Bone Marrow Risotto with Morel & Porcini Mushrooms

Bone Marrow Risotto 1

Oh, how I wish I could claim that I came up with the idea of using bone marrow to make risotto! Instead, it was one of my favorite chefs, Lidia Bastianich, who inspired today’s dish.

Most days, my television or radio is left on, the noise keeps my parrot company while I’m in another room or running errands. (The jury is still out as to whether it helps Max, although as a puppy I literally caught him in mid-air as he lunged at a screen full of unsuspecting meerkats.) On most Saturdays, my TV is tuned to PBS where a number of cooking shows are featured. Early last Spring, while I was working out some of the details for our then-upcoming trip to San Marino, I heard Lidia describe a recipe that used marrow as the fat to start her risotto. I didn’t need to hear anything else. I knew that I’d be preparing that dish.

In what can only be considered as a happy coincidence, the week I was going to prepare the risotto, porcini and morel mushrooms were available at the Fish Guy market. Well, if you’re going to make a special risotto, why not go all the way? I bought some of each mushroom and bought some beef soup bones on my way home. I had several chicken backs in my freezer and my crisper had plenty of veggies to add to the stockpot. Soon there was a large pot of stock simmering on the stove top.

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Morels - Bone Marrow Risotto

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Before starting the risotto, the mushrooms need to be cleaned. The porcini can be cleaned by a quick rinse and thorough drying. Given their pock-marked surface, morels are a little more complicated to clean. I’ve never been satisfied just brushing them for I fear I cannot get into the holes deeply enough, while their surface makes it nearly impossible to completely dry them after even a light rinse. So, I place several into a colander and toss them again and again, (hopefully) catching them with the colander each time. The result is that the debris is knocked out of the crevices. After several tosses, each morel is inspected and, if need be, tossed again. I get out the brush as a last resort only.

So, with the stock made and defatted, and the mushrooms cleaned, it’s time to start preparing the risotto …

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Beef Marrow Bones

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Bone Marrow Risotto Recipe

Ingredients

  • 7.5 oz (410 g) beef marrow bones yielding 2 oz (58 g) marrow
  • butter or olive oil, as needed (see Notes)
  • 2 shallots, chopped – 1 small onion may be substituted
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced or grated
  • 4 oz fresh morel mushrooms
  • 4 oz fresh porcini mushrooms (See Notes)
  • 1.5 cups (340 g) Arborio rice
  • 1 cup (237 ml) dry white wine
  • 4 cups (948 ml) stock (see Notes)
  • 2 tbsp (28 g) butter
  • 1/3 cup (70 g) grated Pecorino Romano or Parmigiano Reggiano cheese
  • salt & pepper
  • additional grated cheese for garnish and serving

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Bone Marrow Risotto 3

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Directions

  1. In a large sauce pan or deep frying pan, melt the marrow over med-high heat. Add the shallots and sauté for about 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.
  2. Add the garlic and sauté until fragrant, about 2 minutes more.
  3. Add the mushrooms and sauté for a few minutes.
  4. Add the rice and sauté for another 5 minutes or so to toast it. The grains should be partially opaque.
  5. Reduce the heat to medium and add the wine. Stir frequently.
  6. Once the wine has just about been absorbed, add a ladle or 2 of hot stock, and stir. Though you needn’t stir it constantly, you shouldn’t leave it for more than a couple of minutes.
  7. When the stock is all but gone, add another ladle of stock and stir. Repeat this process again and again until the rice is just about cooked. This should take about 20 minutes and the risotto should not be gummy but very moist, though not so much as to be a soup.
  8. Taste and add salt & pepper, as needed.
  9. Turn off the heat, add a final ladle or 2 of stock, cover the pan, and let the risotto rest for 5 minutes.
  10. Add the butter and grated Pecorino Romano cheese, stir to combine, and place on the serving platter.
  11. Garnish with more grated cheese and serve.

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Bone Marrow Risotto 4

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Notes …

If you find that you haven’t enough marrow for the amount of rice you’re going to cook, just add a bit of butter or olive oil to the pan. I won’t tell anyone.

I’ve made this dish 3 times since first hearing Lidia. The first 2 times, I was lucky enough to get fresh mushrooms, both morels and porcini. For the last time, with fresh porcini no longer available, I used a package (1 oz, 26 g) of dried porcini that I hydrated in hot —  not boiling — water before using. The liquid was saved for some future use. By the way, I’ve no idea where my photos of the fresh mushrooms went. I used a photo from another post for the morels pictured but I’m pretty sure I’ll find them all now that this post has been published.

To make the stock, about 5 lbs (2.25 kg) of beef bones, along with the backs of 3 chickens, were roasted in a 400˚ F (200˚ C) for about an hour. All were then placed in a large stockpot and Mom’s broth recipe was followed to create a rich, flavorful stock. Strained before being refrigerated overnight, the stock gelled as the fat rose to the top. Once the fat was removed, the stock was ready to be used in today’s recipe.

When making this or any risotto, use only stock that has been heated just to the point of a soft simmer and no more. Too cool and the stock will slow the cooking of the rice.

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It’s déjà vu all over again …

Fried Sage Deja Vu

 

I first “met” fried sage a little over 2 years ago when friends and I were in Florence. It was our first night together and we took a chance on an appetizer called “Salvia Friiti”. It was incredible and we still talk about that dish to this day. Did I mention that an anchovy is placed between the sage leaves before frying? Oh, yeah! Well, once I got home, I set about attempting to replicate that delicious appetizer. I think I did a pretty good job of it but you can see for yourself by taking this link HERE.

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Coming soon to a monitor near you …

Pinzimonio Preview

Pinzimonio

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96 thoughts on “Bone Marrow Risotto with Morel & Porcini Mushrooms

    • I really do love this dish but don’t worry if you cannot find fresh morels or porcini. I’ve dried and other mushrooms, too. Just use a good stock and plenty of marrow. The rest is fantastic. 😉

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    • Yes on both accounts, Debi. I’m surprised bone marrow risotto isn’t more common. It really is that good. Those sage leaves were such a treat and the anchovy filling a real surprise. We returned to that restaurant just for these appetizers and the entire place heard us gasp “No!” when the waiter told us they were out for the evening. My friends and I still laugh about that moment. 🙂

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  1. Wow, John, that’s one hell of a risotto. I’ve never seen fresh porcini and fresh morels available at the same time, and I’ve never actually purchased fresh morels because they were simply too expensive. I’m sure the people of Milano will forgive you for suggesting Lidia came up with the idea to use bone marrow in risotto 😉 Although I believe the Milanese add it at the end. The idea to make this with dried porcini is a good one — think I’d substitute part of the stock with the soaking liquid. In fact, I have some dried morels as well so perhaps I’ll make a risotto with bone marrow and both kinds of dried mushrooms in fall. Somehow this risotto says “add salsiccia” to me 😉
    PS the finished risotto looks a bit dry to me in your photo — was it so good that you had a plate first and the photographed what was left? 😉
    On a final note, I’ve never seen beef bones sawed lengthwise available here before, it looks nice.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks, Stefan. You’re right about the cost of morels. My fishmonger was offering a sale otherwise I never would have bought them. Even then, it’s a once-a-year purchase/ I debated adding the soaking liquid but I was leery of muddying the dish. It was a very good stock and the marrow lent a lovely flavor. Besides, now I’ve got a great base for another risotto or soup. Thanks, too, for the heads-up on adding marrow at the end of the process. I really must try that. Not al butchers will cut the bones like that. I found one that does and now he gets all my marrow business. Surprisingly, I’ve bought quite a bit from him of late. I really do love this dish.
      As for your PS, my eagle-eyed friend, what can I say? You caught me! My home gets very little natural light, except in the early morning hours and through one window in late afternoon for about hour, if that. As a result, many of my photos are taken in my yard or under artificial lighting. This very often means I’m eating a cold dish and, after almost 6 years of blogging, I think I owe myself a hot dinner or two, especially when the dish is as special as this risotto. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Unlike most others – I have been ‘afraid’ of this! Ever since you said you would prepare!! Blame it totally on who I am !!! I so love the recipes you have posted that I shall follow this, every bit of it, word perfect [I promise] OK: so, so, so love bone marrow!!! So, so, so know that perhaps I should desist!!! Oh, yes, John . . . I shall . . . and when, once upon a magical time, Max will actually rush from your grip to say ‘hello’ . . . . . that will be magical too . . .

    Liked by 1 person

    • Well, you are in for a treat, my friend. I’ve made this risotto several times now — and as you know our weather has been blistering lately. Imagine how many times I’ll prepare it in the colder months. In Stefan’s comment directly above, he mentions adding the marrow at the end of the cooking process. now, that sounds really good, too. I must try that.

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      • Thank you for understanding my ‘Ehaspeak’ – you know I’ve done e’thing at triple speed lately. I agree with Stefan that all our bones are sawed cross-wise too: that is actually fine by me: nothing drips out during cooking! And, without your recipe, I would have added the marrow at the end also – what a great excuse to try it both ways!

        Liked by 1 person

        • I couldn’t agree more and will definitely add marrow at the beginning and end of the cooking process the next time. I think I’ll let the temps drop a bit first, though. I’ve been heating up the place pickling and preserving peppers. My kitchen and I need to cool down. 🙂

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    • I would love to come visit and cook for you and your parents, Mandy. I was to visit a friend in Capetown a number of years ago but he grew ill and the trip was cancelled. Never did attempt it again and went back to Europe. 🙂

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  3. As I expected, the risotto looks amazing! I will have to try this and am visiting the butcher today. I must try the sage recipe too – I was thinking about it the other day, as I have some large sage leaves growing and a constant stock of anchovies in he cupboard 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • I bet you’ll love this risotto, MD. I can’t seem to get my fill. I have a sage plant that I bought just for it’s leaves and I baby it more than anything in my garden. You’d think it was some rare plant. 🙂

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  4. Bone marrow and morels in the same dish?!! That is brilliant! And something that has just moved to the TOP of my list of must try dishes. You don’t have to take credit for coming up with the idea, but I’m glad you passed it along. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Judy. I do hope that you can make this dish. I’m sure you’re going to love it. I’ve made it a number of times and even now I’ve got 2 quarts of stock and marrow bones in my freezer. I can no longer get fresh morels or porcini this time of year but that’s OK. I’ll make do. 🙂

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    • Thanks, Stefano. It really is a great dish and thanks, too, for the link. The sight of those marrow bones being removed from the oven has my mouth watering. That’s the 2nd simple parsley salad I’ve seen prepared in as many days. I think its a sign from the food gods telling me to prepare one. 🙂

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  5. Wow, bone marrow and risotto? Brilliant idea! And the morels put this dish over the top. I’m always puzzled about how to clean morels, too. Although maybe because I don’t have much practice — I don’t often see them in the market, plus they’re pretty expensive. So not my everyday mushroom, for sure. Wish they were, though. 🙂 Really good recipe — thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, John. Believe me. Morels are my once-a-year mushroom. Even the, I buy them when my fishmonger has them on sale. Cleaning them is not at all easy. I’m not sure if my method is the best but I sure do get a lot of grit out of them. Glad you enjoyed the recipe, John. Have a great week!

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  6. That dish has scrumptious written all over it! I love Lidia Bastianich, and learned she has a restaurant two hours from us, in Kansas City… I gotta go there sometime

    really spectacular dish, John! I would gladly sit at your table.. anytime!

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  7. I think if my mother saw this she would worship you! I am not a meat eater but she loves anything with bones, and marrow to her is like dessert. I love most anything with mushrooms and was so happy to receive the most beautiful dried porcinis from a friend who returned from Italy! This risotto will be on my list to try!

    Liked by 1 person

    • My mom would have loved this dish, too, Abbe, though she would have stopped short of worship. I may have earned a step up in the pecking order, however. 🙂
      I saw porcini when I was there in April and had intended to buy some — them forgot all about it. If I had a memory …

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  8. I was raised on bone marrow. My darling mom was a great believer in its powers. 🙂 Your recipe sounds too delicious, John. I don’t think I’ve ever knowingly eaten morel mushrooms, but I’m sure that I’d love them. Something else to look for. Your Max sounds just as hyper as my grandson Max. 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    • Raised on marrow? Oh, my! I was raised on pasta. 🙂
      Maybe it’s the name “Max”, although mine is calming down a bit. Well, he’s over 8 years old and it’s about time! Even so, he’s still has his moments when all hell breaks loose — and I wouldn’t trade him for the world.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Love the flavor and mouth-feel of beef marrow, great combo with those pricey mushrooms, sure is a treat. I don’t see bone marrow sliced lengthwise at our market but if I ask the butcher maybe he would oblige, worth a try.

    Liked by 1 person

    • It is a good dish, Norma, though, as you say, pricey. I don’t buy morels unless they’re on sale and, even then, only rarely. Not all butchers will cut the bones lengthwise like that. I’ve found one and I buy all of my marrow from him. I hope your butcher will do the same for you. Good luck!

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  10. And…when this dish first appeared on my radar, it was presented by one of my favorite chefs…You! Oh my…this looks wonderful, John! Using the marrow is genius and the mushrooms you’ve paired sound delicious. This risotto and a glass of wine…Mmm…pure heaven. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Wow. Just wow. (And I can’t get away from the “racket,” as my grandmother always called it, either. If it’s quiet in the kitchen, I’m always like “Steve, turn on the tv or the radio. I need the racket!”)

    Liked by 1 person

  12. So cool that you leave the TV on for your parrot and Max, we do the same thing for our dogs as they are older, we keep it on PBS or a home improvement channel as I think the animal channel can be good or bad for them. (who knows) anyway love this risotto. Never thought to use bone marrow in this way but with the mushrooms this must be magical.

    Liked by 1 person

    • This is a great dish and I hope you do give it a try. Although I do see that some kind of noise in the background is good for the parrot, Max is another story. He’s a one-of-a-kind type of dog. I never really know what to expect. 🙂

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  13. For stew or soup dishes made for the family meal, it is very common for Iranians to add bones to the pot. Then we are taught by our parents how to suck on the bones to get to the melted marrows. I think of bone marrow as a delicacy. I was not aware that you can get cross cut bone marrows in at the butcher. I should look up a butcher who does that. Knowing how bone marrow adds a rich taste, and addition of morel and porcini mushrooms also add additional flavor and texture to the risotto, this dish truly is a winner! Bravo! I just love it!!! 😛

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much, Fae. You’re right about the flavors within this risotto. Each ingredient adds to the richness. You’re also right about finding a butcher to slice the bones lengthwise. Not all will do it, as I found out. I do have one, now, and he gets all of my marrow business and whatever else catches my eye while I wait at his counter. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  14. I wish I had shops and markets like you John! I’ve never cooked with fresh porcini only dried and I have to admit I’ve never used marrow bones either! I’ll have to go and chat up the butcher, (he normally gives me free bones for the dogs).

    Liked by 1 person

    • I am really fortunate, Amanda. I’ve a great number of markets in town and I can get just about anything. The neighborhood give me bones for Max, too, but he retired and there was no one to take over the business. It’s happening all across town. No one wants to apprentice to be a butcher. Such a shame.

      Liked by 1 person

      • We are really in the sticks so shopping is always a major hassle. I am always inspired by the different cuts and I’m sure I can get marrow if I look it up! After all, the French don’t waste any part of the animal – I still can’t get used to seeing ears and other bits I won’t mention! 🙂

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  15. Hi John somehow I thought you were going to tell me your Parrot recited the recipe for this rissotto when you got home from the market. It is a very luxurious ingredient rich risotto indeedy.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ha! That’s all I need, taking cooking instructions from my parrot. She keeps me hopping in other ways, as does Max. I just can’t seem to remember the point where each became master and I the servant. 🙂

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  16. That is one amazingly luxurious risotto! So many gorgeous and delicious ingredients, I will have to stop dreaming about how it tastes and get on and make it! I popped back over to the fried sage recipe too and once more enjoyed reading all about the family in San Marino….wonderful! And am laughing at the comment above mine with someone picturing your parrot reciting the recipe from the TV 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Tanya. I really do hope you prepare this risottos. It is something else! Why isn’t this the way risotto is supposed to me made? As for the parrot, she would have been gone long ago if she started giving me cooking instructions. As it it, when sh was quite young, I taught her to whistle the first 2 bars of Mozart’s “Eine Kleine Nachtmusik”. I though it would be cute — and it was for about a month or so. Now, after over a dozen years of her whistling Mozart whenever she wants attention, I no longer find it cute, Go figure! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  17. I’d have a battle with my dog for the bone marrow, he’s crazy for it. He brings his half chewed shin bones to me so I can poke the marrow through with a chopstick. Lovely risotto John, mushies and bone marrow with. Delicious stock, mmmmm

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Sandra. Yeah, Max eyes the marrow bones as soon as I pull them out. I make sure to give him a “special” treat so that I can get the marrow prepared in peace. Well, that’s the plan. He’ll sometimes run off, hide the treat, and then come back to the kitchen hoping a bone will fall to the floor. Like that’s going to happen! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Fantastic! I would have loved to have been at your table on the night you made this! I have never seen fresh porcini – we seem to only be able to buy them dried and yes, you do have to wash them well or else you eat grits! I will remember that technique for washing morels. Really impressed you made this with bone marrow and that you went to the extra effort of making your own stock – what an authentic risotto! xx

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    • Thank you so much, Charlie. Once i saw that the morels were on sale, I knew that I was going to go all out with this risotto. It was just a happy coincidence that the fishmonger had porcini, too. I’d already gone far enough to buy some morels, so, why not get the porcini, too? Making my own stock was a natural progression. I didn’t want to risk ruining the dish with an overly salty store-bought stock. All I can say is that it worked! 🙂

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  19. Love me some risotto. We just got a pressure cooker and are hoping to test out risotto in it in the semi near future. I’m not about to stand at the stove slaving over risotto in this 100 degree weather!

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    • I never thought that I’d be standing over a stove stirring risotto either, Gretcen — and then I heard Lidia use marrow to start hers and, well, I had to try it. That was in the spring but it’s so good that I’ve made it several times since. Granted, I cannot afford to use fresh morels and porcini more than once but I still made risotto. If I’m being honest, I know I’ll be making it again real soon. I’ve got marrow and stock in my freezer. Maybe I should borrow a page from your book and look into pressure cookers. Hmm … 🙂

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  20. I remember the first time I used marrow to make risotto. It was a recipe from Lorenza de Medici, and it was life altering. Nothing to me is more luxuriant than risotto made with marrow. Thanks for the reminder – I’ll need to make this again soon! And I will definitely try it with the morels and porcini.

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    • Thanks, David. “Life altering” is definitely the way I’d describe it. I love my family’s risotto but this is something else entirely. I’ll be sure to make it again and again.

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  21. wow. I’ve always had bone marrow as, well, bone marrow. I’ve never thought to use it in any kind of recipe! The idea of it in a risotto with mushrooms sounds absolutely divine. I’ve been recently seeing bone marrow on appetizer menus, and when I’ve ordered it, the bones are cut lengthwise. So much fun and goodness!!

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  22. What a delightfully rich risotto! I think the star for me would be the morels, and I’m glad you gave a few hints as to how you clean them! On the rare occasion that I bring them home for a recipe I’m intimidated with the cleaning. I think I generally do as you do, but I’m always concerned that they aren’t as clean as they could be! I’ve had very mixed success with risottos and at times they end up tasty, but a bit gummy! I’ve read your instructions, John, and since this sounds so delicious, I’m going to give it a try as soon as I can collect the ingredients. It would be worth the effort of perfecting! And I occasionally catch Lidia on television and I always think of you–now I’ll picture your parrot as well. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Debra. This truly is one special risotto. I wish I could pass along some secret trick to help you but there aren’t any. In fact, I ate many a “gummy” bowl of rice — until I didn’t. For me, it was getting the flame right so that the rice cooked and stirring it enough to get it to release the starch. But it’s a fie line between starch and gummy. It was only by making risotto again and again did I get it right. Now, it’s a cinch and it will be for you, too. I guarantee it. 🙂
      As for Lidia, the noise is for Lucy and the show is for me. If I’m to cater to Lucy tastes, she likes the Disney Channel. Something about that station really gets her going. Come to think of it, maybe she hates that channel. 🙂

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      • Thank you for the encouragement to just keep making the risotto until I get it right! I do think that’s often the problem. If I don’t immediately have success sometimes I seem reluctant to have multiple failures. LOL! I do recall that gummy rice can at least have decent flavor. I will persevere! 🙂

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  23. This sounds glorious! I can only imagine how rich and flavourful this dish is. Your tip for cleaning morels is very clever. I’ve never used morels, but I’m thinking your technique might work for other mushrooms to knock off some of the bigger bits of soil before wiping them clean. I’m going to think about this risotto all day now!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Well, Mar, I think you should stop thinking about it and make the dish! You’ll love it when you do. It’s far too late to get fresh morels or porcini but just use any mushrooms you like. It’s the marrow and stock that are most important here. As for the cleaning, I’m not sure what a purist might say but this works for me. I’ve never thought to try it with other mushroom types but I certainly will now. Thanks for the idea. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  24. Wow, what a tremendous way to enhance risotto . . . with bone marrow! Totally over the top in flavor! I adore mushrooms, especially strong porcini and the ever-so-hard-to-find morels! I’ve made a risotto with porcini mushrooms only, so I know that what you’ve added to this recipe must be utterly amazing! I’d be in heaven, John!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Roz. I must admit this was one special risotto. I’ve only come across morels in the last few years. The first I saw them was in Eataly, Mario Batali’s Italian market. I’ve since learned that my fishmonger carries them every spring, too. Thank goodness! I really cannot afford them unless they’re on sale and even then they’re a splurge. I’d splurge again, though, for this risotto. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  25. What an absolutely decadent risotto, John. But one that I would also make for certain friends, it’s worth splurging every once in a while. I have only ever had fresh morels and that was in Switzerland several years ago, I do find them regularly dried but I’ve not seen them here fresh. Pairing the morels and mushrooms with the marrow is genius! I was thinking even a duck fat risotto might be amazing too. I’m definitely going to bookmark this tasty treat for the cooler months (it’s a bit too hot for a rich but tasty dish like this now).

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Eva, for both the kind words and the idea of using duck fat. Oh, does that sound good! We made duck risotto with duck stock and leftover roast duck. Never thought to use the fat to start the rice, though. Definitely won’t pass up that chance next time. As for the marrow, Stefan in an earlier comment spoke of adding marrow at the end of the cooking process. I am definitely going to give that a try, too. Maybe, as Eha subsequently said, do both. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  26. I used to get so frustrated with risotto, but I tried it again a few months ago and I suddenly “got” it – how it was supposed to cook and why.

    Now. This, THIS looks absolutely marvelous. Honestly, I could taste it as I was reading. There can never be too much of a good thing when it comes to meat, and the next time I make risotto, I’ll be making this. Thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

    • You’re singing my song, Ruth. it took me some time to get risotto right. I actually remember the exact dinner, too. Mom and Zia were visiting just after I moved into my current home. I had a small dinner party for them and bravely served risotto. There must have been a moment of good in my wicked childhood because the food gods blessed that risotto. everyone loved it. I’ve prepared a couple bad ones since then but, for the most part, the gummy days are behind me. Whew!

      Liked by 1 person

  27. That’s funny that you leave the TV on for your parrot. When we leave the house, I turn on the TV for the cat. 🙂 Oh what we do for our animals. Great pick up from the cooking show! Never ever would have thought of bone marrow as fat for risotto. What flavor that must have added to this dish along with the mushrooms. Fabulous risotto John!

    Liked by 1 person

    • It’s worse than that, MJ. The bird has favorites. She likes the Disney Channel and Gloria Estefan. I don’t know where she heard/watched either of them but if she hears them, she gets very animated. Just my luck.
      Once I heard Lidia mentioned using marrow, it was a head-smack moment. Of course! Why isn’t everyone using marrow? No matter. I’m just glad I’m doing it now. 🙂

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  28. carissimo amico John, innanzi tutto ti ringrazio per i bellissimi commenti che ho trovato nel mio blog! Poi mi scuso per il ritardo con cui vengo a ringraziarti da giugno a luglio sono stata molto impegnata e ho avuto poco tempo per il blog, cercavo in ogni caso di fare post perché gli amici ed i lettori non si dimenticassero di me, ancora dopo sono partita per il lungo viaggio dell’estate che ho appena cominciato a descrivere nel blog, questa spiegazione te la dovevo vista la tua squisita gentilezza!
    Ho visto che in questo periodo hai scritto molto e sono curiosissima e giàmi viene l’acquolina in bocca solo dando una prima occhiata! voglio leggere attentamente e non potrò quindi fare tutti i post se non in numerose visite, ma quello che è certo non me ne perderò uno!
    I risotti sono uno dei primi piatti che adoro, come ben tu sai in Italia ne abbiamo una grandissima varietà, ma questo con le spugnole ancora non lo conoscevo, quindi ho preso nota, e vedremo cosa ne verrà fuori! ti ringrazio soprattutto per la spiegazione della loro pulitura! senz’altro farò una sorpresa ai miei cari!
    A presto caro amico, con un affettuosissimo saluto
    Annalisa

    Liked by 1 person

    • Welcome! Yes, your Amatriciana recipe is a good one. Isn’t that a great dish? For me, it represents the best of Italian cooking: uncomplicated and tasty.
      Thanks for stopping by and commenting. 🙂

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