Peach Ice Cream – Revisited with Custard and Nectar

 

Yes, I know it’s getting a little late for ice cream recipes and peaches are all but gone from the farmers markets, but I just couldn’t let this one sit around until next year. My previous peach ice cream used sour cream for its base. Today’s recipe uses custard for a base but it, also, uses peach nectar for added flavor.  That peach nectar also affects the ice cream’s texture. One of my tasters said it was like a cross between sorbet and ice cream. Despite its great taste, though, you may prefer a more traditional, custard only, ice cream. Lucky for us all, Betsy has already shared her recipe for peach ice cream on her blog, Bits & Breadcrumbs. (Do take a few minutes to check out both her recipe and her blog. You won’t be disappointed.)  So, you now have 3 peach ice creams from which to choose but if you think I’m done with peaches, you’d be mistaken. Next week I’ll share a recipe for peach cobbler, with a twist.

This ice cream will have a better “mouth feel” if you fully purée the peaches.  Although you can process the peaches until merely chunky, I find it better if they are puréed until completely smooth. This recipe will make 3 quarts of ice cream. That’s quite a bit if you’ve a smaller machine like mine. The saving grace of my machine is that I purchased it on Amazon during a sale in which I received an additional freezing canister for free. That additional canister means that I can get all 3 quarts made and put away in one night. To see how it’s done, be sure to check out the Notes section below.

Now, I’m already in Michigan, where Zia and I have plans to stock her freezer with ravioli and sausage, that is if we can keep Max occupied elsewhere. So, I’ll keep the posts for today and next week on the short side. Given the sorry state of that area’s internet coverage, I hope you’ll understand if I’m not quick to respond to your comments or to leave a remark on your blogs.

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Peach Ice Cream Recipe

Ingredients

  • 4 cups peeled and chopped peaches (about 3 lbs or 6 large peaches)
  • 1 cup nectar
  • ½ cup sugar
  • 4 egg yolks
  • 4 cups milk
  • 1 cup half-and-half
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice
  • ¼ tsp cinnamon
  • pinch of salt
  • sliced fresh peaches and toasted pecans for garnish (optional but strongly advised)

Directions

  1. In a large bowl, combine peaches, sugar, and nectar. Mix thoroughly.
  2. Working in batches, use a food processor or blender to fully purée the peach mixture until smooth. Refrigerate.
  3. In a mixing bowl, whisk together egg yolks and milk until fully blended. Add the egg mixture to a heavy-bottomed pan or double boiler (my favorite). Heat over a med-high heat, stirring constantly, until it thickens and a custard forms, about 20 to 25 minutes. DO NOT ALLOW TO BOIL.
  4. Once thick enough to coat the back of a wooden smooth, remove from heat and pour the custard through a fine mesh strainer into the reserved peach purée. Add the half-and-half, lemon juice, cinnamon, and salt, whisking until fully combined.
  5. Cover and place in the refrigerator for at least 4 hours.
  6. Make your ice cream using this peach custard and following your machine’s instructions. Place in freezer until frozen to your liking.
  7. When ready to serve, garnish with sliced peaches and toasted pecans. (See Variations)

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Variations

This is a good ice cream recipe but it is so much better when served with sliced fresh peaches and toasted pecans. To prepare the peaches, just peel and slice a ripe peach, putting the slices in a resealable container. Sprinkle a little sugar on top, seal the container, and place in the fridge for at least 30 minutes, giving the fruit a chance to macerate. In the meantime, toast the pecan chips in a small frying pan over medium heat. Be attentive or they’ll burn before you know it. Add a little of both to your ice cream cup for a dessert that is just about perfect.

Notes

As I’ve mentioned, this recipe will make enough peach custard to make 3 quarts of ice cream. That is 2 quarts too many for a single machine like mine and even though I’ve got a 2nd canister, that still leaves me with one quart of custard too many. Since it takes a full 24 hours to freeze my canister, this recipe could stretch out over 2 days, at least. Here’s what I do to get around the problem.

Once the custard is chilled and ready to be put into the machine, I put it into the canister and refrigerate the excess.  When it’s ready, after about 25 minutes, I quickly dump the newly formed ice cream into a container, place it in the freezer,  and quickly refill the canister with more custard. If there’s leftover ice cream in the canister, all the better. After 25 minutes, I will not have ice cream but I will have a thicker, chilled custard.  I then pour this custard into the unused frozen canister, which I’ve kept in the freezer until now. No need to let the machine process for all the 25 minutes, 15 minutes will do. Quickly remove the ice cream, use it to fill another quart container, and place it in the freezer. I then pour the remainder of the custard into the same canister and let her rip! Surprisingly, after about 30 minutes, I’ll have another quart of ice cream ready to be frozen. And what do I do with 3 quarts of ice cream? I give 2 quarts to my tasters and keep one for me.

Adapted from Southern Living, July 2005

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It’s déjà vu all over again …

Well, with today’s recipe being an ice cream, what better recipe to pull from the past than the one for pickles, Bread & Butter Pickles? These are not preserved but are kept in the refrigerator, where they will keep for weeks. You needn’t worry about that, though. These pickles will disappear long before freshness is an issue. You can read the recipe by clicking HERE.

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The parting shot …

For the past 13 weeks, I’ve ended each blog entry with a photo. Well, I’ve no more roses to share but I didn’t think it right to abruptly stop the practice. So, I give you this last photo and, although this may have nothing to do with roses, it is, in its own way, every bit as memorable. With thanks to Chris.

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107 thoughts on “Peach Ice Cream – Revisited with Custard and Nectar

  1. Ha, ha. That’s a really funny photo. Yes, that’s exactly how it is. We are so looking forward to peach season. Haven’t seen one in the shops as yet, it’s a bit too soon, but I am on the look out. Lovely looking ice cream John xx

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    • Hey, Charlie! I’m so jealous that your peach season will be starting soon. We can always find them here but they aren’t nearly as good as locally grown in season. That’s OK. There are apples and pears to be had now.

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    • I’ve got plenty of ice cream in my freezer, Roger, and made 6 quarts for my Zia and her neighbors during my visit. I need to give some of this away before I start eating it all. Ha! Who am I kidding?

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  2. Even though it’s not peach season in Australia yet, and for so many reasons I’ll probably not make icecream of any kind, I love reading these posts – I can dream, I can imagine the fragrance and flavour – that it’s so far from my reality, makes it even more wonderful 🙂

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    • I hear ya, MD. I’m in the process of clearing out my freezers. I’ve not bought any protein in weeks, using only what I’ve frozen. I’m finally starting to have room again. Now, if only I could find a way to get rid of all of this ice cream. I guess I’ll just have to eat it. Poor me.

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  3. What a lovely recipe and one I think I might prefer over the custard base version. I think you might have a typo in the ingredient line for the nectar.
    Yes, I’ve seen that photo before, very funny shot. The same reason why we had to put a bunny gate on Dustie’s room (she was our Bunny who acted like a dog), she just bugged us too much at night. Now I’m wishing for just one more night of bugging! She’s been gone almost six years.

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    • Thanks, Eva, for both your comment and for pointing out my error. I wasn’t sure how widespread that photo was circulated but I get a laugh out of it every time I see it. I, too, have “lost” pets and it’s funny how the most irritating things they did are often the ones we miss most. Pets sure do have a way of working their way into our hearts and lives. 🙂

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  4. I am still laughing with your parting photo… I am peachy keen for this dessert, creamy and delicious and fresh. Those peaches look gorgeous. Please have a relaxing visit in Michigan and enjoy the fall weather. Take care, BAM

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    • I’m glad you enjoyed the picture, BAM. I was lucky. The weather in Michigan was still very much Summer, although signs of Fall were beginning to show themselves. Still it was a wonderful trip.

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    • Hello, Tanya! Yes, the doggy sounds would have been a nice addition but I fear that the cursing that woman made when she woke up to find a dog’s leg across her face may have made my blog not suitable for children. 🙂

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  5. I like that you pureed the peaches until smooth, I bet that makes a huge difference! I am intrigued, if this was described as tasting like a cross between sorbet and ice cream, then I have to try it!!!! On a separate note, how fun that you get to spend time in Michigan working in the kitchen with your Zia!!!

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    • Yes, Tanya, working with Zia in the kitchen is special and I look forward to it every year. Not only do I learn a new recipes and “tricks” but we reminisce and very often I’ll learn some long-forgotten family history, as well.

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  6. We’ve had our best peach season in years up here – the pick-your-own up the road is still going strong! Wonderful recipe, and great timing for the end of the season…
    Love to Zia, and I hope you can find some time for puffball-gathering while you’re there 🙂

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    • Thanks, Marie. I had a very nice visit home but, unfortunately, no puff balls. I was about a month too soon, although one can never be sure. For all I know, the heatwave and lack of rain may prevent them from growing this year. That’s OK. There’s always next year. 🙂

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  7. I don’t think I would mind the mixture of sorbet and ice cream texture at all! I think it would only add to the experience. It sounds so good! Last week I was able to make two different kinds of ice cream from coconut milk in my new Kitchenaid mixer. Organic strawberry and nutty coconut with toasted coconut, honey baked almonds, and chunks of belgian chocolate! I never got around to blogging them so you know what that means…I’ll just have to force myself to make (and eat) them again. Ha!

    When you talked about a fridge stuffed with ravioli and sausage, it made my stomach growl! Must be time for breakfast….

    The picture of sleeping with pets is so true. When my husband is traveling both dogs (even the big one!) are allowed to sleep with me. I end up being curled up in a ball while they take over the entire bed!

    Enjoy your time making ravioli! Talk to you soon ~ April

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    • Before I say anything. Congrats on your new KitchenAid Mixer! I really enjoy mine and wouldn’t trade it for any other brand. I’m glad you put it so such good use, too. Making ice cream. Brava!
      Yes, it was a productive trip and Zia’s freezer is well-stocked. And this time around, Max was only able to snag a few ravioli. Either hes getting old or we’re getting better at guarding our work. I really enjoy these “sessions” with her. It is a very enjoyable way to spend a late Summer afternoon.
      I knew that photo would be a hit with every dog owner, no matter the size. I still chuckle whenever I see it. 🙂

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    • Thanks, Sally. I hesitated sharing that photo; I’d received it a few weeks ago. I was afraid it may have been seen by many already. Judging by the response, I was wrong and I’m now glad I posted it. It’s an experience all dog owners share. 🙂

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  8. Can I be one of your taste testers? Please? This ice cream sounds delightful with the nectar, and it’s making me wish I had peaches so I could try it. Next year I’m going to freeze some. And thanks so much for the very kind mention, John. 🙂 I’m bookmarking this for next year’s peaches…it sounds a bit lighter than my version, and so that must mean it’s healthier, right? 😉 One of our cats weighs almost 14 lbs. and she’s a total bed hog, almost exactly like shot 2. I wake up each day in some very contorted postion that the cat has pushed me into. The things we’ll do for our pets. Have a super time in Michigan with Zia!

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    • Hello, Betsy, and thanks for commenting. I was glad to have remembered your recipe. I was going to make another batch of this recipe but without the nectar. The more I thought about it, the more it sounded familiar and that led me back to your blog. This recipe definitely has a lot of peach flavor. The texture, though, is not a creamy one like most frozen custards. My friend was right when she sid it was more of a cross between a sorbet and ice cream. I, too, had cats and one of them insisted on sharing my pillow. I don’t know how many mornings I awoke to a face full of fur, her body pressed up next to me. That photo is so very true!

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  9. I love the photo, John. So funny! Well, I loved the previous peach ice cream with the sour cream, but I do love “custard-y” ice cream, so I’ll definitely make this soon. I think our peaches are getting a little slim, but the grocery stores still have them-not quite the same as the Farmer’s Markets, but they’ll do. I know you’ll have a wonderful time with Zia. It’s wonderful that you can go and stay a bit.

    I haven’t mentioned that since my dad came out of the hospital in June he hasn’t been allowed to take any food by mouth…but his swallow reflex is improving and we are hopeful that soon he’ll be allowed at least a little soft food. I’ve been setting aside your ice cream recipes because I don’t care what season it is, ice cream is a treat! When he can eat again, I’ll be making ice cream on a continual basis! I’ll let you know! Debra

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    • Hello, Debra! My friend was right about this ice cream’s texture. It is a cross between a sorbet and a frozen custard. The peach nectar brings a lot of flavor but, also, a lot of liquid. WHen I was in Michigan, I made 6 quarts of ice cream for Zia and her friends. I made them Blueberry Swirl Cheesecake ice cream. You needn’t include the blueberry swirl nor graham cracker crumbles if your Dad is having trouble swallowing. I have to say, though, that this is the favorite ice cream recipe that I’ve served to my family and friends. It has become the standard against which all of my other ice creams are judged.
      Your poor Dad has had such a tough Summer, Debra. I hope Fall brings him enough improvement so that some normalcy returns to his life. Being able to eat some soft food would be a great place to start.

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  10. I think this peach ice cream recipe is a little more up our alley with the creaminess involved. Now the question is whether or not to load up on Colorado Peaches prior to heading back to NYC? I’ll see what I can con Liz into handling. 😉

    Have a great time in Michigan with Zia!

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    • THanks, Jed, the visit went very well. This recipe has a ton of peach flavor but it, too, isn’t the creamiest. The peach nectar brings liquid as well as flavor to the mix. It is truly more a cross between a sorbet and ice cream. Betsy’s recipe over at Bits & Breadcrumbs is a true frozen custard and more to your liking.
      Moving from the Equal Rights State to the Empire State. That should be easy. hehehe

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  11. That bottom photo is a winner! Great notes on how to make 3 quarts of ice cream with a 1-quart container – very useful. I haven’t made peach ice cream in ages, but I agree that it’s better when it’s fully pureed. And I’ve never served it with sliced peaches – excellent idea. Thanks for this.

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  12. haha…that photo is the best!! That’s why my dogs sleep in their cage!! So, you know how I wish we were neighbors…well considering all that ice cream you now have, I’d be popping over right now (or when you return) for my scoop! Seriously, peach is my favorite flavor and having it pureed thru the ice cream has to make every bite…and lick…so delicious!!

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    • It was my plan for Max that he spend his nights in his crate — but he was only supposed to grow to “35 pounds, 40 pounds at the most.” He grew to 80 pounds and outgrew 2 crates. He now has a very large carrier but it is only good enough for short periods of time. I’d never leave him in there for 8 hours.
      Linda, if we lived near each other I’d have to set up a room for Zia. She’d insist on a seat at the Chefs’ Table. It is one of my greatest pleasures to cook a new dish for her. I think it the best compliment when she asks for a recipe. 🙂

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  13. pure peaches and cream John! beautiful recipe! I’ll miss seeing your roses til next summer (and know that YOU will!) but the whole sleeping with pets is priceless! 🙂 Now off to the pickles!

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  14. John, this recipe s too dangerous: I am afraid if I make 3 quarts of ice cream that would be all we eat until it’s gone… Especially the peach one: everyone in my family loves peaches. And don’t you worry, there’s always a hot place somewhere that would appreciate such a great and cool dessert: we are still around 100 somewhere! 🙂
    When you mentioned stocking up Zia’s freezer with ravioli and sausages, it made my heart melt: we have the same tradition: family gets together before cold months arrive, and make raviolis, it’s like ravioli family reunion… Sigh… I miss those gatherings even though we do have ravioli making days when everyone is involved… Have a great time with Zia, and post some pictures, please! 🙂

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    • As I mentioned in the post, Marina, this recipe isn’t quite like most frozen custards. It is more a blend of sorbet & frozen custard. The peach nectar brings a ton of flavor but also more liquid. Betsy’s recipe at Bits & Breadcrumbs is a true frozen custard.
      Mom and Zia used to work together, sharing the “results.” When Mom was taken from us, Zia did it all herself but now, approaching 90, it is too much for her. About this time each year, I bring my KitchenAid mixer, a few attachments, and we get to work. It’s a great deal of fun and we laugh through most of the afternoons. I also have learned a great deal of our family history during these “sessions.” The fact that we have ravioli and sausage at the end has become secondary for me. 🙂

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  15. Peach is obviously one of your favorite fruits, just wondering, when at their, peak, do you freeze some for winter use? Our peach is coming to an end, bought some few days ago and they are grainy.

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    • Hello, Norma. I fear I cannot help you. A number of years ago, I froze a few batches of filling for peach cobbler. All I had to do was thaw it and bake it as I would any cobbler. Well, that was the year my basement freezer died. I didn’t realize it until it was far too late to salvage anything. So, I really cannot say whether they freeze well. I can say that they do defrost. 🙂
      Grainy peaches? I didn’t get any of those this year, I’m very happy to say. I think that is a sure sign that peach season is over. 😦

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  16. Ok that last shot was hilarious! I am certainly going to be making this ice cream soon. At the risk of being a complete prat though i may have to use canned peaches, all the fresh ones are GONE!! Gone i tell you! GONE!! love to Zia, My favourite Aunty! c

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    • I had a great visit with Zia, Mar, and yes, I sent along your greetings. Being her husband, “Uncle”, was from Canada, I show her posts from all our Canadian friends. You’re the “Ontario woman who vacations on the other side of the lake”. I suggested we take a swim to meet you but she declined. Maybe next year. 🙂

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      • How sweet! It’s getting a little cold for that swim, so I agree it will have to wait until next year.

        I just love hearing how interested your Zia is your blog and all the comments you get. She must be so pleased by how you’re documenting the family recipes. I’m guessing you’re her favourite nephew!

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        • Zia does know a a number of you, although certainly not by name. We’ll sit and I’ll show her posts from her favorites. Your pizzoccheri recipe put you on “the list.” Like me, she cannot believe how many people are following the blog. Sometimes she is amazed that I remember some of the things I’ve written about and very often will add something I’ve forgotten. And, yes, I’m her favorite but for reasons yet to be revealed. Now that’s a story!

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  17. Bwahahaha – love the dog photo! We can put this re-visit on a loop and we would all be very happy!
    Right, now, I am off to pack my bags so I can meet you at Zia to get my lessons on pasta – wait for me to get there before you start…
    🙂 Mandy

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    • We waited and waited for you, Mandy, until we could wait no more. Nevertheless, kind woman that she is, she made enough ravioli for you when you do make it to Michigan. The only problem is that her family and friends all know that her freezer is now fully stocked. I imagine her dinner table is going to very popular in the weeks and months ahead. THe wise visitor will arrive sooner rather than later. Just sayin …

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  18. That last picture is so true!! LOL!! That could have been taken in my house….if the dog was a Lab…

    John, I really love this recipe. I’ve been making a delicious peach sorbet, which we both love, but now that it’s a little cooler outside, I find myself graving something with a little more….um…..what’s the word? LOL! In any case, I think this custard-base is just what I was thinking of. Thank you for sharing this one. Safe travels!! Have FUN!

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    • Thanks, Sarah. Yes, that picture never fails to make me laugh. No matter what size the pupster, we’ve all been there. This recipe is still like a sorbet but is a custard too. Betsy’s recipe is a true frozen custard, if that is what you’re looking for. The peach nectar in my recipe brings a lot of flavor but also dillutes the custard a bit. Make ’em both. Why not?
      I had a wonderful visit back home and will be posting something later in the week, once I get caught up a bit.

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    • Thanks, Lisa. We had a wonderful time together. 2 afternoons we made ravioli and a 3rd was spent making sausage patties. At night, we traded cooking duties, one night she cooked, the next I did. And the weather was perfect for the entire week. Really could not have asked for anything more. 🙂

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  19. Thanks for making me laugh John. Sadie often sneaks into my bed about three in the morning and pushes her back into mine. Lately, I’ve been ending up with back aches in the morning and I am having a power struggle to give her a push right back off the bed. Most days I win, not always. The ice cream sounds fabulous! We still have plenty of peaches here at the farmers’ markets but i guess soon they will disappear. Have a great trip!

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    • I think every dog owner whose dog isn’t crated at night can identify with that photo. I sleep in a queen-sized bed and still end up hugging the side of the bed while Max is sprawled across the other 90% of the mattress. How did we let this happen? 🙂
      It was a great trip, Geni. Thanks for the well-wishes.

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  20. Lol! I love that last photo. My one cat (he thinks he’s my third child) likes to sleep on the top of my head at night. It’s much more like the second photo! Fabulous recipe. I’m all for peach ice cream any time of year. And I would enjoy it puréed until smooth too. Can’t wait for your cobbler recipes. There are few things better than cobblers in my book (Pasta maybe…enjoyed your aglio e olio last night. My parents loved it too. 🙂 )

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      • Thanks, Kristy. We had a great visit and I showed her the latest from your SousChefs. Like me, she’s impressed by their kitchen skills and marvels at all of the foods they’ll try. I told her that we’re going to their restaurant’s opening. Make a note, Kristy. 2 for the Early Bird Special on “Opening Day.” 🙂

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    • I envy you right now, Celia. You’re at the start of the growing season and ours is fading fast. There’s even talk of frost to the north of us. Frost already!!! This will take some getting used to. 🙂

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  21. Awww… hugs to Zia.. and Max while I’m at it! And your roses! And your pickles too.. but the ice cream.. giving it a hug for me would never be enough! I need to have a really large spoon and I want to catch a batch of this just as it’s finished in the canister.. you know the part where you pull the paddle out and the ice cream is still soft and stuck to the paddle? Then.. that would be just heaven!! Hmm.. but I’d want some of that sausage and ravioli as well, would that be all right.. eaten in that order?? Have a wonderful holiday!! xx

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    • Shhh! Don’t tell anyone about the paddle! Next thing you know, people will be crowding my kitchen, hoping to grab the paddle. That is mine, all mine!
      We certainly made enough of both to ensure a hearty dinner for you when you visit. By the way, you’re known as the “Canadian woman from Calgary who writes poetry with her recipes.” We Bartolini have some sort of genetic failing making it virtually impossible to remember names. This Zia will remember. “Barb” she will not. She does, however, find you posts beautiful. 🙂

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  22. It’s NEVER too late for ice cream recipes! Especially since it’s still in the high eighties here…ick. This sounds so refreshing and delicious. I wouldn’t mind a large bowl. 🙂 I’m cracking up over that last photo with the dogs–it’s way too true.

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    • If I can put a smile on your face, Kay, then I know the post is a good one. Your blog never fails to give me something to smile about and I’m more than happy to return the favor. 🙂

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  23. I was waiting for your custard-based recipe. Not sure if there still will be peaches available when I’m back home in October, but I can always wait for next season. Thanks for sharing.
    By the way, I’m never patient enough to make custard in a double boiler over medium heat. I use an instant-read thermometer with a probe, and heat over high heat initially, stirring all the time, and lower the heat when getting close to the target temperature of 85C/185F. It will coat the back of the spoon then, after only a few minutes (depending on the amount of custard and the power of the stove).

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    • Hello, Stefan. Thanks for commenting. I, too, used to make my custard in a thick bottomed pot — until last Christmas. I was making Zuppa Inglese and using 24 egg yolks to make my custard. Well, I had to leave the stove for a minute and came back to a curdled mess. It was Christmas Eve and I had to rush to a store to buy more eggs. Now I use a double boiler. It is much more forgiving. And I always buy extra eggs, just in case. 🙂

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      • The trick with the thermometer does indeed mean that you have to stay with it the whole time. I always buy extra eggs when I have to separate them, or seperate each egg above a small bowl first to avoid having to start with new eggs if I mess up the last egg…

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        • My Mom taught me the “bowl trick” when she first started teaching me and I’ve done it ever since. It’s not worth the risk of dumping eggs because some yolk got into the whites.

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  24. hehehehe that final photo really made me laugh…the same thing happens if I allow any of the kids to sleep in the our room 🙂
    I sadly have not used the icecream machine despite my best intentions and now I am not sure I can find any good peaches, maybe next year or maybe I will find some peaches in the market that will call to me 🙂

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    • My Max is double the size I thought he would be. Some days we look just like that picture. I probably should be cross with him but i cannot helo but laugh and be thankful no one else can see it. 🙂
      I went the farmers market yesterday and was surprised to see peaches were still available. I’ve never seen such a long peach season. Even so, I had to pass them up. It is time for apples and plums and pears. I have to move on. 🙂

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