Farmers Market Pasta

Pasta Primavera

It happens every Spring. After having spent the Winter avoiding most fresh vegetables because they’ve seemingly spent more time in transit than in some distant fields, the farmers markets open and I can barely contain myself. I go with a general idea of what I’d like to buy and return home with two bags full of produce and a loaf of bread. As I unpack Saturday’s harvest, I begin to plan my meals.

In the past, I’ve commented on a couple of blogs that I’m amazed at how we all could look at the same ingredients and “see” different dishes. Nazneen, for example, could take these ingredients and have no trouble creating a tasty pullao. BAM, on the other hand, could easily prepare a flavorful GF stir fry. Then, of course, there’s Katherine and Greg. Heaven only knows the dish they’d create but I guarantee it would be delicious and I wouldn’t be the only one to bookmark the recipe. Me? Every week I break out the flour and start making pasta. The only question in my mind is what vegetables to use for which pasta. And when all is said and done, on Thursday or Friday night, I use leftovers and whatever vegetables remain to make a fresh egg frittata. Come Saturday, with a newly cleaned-out refrigerator, I head back to the market and start the process all over again. Today’s recipe is one of these farmers market pastas.

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Primavera is the Italian word for Spring. Pasta Primavera is a dish that celebrates the freshest of ingredients. It is a true marriage of flavors, with no single taste dominating  the rest. To dress the pasta, the “sauce” can be cream-based, oil or butter-based, and even include tomatoes. In short, a pasta primavera can be whatever you would like it to be, so long as the ingredients are fresh.

For today’s recipe, I rendered some guanciale and used the resulting fat as the base of my sauce. Since I was adding scapes, there was no need for garlic but I did add a couple dried red peperoncini to add some heat to the dish. Beyond that, fresh peas, asparagus, and a few mushrooms were added, with a splash of white wine to round out the dish. And just to make sure that they didn’t get “lost”, I grilled the scapes and asparagus spears before adding them to the pasta. Then, after adding a sprinkle of cheese, dinner was served.

And to my fellow Americans, have a happy and safe 4th of July.

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Farmers Market Pasta Recipe

Ingredients

  • 3/4 lb (340 g) cooked trenette — any “ribbon” pasta can be used
  • 6 to 9 garlic scapes
  • 9 to 12 asparagus spears
  • 3 oz (113 g) guanciale, chopped — pancetta, prosciutto, bacon, or ham can be used
  • dried peperoncini (optional)
  • 1/2 lb ( 227 g) fresh peas
  • 8 to 12 small mushrooms, halved or quartered depending upon size
  • white wine
  • salt & pepper
  • Pecorino Romano cheese, grated, for serving — Parmigiano Reggiano can be substituted.

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Directions

  1. Clean and heat the barbecue or grill pan
  2. Lightly coat scapes and asparagus with olive oil
  3. Place the scapes and asparagus atop the hot grill surface. Cook each vegetable to your liking before removing from heat. When cool, roughly chop both vegetables.
  4. Meanwhile, bring a large pot of salted water to the boil.
  5. Add the guanciale to a large frying pan over med-high heat. Continue to cook until the fat has rendered and the guanciale is not quite fully cooked.
  6. Crumble the dried peperoncini by hand before adding to the pan.
  7. Add the mushrooms and continue to sauté for a few minutes.
  8. Lower the heat to medium, add a couple of ounces of wine and the peas. Continue to sauté.
  9. Time the pasta to be just shy of al dente at about the time that the peas are cooked to your satisfaction.
  10. Drain the pasta, reserving a cup of the pasta water, and add the pasta to the frying pan.
  11. Add the chopped scapes and asparagus, mix well, and continue to cook until the pasta has reached al dente. Add pasta water if the pan’s contents are too dry.
  12. Remove to a serving platter, garnish with grated cheese, and serve.

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Notes

Be careful not to use too much guanciale. If you do, the taste will become predominant and you’ll be unable to taste much else. I’ve made that mistake and although it is still a very flavorful pasta, it’s also a waste of garlic scapes.

I like a little heat in the dish so I crumbled 2 dried peperoncini that came from the heart of Italy’s peperoncini region, Calabria. You could easily substitute red pepper flakes or skip them entirely, if you like.

Before using the scapes, I trim an inch or two off the bottom of each scape and, because they can get hard and unpalatable when grilled, I trim off each top just above the flower bulge.

I used 3/4 lbs. of trenette pasta because that’s the amount of dough I had left over when I made last week’s ravioli. Use as much, or as little, pasta as you like. The same holds true for the rest of the ingredients.

As the Summer progresses  the ingredients will change to include broccoli, chard, cauliflower, and/or whatever else catches my eye as I walk around the market. You can and should do the same with your pasta primavera.

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A word about the pasta …

I have an attachment for my pasta machine that will cut trenette pasta. Used throughout Genoa and Liguria, trenette — not to be confused with trennette — are one of the flat, “ribbon” pastas, this one being about “a silly millimeter thinner” than linguine. Although trenette is traditionally dressed with Pesto Genovese, I like the pasta because it most closely resembles the pasta Mom & Zia cut by hand when I was a boy. I can almost hear Mom’s knife as she quickly cut the rolled sheet of pasta, sfoglia, all the while having a conversation with whomever was in the room or seated at the table. The speed of that blade was truly a marvel, at a rate easily 5 or 6 times my best. And the noodles were all uniformly cut, something I cannot do even when working at a snail’s pace. So I cheated. I bought myself a trenette pasta machine attachment — and one for Zia — and now we can enjoy a dish of pasta just like back in the day.

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Cheaters do prosper sometimes …

When this year’s seedlings didn’t fare so well, I bought heirloom tomato plants from the farmers market. Lo and behold! For the first time in years, I’ll be eating home-grown  tomatoes, even if only the tiniest of cherries, on the 4th of July.

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It’s déjà vu all over again …

Lucky for us, all is not vegetable at the markets. We are now in cherry season and this year I’m twice blessed. Not only are Michigan’s tart cherries hitting the markets but I’ve a friend that surprised me with enough cherries to make a fantastic pie. Now, I can eat sweet Bing cherries by the fistful but these tart red beauties are meant for pies, muffins, and jam.  Pictured on the right is a bit of the pie I made with my friend’s gift. You can see the recipe I followed by clicking HERE.

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Coming soon to a monitor near you …

Rack of Spring Lamb

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213 thoughts on “Farmers Market Pasta

  1. Ooh this is a gorgeous pasta dish. I used to eat this a lot when I was a single chick, stretching out the money at the end of the month and using lots of veggies. Luckily, where I lived in London there was a great market for fruit and veg, so I could treat myself to things like asparagus without breaking the bank! And now you’ve reminded me I need to go on line and try to order some attachments for my pasta machine. The rollers work fine but the cutter I had for spaghetti and fettucini seems to have fallen apart 😦 Looking forward to the lamb dish!

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    • Cost is a big advantage for making this dish, Tanya, especially since the vegetables at the farmers markets are more expensive than those at the groceries. I understand that I’m paying for freshness but, somehow, my wallet does quite get the point. I’m very fortunate to have a good pasta equipment warehouse that I order from. Unfortunately, they only accept orders from the US — I’ve already checked. 😦

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  2. Everything looks delicious as always John, but I love the arrangement with the scapes and that perfectly succulent lamb pic.
    What a very good friend who gave you the cherries. Cherry pie with fresh cherries = summer. And enjoyed your references to the other food bloggers.
    Those heirloom tomatoes are going to burst in your mouth with perfect flavor, too. Try them warm from the sun. Mmmmmm. Have a great 4th.

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    • Thanks, Ruth, for the nice compliments. Yes, those cherries were heaven-sent!
      I’ve been watching those few tomatoes go from green to orange to pink and now red. I so want to pop them in the morning for breakfast but I’m saving these for my salad. (I write that last statement knowing full well that in Summers past, my nemesis, the evil squirrel, has stolen them just hours before I intended to pick them.) Hope you have a great 4th, too, Ruth!

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  3. John I have been wondering how I might use scapes in a dish after seeing them at the market last year. I also love that grilling the veggies on the barbecue means that I get to split up the work involved since I am not allowed anywhere near the new weber. Good point as well about how we all see different potential dishes with our ingredients — it makes things so interesting!!!

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    • Thanks, Barb, for the chuckle. I can just see you sending more and more food out to your husband for grilling. For me, one of the benefits of blogging is being introduced to so many different foods and seasonings. My diet today is far different from what it was 3 years ago and it’s all due to the blogs I read. It’s quite nice, actually. 🙂

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  4. Happy 4th of July John! I LOVE seeing bloggers different dish interpretations using the same ingredients too. Your pasta looks beautiful, and makes me yearn for warmer weather. I love that your mum chatted with whomever was in the room or at the table while she rolled the pasta. My dad enjoyed that too, whilst rolling his Dutch veal or fish croquettes!
    Scapes are not readily available here. It’s a shame they’re not more widely used as the long-suffering Australian garlic industry would no doubt appreciate it. I’m not sure about the US garlic situation but our greengrocers are flooded with imported garlic, which is fumigated – and bleached!! It does my head in as Australian garlic is high-quality with a beautiful delicate flavour (and unbleached!) but it costs more to buy than the import! Is the situation similar there? Sorry to use this space for a rant John – I just had to get that off my chest!
    Looking forward to your lamb recipe. It looks lovely and juicy.

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    • Rant? That was hardly a rant. Someday I’ll show you what a rant is. 🙂
      I can understand imported garlic being fumigated and bleached to prevent it from carrying bugs and spores into your country. Our garlic is grown here in America. In fact , many of the bloggers I follow grow it in their gardens. Depending upon the variety, it can be very mild or quite strong.
      It really is fascinating seeing how different people look at the same ingredients and develop completely different dishes. I’m glad you enjoyed my interpretation, Saskia, and thank you for the compliments. I hope yours is a great 4th of July, too!

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  5. Your first photo of your spring blessings with the homemade pasta is stunning. Grilling your garlic scapes is a wonderful idea and I bet it makes them kind of sweet too. We have Chinese garlic chives in HK, I want to try to grill them. YUM! I would need to hide the green things under all the wonderful pasta, pancetta and cheese so the boys would not know. hmm that just might work. (It was very sweet for you to think of me but can can you please change my name for our dear friend, “Norma” as she is the stirfry queen and love her delightful garden creations.) Take care,BAM

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    • Thank you, BAM. I hope this means you’ve recovered. Cheese hides plenty of vegetables. I think it’s a Mom’s best weapon in getting her children to eat things of a green persuasion. I chose you and that particular recipe because it’s gluten-free. I’ve a number of GF subscribers and a Cousin is among them. You are right, though. Norma prepares some wonderful stir fries.
      Enjoy the rest of your wek.

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    • Thanks, MD. There were 6 of us that grew up in that two-flat. All of us agree that we cannot look at a tomato plant, let alone grow one, without thinking of Grandpa. Each of us have our own set of memories involving him and his vines — and his vino. 🙂

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  6. Primavera means “Take what’s in the fridge and put it in the pasta,” doesn’t it? 😉
    Never thought of grilling the scape – have to try that…
    Speaking of garlic, I’m off to start pulling this year’s crop!

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    • That definition pretty much sums up 90% or my pasta dishes, Marie. Of course, if you were to come for dinner, everything would be fresh. 😉
      Already garlic harvest time? This year is flying by, isn’t it?

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  7. Never thought of grilling garlic scape, bet the grilling intensified the flavor, what a clever idea! No more home grown scapes this year (harvested the last from my garden last week), but next spring I surely will remember this post.
    Every time I come across a pasta primavera recipe I think of Chinese stir fry noodles, the only difference is there is no cheese.
    Jealous of you picking your cherry tomatoes for July 4th, mine is no where near ready yet. Happy 4th!!!!!

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    • Thanks, Norma, and a Happy 4th to you, too.
      Whenever I’m in Chinese restaurant, it we’re not having dim sum, I look for recipes with thin noodles similar to vermicelli. You’re right. They are so similar to these pastas. That’s why I order and enjoy them so. 🙂

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  8. I had garlic scapes for the first time this year. What a treat! Also, my husband bought me a pasta attachment for my kitchen aid and making pasta was easier than I thought and was so good. I have never heard of guanciale before. How is it different from bacon?

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    • See? I”ve been telling everyone that making pasta isn’t as hard as one might think and, believe me, it gets easier each time you make it. Guanciale is made from the jowls/cheeks of the hog and is cured but not smoked, much like pancetta. It is said to have more flavor because a hog’s jowls get so much use. For years, I could not find guanciale and used pancetta instead. The dishes were fine. 😉

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  9. Good luck with your tomatoes, John – I’ll be interested to know if you won the war with Mrs. Squirrel, and if so, how??? You’ve mentioned scarpes a few times in the past and now I’m really looking forward to trying them when I get back home – the simplicity of this recipe looks wondrous 🙂

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    • Thank you, Meredith. This year’s battle is not yet joined. My Nemesis has a knack for picking tomatoes early on the day I plan to pick them. Those cherry tomatoes in the photo are to be picked tomorrow. Knowing the Evil Beast as I do, I will find those tomatoes just outside my kitchen door, each sporting the Beast’s teeth marks. It is Evil, I tell you!
      Scapes have a delicate garlic flavor and anything with garlic flavoring is fine with me. 🙂

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    • Thank you. Scapes have a mild garlic flavor. I’ve used them raw, chopped, in salads and, sautéed, in pastas and vegetable dishes. Some people don’t use the flower buds, though I do. Grilling and roasting brings out a bit of their sweetness. I hope you and your men have a great 4th!

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  10. Garlic scapes are a whole new concept to me! I’ve never seen them before in Sydney.
    John, it really is amazing how different people and different cultures can produce such different dishes with exactly the same ingredients. I do love the blogosphere melting pot, so many great ideas and so much diversity 🙂

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    • Another commenter mentioned that most of Oz’s garlic is imported, Lisa. That would explain the lack of scapes.
      The blogosphere really is a melting pot — a very good term when used in reference to food bloggers. My cooking is different today from what it was when I first started blogging. I don’t know how one could write a food blog and not be affected by other’s writings and recipes. I think it’s great! 🙂

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  11. What a beautifully melodious word: ‘primavera’: the first green! A wonderful pasta one can kind’of prepare in most countries where fresh greens are available around the year at any time really! I notice you have used ‘guanciale’ which I still have to access here [but am certain I can] ; saw a cooking show yesterday which showed this cured pig’s cheek and explained ‘it’: am certain you have too: just have to look!! That rack of spring lamb to come looks absolutely unreal . . . so . . . thanks again . . .

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    • Hello, Eha. Yes, primavera is such a wonderful word. For years I looked for guanciale, only finding it last year. Now, I’ve a second source and couldn’t be happier. Guanciale was used primarily in Rome an Lazio but now it has spread throughout Italy. A true Roman carbonara uses guanciale rather than pancetta or prosciutto. Next week’s lamb post is really quite simple but I want to get my family’s technique written down for future Bartolini. One of them may be looking for it one day. I’m glad you liked today’s post and hope you’ll like next week’s, too.

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      • First of all: have a very happy 4th of July. Since we obviously do not celebrate the date, my memory banks failed 🙂 ! Secondly: we have had to put up with string bags of bleached and fumigated Chinese garlic for years!! Sure, one can grow one’s own or buy it hugely more expensively at speaciality greengrocers [you don’t use that term, do you?] or farmers markets. Just these past few months my Supermarket Woolworths [one of a duopoly with ‘Coles’ in Oz] has switched to single heads of purpley kind, but, still often from Chile etc. Have to learn to grow it myself, it seems!!

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        • Thanks, Eha, for the holiday wishes. I am aware of the term greengrocer but it is rarely used here. We shop at fruit or vegetable markets. From what I understand, garlic is relatively easy to grow but I’ve never tried it myself. I’m forced to grow my few garden plants in containers and wouldn’t be able to grow enough garlic to make it worthwhile. Besides, given how much garlic I use, I’d need some serious acreage to grow enough for a year. 🙂

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  12. This is a celebration dish — of freshness and summer harvest — love it! Primavera is a favorite, usually with a light lemon-garlic cream sauce for me, but always delicious. I had to look up guanciale, now I’m ready to run down to the local Italian market and see if they have it. Another enticing dish, John, looking forward to your spring lamb recipe too. 🙂

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    • Thanks, Judy, and that’s a great way to put it, a celebration dish. A lemon garlic ream sauce would be very good with this type of pasta dish. Well, I’d be hard-pressed to name a dish that wouldn’t be better with a little lemon, garlic, and cream. I hope you do find guanciale but, if you don’t, pancetta makes a good substitution. Bother are cured but not smoked and their fat, when rendered, can really flavor a dish. 🙂

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  13. Ah the pie! Gorgeous. Such a lovely colour.. and thank you for showing the pic of the garlic scrapes, I was always a little mystified as to what they were. Though our garlic is already up and drying! Beautiful pasta and I love the anything goes kind of philosophy, this suits me just fine. Your tomatoes!! wow. We ate our first one last night, it was split from the rain and warped and funny looking but delicious. We will have another wait for more though as it is so cold! now I am going to go and repack my suitcase. Just in case. c

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    • I’m surprised you’ve only enjoyed 1 tomato. I thought your plants were further along than that. Once i pick these 5, it will be wek before I’ve anything else to pick but once that cherry tomato gets going, I’ll be loaded with tiny tomatoes.
      Yes, that pie was soo good! Tart cherries make the best pies. With everyone sending positive thoughts your way, I’d be very surprised if you didn’t make it to the Church on time, so to speak. 🙂

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    • Oh, I know that feeling. I’m sorry but, as you know, “This, too, shall pass.” I just hope it didn’t get any worse for you and that you’re already feeling better. 🙂

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  14. Pasta primavera, prego! 🙂

    Lovely dish, lovely post – I also love how different people use ingredients in different ways. John, I saw this article and thought of you

    http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/07/01/world/europe/A-Short-Lexicon-of-Italian-Gestures.html?_r=0

    I tend to use my hands a lot when I speak, and back home they would say I must have some Italian genes no one knew about 🙂 Some of these gestures (3 of them) are used exactly the same way in Brazil, but most are exclusively Italian. Cool…

    Happy 4th for you!

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    • I’m glad you enjoyed the post, Sally, and very glad you included that link. I’m very familiar with some of those gestures and will be sending the link to family members. I’m sure they’ll enjoy it as much as I. My Dad was a great one for hand gestures and some of these were definitely a part of his “speech.” When I first moved to Chicago, I had friend from Brazil and he, too, used hand gestures. It wasn’t until someone else mentioned them that I noticed. I guess I just saw them as a part of speaking. 🙂
      Thanks for the link and memories. Have a great 4th!

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  15. Guanciale, homemade pasta, scapes and asparagus – what’s not to like? I’ll take two bowls and a bottle of Sangiovese. Your mother must have had a very precise knife hand to be able to cut trennette by hand. Lucky guy. Ken

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    • Thanks, Ken. A Cousin and I talked about this last Summer. WHen both Mom & Zia cut the pasta dough, there was a “tap, tap, tap, tap, tap …” of the knife as it quickly cut the pasta noodles. It was fast and precise and I am still in awe. There was also the “whirl and cling” that the pastry cutters made as they were used to cut rows of ravioli. It amazes me that not one photo or home movie exists of them making pasta of any kind. It was commonplace, like vacuuming, and who would waste film on that? Unbelievable!

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  16. Yay for farmer’s markets! We hit ours a few weeks ago as well and what fun it was. I came home with tons of food and we ate fresh vegetable dishes all week long. It was so much fun. Last year I would go with a specific list in mind having already planned my meals. This year, I threw caution to the wind and went without a plan. I have to say it was great fun to buy what looked good and then plan around that. Next time I go back, however, I think I will have this pasta dish in mind. 🙂 Oh, I also got heirloom tomatoes and made them into a salad with a touch of lemon olive oil, basil and burrata. I of course thought of you when I bought the burrata (at the farmer’s market). Next time I’m going to get some and make your burrata pasta dish with it. 🙂 Happy 4th to you too John! Enjoy the long weekend.

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    • Yay for farmers markets! I, too, enjoy them and I go every Saturday morning. Going without a list is great but, then again, I only have me to worry about. If I don’t like something, I simply do not buy it. And no matter what, I can toss a number of Saturday’s finds into a pasta like I did for today’s post.
      Thanks for the burrata tip. I’ve never really stopped by the cheese vendors because I buy Italian imports and so rarely need something like burrata. I never thought to check out exactly what they sell, though. If they do have burrata, it must be fresher than what I’ve been buying.
      I hope you all have a fantastic 4th, Kristy. 🙂

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  17. It is 7:30 a.m. and this post has me aching for dinner right now! Wonderful pasta primavera that I want to make sometime over this weekend. After that farmer’s market in San Francisco I featured on previous posts, I haven’t been able to get back to any farmer’s market since (new grandson arrived). Maybe this Saturday will be the day to get to our local FM and get fresh veggies.
    Happy 4th of July, hope you have a fun and safe weekend.

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    • Oh, Angeline. I may take some heat from the “Fresh is Best” Crowd but you’ve a new Grandson. Buy frozen and spend as much time as you can with the Little Guy. 🙂
      Congratulations! I hope you and your expanding family have a wonderful 4th.

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  18. Hey John! Thanks for the shout out! I have to say when I read your pasta posts and recipes I just want to throw this whole GF thing out the window and enjoy making and eating pasta. It is one of my favourite things in the world. My problem with pasta is, I don’t know when to stop, I can eat it everyday. I think I force myself to do semi GF not for my RA but to control my love for pasta! My father lived and worked in Italy for a few years after he first married my mother. He recalls that time with such fondness and can talk for hours about his love for Italy and all things Italian. I think my love for Italian food came from his enthusiasm.

    It’s funny because as much it seems on my blog that I fall back on Indian food, which
    I do, but I would probably make this very dish if I had those vegetables! It is one of my favourite ways to eat pasta; lots of vegetables and a light sauce. Lucky you to get garlic scapes! I’ve been so preoccupied this year to even hit my markets but this Saturday I have a plan. Hope I find some good stuff. It was also lovely to hear your memories of your mother. I have similar ones and the best ones always involve the kitchen and food. Thanks John for a lovely post.

    Nazneen

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    • You’re welcome, Nazneen. I remember “talking” about this with you when you posted your pullao recipe. BAM’s GF stir fry post was only a couple days later and it was the same discusion: how we can look at the same ingredients and create completely different dishes. It’s what makes blogging so interesting.
      I have the utmost respect for people who go GF. I’ve a Cousin who has and, in this family, it ain’t easy! I had wanted to make ravioli for her but she’s too sensitive. I would have to purchase all new equipment because mine has been used with wheat flour for years. I’ve heard, though never tasted, that there are some wonderful organic GF pastas now, though I’m sure you’ve already checked them out.
      If you are going to go off the GF wagon, doing it after a trip to the farmers market would be the day to do it! The possibilities for a great pasta dinner are endless. And later in the Summer I’ll use many of them in pasta salads.
      Whatever you do, please don’t stop posting Indian recipes and cuisine. Much of it may be beyond my reach, for now, but I now know what to look for when I dine in Little India. Finally, I can order something other than chicken tikka masala. 🙂
      I hope you and your family have a great 4th, Nazneen.

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  19. Love the picture of the asparagus and scapes. Scapes are new to me, although I can see what they are. It’s not a thing I’ve run into here, but I guess it’s just a matter of planting garlic and letting it shoot. Lovely recipe, John. My kind of food.

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    • Thanks, Roger. I wasn’t at all familiar with scapes until 3 Summers ago, once I’d started blogging. I’ve still not “conquered” them but grilling them before adding them to pasta does work well. I just don’t get enough of them to really experiment and before you know it, they’re gone.

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  20. This looks fabulous! Thanks for the tips on garlic scapes. We have some in the garden, and while they made their way into flower arrangements, I was rather puzzled about how to use them in cooking.

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    • Welcome, Sarah! There are plenty of scape videos on YouTube, showing everything from harvesting to cooking. The info available online never ceases to amaze. Thanks for stopping by and taking the time to comment.

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  21. What a nice, simple dish! And with loads of flavor from the fresh ingredients! I love simply sauced dishes like this where you can taste all of the ingredients. I only sometimes see garlic scapes in my farmer’s market, but next time I do I need to make this dish. Really terrific, and a lovely way to serve pasta. Thanks.

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    • Thanks, John, for leaving such a great comment. One thing Mom & Zia showed me was that you needn’t add many spices and herbs for most Italian dishes. Use fresh ingredients and keep it simple. With so many wonderful ingredients coming to market now, it’s a pasta lover’s dream! 🙂

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  22. I’m taking this as permission to buy whatever looks food at the Farmer’s Market Saturday. I never thought of grilling the veggies either and I love that idea! I love this as a summer lunch….or dinner too. It’s just perfect for this time of year. I really appreciate the instructions John, thanks.

    I had no idea Primavera meant Spring!

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    • You need no permission from me, Sarah, and I’m glad that’s what you got from today’s post. It’s not a recipe for these ingredients but hopefully inspiration to buy whatever catches your eye at the market and use it to make a pasta. If it’s raining or the grill is out of commission, roast them in the oven. Grilling the vegetables and adding them at the end of fixing your pasta dish is a great way to add more flavor to the dish. Primavera literally means first green. Though some think primavera pasta refers strictly to Springtime ingredients, it actually refers to using the freshest of ingredients, no matter the season.
      Have a Happy 4th, Sarah!

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      • Happy 4th to you too John! This one is on the menu for Saturday. I’m excited to head to the Farmer’s Market for this one. Endless possibilities for my beloved pasta.

        With your blog in my arsenal, I really don’t need anything else. Hubby is surprised I haven’t bought a cookbook in 2 months thanks to you, John. He says the check (to you) is in the mail, lol.

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  23. Putting garlic scapes on the barbecue is genius! I always learn something when I come to visit, John. Your pasta primavera sounds and looks delicious – I’m a little overdue for lunch and now I’ve got a craving on! (BTW, there’s a little something for you and your Zia over at my site today!)

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  24. It’s a great way to use up vegetables or even better, home grown ones 🙂

    Yaay for your new pasta machine attachment and the cherry tomatoes.

    Happy 4th July, John.

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    • Thanks, Marianne. Pastas like this are a real staple for me during the Summer months. No two are alike — unless I’m blogging a recipe and need more photos — and each tasty. Yes, Zia and I both love that attachment. It’s a great little blast from the past each time it’s used. Have a great rest of your week and weekend!

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  25. With the summer heat, the simplicity in this pasta dish just sounds wonderful. I never considered grilling scapes, and what a great idea. We grill asparagus almost anytime we can, and I do agree the grilling would keep the vegetables front and center in the pasta. Even though our Farmer’s Market is really good all year round, there’s just something particularly appealing in the summer and I can easily get a little carried away. I like the method that goes into your planning. I will definitely be making this very soon. I hope you, too, enjoy your 4th. I think we are going to have a quiet one, which sounds perfect to me right about now! 🙂

    Like

    • I envy those who, like you, have access to farmers markets year round, Debra. Ours will close about the 1st of November and re-open in late April or May 1st. Of course, what could our farmers possible bring to market in January? That’s why I go hog wild when they re-open. And with my love for pasta, well, it’s a match made in Bologna!
      I really have fallen in love with roasted vegetables and in the last couple years I’ve been moving them out of the oven and onto the grill. I’ve always used roasted tomatoes in pastas but now I’ll add any roasted vegetables, too. Roasting does add a nice flavor to the final dish.
      A quiet 4th sounds nice, Debra. Enjoy!

      Like

    • I make variations of this theme all Summer long, Betsy, and never tire of them. I bet you will, too, once you can use that new pasta machine. 🙂
      I hope you have a great 4th, too.

      Like

  26. While I was reading your story about your Mom cutting the pasta while family members sat at the kitchen table took me right back to my childhood when we visited Hungary for the first time. It was common for my Aunt to start cooking early in the day so that she didn’t have to be in the kitchen during the heat of the day, and my Mom and I often sat at the little table all the while chatting with her (because she would not let us help!). What a lovely memory, thank you.
    I have the wider noodle attachment to my stand mixer and I have used it but not recently. Perhaps it’s time to break out the pasta machine once in a while for a wonderful pasta like your primavera. What I love about this type of dish is the simplicity, yet I can just imagine the explosion of flavours in my mouth at the first bite. Do you freeze your left over pasta dough? If not freeze, then how do you store it? When I did make pasta I usually made too much, which just meant we ate too much that night, a slippery slope as you can well imagine.
    It’s finally warmed up in the big smoke, and the humidity has set in, but I’ll take it to the gloomy, grey and cold spring we’ve had. Let’s hope it’s a wonderful summer, looks like I’ll have time to enjoy it!

    Like

    • You, Eva, might break out the pasta machine? My work here is almost done. 🙂
      I do enjoy everything about these pastas. Shopping at the market, making the pasta, deciding which of the day’s vegetables will go in that night’s dinner and which will be reserved for later in the week. I know. It’s the little things that make me happy. 🙂
      I know that people do freeze pasta dough but I never have. We, my family, always use up all of the dough, either by cutting noodles or making quadretti. This may set off alarms for some people but the extra noodles are dried and stored on baking sheets or, as Zia does, in a specific woven basket. THe quadretti goes into a sealed plastic container for use in soup. So long as the pasta is quickly dried, there’s no spoilage and nothing to fear. Once fully dried, they’re covered with a paper towel and I’ve kept them for weeks that way. Being single, it would be too much work to make enough pasta for just one meal. If I make pasta, I’ll make enough for at least two meals and store the rest. It’s also a great thing to have on-hand if someone drops by around dinner time.
      We, too, are having a cool start to Summer but at least the rain has stopped. This will be a great Summer. 🙂

      Like

  27. Gracious! I’m amazed yet again by how much crazily delicious looking and sounding food you can cram into one post, John! So much here to inspire (both cooking and just drooling over it)!!! Happy Fourth!

    Like

    • Thanks for leaving such nice compliments, Kathryn. I feel very much the same way when I read your Foodie Tuesday posts. You make and photograph these great dishes, making it all seem so effortless, a sure sign of talent. I hope you and your Conductor have a fantastic holiday!

      Like

    • Thanks, Conor. I’ve seen your posts — salivating while doing so — and know better than to, in any way, challenge you when it comes to preparing and roasting meat of any kind, not the least of which would be lamb. You win. No contest. 🙂

      Like

  28. One of the wonders of food blogs – the many different ways in which we can all be inspired by the same or similar ingredients. One thing is certain, though – your pasta dishes always look delicious and irresistible! Happy 4th July to you!

    Like

    • That’s such a nice thing to write. Thank you. Enjoy your weekend. I hope yo’ve some local event to attend. They always seem so charming and a great way to spend a Summer’s day.

      Like

  29. Oh, how I love your style… that is a perfect weekly shopping cycle. A visit to the market on Saturday, and still eating from the treasures on Friday. I hadn’t heard of scapes but now I will look for them. The simple goodness and authenticity of this dish stands out… but then again it’s exactly what I’ve come to expect from you, and you always deliver. Happy 4th of July. Enjoy those tomatoes 🙂

    Like

    • Thank you , EllaDee, for leaving such a nice compliment. Scapes are just about gone now from our markets. I fear this will be their last weekend. If you cannot find them, you could substitute Spring or new garlic. Like scapes, it is milder than normal cloves are. In this dish, the idea is to avoid any harsh or strong flavors. Balance is the key. I hope you have a great weekend.

      Like

  30. You should not tease us with that beautiful piece of meat you have prepared lol. And as usual John you’ve gone and made me hungry again and I can’t wait to have pasta again :). I need to visit my farmers market myself and see what I can find

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    • Exactly, Kay. This isn’t a recipe but a recommendation to shop your market, buy the freshest ingredients, and make yourself a great dish of pasta. It really is that easy and so very delicious! Have a great 4th!

      Like

    • Thank you so much, Sharyn. If there is something wrong with fresh pasta, frittata and pie, I’ve yet to find it. These 3 dishes have served me very well. 🙂

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    • Thanks, Brandi. We share a love for all things asparagus. I hate that the season is ending here. It comes and goes so quickly. I hope you enjoy the 4th and have a great time!

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  31. The scapes reminded me of the very first dish I posted on my blog – a darn good chicken dish with AWFUL photographs, lol!! The pasta looks amazing.

    Did I tell you that I have started to venture out trying pasta and Italian all over again? Just due to your blog. And what did I learn? That my older one ADORES Italian, and anything pasta. And that resets a lot of stuff in my kitchen. I haven’t yet gone far enough to make my own pasta, but I have been buying different varieties and spend a lot of thoughtful time in the pasta aisles, and believe you me, think about you and your dishes. Your pastas have changed some lives here 🙂

    Like

    • “The Kitchens are changing people’s lives!” That could be our new tagline. LOL
      I can promise that making your own pasta will be another life-changing event. I fully understand that you’ve far less time than I have and whereas I make most of my pasta, you could only find the time occasionally. Even so, the difference in taste is just unbelievable. Whether you wish to admit it, you are on the road to homemade pasta. And I’m here to give you a little push. 🙂

      Like

  32. Pasta primavera … a favorite of mine. This is the time of year I miss living in the Chicago burbs. My dad always has an amazing garden with the most yummy tomatoes. And summer trips to Michigan are never complete without returning home with baskets of cherry’s and berries…yum. Your post reminded me of fond memories 🙂

    Like

    • You are so right about those trips to Michigan. Originally from Michigan, I travel home and usually stop on the way back here for all kinds of fruit, vegetables and yes, tart cherries. I’m hooked on them, to be sure. I’m glad you enjoyed the post and that it brought to mind some wonderful memories for you. 🙂
      Thanks for the visit and have a great 4th of July.

      Like

  33. Thanks for the picture of the garlic scapes on the grill! I just bought some and having never cooked the before, I’m not having much luck. I tried sauteed them, but they were very tough. I think I overcooked them. Looks like I’ll put the rest of them on a grill and them maybe throw them in with some pasta. Sounds wonderful! I’m not familiar with guanciale, but it sounds delicious! Love this pasta as I love all of your pastas!

    Like

    • Thanks, MJ. I’m by no means a scapes expert but I, too, had problems sautéing them and, like you, found them tough. Then I added some white wine a few minutes after the sauté was started and let them braise for a bit. That seemed to work and they were much softer. Then I discovered roasting them and it was game over. Now I roast or grill them only.
      Guanciale is a cured pork product that originated in Rome and its surrounding district of Lazio. It’s made from the jowls of a hog. It sin’t smoked like our bacon and it’s believed that it has a good deal of flavor because a hog’s jowls are always in use. For years I couldn’t find it and always used pancetta instead. Now that I have 2 places that carry it, I’ve been on a guanciale binge. 🙂

      Like

      • Thanks for the great reply John! Definitely will be giving grilled garlic scapes a try! Interesting information about guanciale. Hog Jowls – bet that is good!

        Like

  34. I love farmer’s markets. It must be from growing up in Illinois and always stopping at the roadside stands. Still love to do that but unfortunately don’t get on the road much. And garlic scapes/ Last year I could find them and didn’t know what to so with them and this year now that I know what to do with them, can’t find them! And this looks soo ,so good. And you are going to have fresh cute teeny tomatoes. You lucky man. Have a joyous 4th!

    Like

    • I love the farmers’ stands, too, Abbe, but don’t know where to find them around here. One Saturday, I should just head out of the city and search for them. Until then, I’ll just stick with “my” farmers markets. I get such a kick out of walking around them, comparing prices, and buying whatever appeals to me that morning. It’s a great way to start the weekend.
      Those tomatoes are an heirloom variety called “Mexican Midget.” They average about 1/2 inch across, perfect for salads and for snacking fresh from the garden with my morning coffee. It’s a big producer so there’s little worry of running out.
      Hope you have a great 4th, too!

      Like

  35. Pingback: Life is one grand, sweet song… | elladee_words

    • Thanks, Maureen. Part of the fun of blogging is seeing how different cultures/cuisines use the same basic ingredients. Some version of that pasta is a staple around here and that rack was prepared during my last visit with Za. It was a treat that we both enjoyed. 🙂

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  36. It’s such a season of anticipation, when everything is growing but the harvests are just starting to trickle in. This looks so good!

    Like

    • You’re so right, David. Each week at the farmers markets brings more and new produce. It’s a constant progression that I love and use in my pastas. I’m glad you enjoyed this one.

      Like

  37. What a fantastic looking pasta! I just made a trip to the farmer’s market this morning. Ours is open Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays during the summer months. My haul includes peas, strawberries, and some heirloom tomatoes. I think I’ll have to follow your lead and make some pasta primavera!!!

    Like

    • Thanks, Amber. Although there are farmers markets open practically every day of the week, the one I shop is only open Saturdays. I envy you being able to go 3 times weekly. I hope you do go through your market, looking for pasta ingredients. That dinner will be fantastic. You’re gonna love it! 🙂

      Like

  38. Oh my goodness…I had to scroll forever to get to the bottom to comment on this “melt me” pasta! I can not think of a better combination for a fresh grilled farmers market pasta! You are always inspiring me to make my own pasta! I pay way too much for good quality pasta (sometimes $6-$8 a lb.) and even then I am sure it doesn’t compare to freshly made.

    Like

    • Thank you so much. I know what you mean about the cost of “gourmet” fresh pasta. You can make 1.5 lbs of fresh pasta using 4 eggs and about 3 cups of flour. That’s quite a bit less than store-bought and far tastier. To be honest, you may have a little difficulty the first few times you try to make pasta until you get a feel for the dough. After that, you’ll be able to crank out the pasta dough in no time. Did I mention how much better it tastes? 🙂

      Like

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  40. See great minds think and do alike ! I put lots and lots of fresh veggies in my pasts too !
    Your pasta looks unpretentious, honest and authentic 🙂 Just the way I like it.

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    • Thank you and we are so in agreement. I like a tomato sauce, to be sure, but with so much fresh produce arriving at the farmers markets, I’ll put as may as I can into my pasta dish and save the tomato sauce for later in the season. 🙂

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  41. Aren’t farmers markets terrific? And look what you did with those vegetables, that looks wonderful. I just made something similar – used some yellow squash, onions, broccoli, and mushrooms and now I’m giving myself a head smack for not thinking to put them on the grill. That’s a genius move if ever I saw one. Now I know what a garlic scape is although I don’t think I’ve ever seen them in the markets. I think I might have had some starting in the pot of garlic I was growing, but for some reason a weird cat thought he would try them.
    And that photo of the lamb? You’re killing me John!

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    • Thank you so much, Diane. I’m hooked on shopping at farmers markets. I go weekly and love it, feeling bad if I cannot get to one on Saturday. I’ve been roasting more and more vegetables than ever and recently started moving them all to the grill. I then add them late to the pasta, once it has been drained and dressed, so that the grill flavorings remain strong. It works for me!

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    • Thank you so much. I make pasta, on average, every other week. Living alone, I make about 1.5 lbs at a time and that will last me 2 weeks. If I’m having guests for dinner or giving pasta to friends, I’ll make it fresh, no matter when I made some the last time. I’ve been doing it for so long that it’s not at all time consuming anymore.

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  42. John, it looks delicious! Great meal, as always. Farmr’s Market is the place to shop. I love going to the market every Saturday, made many friends there too! I have. several favorite vendors (?), that I regularly buy from. And often i get a really good deals. 🙂

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    • Hello, Marina! Hope all’s well with you.
      I love my famers market and I look forward to going there very Saturday morning. I, too, have my regular vendors but the deals are few and far between. That’s fine. I go there for the fresh produce. If he/she gives me a deal, fine but I’m going to buy the produce no matter what. 🙂

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    • Hello, Joanne. My Aunt ( my “Zia”) and I joke that we could eat pasta 3 times each day and never complain. You may have a little Bartolini in you. If so, you’d be the first to live in the Southern Hemisphere. 🙂

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  43. am with you that farmers’ markets are just about the best thing ever. Especially in mostly cold climes such as Chicago and MN. You work wonders with your veggies and good point that different cooks will see different dishes in the same ingredients. The pie looks wonderful and oh, the lamb! Good stuff, John.

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    • Thanks, Liz. I haven’t the space for a large garden and rely on several containers for a few things.The farmers markets are the next best thing. Too bad they’re open for such a short period of time, as you very well know.

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  44. I love pasta primavera, John, and your version looks great. Our minds seem to have been synched again with both of us blogging about trenette in the same week. I’d never heard of scapes before and I can’t find a Dutch term for them.

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    • I got a chuckle when I read your post, Stefan. It’s bound to happen. I only started noticing scapes a few years ago. I think their popularity is based upon the food shows use of them. I hope to find more this weekend. I want to experiment with them and I’m running out of time. Their season is so short.

      Like

  45. I do love pasta primavera but it does always remind me of that Seinfeld episode. I love your enthusiasm for all the new produce. I think the end of winter and the leap into the new season always does give us new energy – love how you’re channeling that into the kitchen xx

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    • Thanks, Charlie, and you’re right. After our Winters, seeing fresh produce at the farmers markets is really a thrill. My car is in repair but that wasn’t going to prevent me from going to the market on Saturday. It took over an hour via public transportation but I got there!!! Recipes are forthcoming …

      Like

  46. What a beautiful pasta dish John! I just love scapes but limit their use to potatoes and scapes on the barbie. What a great idea to use it in pasta! I will definitely be giving this a try seeing as I have 2 bunches of scapes in the fridge. You’ve also taught me a new word for these little babies…here, we call them garlic shoots. Thanks for a lovely recipe John!

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    • Thank you, Lidia for the nice compliment. With these fresh vegetables, I was afraid that a couple cloves of garlic might overpower them all. Mild-flavored scapes kept things in balance. I still want to find other ways to use them. I better hurry, though, Their season is rapidly coming to a close around here.

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  47. Ooooh, this is a great, savory dish, John: being Genovese myself, of course I love trenette, and guanciale is just delicious and adds so much flavor in itself! As I mentioned before, I found that way too often in the US restaurants tend to add way too much garlic to their pasta dishes, probably in an effort to give them enough flavor. As you know, and as you suggest in this dish, in Italy this is not the case as you generally resort to other factors, such as the meats as tasty as guanciale or even fresh, flavorful veggies when in season. Once again, I love how you create your dishes without departing from the base principles of authentic Italian cuisine!

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    • Thank you, Stefano. Those are some wonderful complements and I very much appreciate them. We are in total agrement about the “secret” behind Italian cooking being the freshest of ingredients. As a boy, I often accompanied Dad as he shopped for vegetables on Sunday mornings. He never bought something unless it was in season. Not a bad example to follow. 🙂

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  48. At the risk of sounding like a hick, I have never seen nor heard of scape in my life. I just did an online search and lo & behold, a whole new world has opened to me. LOOK at all the things you can do with it! See what an important public service you provide here?

    Your pasta looks fabulous. I have to say that reading your blog has made me a more adventurous cook…and a bit of a heavier one at that, I might add.

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    • You’re hardly a hick and you’re not alone. In hindsight, I should have at least put a link in the post. ANd yes, that’s me. Public Servant!!! 🙂
      Not having anyone dependent upon me for meals, I can be as adventurous as I want. No matter how bad my experiment may be, I’ve got a dog who will eat it and a passable meal is just a phone call away. 🙂

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  49. While it doesn’t seem like it was or ever will be Spring here in Calgary.. it is definitely Spring here in the Bartolini Kitchens!! As soon as I opened your post.. the colors just sprang up and sent such joy onto my little computer screen. I was too lazy to make supper tonight.. scraping by with bits of cheese and crackers.. and I could now almost inhale this beautiful Pasta Primavera! Thank you for making my day!! I love that you bought Zia the attachment.. you’re so thoughtful and loving! I know she’ll get a real kick out of using it! Happy Spring!!

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    • You guys have had such terrible weather! “Epic” comes to mind. I think it wonderful, however, the way your community has responded. There’s the silver lining in the cloud and you all should be proud.
      What I’ve learned, Barb, is not to carry a shopping list to the farmers market. I take a walk around the place, decide what’s freshest and who’s selling it, and then take another walk and fill my shopping bags. Back at home, if not that night, certainly within 2, I’ll be making some sort of pasta. You just can’t beat a dish of pasta with really fresh ingredients.
      Zia doesn’t make as much pasta as she once did. Though she still does, most often I make plenty when I visit and she stores it away. Her having her own trenette cutter means I’ve one less piece of equipment to bring with me. 😉

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  50. John, I Love the idea of grilling scapes. I just cut a bunch off my plants. A few years ago they went straight to the compost bin. Now they’re chic eats. My garden is lush. Looks like a bumper crop of basil this year. Do you have an easy foolproof recipe for making basil oil?
    Toni

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    • Thanks, Toni. Once the food shows “discover” something, it becomes hard to find and 3 times as expensive. Never fails.
      Sorry to say, I’ve never made basil oil. When I have a great deal of basil, I’ll load it into the food processor as if I’m making pesto. I won’t add any cheese and use only a little bit of olive oil. I find the cheese won’t thaw very well and I can make up for the oil by adding some to the pasta later on. Once everything is chopped, I use it to fill ice cube trays. When frozen, I store the cubes in plastic bags in my freezer. When it’s time to use it, I either thaw a cube or two on the counter or add it frozen to the hot pasta. Add a little cheese and more olive oil and dinner is served. I hope this helps, Toni. 🙂

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  51. OMG, pasta primavera, yummy!!! I have an Italian friend here in Moscow, who’s been promising to make some mean pasta… Now that i think of it, i just might sent them a ‘reminder’ in the form of this divine recipe of yours! 😉

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    • I’m with Tony, April, and that’s how I prepare my pasta through the colder months. Once the weather turns warmer, though, I go with an olive oil-based sauce and plenty of vegetables. Our farmers markets aren’t open for long and I try to take advantage.

      Like

    • Thank you, Tanya, that was a nice thing to say. It took me years to find guanciale and I’ve yet to find one that’s imported. Now that I’ve found it, I’m going a little overboard, using it wherever I can. 🙂

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  52. I have never used garlic scapes before! I need to find out if these are available in Italy! I love the grilling of vegetabbles since it keeps them crispy, in contrast of the softness of pasta. The addition of pancetta gives that fatty touch much needed to complement the freshness of veggies, and that peperoncino -as we say in Rome – e’ la morte sua (referring as the best way to cook something by pairing the right ingredients)

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    • Thank you so much, Ambrosiana. I walk around the farmers market and get inspired. I learned watching my Dad select only in-season vegetables and nothing more. As I’m sure you know, if you’ve got fresh vegetables, it is very easy to create a pasta. I’ll be visiting Zia next week and will show her “e’ la morte sua.” I wonder if she knows the expression. Well, she will next week, that’s for sure.

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  53. There is a major difference in the taste, when we use fresh ingredients in any recipe and that’s why your recipe appeals to me a lot! I loved the fact that you used garlic scapes in this pasta dish… Guanciale is something I would need to figure out, though.

    Same here…whenever I see fresh produce in the market, I end up buying a lot of them. It makes me feel happy!

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    • Thank you so much. We certainly do agree on fresh ingredients and the markets. 🙂
      Guanciale is cured pork that comes from the jowls of the pig. It isn’t all that common, unless you have a good Italian market in which to shop. Before I located guanciale, I substituted pancetta. If you do not eat meat or pork products, sorry to say that I really do not know of a substitute.

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    • Thank you. If you like homemade pastas, I’ve quite a few dishes using them and a few posts demonstrating how to make them. Take this LINK to see some of those posts listed. If you’ve any questions. I’m nere to answer them as best I can.
      Thanks for the visit and for taking the time to leave a comment.

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    • You’re so right, Karen. Last Saturday, with my car in the shop, I had to rely on public transit to get out to Evanston. I was only going to buy a couple of things. I ended up with 2 full shopping bags and a plant, riding the trains and bus!
      I did enjoy the holiday and hope you did, too, though, if you were in Maine, that’s pretty much a given. 🙂

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  54. Hi John, you are in good company with the “cheating” I ended up buying various plants this year after seedling failures – well ok it was actually human failure not to let the seedlings FRY in the greenhouse, unwatered and unloved. I just call it practical as opposed to cheating 🙂

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    • To be honest, Claire, I think I’m through with trying start my own seedlings. My garden is really quite small and consists now of 6 containers. WIth very poor natural light in my home, I just don’t think it worth buying a light system — and my current make-shift measures clearly aren’t working. I bought some wonderful heirloom plants at the farmers market and my garden is doing well. I hesitate to say too much because the last few years, some calamity has struck mid-season that terribly impacted my “harvest.” Fingers crossed for this season.

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        • I agree whole-heartedly. Last Summer in the middle of that horrific heatwave, I discovered that 2 of the containers had hairline cracks about 3 inches under the soil level. The result was that no matter how much I watered, the tomatoes’ roots were dry and the plants withered. I threw them out in mid-July. This year I’ve new containers and hope springs eternal! 🙂

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  55. I was at the farmers market last weekend and garlic scapes were everywhere. I have now learnt another vocabulary from you “Primavera”, thanks for that. I shall be asking my Italian neighbours next spring how goes their Primavera! You know what I love about your recipes? they are always so simple and straightforward and well narrated with clear instructions. One of these fine days I’m going to surprise you, by making one of these elegant recipes of yours. I haven’t forgotten the Egg Frittata either, it’s still fresh in my mind, I am usually slow, but sure. And I like the way you have a methodical way of clearing your fridge at the end of every week. I should borrow that and stick to it. It’s a good habit. Thanks so much for sharing this wonderful recipe. The real art of good cooking is balancing flavours; I fully agree on that one. Thanks for visiting my blog, enjoy the week and best wishes to your family.

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    • Thanks you for the lovely comment and well wishes. I’ll be leaving later in the week and will be sure to pass them along to Zia. I’ll be leaving to visit her in a few days and she’ll be touched by your sentiments. I’m envious of your scapes. They’re gone from our markets now. The wonderful thing about the internet is that the recipes will be here whenever you’re ready. And I’ll be here, too, to answer any questions.
      Thanks, Liz, for always being so complimentary and supportive.

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  56. Fresh asparagus! Garlic scapes! It all looks so green and summery! I’m so pleased you have regular guanciale to use – we buy it all the time now, thanks to your inspiration – and we only ever need 100g (about 3oz) to flavour a dinner for four! It’s amazing how much flavour it carries! 🙂

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    • Thanks, Celia. With our Winters so severe, it really is a treat to walk around a farmers market again. It’s a treat to come home and make a pasta with purchases. You’re right about the guanciale. it doesn’t take much to add a nice flavor to a dish. I love it! 🙂

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    • Thank you, Mary Frances. I really do enjoy going to the market every week and, far too often, some sort of pasta results. Thank goodness there are no shopping carts and I have to carry my purchases. There’d be no stopping me otherwise. 🙂

      Like

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  59. This is the first year I had a nice big garlic harvest in my garden, and I’m wishing I had known about this recipe for using the scapes! I’ll have to bookmark it for next year – what a delightful looking dish.

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    • Thank you so much. Congratulations on your harvest! I envy all of you with your garlic beds. I just don’t have the room for them or else I’d definitely plant my own. It’s not like I haven’t any use for it. 🙂

      Like

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