A Pasta for the Open

I don’t know about you but when I hear that the US Open Tennis Championships are about to begin, I immediately think of pasta. I mean, how could I not? So, when the Open starts, I naturally prepare some form of pasta to mark the occasion, just as so many of you do, I’m sure. In the past, it didn’t really matter what pasta was selected for that meal, and my choices have ranged from Bucatini to Ziti, and several pastas in-between. This all changed, however, one day when I toured the newly discovered Italian market’s pasta aisles. That’s where I discovered Racchette, a racket-shaped pasta.

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Although I’m certainly no expert, I think it safe to say that Racchette are a relatively new pasta and virtually all are manufactured by machines. I mean, I just cannot imagine Nonnas — be they from Today or the 19th Century — rolling out dough sheets and making these little rackets. I know my Nonnas certainly didn’t — but if yours did, please leave a comment and I’ll be more than happy to amend this paragraph. Moving beyond Racchette’s manufacture, I can say, in all honesty, that the first any of the Bartolini women heard of Racchette was when I mentioned the pasta to my Zia a couple of weeks ago during a conversation. It should come as no surprise to anyone, therefore, that there is no Bartolini family recipe for Racchette.

Without a family recipe to use, I did what most do in this situation:  I googled it. That search returned thousands of results but most were very similar. That base recipe is one that I will make but I’ll do it in Spring, when the ingredients are fresh and readily available. Onward I went, wading through more of the search results until I came upon a recipe that was presented by the company that made the pasta. I went into kitchen, grabbed the box, and, sure enough, the recipe was on the back of the box of Racchette. (Isn’t it always the last place you look?) That recipe, Racchette California Style, is the one I’ll share today.

The recipe, as written, calls for red, white, and Marsala wines. When I prepared it, I used what I had on-hand, Pinot Grigio, Merlot, and a sweet Marsala. You may have better wine selections in mind (Jed) and, if you do, I hope you’ll use the Comments section to make your suggestions — and that includes ideas beyond wine selection. I think you’ll find this to be a simple, easy to prepare recipe. All you need to do now is to find the Racchette.

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Racchette “California Style” Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1 lb Racchette
  • 1 handful fresh basil
  • 2 tbsp pine nuts
  • 1 clove garlic, smashed
  • 1 tsp grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1 tsp grated Pecorino Romano cheese
  • ½ cup white wine (I used Pinot Grigio)
  • ½ cup red wine (I used Merlot)
  • ½ cup Marsala wine (I used a sweet variety)
  • 2 tbsp butter, softened

Directions

  1. Bring a large pot of salted water to boil and cook Racchette per package directions or to taste.
  2. Meanwhile, add the basil, pine nuts, garlic, and cheese to a food processor until blended.
  3. Add the wines and process until well-mixed.
  4. When cooked to you liking drain the pasta. Add the softened butter to the sauce, giving it a creamier texture.
  5. Add the sauce to the pasta, toss, garnish with additional grated cheese & cracked pepper (optional), and serve.

Inspired by the De Cecco company’s Racchette California Style recipe

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Notes

I must admit to having been surprised by this pasta. Neither Zia nor myself have ever used wine in pasta without cooking it, even if only for a few minutes. Using a total of 1½ cups of “raw” wine to dress a pound of pasta is completely new and something I never would have considered doing on my own. And the verdict? I enjoyed it. I make simple pastas with garlic, mushrooms, lemon, basil, or cheese as the predominant flavor within the “sauce”. Why not wine? Of course, if you’re not a wine lover, this dish isn’t for you. On the other hand, if you do enjoy a glass of wine every now and again, you just might want to give this dish a try.

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It’s déjà vu all over again …

Just as was done in the last 2 posts, today’s look back will take advantage of the season’s harvest. Illinois is a leading producer of corn in this country and, even though the state is suffering the effects of a severe drought, there’s still plenty of corn in the farmers markets — at least in this area. This recipe for Corn Relish comes from Zia’s kitchen and is one that she prepared and canned every year. You can make it as spicy as you like and it is a terrific way to add a little Summer to your meal in the dead of Winter. Just be sure to make a double batch. It’s the only way to ensure you’ll have a few jars when Winter comes. Click HERE to see the full recipe.

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By any other name …

In morning light …

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Later that day

Never one to show up on time, she’s finally bloomed. Meet the last of my girls and last of my roses, “Marilyn Monroe”. Officially said to be apricot-colored, some say that the blooms are flesh-toned and mirror the complexion of its namesake.

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120 thoughts on “A Pasta for the Open

  1. John, this pasta is so intriguing with its wine sauce, and it sounds delicious. I agree, the racchette is the perfect pasta to celebrate a tennis match! I certainly can’t imagine anyone making it from hand (not even you!).

    Your Marilyn rose is beautiful, like her namesake! Thank you for sharing your rose garden with us this summer.

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    • Even if someone does make this one by hand, Mar, I’ll take a pass, thank you very much. I have to draw the line somewhere and I think that no matter where that line is drawn, little tennis rackets will be on the other side. 🙂
      And you’re welcome about the roses. I had my doubts about Marilyn surviving, so, seeing a bud on her was a big surprise. She just bloomed last week so her timing could not have been better.

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    • It’s that Italian market I discovered, Roger. Every time I walk down their pasta aisles, I find a new one. Little tennis rackets? How was I supposed to walk passed that one? OK… I’m weak. There I admit it.

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  2. OK! Please do teach an ignorant child from Down Under!! Why do the US Open Tennis C’ships equate with pasta 🙂 ! ? Interesting shape admittedly and almost pesto ingredients: why both white and red wine? Am in NO way arguing, just wondering 😀 !!! And I DO love the rose: almost similar to the ones budding in my garden at the moment!

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    • Every thing in my life somehow equates with pasta. This was one of those rare occasions where I found a new pasta at the right time. As for the wines, I’ve no idea why it calls for a red and a white. I chose 2 dry wines to counter the sweet Marsala. It’s the manufacturer’s recipe but, I must admit, it was a good dish of pasta.
      Who knows? Maybe you have a Marilyn Monroe in your garden. She’s a real beauty and if yours are similar, they, too, must be something to see.

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      • Thank you! Your reply is truly ‘good enough’ for me to try the dish 🙂 ! Roses: well, not THAT much of a rose person, but have a rather wellknown ‘Crepuscule’ standard [ie, I have bugged e’one around the world with it, but don’t know your email: aren’t you lucky!!] to ‘pester’ others!!

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  3. I have never seen racquet shaped pasta before (and I’ve seen some unusual shaped pasta – kangaroo is one I can mention) but the recipe and end result look wonderful, and I do love wine – sometimes I even put it in the food 😉

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    • I’m with you about the wine. In fact, one of the unmentioned benefits of this recipe is that, at the end, you have an open bottle of red and another of white to “dispose” of. Cooking does have its rewards. 🙂

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  4. I am just waiting for some grandma to step in any say, “But every Sunday we spend hours weaving pasta into little tennis rackets of course!” How adorable are these and the wine and the butter and the parley and cheese. So simple but ohh so delicious for this event. Have a super day. BAM

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    • Now that would be funny, BAM! Can you imagine? 🙂
      This is such a simple recipe. The sauce can be made completely while the pasta is cooking. It could not be easier.
      Have a great day, too.

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  5. What a giggle! Racket shaped pasta for the tennis. I sometimes go to an Italian Deli in London and I stand by the pasta, and wonder, and wonder what to do with it all. Well I should stop wondering and either a) look on the back of the packet or b) much more pleasurably read your blog !
    I love the idea of the ingredients !!
    and I suppose Maralyn just had to have the last word – beautiful !!

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    • Hello, Claire. I could not believe them when I first saw them. And then to find a completely different recipe for preparing them. Who knew? I know from now on I’l be paying more attention to the recipes on the packaging, something I’ve never done.
      Yes, she may have been last but Marilyn certainly isn’t the least.

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  6. I was wondering for a moment if you actually made this pasta but I can honestly say I’ve never seen any like it before! I just read something horrific though! Due to drought conditions in the corn belt there may be a shortage of – GASP – popcorn later. Meet me at Garretts so we can hoard! Marilyn is lovely.

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    • Good morning, Teri. This was a completely new shape and recipe for me, too. Yes, I saw a news report about the popcorn shortage. It’s price has increased 50% thus far. The good news is that this area’s theaters won’t be increasing the price of their popped corn. The owners think that we consumers wouldn’t pay it. The bad news is that means if they can absorb a 50% increase in costs, then we’ve been paying too much all along. Grrrr!
      I’ve no idea what Garrett’s intends to do but this could mean shorter lines. With Winter coming, that’s good news!

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    • Hello, Mandy. This pasta and recipe were as much a surprise to me as they were to you. 3 wines in one pasta and none of them cooked? I took that as a challenge and just had to try it. I’m glad I did, too. Have a great week! 🙂

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  7. I’m fairly certain I will never come across racket shape pasta in these parts, are stores are very limited! I wish I did, because I would duplicate this recipe to a T! But I love pasta and I love wine. Which means I should probably grab, maybe wagon wheel pasta and recreate this fore me! We have an Old West Fest opening near by, I’ll do it in honor of that! Thanks for the recipe and the Marilyn Monroe Rose!

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    • Hello, Tanya. I was surprised to find it here! I’d never heard of such a thing as racket-shaped pasta. I’m sure that wagon wheel pasta would be a good substitute, especially for something like an Old West Fest. Sounds like fun! Marilyn is a beauty, isn’t she? 🙂

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  8. I walk past all these clever pasta shapes in the store, and think, “Pasta Salad.” or “Mac and Cheese”… not “Dinner!” Cool way to celebrate the Open, though. And, just think – when they start trotting-out the tree shapes at Christmas, you’ll already have an idea! 😉
    The sauce sounds good, and Marilyn does her namesake proud!

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    • I’m with you, Marie. I rarely serve oddly shaped pastas any way but in a salad. After my experience here, though, I’m going to check the back of the boxes more closely. I learned a completely different “sauce” with this pasta, one that I’ll definitely be making again.
      I though Marilyn was a goner. Seeing that bud appear was practically miraculous. I feel much better that it will last the Winter now.

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  9. You know I think I have seen them B4…never bought them though, now don’t gasp, but after reading “Wheat Belly” I am doing the no grain, no sugar thing and I am dropping this weight finally…they are saying that the epidemic of obesity is from the wheat and the grains and sugar too, I’m going paleo baby!…down 19 lbs so far just by giving up grains!

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    • I give you so much credit Maria. Congratulations on your weight loss! I certainly have a “wheat belly” but just cannot give up my pasta or bread. I shudder at the thought! Members of a blogging friend’s family have gone “Paleo”. That’s a diet I could follow — so long as I can have pasta a couple nights a week. 😉

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  10. What an interesting pasta John and I love the tie-in to the Open! I can see this pasta holding onto the sauce very well. I too am quite surprised of the raw wine, was is not harsh? And alcoholly? Not that that is bad, I would think its rather strong against the cheese and subtle flavour of the pine nuts.
    The rose is spectacular! Although our days are still sticky, hot and humid, the nights are cooling down and fall us definitely just around the corner. A few trees had already started to turn up north. But I noticed that the garden gets its second wind this time of year. A small consolation to the impending chill of winter.

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    • Thank you, Eva. There is definitely an “edge” to this pasta but not nearly as much as I had feared. The “sauce” is more like a thin, wine-based pesto. I have never had a pasta dressed liked this — and I’ve eaten quite a few different pastas. The recipe intrigued me and I had to try it. I’m glad I did.
      We’ve another hot one forecast for today and then our temps are supposed to cool for a few days. Although the temps keep rebounding, one of these times they won’t. Then they’ll just keep getting colder, as I’m sure you’re very much aware. It’s only a matter of time.

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  11. What an intriguing sauce, indeed! You know, the only thing I would add to it apart from all the goodies already there would be red pepper flakes. I love how they give this concentrate heat in a bite here and there, and I think it could go great with all other components.

    Now you got me in a serious search for “rachette” pasta – too cute, and the way it holds the sauce in the little holes makes it even better!

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    • Your use of red pepper flakes is so very Italian, Sally! I prefer to add them early in the cooking process so that the heat is spread evenly through the pasta. According to one of our chefs known for his Italian cooking, the Italians add them much later because, like you, they like that “bite” of heat, here and there. His name is Mario Batali you might enjoy his cooking style. It is quite authentic.
      Don’t get stymied looking for racchette. I’m sure “wagon wheels” (rotelle) or “little flowers” (fiori) to name two, would do just fine as substitutes. Good luck!

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    • The great thing about this recipe, Greg, is that it can be completely prepared while the water is brought to boil and the pasta cooked. Dinner on the table in 20 minutes. That market’s pasta aisles are full of surprises. I find a new one every time I stroll down them.

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    • Hello, Ambrosiana. I’ve never seen 3 wines in one recipe either, let alone all of them “raw”. I just had to try it when I found the recipe. This “sauce” is very much like a thin, wine-based pesto. I was at first concerned because some of it pooled at the bottom of the pasta bowl. That was only temporary, though, and the pasta absorbed all of it. The result was a pasta unlike any I’ve had before — and I’ve eaten a lot of pasta! 🙂

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  12. Bet this sauce was ‘cooked’ up by someone in California wine country. Love the pasta shape, each little cavity filled with wine sauce, divine, will definitely need a nap after the meal.
    Marliyn Monroe is just gorgeous, thanks for sharing.

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    • Thank you, Norma. I, too, think this recipe came to us by way of California. 3 wine in 1 pasta dish is not at all common, at least I’ve never seen it before.
      I was so happy — and surprised — to see that bud appear on Marilyn. She is such a beauty and she really was doing poorly all season. This bloom makes me feel much better about her chances for surviving Winter. What a relief!

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  13. My household loves pasta of all kinds never saw this type and I will be on the lookout for it. Also never considered wine in pasta before so I am eager to try it. I am sure my family will love this recipe . I will also try the corn relish. Thank you for your wonderful shares.

    BE ENCOURAGED! BE BLESSED!

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    • You are very welcome, Francine. After “discovering” this recipe, I’m going to pay more attention to the recipes on the back of the pasta boxes. I’ve always ignored them and heaven only knows what I’ve been missing! 🙂

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  14. As I read through the ingredients the cup and a half of wine really caught my attention–you would hope to have some already on hand or some friends on hand to help you finish the bottles, otherwise it would be tough to justify opening three all at once. I would imagine the sweet Marsala would help balance the other two — I am intrigued by this recipe for sure.
    And might I say, LOVE the rose photos … so delicate, so sweet. 🙂

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    • Hello, Judy! Yes, the large amount of wine added to anything is a lot. Not cooking it at all was unique for me. It is rare for me to use “raw” wine in any dish let alone 3 at once. Because of that, though, it would make a great party dish. It doesn’t even take 30 minutes to prepare, from start to finish, so you can spend time with your guests and you’ve already opened the wine. That’s my kind of party!
      Thank you for complimenting my roses. This was a tough year for them but I’m hoping for better blooms next year. I know. All gardeners sing the same song … 🙂

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  15. This makes perfect sense though having all those bottles of wine open at the same time must lead to quite the headache.. one for me one for you.. throw away the cork.. or is that just me.. more to the point i have seen those little pastas in our supermarket here. Weird! So i shall make this delightful dish . Enjoy the tennis! c

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    • Hello, Celi! You can find this in your store? Of all the pastas, they stock this one? Too funny! Yes, one of this dish’s advantages is the open wine afterward. It certainly does narrow down the field when wondering what to drink with dinner — and after, too. 🙂
      I didn’t see you around last week and wondered if you’d “lost” me again. Good to see you’re back and hope whatever it was finally got resolved. Have a great day! Cool weather is coming.

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  16. I’m so excited…I’m making this asap!! Wine in pasta? I’m so intrigued and cannot wait to see how it tastes. I trust you so much that I do know I will enjoy it. I’ve got the Marsala already opened from making veal marsala the other day, so I’m always looking for ideas to use the open bottle. And I certainly have NO problem in opening both a red and white!!
    My daughter loves Marilyn Monroe – and so do I but she’s taken over having decorated her apartment with framed artwork of Marilyn everywhere. I’ll have to let her know about the rose – just as beautiful as the woman!

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    • Hi, Linda! There’ll be no mistaking that you’ve included wine in this pasta. The sauce, though, is a very thin pesto, with wine being the predominant flavor. I chose the wines Idid because they were handy and I thought the dry would counter the sweet Marsala. I’m sure that by varying the wine choices, you can make the pasta sauce sweeter or drier in comparison, according to your preferences. I, too, had made veal Marsala a couple days before, so, finding this recipe was heaven-sent.
      I’ve noticed that my roses don’t always bloom as expected. Barbra Streisand was hot pink and not the lavender I was expecting. She was replaced with “Honor” early this Spring. Bella’Roma’s coloring is much softer than “advertised.” I think much has to do with the soil and the amount of direct sunlight. Lucky for me, Marilyn, in my yard, is simply stunning. It would be nice for your daughter if a flower shop offered them by the dozen but I don’t think the rose is popular enough these days for that. And I’m just happy she has survived. It didn’t look good for most of the season.

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  17. I’m saving this wine for one of the nights I work late. It will be perfect after the kids are in bed…I’m going to enjoy it alone (or with Mike if he’s home) on the couch with a glass of wine and a favorite TV show. It will be perfect! Love the little pasta shapes! I’ll have to check if ours has it. Love the picture of your last rose of the season. It was well worth the wait – she is beautiful!

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    • Yes, Kristy, this recipe is certainly not “kid friendly”. Aside form the obvious, the alcohol content, the taste is unmistakably wine. Few kids would enjoy that. Adults, though, are a different story and if you’re a wine-loving adult, you’re all set.
      If you cannot find the racchette, look for the “wagon wheels” (rotelle) or “little flowers” (fiori). Either pasta shape will work just as well as the racchette and both are more readily available.
      Thanks, Kristy, Marilyn kept me waiting but she’s a real beauty!

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  18. Gosh, whenever anything happens I usually think about pasta. I even consider it every morning for breakfast, although often (OK, usually) don’t carry through with that idea. I’ve not heard of Racchette – cool shape, great name. And I’ve also not heard of using uncooked wine as a sauce. It sounds really odd, but obviously it tastes good. Fun post – thanks.

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    • Thanks, John. See? You know what it is like. My Zia and I joke that we could eat pasta every day and we would never complain. You’re right, though, everything about this dish, from the pasta shape to the uncooked wine, is odd. Yet, it comes together and really does give you a pasta dish that is utterly unique. I’ve eaten a lot of pasta and that just doesn’t happen very often any more.
      I’m glad you enjoyed the post.

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  19. Hi, John. Love the racchette. Like yourself, I have never used nor thought of using raw wine in a pasta and especially not 1.5 cups! Cooking the wine makes the sauce more “round” and blends the flavors. Now, I have been known to partake of a glass or two of wine with my meal so this recipe intrigues me. We will let you know what we think.

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    • Hello, Richard. As I just replied to John above your comment, everything about this pasta is odd — and that’s what drew me to it. It’s rare to find a pasta that I’ve nothing with which to compare. Even though this is pesto-like, that raw wine is totally unique in my experience. I do hope you will let me know whether you like it. My judgement may have been impaired. In my defense, I did have to do something with those open bottles of wine. 😉

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  20. For sure I have never seen this pasta, but it looks like such fun to eat! An intriguing recipe with all the wine…fortunately I love wine, so it definitely appeals to me. Also makes me want to add a bit of beef to it for some reason. Well I think you saved the best rose for last. Marilyn is voluptuous and spectacular, and such a beauty. Love the morning and later color, and the apricots/pink tinged roses have always been my favorites.

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    • Hello, Betsy. I think beef would be a great addition, given this pasta definitely has a wine flavoring. It is an unusual dish, that’s for sure and that’s what drew me to the recipe. As I’ve mentioned, if you cannot find racchette, you might try “wagon wheels” (rotelle) or “little flowers” (fiori). I’m sure they’ll work just fine.
      I’m glad you enjoyed today’s rose and thanks for your compliments. When Marilyn bloomed last week, quite unexpectedly, I wanted to take a set of pictures showing her bloom in all stages and I would pick the best for today’s post. That morning and early afternoon were beautiful and I got some great pictures. Clouds and a storm pulled in that afternoon and the heavy rains beat the bloom down. I was left with shots in bright morning light or softer in the shade. Honestly, I couldn’t make up my mind. Since it was the last rose of the year, I didn’t think any one would mind 2 shots. Besides, considering I thought that she wasn’t going to make it through Summer, I think she deserves special treatment, just like her namesake. 🙂

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  21. This was a fun post. I must see if I can find those little rackets. I’m intrigued. And is all the wine the reason it’s a “California” recipe? I think so, and it sounds divine, to me! I learned something extra, too. I didn’t really know that Illinois was the leading producer of corn! That’s an important fact to know.

    Marilyn is gorgeous, and just like her namesake…making a dramatic late appearance! 🙂 Debra

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    • I’m so glad you enjoyed today’s post, Debra. Yes, this is some pasta recipe! It is certainly not something you’ll find at the Olive Garden. I agree with you and think the wine is why it is called a California recipe. Well, more to the point, that the wine is uncooked, I’m not aware of any traditional Italian pasta that includes raw wine, especially 3 different ones!
      Just to make sure our Iowa friends don’t get upset, Illinois is a leading producer of corn, number two in fact. Iowa is number one. Sorry to have mislead you.
      Marilyn is a real stunner. Just like in real life, she commands attention when she’s in bloom in the garden. 🙂

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  22. I am intrigued by the use of the three wines too, I simply must try this! I love that everything equates to pasta with you John, I can relate! Just getting the mail makes me hungry for pasta, hahaha. THIS recipe is wonderful and has things in it that I always have here, except the racchette. I’ve never tried that, so I’m going to with this. It looks like a pasta that holds on to the sauce very well.

    Thank you for the relish recipe too! I wasn’t here yet when that was published, so I’m excited to see it and have it. We LOVE corn relish, of course 🙂

    Marilyn! Always late, LOL! Well, she is gorgeous. So perfect, and I love that color! I’m gonna miss the roses this winter….

    Have a wonderful Wednesday John, and thank you!

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    • Thank you, Sarah. It is always a pleasure to hear from you.
      I really do have a one track mind when it comes to pasta and use this blog as an excuse to eat more of it. I head down that pasta aisle and I’m in heaven — and I haven’t even bought anything from the frozen pasta section.
      I love that relish recipe, Sarah. You can make it as spicy as you wish and it is such a great addition to a Winter’s meal, a little bit of Summer on your plate.
      Yes, Marilyn is one gorgeous rose, isn’t she? I’m so glad to see her bloom again, I feel much better about her chances of making it through the Winter now. What a relief!

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      • I think your pasta obsession is perfectly healthy and I can fully support it, lol. And, I’m glad I’m not alone in that. I have poor Hubby making it all the time, but he’s pretty sure he can’t pull off the racchette. No worries, right?

        I so wish I had time to make the relish today. Hopefully this weekend after the Farmer’s Market. I’m soooooooooooo hungry for it now.

        Marilyn IS gorgeous, in fact I showed her off this morning to a couple of friends who love gardening, and in particular, roses. They both gasped when they saw your picture, lol! it was cute. They fell in love with her. Fingers crossed she makes it through the winter! I believe she will.

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        • If your friends are interested in Marilyn, they should talk to their “rose expert” at their garden center. Soon they will be putting in orders for next year’s roses. If they haven’t a specific garden center, this rose can be ordered online for delivery next spring at, Edmund’s Roses. I’ve ordered some of my roses from online growers, particularly the older, less common ones like Judy Garland. If they are interested in older roses, I’ve a place that I’ve used and would recommend, too.
          Now, what about your rose garden?

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          • I’m going to try for one John! Hubby loves the idea…. I should start planning it right now. My friends have a nursery (Milwaukee) that they go to, but they’re both excited to see what Edmund’s has. They send big thanks!! ME TOO!!

            Have a fun weekend John!

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          • Good for you, Sarah! Marilyn will beautify any garden spot. There are other place to order roses, as well, and I’ll be happy to send you the names if you like or to help on any way. You, too, enjoy the weekend.

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    • Thank you , Marina. If you do make it, I hope you do let us know what you think of it. I must say, though, I love reading that you made pasta this morning. I just love to make pasta and love eating it even more. I’m hopeless, I know. 🙂

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    • You are very welcome, Kay. It is probably a good thing you weren’t with me when I found that box of racchette. We would have both left that aisle, giggling like fools. I was alone and grinning ear to ear, like I just found the ultimate Cracker Jack toy. The 2 of us together would have raised a few eyebrows, to say the least. 🙂

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    • Good question, MD. I know that whenever I enter those pasta aisles — usually while I’m waiting for my number to be called at the deli counter — I find some new pasta shape. most i just look at and shake my head but racket-shaped pasta? Are you kidding me? There was no way I could pass this one up.

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  23. I can’t believe that there are racquet shaped pasta! I’ve never seen it here, naturally, but Ali dislikes wine in food, so there you go. Marilyn is gorgeous — at any time of day. Does this mean no rose photos for a while? I have enjoyed them.

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    • Your thoughts mirror mine when I saw that first box of Racchette. If Ali does not like wine in his dinner, this is certainly not a dish for him. You cannot mistake the wine in this dish.
      Yes, I’ve 13 bushes and Marilyn was the last one of the group. She is such a beauty that I’m glad her “arrival” was delayed. I can think of none prettier to end the tour. I’m glad you enjoyed them. 🙂

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    • Hello, Celia. This is probably the most “potent” pasta you’ll ever come upon. It’s certainly the only pasta I’ve ever heard that uses 3 types of wine, none of them cooked. The result is a uniquely flavored pasta — and a possible hangover the next morning. 🙂

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  24. What sweet pasta shapes – maybe they were invented for the tennis championships! I’ve never tried using uncooked wine with pasta either, but why not? I’ll have to try it with some of our excellent local wines, although I doubt I’ll be able to find racchette!

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    • I wouldn’t worry about finding racchette, especially where you live. I don’t know how large a selection of pasta is available to you. Maybe you’ll be able to find “wagon wheels” (rotelle) or “little flowers” (fiori). They are far more common here and they are similar to the webbed end of the rackets. More important than the pasta is the wine selection. With you choice of superior wines, I bet your dish will be far better than mine, which was made with what I had on-hand. If you do make it, I hope you’ll come back and tell me what you think of the dish. Have a good night.

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  25. John, this looks delicious! I love finding different types of pasta shapes; interesting. And of course the wine blend sounds appetizing! Beautiful rose!

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    • Thanks, Judy, for stopping by & commenting. I agree with you and am amazed at the Italian’s naming of their pasta. One of my favorite things to do when in Italy, besides eating pasta, is to find a pasta store and just marvel at all of the shapes and sizes, most of which being hand-made. And yes, purely by coincidence, the best rose was the last rose of the tour.

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  26. I love your Marilyn Monroe rose. I’ve seen a lot of different pastas in my time but I’ve never seen any in the shape of tennis rackets. How cute and how appropriate to eat these while watching the US Open. I would like to try this pasta because I don’t mind the occasional glass of wine. But it is interesting how the alcohol isn’t cooked out of it. Worth a try! xx

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    • Charlie, I’m with ya! I’d never seen this pasta before and had a good chuckle when I found” it. It was not even 2 weeks ago so, with the US Open getting ready to start, the timing could not have been better. Of the recipes I came across, I tried this one because,as you noted, 3 wines are used and none of them are cooked. I’ve never heard of anything like it. I hope you do try it and enjoy it. Just think, if you don’t like it, you’ll have 3 open bottles of wine to help you get over your disappointment. 🙂

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  27. A recipe I can actually make without stressing about creating fresh pasta. Now the wine is a new twist but I have no fear of attempting this recipe. Sounds worth the risk of hangover.
    Many of your other recipes, John, I am in awe of but read them and think how great it would be to eat it but don’t actually get down to business in the kitchen True confessions. I just can’t see myself making the time to make cheese. I know yours is delicious and beyond compare, though.
    Marilyn Monroe is lovely. A real looker. The light on velvet skin. Sensuous just like MM.
    Which wine to accompany the wine laden tennis rackets? Just seems fun all around.

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    • Now, Ruth, you are far too busy to find time to make cheese or pasta. I’m at home and can easily take an afternoon to make a pound of linguine. Heck! If you lived around here, I’d gladly drop some off at your place from time to time. I can just as easily make 2 pounds of pasta as a pound. As for the cheese, I don’t make it all that often, unless I have a specific need. Yes, it is very good but how often do you need a couple pounds of mozzarella, for example?
      This pasta and sauce, however, are really quite accessible. You can easily have the sauce prepared as you boil the water and cook the pasta. Everything goes into a food processor, give it a whirl, and you’re just about done. And there’s 3 open bottles of wine to enjoy, whether or not you like the pasta. A win-win if ever there was one!
      Yes, Marilyn is a very pretty rose. I was so glad to see a bud on her last week. Considering I thought I might lose her at Summer’s start, she’s made quite a spectacular comeback. Now, if she can make it through Winter …

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  28. Ahh.. and this recipe will ensure that I use the rest of the wine from a dinner party in a lovely dish.. instead of just tipping it all into my glass! I loved this one.. although, for some odd reason I read “rocket” at first.. must be time to put my wine glass back on the shelf:D I adore your rose.. and think she’s got a definite Marilyn *blush* to her cheeks.. and I must admit I’m sad that she’s the last of your roses.. for that means fall is most definitely on it’s way! Perhaps a post with all of your roses side by side.. just like in your garden would tide me over until next year! xx

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    • Thank you so much, Barb. Why deprive your glass of the previous night’s wine? Just open up new bottles for this pasta. If you don’t like the pasta, you really won’t mind much by the time you’re into the 2nd bottle. Works for me!
      I was so hoping Marilyn would improve to the point where she would bloom again this season. She is such a beauty and I knew you all would enjoy her. It does her namesake proud, more so than any of my other girls, just don’t tell them I said so. I just might put together a post of all 13 blooms. I’ve got an occasion in mind for it. Mums the word! 😉
      I do hate to think that Fall is coming on very fast. I knew that my little rose parade would fill most of Summer’s Wednesday’s. I just didn’t think the weeks would go by so quickly. I can only hope that Winter passes as quickly.

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    • Thanks for taking the time to comment. If you cannot find racchette, I’m sure that “wagon wheels” (rotelle) or “little flowers” (fiori) would do just fine as substitutes. They are much more common here than are racchette. Good luck and I hope you enjoy both the Open and the pasta.

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  29. What a fun pasta! When I was searching for some “special” shaped pasta for a friends bachelorette party I found some quite interesting shapes that’s lets just say… are not kid friendly! 😉 Cheers!

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    • I’ve seen some shapes, ZBD, that I’d be embarrassed to buy, let alone serve. You’re right, though. Depending upon the party, they’d be perfect — just please don’t ask me to buy any. 🙂

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  30. What fun John! A great way to celebrate the Open. One of my last go-to for recipes which has usually surprisingly panned out is just going to the manufacturer’s website…like Quaker Oats when I had a Costco Sized conatiner of it to use up. Got the best PBnJ oatmeal coffee cake recipe that my family just adores! Cheers.

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    • Hey, Geni! I’ll pay more attention to the boxes now, that’s for sure. This time, I learned something new and tasted a pasta dish I never would have dreamt up on my own. 3 wines, none of them cooked? I’m still surprised that it “worked” and that I enjoyed the dish. Who knew?

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  31. Our grandmothers never made Racchette pasta either, John. It’s been a long-running tradition in our family that the children, with their tiny fingers, do the pasta weaving. (Not the pleasantest of memories, so don’t get me started.) But our grandmothers DID cook it up, similar to how you’ve prepared it here…though I think yours looks quite a bit more delicious than theirs. Yours almost has me wishing I still had little ones at home to weave up a batch…but that would be cruel. So boxed racchette it is! And I thank you lots for the recipe!
    And that Marilyn rose of yours, in afternoon light, is possibly one the prettiest roses I’ve ever seen. Just exquisite, like she.

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    • Hello, Spree. This pasta was totally new to me. From its shape to the wine content, I was completely surprised. I can’t help but wonder what else is lurking in that pasta aisle just waiting for me to find it. I guess it is my duty to fine out. 🙂
      Marilyn was one of the first I planted, some 7 years ago. She’s a real stunner and I would have been upset if I couldn’t get her turned around before Winter arrived. Of all of them, I’d really hate to lose her. I’m glad that you enjoyed her, too, Spree.

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  32. Great recipe, John! It sounds great and I’m looking forward to taste that dressing with raw wine… But I think the Racchette haven’t made the trip to Spain yet, so probably have to use some other kind of pasta.
    Thanks for sharing; your girl from today’s post is gorgeous 🙂

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    • Hello, Giovanna. Don’t worry about finding racchette. I’ve only seen it here at one store. This pasta dish is all about the sauce with its 3 wines. It’s pretty unusual. I’m glad you enjoyed today’s rose. She’s a good one to end the tour with.

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  33. Thanks for dropping in. Your pasta sounds like an aglio e olio (garlic and oil) but with wine. I bet it tastes great! Have you posted the recipe? I’d love to give it a shot. FYI: If it’s a pasta dish, I am so there!

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    • Hello, Villy! This is certainly different and if you’re not a wine drinker, it probably isn’t for you. I think much depends on the wine selection. For me, I don’t think I would have like it if I had used a sweet white, fruity red, and sweet Marsala. Using dry wines counterbalanced the sweet Marsala and the result was better than I had thought it would be. I tell you, I never would have tried this on my own. Uncooked wine? Never.

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    • I agree completely, Karen. Once I read the recipe, I immediately called Zia to see if she’d heard of anything like it. She hadn’t either. That made me want to try it even more. 🙂

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  34. First of all, that pasta is awesome!!! When I first saw it, I assumed it was just a shaped pasta like they have character-shaped pasta and whatnot. But it has a special name, and specific recipes! I’m quite shocked and amused 🙂 hehe. Second of all, I too never heard of using uncooked wine with pasta, let alone combining three different wines to make a sauce. I’m quite intrigued and may need to try this, though I doubt i’ll find the special pasta. Guess I’ll have to use a boring normal pasta 🙂

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    • I’m with you, Stefanie. I’d no idea this pasta came with such an unusual “sauce.” 3 raw wines? No way! Once I read that, though, I had to try it. I’m going back to that store today. Heaven knows what I’ll find this time when I go back through that pasta aisle again. 🙂

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  35. Ok so I’m entirely late to the party, but after all I was camping and reading my reader on a smart phone isn’t my favorite thing in the world. As for the wine recommendations…I’m totally fine with the PG, but I’m thinking that a Cab Franc, Carmenere from Chile, or a “right-bank” Bordeaux (mostly Merlot) would be excellent for this dish. Good enough? 🙂

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    • Yes, Jed, good enough! As I said in the post, I used what I had on-hand — and what I didn’t mind using in what would be an experiment. As it turned out, it’s not a bad dish of pasta but the wine selection is definitely key. Next time around, I’ll know which to select. Thanks for the advice. 🙂
      How ’bout dem Cowboys? (&^@%&*&#^!)

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    • Thanks, Marianne. Racchette aren’t common here at all. Maybe you’ll have better luck finding rotelle or fiori. Even farfalle would work. Whatever you find, I hope you like the dish. Yes, that rose was the last. She bloomed just in time, too. 🙂

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  36. Hello! Yes, I am connected finally and although I should right now be painting, I couldn´t resist a quick visit to see what you are up to as I couldn´t wait until tomorrow. Not only a great recipe with some quirky pasta, but a rose called Marilyn Monroe – how happy I am I today?! Big hug to you John 🙂

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  37. Hi John,

    Lovely pasta dish and I’ve searched around and we can get these unusual pasta shapes at specialist shops and some online places here.

    Now about the winner of the tennis-can I just do a great big British hurrah!!!

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    • Thanks, GD! It took me a while to get back to you but here I is! If you make this pasta, I hope you enjoy it. I sure did enjoy watching your fellow Brit win the Open. What a Finals! Worst part, for me, my cable went out during the final set. ACH! Miraculously, it came back just in time for the final volley and point. YAY!

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  38. Sorry I have missed a few of your posts John. I had a little accident in my daughter’s school (I slipped going down the stairs and hurt my knee) so I have been a little behind in visiting your wonderful blog. Sorry for that
    I won’t be using the sauce because of the wine but I will look up the pasta because my kids would love the shape 🙂 thank you for the inspiration

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    • Sawsan, you never need to apologize should you miss my posts. You’ve always been a big supporter of my efforts here. Besides, I still haven’t caught up since returning from my visit with Zia last week. I’m beginning to doubt I ever will. 🙂
      I’m so sorry to hear of your accident and hope your knee is feeling better. You would probably do well to rest it for a day or two but you are far too busy, especially with your children, for that. Sometimes I wonder how you Moms do it.
      Thank you for commenting and, again, do not worry if you cannot always drop by for a visit. We’ll catch up, not to worry.

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