Goat Slow-Cooked with Harissa & Borlotti Beans

harissa-braised-goat-4

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Hello there! When last we spoke, it was Christmas Eve and I announced my return to the wonderful world of Word Press. Well, that was the plan anyway. Shortly after posting, I met dear friends for dinner, during which I mentioned a “scratchy throat.” (Cue ominous music.)

Christmas morning I awoke with what would become the Mother of all Chest Colds. (It couldn’t possibly have been flu because I had received a flu vaccination last fall.) With Max playing nursemaid, I was sofa-bound for much of the next month. Even now, I’ve a mild case of the sniffles. Worse, this “thing” is making the rounds and a number of friends are similarly affected. Happy New Year!

But enough about me. Today’s recipe, like many to come, was written during my ever-so-lengthy “brief” hiatus last year. If and when I came upon a great recipe, I’d prepare it, record the recipe, and post its URL in a special file so that I could credit the author when the time came. What could possibly go wrong?

Earlier this week, I pulled up this recipe and looked for my file of recipe links. As you may have already guessed, the file was nowhere to be found, and my attempts to recover it from back-ups have, thus far, been unsuccessful. As such, we’ve little choice but to soldier on and I promise to come back and give credit for the original recipes when and if I find them.

I truly enjoy this dish and it has become part of my winter rotation of suppers. It is pure comfort food and just what’s needed when a Polar Vortex threatens. Truth be told, it’s for dinner tonight, although lamb is the protein but more about that later.

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harissa-braised-goat-1

Brown the goat

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Harissa-Braised Goat with Borlotti Beans Recipe

Ingredients

  • at least 4 tbsp Olio Santo, divided (see Notes)
  • 2 – 3 lbs (900 – 1300 g) goat cut into 1 to 2 inch pieces (See Notes, & Variations)
  • approx. 1/4 cup flour
  • 2 tbsp coriander seeds, toasted and ground (see Notes)
  • 2 tbsp cumin seeds, toasted and ground  (see Notes)
  • 1 large onion, sliced
  • 1 inch ginger, grated
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced or grated
  • 1 small can (14.5 oz, 400 g) diced tomatoes
  • 2 tbsp tomato paste
  • 3 tbsp harissa sauce — more or less to taste
  • 2 tbsp honey
  • zest and juice of 1 lemon — 1/2 preserved lemon, sliced, may be substituted (recipe follows)
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 2 sprigs rosemary
  • 1 cup dry white wine
  • 1 lb (450 g) fresh Borlotti/cranberry/Roman beans (see Notes)
  • salt and pepper

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for the Gremolata  (see Notes)

  • 2 anchovy fillets, finely chopped — anchovy paste may be substituted
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 3 tbsp fresh parsley, chopped
  • zest of 1 lemon

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harissa-braised-goat-2

Start of Braise

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Directions

  1. Heat 2 tbsp Olio Santo in a large frypan over med-high heat.
  2. Season the goat with salt and pepper.
  3. Use the flour to coat the goat pieces.
  4. Brown the goat pieces on all sides. Work in batches and it will take about 5 to 7 minutes per batch. Add more Olio Santo as needed. Remove and reserve the browned meat.
  5. Heat 2 more tbsp Olio Santo in the same pan and add the onions. Sauté until soft, about 8 minutes.
  6. Add the ginger and garlic, continue to sauté until fragrant, about 3 minutes.
  7. Meanwhile, add the tomatoes, tomato paste, harissa, honey, lemon juice & zest, rosemary, and bay leaf to the slow cooker. Stir to combine.
  8. Add the cooked onion mixture to the slow cooker when fully sautéed. Stir.
  9. Use the wine to deglaze the frypan. Add the liquid to the slow cooker when the pan is fully deglazed.
  10. Add the meat to the slow cooker and stir.
  11. Set slow cooker to LOW and cook for 4 hours.
  12. After 4 hours, add the beans and stir.
  13. Continue to cook on LOW for 4 more hours.
  14. Make the gremolata towards the end of the cooking process:
    • In a small bowl, combine the anchovies, garlic, parsley, and zest. Stir until fully combined.
  15. Serve immediately, garnished with the gremolata. A chunk of bread wouldn’t hurt.

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harissa-braised-goat-3

End of Braise

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Notes …

Olive oil may be substituted for Olio Santo. If preferred, add red pepper flakes to the pan when the onions are added.

Use 2 lbs of meat when boneless, and closer to 3 lbs when bone-in.

This recipe requires 8 hours on LOW to prepare. You can reduce the cooking time by setting your cooker to HIGH for all or part of the time. Just remember that 1 hour on HIGH equals 2 hours on LOW.

When using whole herb seeds, it’s best to toast them prior to grinding. I use a small frypan on the stove top, while others prefer to spread the seeds on a baking sheet before placing in the oven. Either way, if you intend to use the same utensil, place the larger seeds on the heat source before the smaller to prevent the small seeds from scorching. Here, I toasted the coriander seeds for a minute or so before adding the cumin. Once cooled, I ground them together and added the mixture to the recipe.

Although I used fresh beans, you can use canned or rehydrated beans. If using canned, be sure to rinse them before adding to the slow-cooker 2 hours before the dish is fully cooked. If using dried beans that you’ve pre-soaked, treat them as fresh, adding them to the pot 4 hours before completion..

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Variations …

Good quality goat is not available in all areas. Not to worry. You can substitute lamb and still enjoy a fantastic meal.

The gremolata recipe is one that I found in one of Mom’s recipe notepads. I prefer it because, unlike most others, it includes anchovies. If you prefer, you can omit the little fishies, or the gremolata altogether. if you do choose to leave out the gremolata, a bit of citrus zest — lime, orange, or lemon — makes a great garnish, as does a dollop of sour cream or Greek yogurt. The latter being particularly useful when you’ve added a bit too much harissa.

Although it is meant to be served as-is, I’ve found that a scoop of plain rice is a welcome addition, resulting in a very flavorful beans and rice dish.

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Preserved Lemons Recipe

Preserved lemons are believed to have originated in Pakistan and India, before making their way to the Middle East. Today they are an integral part of many Moroccan recipes. The lemons add a distinct citrus-y flavor to a dish, and some say that the flavor intensifies the longer it cooks in the pot. Although there are a variety of recipes, each using a number of spices, all are based upon the same 3 ingredients: salt, lemons, and lemon juice. I use the simplest of recipes so that I can better control the flavor of the final dish.

Here in the States, Meyer’s lemons are in season. It is said that these lemons are closest to those found in Morocco. Of course, if you cannot find Meyer lemons, any old lemon will work.

To begin, take 4, 5, or 6 (Meyer) lemons, depending upon the jar size, and scrub well. Place 1 tbsp of kosher salt into a clean jar with a tight-fitting lid. Remove no more than the tip from each end of the lemon. Beginning at one end, slice the lemon at least halfway down but no more than 3/4. Do not separate the halves. Turn the lemon and repeat the process, slicing it into quarters. Place a tbsp of kosher salt between the sections, covering the cut surfaces, before placing the lemon into the jar. Repeat the process with more lemons, stuffing the jar as best you can. When finished, add another tbsp of kosher salt on top. If there isn’t enough liquid to cover the lemons, add the juice of a fresh lemon to “top off” the jar. Cover the jar and place in a warm room, shaking daily, for one month. Use as the recipe requires.

Your preserved lemons will last indefinitely. The liquid can be replenished using fresh lemon juice, as required. The liquid can even be used in recipes, or, to help start your next batch of preserved lemons,

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It’s déjà vu all over again …

You may recall that in recent years, I’ve prepared honey mustard and ketchup at Christmas time, giving friends jars of the condiments as gifts, This year was no exception. Both are easy to make and so much better than anything that might be found on a grocer’s shelves. You can find the Honey Mustard recipe HERE, and the Ketchup recipe HERE.

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Coming soon to a monitor near you …

Slow-Cooker Mole Pork

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80 thoughts on “Goat Slow-Cooked with Harissa & Borlotti Beans

  1. So I can make this with Lamb too? Sounds divine and you know I have never preserved lemons – that is something I would love to do – I never have a lemon around when I want one and the shops are so far away! Great recipes – I am miserable that you were sick for that long! This hot and cold hot and cold weather is not helping! c

    Liked by 1 person

    • Well, whatever it was, it is making the rounds. Everyone comments on how it just won’t quit. Just this morning, the clerk at Max’s food store said she caught it on Thanksgiving and it lasted until New Year’s. I guess I should’t complain, eh?

      I went to the grocery and they had Meyer lemons.. I’ll make us both a pint and bring yours the next time we get together. It’s not like they’ll spoil in the meantime. 🙂

      Like

  2. John – I am not about to wait for winter to prepare this: fascinating spice presentation which seems to begin in India, travel to the Middle East and end up with a very piquant family gremolata in Italy ! Am trying to ‘taste’ it but can’t! Lamb it will have to be and I do not care that it is 40C outside !! With your preserved lemons there will be a time lapse: my beautiful Meyer lemon three will fruit for my birthday in six months . . . sincerely hoping meanwhile that the last tickle in your throat is soon past history so you can cook us the mole . . .

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Hi There John!! You know what, you could possibly have had the flu because the ‘damn thing’ mutates so quickly. But then again, if it was the flu, it shouldn’t have been so very severe after having had a flu shot… so NEVER MIND!!
    So sorry to hear that you’d been under-the-weather. Glad you’re up and about again!
    you know, at I wasn’t impressed by the title of the recipe… for some reason the idea of eating goat kind of gets to me… I don’t know why. I usually love trying all kinds of things… Great idea to have prepared it with lamb – it looks sooo delicious.
    (I’m still not back to posting … but I plan to be soon. And I am LOVING living here in St. Augustine, Florida!!! Esp. this winter.)

    Liked by 1 person

    • I kid about the flu shot, Cecile, although I didn’t experience the high fevers and nausea that I normally get when the flu calls. Whatever! It’s in the past now and the rest of my winter should be illness-free.
      This is really just as good with lamb, so, don’t worry about not wanting goat. It’s also one of the reasons I spent so many Saturday afternoons shelling beans that I had bought that morning at the farmers market. It’s only early February, so, I’m sure t make it again at least once before Old Man Winter leaves.
      So glad that you’re enjoying your new home. Don’t it make my brown eyes green? 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  4. It’s great to have you back and well! Next – two recipes for the price of one! How fantastic. I can get goat, so I will definitely be trying your recipe. I’m looking forward to the Slow-Cooker Mole Pork in due course.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, MD. After years of searching, I now have a selection of places where I can purchase goat. Even so, it’s great to know that lamb works so well with the spice mix. I’ll be interested in hearing your thoughts on the recipe, once you’ve tried it. I hear you’ve just posted a great recipe. I’ll be there in a little while. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Oh, no! Sorry you’ve been sick! Stinks, doesn’t it? But glad you’re on the mend, and really glad to see a LONG DELAYED new post from you. 🙂 Goat is great, isn’t it? Years (decades!) ago I lived in Texas, and used to travel to western Texas for business sometimes. Folks out there despised lamb — considered it far inferior to goat. And goat is really good, I must admit, although I remain really fond of lamb. Anyway, what a neat recipe! Meat! Spice! Beans! How can one go wrong? Good grub — thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, warn the villagers! I’m back!
      I wish I knew a place that I could go to sample goat that was properly grilled. I bet it’s wonderful. Until that time, Ill satisfy my ravings with this braise. I do enjoy it, John, and bet you and the Riffs will, too.

      Like

    • Happy new year! There have been some changes to our grocery landscape in recent years, Amanda, and I’ve noticed goat and some seafoods (octopus, cuttle fish etc.) are more prevalent. I am so enjoying this! Even so, this dish is equally good with lamb as its protein. The secret is the sauce. It’s fantastic!

      Like

  6. John, so good to hear you are on the mend again.
    Too hot on this side of the world for a slow cooked anything……unless I put it outside in the sun. Thank you for so much for all the wonderful food today.

    Keep well and best wishes for 2018.
    Elaine.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Happy New Year, Elaine, and thanks for the well-wishes!

      Oh, how I wish I could say that it’s hot outdoors, even in the shade. The forecast is for the worst weather of the season next week. Ugh!

      This, too, shall pass …

      Like

  7. John, I am so very sorry you have been sick for so long – major unfun. Hope you are well on your way to being 100% better now. What a magical comforting meal for when you are feeling a bit under the weather. I have been threatening for a while now to cook goat but alas have not got around to it yet. It is readily available in Kenya so on my next trip over, I promise, I will cook it for the first time, and hey, here is the perfect recipe for it. 😀
    Have a glorious and happy week. Hope Max is still being a good nursemaid. xo

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Mandy. I am doing much, much better now. Yes,Max was the ever-present nursemaid I’ve come to rely upon.
      This dish was my celebratory “‘I’m all better now!” meal. In another time, I would have sacrificed a goat. Today, I ate one. It all worked out fine — except for the goat.
      Hope you’re enjoying a wonderful weekend, Mandy. Give your fur-babies a long pet for me.

      Like

  8. Hi John, so sorry to hear you’ve not been well. All kinds of cold and flu are going around here too, and I have been hit twice but only for some days each time. This goat/lamb recipe looks great. I have never used either harissa or preserved lemons, so it’s time to fix that.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Stefan. Our area has been hit pretty hard, with several schools being closed while the authorities attempt to disinfect them. I don’t ever recall this happening prior to this year. I hope my roll in this epidemic is now over!
      I’m relatively new to both myself. I did make harissa but all of the recipes make far too much. Better still, I’ve a nearby Middle Easter market that prepares harissa, supplying it to many of our restaurants. I’ve not made it again since I made the discovery.
      As for the preserved lemons, they are incredibly easy to make. I just prepared 3 pints last night and it took less than 30 minutes. You can’t beat that!

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Happy New Year, John! And glad you’re over the germ. I had it too after Christmas, and it still lingers. This recipe looks as though it might knock it on the head. I don’t have goat but I have stewing venison from deer that roam around locally. And I have borlotti beans that I grew in the summer. I even have a jar of preserved lemons made to a similar recipe. Yay! So I’m good to go. And then you mentioned the upcoming honey mustard – I have a jar of that too – made to your recipe. It’s v. good. And more is needed. You are a star!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Happy New Year, Tish We’re not alone. I know of a number of people who, like us, are still not 100% after weeks! This, too, shall pass …
      Oh, how I wish I could get my hands on some good quality venison. I bet it would be fantastic in this dish. Glad, too, that you enjoy the honey mustard and thanks for letting me know. It’s a favorite among my friends and family. Have a great week!

      Liked by 1 person

  10. With winter on the ground and in the air, this is the perfect dish for us. I love the harissa sauce and honey addition, it’s got to make for an interesting dish. The spice combo is also intriguing. Can’t wait to give it a go. Stay well John!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. What an incredibly comforting dish, simple and beautiful. I am glad you are on the mend, I have been fortunate and have avoided the cold this year, hoping my luck continues into the next cold snap. We are expecting 10 cm (about 4 inches) of snow tonight, this would be a welcome recipe, wafting the wonderful aromas around the house. Thanks for the tip about the timing for high and low on the slow cooker, really handy.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hello, my good friend! I sure hope you guys continue to evade this accursed virus! I cannot tell you how many people I know that have been bed-ridden because of it — and few get over it in the usual “7 to 10 days”.
      Ah, the aroma! That, for me, is the worst part about using a slow-cooker these days.Time was that I’d fill it, go to work, and arrive home to a piping hot dinner. Now, especially with this severe cold, I’m home the entire time it’s cooking. The last hour is pure torture. That’s when knowing how to adjust the cooking time comes in handy. 😉

      Liked by 1 person

    • Happy New Year, Kathryn and thank you. Oh, I’ve had both bronchitis and pneumonia. This had very little fever and was not as severe. It just wouldn’t go away! It has now, though. Warn the villagers!

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Oh goodness John! Hope you are on the mend. The flu and its remaining friends bronchitis and pneumonia have been wicked this year. Please do take care with these abrupt changes in weather. Now on to to this slow cooked deliciousness. Loving all of these bold flavors in this dish. Take Care

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Bobbi. I’ve had both bronchitis and pneumonia and I do my best to avoid them each year. This season, however, it’s so widespread that it was only a matter of time. Happy to say that I am much, much better now. Yippee!
      With the weather so cold, this braise is a fantastic dish to prepare and serve. Love the scent wafting through my home.
      Hope your luck is better than mine and you successfully avoid this most accursed virus. 🙂

      Like

  13. We missed you! Do hope Max is still looking after you as you continue to recuperate. Stunning recipe, I can get goat here and you know how much I love my slow cooker and anything with beans in it…I think this was meant to be!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, I’m doing much better, thanks, and Max was at my side the entire time. Make of that what you will. 🙂
      I felt much the same way when I came upon this recipe. It hits all of the right buttons for me and, thanks to a vender at the farmers market, I have a freezer full of Borlotti beans. Must try to convince him to raise goats, too. 🙂
      Have a wonderful week,Tanya

      Liked by 1 person

  14. hey John nice to see you here and with such a delicious dish too. It’ll have to wait for winter cause it’s too darn hot to have the oven on for 8 hours, the only way I slow cook. Stay well, the bugs have been esp tenacious in the past year

    Liked by 1 person

    • As hot as our summers may be, I think yours Down Under are worse. Although right now, with our temps well below freezing, it’s hard not to be a bit envious of your heat. You may keep the bugs. 🙂

      I think you’ll really appreciate this dish next winter. Its aroma brings comfort all by itself. I love it from beginning to end.

      Like

  15. You haven’t had a very good start to 2018. A cold AND computer problems…bummer! So glad you are feeling better and hopefully, you’re done with sickness for the year. Wouldn’t that be nice? 🙂 Personally, I’m not a big fan of goat, but my husband loves it. This is the kind of recipe that he likes to cook, so I’ll be sending it to him for sure. It certainly looks tasty. And the preserved lemons – I always have a homemade batch in the fridge. I use them all of the time and just love them!.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ha!.I prefer to think that 2017 ended badly, MJ. Very badly. That’s all behind me now, though. Thankfully. 2018 started so much better. 😉
      This dish is equally good with lamb, if that’s more to your liking. As for the preserved lemons, i read that you refrigerate yours. I’ve read elsewhere that they can be kept on a shelf. I’ve stored them both ways but doubt that they were around long enough to make a difference. At this rate, I’ll never know.

      Like

  16. Our catch-all description for such as thing as you’re suffering from is ‘the lurgy’… It’s been been reported here in the news media that the 2017 flu vaccine was less fhan optimal. Regardless, it’s good to see you back, and with a goat dish no less. Only a few days ago I mentioned to the G.O. that I was wanting to get my hands on some goat meat. And make some preserved lemons. Good work ♡

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Dale. The “lurgy”, eh? Sounds about right. I’m just glad it’s in the past, hopefully ever to return. It does sound like my timing for this post could not have been better for you. Had I not been ill, it would have been published weeks ago. I guess the virus works in mysterious ways. 😉

      Like

  17. Getting the goat meat is the biggest challenge we face here. I managed to get some a couple of weeks ago. I made a nice chilli with it. The meat is very good done that way.
    I love your approach too.
    I hope all is good with you,
    C

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much. I’d heard tales of a nasty flu from friends Down Under, so, I got my flu shot early and tried to be more careful. I guess the virus is more crafty than I thought.
      This is a most flavorful dish and the aroma is such a wonderful scent in your home when it’s so cold outdoors. 🙂

      Like

  18. Welcome back, John! So glad to see you again on WordPress, and so happy to see you’re promoting preserved lemons. I use those lemons almost all the time – so much flavour, and so easy to do.

    Thanks for sharing this slow-cooked recipe. I think I’ll try it with lamb, because I know a Certain Someone in my house will love it.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much, Ruth. I cannot believe it took me so long to make my own preserved lemons. Once I did, though, I’ve never gone without. M only problem is that I also use Meyer lemons to make limoncello. Either I start making smaller batches of each or I find another lemon supplier 🙂
      I hope your Certain Someone enjoys this dish as much as I do. It’s a keeper!

      Like

  19. We were under the weather for Christmas/New Years, too, but it was mercifully short lived. Glad to hear you’re back on your feet.

    I don’t think I’ve ever tried goat, believe it or not. But since I really like lamb, I bet I’d like goat. And it is available around here. Must give this a try!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Glad to hear you’re feeling better, as well, and that you escaped the “long version” of the malady. I’ve friends in both camps and I wouldn’t call either group happy campers. (Sorry. Couldn’t resist.)
      I’m sure you’d like goat, Frank. When I was a very young boy, our family served kid on Easter Sunday. As the family grew, we switched to lamb and I never enjoyed goat again until relatively recently, mainly due to availability. Now, however, I can get it easily at a number of nearby butchers and groceries. I’m loving this!

      Like

  20. I can’t believe how many people were sick for the holidays! Mark and I were down with a chest cold and bad backs! No fun. However, it didn’t stop us from cooking and eating and drinking! I suppose there is a Silverlining in everything…

    This recipe looks fantastic, John. Such unusual flavors and textures. I can usually find goat in our farmers market – the only thing I need to do now is make my own harissa.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sorry to hear you were both ill, as well, David. I’d heard to expect the worst this year and took all the precautions. Didn’t do me any good — or I shudder to think how badly it could have gone. Yikes!
      I do like this dish and love to enter my home and smell it simmering in the slow-cooker. Talk about comfort food! As for the harissa, I no longer make it. I have a nearby Mediterranean bakery that makes harissa and supplies it to a number of restaurants in town. I do not need a quart of home-made harissa but a half-pint, for a couple dollars, is more to my liking.
      I hope 2018 proves to be better for you guys than 2017 ended.

      Like

    • Thank you so much. Yes, they may not eat goat but they’ve got plenty of tasty cheeses for you to enjoy. It all evens out in the end. And you can use lamb in this recipe and still have a very tasty meal. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  21. I’m so glad to see you back, John! I must have missed the Christmas Eve post, and I surely didn’t see this until today. I’m not blogging quite as much, so I do an occasional “catch up” and I’m delighted you’re joining us again. And very glad you’re feeling better. Thank you for the lamb substitute, as I love harissa and this recipe is undoubtedly very tasty and appealing to my family, but I’m a little unfamiliar with goat. I’m very eager to get the pork mole recipe. I cook a lot for my son-in-law and that recipe, in particular, has his name all over it…or at least next to yours! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Happy New Year, Debra! So good to hear from you. Yes, 2017 ended rather badly but I’m doing much better now.
      The day before I posted this recipe, I prepared it once again with lamb — and loved it. I hope you will, too. Maybe one day, you’ll try it with goat?
      I hope to post the mole recipe tomorrow. It’s another dish that I find so enjoyable on these wintry nights. Unintentionally, I’m rather stuck in a comfort food rut. After mole comes a pork belly ramen recipe, followed by a Japanese hotpot. I’ve got a couple pho recipes waiting in the wings, too. It may be frigid outside but I’m trying to keep us all nice and warm indoors. 🙂

      Like

    • I’m not certain of the ethnic groceries near you but I’ve found goat in Latino and Middle Easter butchers/grocers. That wasn’t always the case, however, and it’s nice to have options now. Good luck in the hunt!

      Like

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