Sometime over the summer. I can’t even remember when at this point. LOL. 😉 It was a quick recipe that I threw together. I have no doubt you could improve it even further.

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  28. Well, my sister took your ideas and ran with them. She’s created five different types of mustard, including a “beer mustard” made with Guiness that is astounding. I almost can’t stop thinking about it, it’s so good.

    John, I don’t think I’ll ever return to commercially-made mustard. Thank you so much for introducing me to this fabulous creation.

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    • So glad that you made and enjoyed the mustard, Ruth. I, too, made a Guinness-based mustard. In fact, it was the first one I tried. I switched to this one because some friends and family do not drink alcohol. Either way, though, like you, Ruth, I don’t buy mustard anymore.

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  29. Pingback: End of the Harvest Hot Pepper Relish (GF) | from the Bartolini kitchens

    • Thank you so much, Sabine. I never thought that I’d still be at it 6 years later but her I am! This blog has been a soure of happiness and has helped me to connect with my family’s history in ways I could’t possible have foreseen. It’s been a very rewarding experience.
      I hope 2017 brings you and yours much joy and good health.

      Liked by 1 person

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