You Say Frittatas and I Say Frittate

For a time, I was Mom’s Chief Cook & Bottle Washer. Living just next door, Zia possessed a standing invitation, so, it was 3 for dinner most nights. Now, I may be able to cook a nice dinner, as surely we all can, but what I cannot do is estimate portion size. One of my dinners could just as easily feed 6 as it would 2 or 3. It’s not a problem here at home for I don’t mind eating leftovers at all. If I make enough for 6 servings, I’ll eat all of them over the course of the next few days and not think twice about it. I really couldn’t do that when cooking for Mom and Zia, however, and as a result, after a few days her fridge was brimming with leftovers. And if you think I could waste food in that kitchen, well, as Mom would say, “You’ve got another thing comin’!” Enter the frittata.

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A frittata is an egg-based dish, the ingredients of which are only limited by one’s imagination. I assume there are probably thousands of recipes for frittate on the web, though I’ve yet to search for one. When I was a boy, Mom often used her leftover caponata to make me a frittata for lunch on Fridays. Once I was on my own, I continued to make them for I found them easier to make than a fancy folded-over omelet but still better looking than a mish-mash of eggs scrambled with a bunch of ingredients. 

So, with a fridge full of leftovers, deciding to make a frittata back then was a no-brainer. In recent weeks, I found myself in the same predicament, having roasted a ham for Easter and then, unfortunately, having to prepare pasta with burrata a few times due to camera difficulties. (That’s my story and I’m sticking to it.) As much as I enjoy ham sandwiches and as frequently as I reheat pasta, I needed a change and again I turned to frittate.

There are a few things common to any frittata that I’ve ever made. There are eggs, of course, and there’s always some form of starch, be that either pasta or potatoes. Onions, mushrooms, tomatoes, and virtually any other vegetable, both raw and previously cooked, could find their way into the skillet. I almost always add grated cheese of some sort and meat is often included, as well. Once everything is in the skillet and the eggs begin to set, the pan and its contents are placed in a pre-heated oven where the frittata bakes until ready. It’s removed from the oven, flipped onto a serving platter, garnished, and served with a piece of bread and soup or salad.

For the frittate presented here, I used an 8 inch cast iron skillet. For a pan this size, I probably should have used 9 eggs, rather than 6, and the dish would have raised a bit more. Cooking for myself, though, I felt 6 eggs to be enough. As I mentioned, I normally add fresh tomatoes but, this time of year, flavorful fresh tomatoes are almost impossible to find. I skipped them but, in the past, I’ve used sun-dried tomatoes instead. Lastly, very often frittate are finished off under the broiler. Although I’ve prepared them that way, I’ve also forgotten about them in there and pulled out something that had more in common with a roasted marshmallow than a frittata. For me, the oven is a safer bet but the broiler is still an option for you folks with any kind of short-term memory. Just cook the frittata atop the stove a few minutes longer and — here’s the tricky part — check on it frequently once it has been under the broiler for 5 minutes.

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You say potatoes and I say patate.

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Frittata with Pasta, Broccolini, and Smoked Mozzarella Recipe

Pre-heat your oven to 375˚ F (190˚ C). Into a hot skillet over med-high heat, place a few tablespoons of the cooking fat of your choice. I used bacon fat. Once hot, add some chopped onion, sliced mushroom, and chopped raw broccolini stems. Season lightly with salt and pepper and sauté until the onions are translucent, the mushrooms have a little color, and the broccolini stems are soft. Add the broccolini florets and continue to sauté for another 3 or 4 minutes. Add the pasta, mix well, and sauté until heated through. Add a bit more oil if needed. Meanwhile, crack the eggs in a large bowl, and whisk. Add a few ounces of grated cheese — I used smoked mozzarella — and mix well. Once the pasta is heated, pour the egg and cheese mixture into the pan and, working quickly, use a flat spoon to make sure it’s evenly distributed. Lower the heat to medium and cook until eggs just begin to set. Remove from the stove top and place in the middle of the pre-heated oven. Frittata is ready when all traces of raw egg are gone from the now-coloring surface — usually about 20 minutes but begin checking at 15. Remove from oven, cover with a platter larger than the pan’s circumference, and quickly turn the skillet’s contents onto the platter. Garnish with more grated cheese and serve.

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Serve immediately
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Frittatas, frittate … 

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Frittata with Ham, Potatoes, Asparagus, and Swiss Cheese Recipe

Pre-heat your oven to 375˚ F (190˚ C). Into a hot skillet over med-high heat, place a few tablespoons of the cooking fat of your choice. I used bacon fat but you can use vegetable oil, olive oil, or butter, if you like. Once hot, add some chopped onion and sauté briefly before adding 1 raw potato cut into a 1/2 inch (1.3 cm) dice. Season lightly with salt and pepper. Once the potato is just about fully cooked, add the cubed, cooked ham. Once heated through, add the chopped asparagus spears. Meanwhile, add the eggs into a large bowl and whisk. To that bowl, add a few ounces of grated cheese — I used Swiss — and mix well. When the asparagus is cooked al dente, add the egg and cheese into the pan and, working quickly, use a flat spoon to evenly distribute the mixture across the pan. Lower the heat to medium and cook until eggs just begin to set. Remove from the stove top and place in the middle of the pre-heated oven. Frittata is ready when all traces of raw egg are gone from the now-coloring surface — usually about 20 minutes but begin checking at 15. Remove from oven, cover with a platter larger than the pan’s circumference, and quickly turn the skillet’s contents onto the platter. Garnish with more grated cheese and serve.

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Serve immediately

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Potatoes, patate.

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Variations   

As I mentioned, everything about a frittata is subject to change, so, the variations are unlimited. In that case, the only variation worthy of mention is whether of not to flip your frittata onto a serving platter. Now, if you’re leery, you can increase the odds of a good outcome by running a knife along the frittata’s edge, separating it from the pan, before the flip. After that, you’re on your own. Honestly? Both frittate photographed here flipped flawlessly. Had there been my friends or family seated at the table, I can guarantee that a good portion of the frittata would have remained in the pan as if held by Super Glue — but that’s why they’re seated at the table. Whether the bruschette are aflame, Max couldn’t wait for leftovers, or the frittate won’t flip, we’re still going to have an enjoyable evening.

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Notes

Always add firm, raw vegetables to the skillet first. Once partially cooked, add the more fragile raw and/or pre-cooked/leftover vegetables. If using leftover pasta, it should be the last thing added before the egg and cheese mixture hits the skillet.

Season lightly with salt & pepper, keeping in mind that some of the ingredients may be (heavily) salted already. Beware of salty cheeses.

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 It’s déjà vu all over again … 

The signs of Spring’ are all around us. There are Spring lambs in the fields, crocuses have given way to daffodils in many gardens, and local-grown asparagus are beginning to flood the markets. For the Bartolini, Spring also means it’s dandelion season and Dad, even though not a Bartolini, enjoyed them every bit as much. Now, I could go on but that might spoil the story.  Click HERE to learn a bit about Dad and his love of dandelion salad.

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Coming soon to a monitor near you …

Split Pea Soup

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Let’s call the whole thing off.

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185 thoughts on “You Say Frittatas and I Say Frittate

    • I’m with you, Maureen. One of the benefits of hosting a holiday dinner, for me, is the post-holiday frittata. Those aren’t every day leftovers and the resulting frittata is something special.

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  1. Looks so gourmet John. I grew up eating these…my mom always made frittatas and quiche for dinner, so your post made me think of my mother. 🙂 While I don’t eat eggs anymore, I enjoyed reading your post and going down memory lane!

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    • Thanks, Brandi. Frittate remind me of Mom, too. 🙂 Do they make a good, vegan egg substitute yet? Things are evolving so quickly in that part of the food industry that I’m amazed at what’s available today — and also at a total loss as to what is good and what is to be avoided.

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  2. I haven’t made a frittata in so long. Used to be a favorite when we had overnight guests, and I’d serve it for a late breakfast/brunch.
    I’ll be waiting for that split pea soup.
    Wonderful post, John.

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    • Thanks, Angeline. My frittata making comes in cycles. For a spell, I’ll make them almost religiously, using up all leftovers in the process. Then I’ll go through a period of time where a frittata never crosses my mind. Frankly, I prefer the periods where I’m making them. THey’re easy to make and such a great dish.

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  3. [laughing warmly!] An oft favourite of mine also and yours looks very appetizing.! The FRITTATA I mean 🙂 ! I use a small heavy iron pan and just two eggs and all the goodies in the fridge but never pasta or potatoes [don’t eat the latter 🙂 !] and always put it briefly under the grill after, so the egg base is set and the top like a souffle and the in-betweens still very soft!! [Oops, broil . . . I do keep on forgetting!] Think it one of the most fabulous dishes to enjoy when on one’s own . . . and I love split pea [or lentil] soups also . . .

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    • I, rather stupidly, got rid of my small pan like the one you describe. It was during an ill-fated attempt to gain more space in my kitchen by ridding it of rarely used items. I like to put my frittate under the “grill” but I really do forget about them in there. Like you, I really enjoy the soft center that can result using your method. “Know thy weakness” is just as true in the kitchen as elsewhere and I’m tired of sacrificing my frittate to Hades. 🙂

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  4. although I love eggs… it’s my favorite thing to eat really, I have to say the only frittate (see? I’m learning) was probably at some fast food joint where only a bad imitation was served. After reading your post… you got me all excited to try this at home!! The only egg dish I’ve ever posted about was a poorly executed tortilla española, it was still tasty 🙂 thanks John!

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  5. Great post, John. I really like the detailed instructions paired with undetailed ingredients, so anyone can make a fritata. I should start to make leftovers on purpose in order to be able to make some of the many great Italian recipes for leftovers. I do have leftover ingredients as some stuff is only sold in certain quantities, so I do prepare Pasta Svuotafrigo once in a while. But I very rarely have cooked leftovers, since portion control is the way we stay slim without working out and still eating everything we like.

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    • Thanks, Stefan. There have been a number of frittate recipes posted of late, few using leftovers. Fact is, if I’m serving one for brunch with friends, I’ll use fresh ingredients. For a weekday meal for myself or family, though, I’ll play “clear the refrigerator”, adding a few fresh ingredients if needed to round out the dish. It’s just a nice dish to have in one’s repertoire for a quick, light meal prepared with little effort.

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    • Thanks, Marianne. Thanks to you and Tanya, I know about Spanish tortillas, not to be confused with Mexican tortillas. 🙂
      You’re so right, though. Whether you say frittata or tortilla, it’s one tasty dish!

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  6. Beautiful frittate! Something we make a lot, although like Marianne we call them tortillas….same good use of leftovers. I love the plate you’ve put the dandelion salad on!

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    • I must say that judging by the recipes you share, I bet you make some wonderful tortillas! Now that the weather is beginning to warm again, I’ll be making them far more frequently. Thank you for noticing that plate. I missed a ferry boat because it was part of a sale that took longer than anticipated. 🙂

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    • Just wait until I see your Mom! 🙂
      In this kitchen, frittate and pasta are the 2 ways I get rid of most leftovers. It’s amazing what you can create — all “scrumity.” 🙂

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  7. Such a wonderful recipe to use up the left overs and yet creating a whole new dish that isn’t left overs! My mother used to make this often, and I loved it. You have reminded me that its been too long.

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    • Thank you, Maria. I think our Mothers had the right idea. (Don’t they always!) This is a great way to use leftovers without it looking like leftovers. And with warm weather coming, it makes a great light meal when it is too hot to cook and eat a full meal.

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  8. What an absolutely delicious use of leftovers. Yours is magazine cover worthy. Mine usually has chunks of it still left in the pan. Maybe the secret is bacon fat? I assume you use a cast iron skillet or do you use nonstick? Because of my flipping issue i usually opt for a quiche but that is definitely less healthy due to the crust.

    I am eagerly awaiting the split pea post. It’s one of my favorite soups to eat and make.

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    • Thank you, Geni. I do use a cast iron skillet mainly because I don’t have to worry about the handle melting in the oven or under the broiler. No matter the grease used, I think it’s important to have enough. Very often once all of the ingredients have been added, and just before the eggs, I’ll add a bit more oil/fat to the pan just for insurance against a sticky frittata. Even os, Geni. If I’m home alone, I can guarantee that the frittata will flip, time after time, perfectly. If there’s someone else seated at the table, that frittata is going to stick like it was glued. That’s when my fancy frittata dinner becomes one of scrambled eggs — and I open another bottle of wine or serve another round of drinks. No one ever seems to mind after that. 😉

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  9. Yummmmm these look awesome! It’s something that never occurs to me to make, but I do get bored with the same leftovers, so next time I’ll give one of these a whirl.

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    • Adding pasta in this house is a no-brainer, Marie. I’ve always got some leftover pasta in the fridge, very often 2 kinds. A frittata is a good way to get rid of one of ’em. 🙂

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  10. I love the addition of broccolini stems here John, most would discard this delicious part away. Frittata/frittate (whatevs 🙂 ) has been the flavour of the month in my household, its just so frugal, flavoursome and healthy too! I love zucchini, potatoe and dill combo, but really its so versatile we just throw in whatever is in the fridge..

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    • Thanks and we are of one mind, Lisa. About the only thing I’ve never thrown into a frittata is a piece of fish — but that’s because I so rarely have a piece of fish leftover. Any other leftover, though, is fair game and will find its way into the skillet. IT is a very delicious way to make space in the fridge. 🙂

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  11. The broccolini/smoked mozzarella combo gets my vote. Delicious! Love frittata leftovers too. Nothing better than opening the fridge in the morning to find lunch sitting there, ready to go. Enjoyed your dad’s dandelion salad story (and the corresponding pee-related comments). Will keep that idea up my sleeves when I feel a need to embarrass my boys – I usually find a spot of loud singing in public does the trick nicely, but your dad’s method is much more creative.

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    • Considering your talent for taking 1 recipe and transforming it into another, frittate should be a part of your repertoire. And you’re right about leftover frittata. A slice is the perfect breakfast on the go — almost as good as pizza. 🙂
      It took us years to realize that much of Dad’s dandelion picking was just to see us act up. He was a practical joker and something like this was perfect for him. And when the joke was played out, he had 2 helpers eager to pick dandelions wherever he wanted — so long as it wasn’t in our neighborhood. I’m telling you, the sight of a parent picking dandelions for a salad in the neighborhood play field will scare any child straight. 🙂

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  12. John I make a crustless quiche for the girls that is a guaranteed hit — and it is very similar to your frittate. I don’t why I never think to switch things up and make a frittata? Now I have been inspired to do so. BTW I am the same as you with the portions — especially when making pasta or noodles. I always make waaaaaay too much.

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    • Thanks, Barb. except for the cream, I really don’t think there’s much difference between a crustless quiche and a frittata — and they’re both delicious. I really enjoy them and, believe me, I use them more than anything to help rid my fridge of leftover pasta. I just cannot get the serving thing right with pasta. If we ever find ourselves working together in a kitchen, we must promise ourselves that pasta is off the menu. If not, we’d have enough to feed an army! 🙂

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  13. I’m so glad you’ve posted this recipe. I have to cater for a function next Monday night and I was asked to do mini quiches but then I found out a lot of the guests are gluten-free, dairy intolerant and vegetarian. So…I thought I’d make frittatas instead of quiche avoiding the gluten pastry issue. But…I can’t add cheese. Do you think spinach and semi-dried tomato (giving that saltiness I was hoping to achieve with bacon) would hold up well as pass-around frittata if I cooked them in muffin pans or perhaps I need to add some thinly sliced potato as well? I’d love to know your thoughts xx

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    • Hey, Charlie! Serving frittate in muffin tins is a great idea, as is adding a bit of cooked potato to each. You certainly do not need to add cheese to the mix. I would definitely use spinach, the tomato, and kick up the spices. Nutmeg, dill, thyme, or even rosemary would add a nice savory taste. Be mindful of the salt, too. Usually, much of my frittata’s salt comes from the meat and cheese. Without them, you’ll need to add salt.
      I hope this helps, Charlie. I’ll be anxious to hear how the event goes. I’m sure you’ll wow the guests. Good luck! 🙂

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    • A shake for dinner? That ain’t right! You must learn to make frittate. They’re light, full of protein, and easy to make — much better than a shake, Bud. 🙂

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  14. great post John…in our house, clean out the fridge dinner is called “pot luck” …sometimes I hear grownnnnz. but with the price of groceries, you just can’t toss them…

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    • Thanks, Maria. Mom & Zia were raised during the Great Depression. There’s no greater sin than wasting food. With me unable to estimate serving sizes, frittate spared me my Mom’s wrath on more than one occasion. And they taste good! 🙂

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  15. John, your post brought me wonderful memories of my Dad, as my Mom used to make fritatta with ANY leftovers, in any combination…. Dad often cracked jokes about it…. I think I might have to make a fritatta and blog about it too….

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    • I’m glad this post brought back memories of your Dad, Sally. I cannot make a frittata without thinking of Mom. Please blog about your frittate and memories. You know I’ll be there to read it. 🙂

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  16. THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU for the photos and your recipes!!
    Great too, for my new and mandatory “Gluten Free” diet.
    Love reading your site—
    Carry on!
    Teri in Oregon

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    • How do you do, Teri. Welcome! I’m glad you like this site. Sorry to hear of you recent need for a GF diet but there are some wonderful recipes and blogs available today for you. There’s a great deal more support available today for special diets than there was even just a couple years ago.
      Thank you for visiting and for taking the time to comment, Teri. Don’t be a stranger! 🙂

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  17. Nice job with the photos John! I love frittatas though most of the time I make the simple Spanish tortilla with potatoes and onions. However, I’ve never added pasta to the frittata I do make and I like that idea! Like you with my pullao, I always have the ingredients for a frittata but never to think to make that as a leftover dish…it’s funny how our childhood decides what we do at short notice! I will keep your frittata in mind for my next meal on short notice!
    Have a good day John.

    Nazneen

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    • Thanks you, Nazneen. Like when potatoes are used, pasta makes a frittata much more filling and can add an interesting flavor component. You’re so right about our childhood affecting our choices today. Wouldn’t it be something if we could all get together in a massive kitchen, have access to the same pantry items, and then be given an hour to create a dish associated with our childhood or ethnic background. I’d be fascinated by the outcome, just as I was to learn that I have the ingredients to make your pullao. Who knew? 🙂

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  18. The frittata has cooked so evenly…love the pictures. I don’t make frittatas often as my husband does not like eating it much, but my older kid and I love it, so I make it once in a while. Plus it’s my go to dish if I have a large breakfast to serve. I add potatoes, mushrooms, and onions. Love tomatoes too. Once I added roasted eggplant —-yummm! The post makes me feel hungry 🙂

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    • Thank you, Minnie. I’ve used all of the ingredients you’ve mentioned — and a whole lot more. You’re right about roasted eggplant, though. It works very well here, too. Too bad your Husband isn’t on board but, then again, it just means more for you and your older kid. 🙂

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  19. You say frittata, I say frittata, we should all say frittata lol. I am in LOVE. I love both of these. But the ham and potatoes of course is my favorite. So guess who’s making these this weekend? ME lol

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    • Glad you like the post so much that you’ve been moved to make one for yourself, Kay. Truth is, I’ve got leftovers beginning to build, including more of that smoked mozzarella, so, I’ll probably be making one for myself in the next day or two. Buon appetito!

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  20. Excellent and several recipes! I’ve found that the secret of non stick for tortillas and frittatas is a very generous splash of olive oil in the frying pan and heating it until it’s smoking before adding the egg mixture. I turn it down straight away after that. I believe that the heat sets the outside of the mixture instantly and stops it sticking.
    I don’t use the broiler – I’m not a big fan, I think it spoils the texture and taste. I always flip tortillas – they have a different texture to frittatas cooked in the oven. I quite like the fact that there is a difference 🙂

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    • I hoped you’d like this post, MD, being you posted such a great recipe for one a couple weeks ago. You’re right about the adding more oil/fat to the pan just prior to adding the eggs. I’ve done it and it really helps — unless there are guests for brunch or something. Then it doesn’t matter how much oil I add, that frittata is going to stick and there’s nothing to be done about it. 🙂

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      • I’ve never really had a sticking problem, but I’ve got a nice cast iron omelette pan that is fantastic.
        I did just think of a tip for people who want to learn how to flip their fittatas and tortillas. I learnt with a small round frying pan for making poached eggs (normally it has 4 little cups for the eggs to go into). They are just right for 6 eggs and other ingredients. Because the sides are so steep (not to mention non stick) and a normal plate fits easily over the top, it makes them very easy to flip without mess 😉

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    • Thanks, Roger. That mozzarella was an impulse buy and a good one. It may not compare to the wonderful cheeses to which you’ve access but it did make one helluva frittata! 🙂

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  21. It’s fun to see the different styles of making frittatas. Mine is similar to yours (as I can’t see the point of wrestling with flipping on the stovetop). But I’m not sure mine is as pretty as yours – perfect browned edges 🙂

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    • Thanks, that’s kind of you to say but I’ve seen the dishes you prepare. I’m sure your frittata look fantastic. I feel lucky when a frittata flips correctly for serving and think that trying to flip it earlier, during the cooking process, is just begging for trouble. It only took one poorly flipped frittata splattered on my stove top to convince me to never try that again.

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  22. What a coincidence John, it’s my go-to use of left overs as well; and what’s so beautiful about this dish is that is it NEVER the same (which is what also makes this dish a little frustrating, particularly when a perfect balance of flavours are achieved). I usually finish my versions in the broiler, but I set my timer to remind me to check on it (one has to do these things at my age!). And regardless of what type of left overs you are trying to use, the dish continues to taste fresh and company worthy!
    In the summer when we’re at the cottage and I have to meal plan very strictly because it’s such a pain to get to a decent store, I often plan to use left overs from Saturday’s dinner in Sunday’s breakfast or lunch frittata! It’s simple but it’s so tasty and it’s easily adaptable to the BBQ (using a case iron pan, on indirect heat) which I also do at the cottage so the oven doesn’t heat up the space! Ham cheese and asparagus is a perfect flavour combo.
    As a note, because I don’t often bake an entire ham, when I see a (smaller) smoked dinner ham’s on sale, I usually buy one and slice it into 1/2 inch thick slices and freeze on a cookie sheet on parchment; that way if we feel like a ham and cheese frittata, I have ham on hand and need not wait on left overs (kinda cheating, but we like our frittata!). Often I don’t even bother defrosting the ham slice, I just cut it into smaller pieces and it defrosts and warms up as the frittata bakes.

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    • Thanks, Eva, for leaving such a great comment. Yes, I doubt I’ve made the same frittata twice and, like you, I’ve made a whole lotta frittate! Your comment reminded me that our frittata night was Thursday. I went for groceries on Friday and needed room in Mom’s fridge, especially if anyone was coming to visit her over the weekend. I smiled reading your timer comment. You’ve no idea how many times I’ve been waiting for that “Ding!” with something under the broiler, only to realize that I forgot to set the timer. And another frittata bit the dust.
      Great idea about buying a small smoked ham. I’m going to follow your lead. As it is, I still have some chopped ham in my freezer from Easter that somehow managed to survive my frittate and next week’s split pea soup. It’s days are numbered, though, because the leftovers are starting to build in the fridge. There’s another frittata in my future. 😉

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  23. I agree with you that there’s nothing better than a frittata to use up leftovers. Heck, I like them so much I often buy ingredients specifically to make frittatas! I often add heavy cream (just a bit) to mine, which makes them, well, creamier! And I always do the oven bit exactly as you do it, although sometimes at the end I turn on the broiler and slip the pan under that for a minute or two if I want a more browned top (that way I figure I won’t forget about the pan and burn it – even I can stay focused for a couple of minutes!). Really good (and fun!) post. Thanks.

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    • Thanks, John, and I admit to buying ingredients with a frittata in mind — but I always feel like I’m cheating when I do. Our frittate have always been a means of making room in the fridge. If I’ve cream in the house, I’ll add a splash, too, but admittedly, spare cream, like milk, is pretty rare. As for the broiler, I think my “syndrome” is genetic. Growing up, Mom burned more dinner rolls than one can imagine. It was a family joke and when we sat for dinner, someone would mention if there were rolls in the oven. I rarely burn the rolls – I don’t often have them – but I do burn just about anything placed under the broiler. I’m telling ya, it’s in the genes. 🙂

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  24. I love frittatas, they are such a wonderful way to actually “enjoy” leftovers!
    I had to smile about the portions part, if you notice I hardly post the servings with my recipes because I can never estimate how many portions a recipe makes. When I have people coming over for a meal, I always make wayyy too much food!

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  25. Frittatas are fairly new to me, or at least the name is, as I always made traditional omelettes, – but I had to laugh at ” mish-mash of eggs scrambled with a bunch of ingredients” John!

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    • Glad to bring a little chuckle into your life, Claire. In my mind — and no good ever comes from a sentence starting with that phrase — a frittata has some a starch, like potatoes or pasta, that an omelet lacks. Otherwise, except for the fancy schmancy fold, the 2 are pretty much the same, unlike their ugly step-sister, scrambled eggs.

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  26. Well you knew this was going to take me down memory lane didn’t you? Huge family lunches on the beach for the whole of August…I think we must have eaten a different frittata every day as it was always made from whatever was leftover from dinner the night before. Happy days! And I had to laugh because Big Man and I had a long conversation about tortilla/frittata as (for him and his family, at least) a Spanish tortilla is only the potato one, a french tortilla is what I woud call an omelette (thinner, softer on one side) and anything else with all the added ingredients (which we eat most often) is a frittata! Vive la difference I say and I loved the story about portion control – everyone tells me I should have worked in Army catering as I love to cook huge portions 😉 Love the asparagus one…now I’m craving it and may have to go out and buy some specially to make it!

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    • Tuna salads and frittate on the beach. You guys knew how to have a good time!
      As I mentioned to MD, I too sometimes buy an ingredient or 2 for a frittata but I almost feel guilty when I do. Our frittate were always made from leftovers and I had a more difficult time than I thought I would writing the recipe. I never really thought about the steps, the ingredient amounts, and everything else. In reality, it’s look in the refrigerator, grab the leftovers, heat them in a pan, add eggs, bake, enjoy. And, true to form, there’s always leftover frittata and it makes a great breakfast or lunch the next day. One things’s for certain, Tanya. We’ll never cook together unless it’s for NATO’s troops. 🙂

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  27. I’m so laughing at myself! Talk about being stuck in one gear…I love frittatas. I love eggs! I’ve made them many times with tomatoes, cheese, mushrooms and the like, but I never really thought about using them as a means to take care of leftovers. I hate waste, and we will eat the same thing until it is gone! I think I need to have one night a week that’s frittata night. And I’ve never used the broiler, just the oven, but I think i could remember it and I would assume it adds a nice little browning that otherwise wouldn’t be achieved without overcooking. This is a wonderful suggestion, John.

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    • I’m glad you found the post helpful, Debra. Back when I was cooking for 3, our frittata day was Thursday. It gave me the opportunity to clear out the fridge before I went grocery shopping on Friday. We never tired of the frittate because no two were ever alike and more than once someone mentioned that a particular dish would be very good in that week’s frittata. And today, for at least one supper following a holiday meal, I make a fantastic frittata with those leftovers. 🙂

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  28. Frittata and it’s cousin Impossible Pie – http://busycooks.about.com/cs/rec/a/improbpies.htm – are a staple in my kitchen. I make a big vege Impossible Pie each Sunday for my weekday breakfasts, and often throw together fridge ingredients into a frittata dinner – that’s when I include a carb like potato or pasta.
    Dandelions just kept popping up yesterday – Celia at the Farmy mentioned dandelions for the bees, and weed salad, as did a UK blogger I follow who came across a patch of wild garlic. Dandelion salad is now on my Spring menu.

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    • I’d never heard of Impossible Pie, EllaDee and they remind me of crustless quiche because of the addition of milk.cream. Whatever you call them, they’re delicious and I prepare them often.
      I chuckled when I saw Celi’s mention of dandelion greens because I’d already included Dad’s dandelion salad into this post. This time of year is prime dandelion harvesting time for us. My family never ate the mature plants, only the very young early in Spring. I hope to get out and pick some by the weekend. I hope you enjoy them next Spring as much as we do.

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  29. Well what the hey! 🙂 I’ve never used potatoes Nor pasta in my frittate! You’ve opened my eyes (again) John! For us it’s always been vegetables, herbs and cheese, sundried or fresh tomatoes. Leftover fish (especially salmon) if we have it. and Always under the broiler – that’s more a result of dumb luck than short term memory though. We love them at our house…comfort food for sure…and next time I’m adding pasta, which will send it to an altogether new food comfort level. Thanks for your inspiration, and as always, such great explanations! (You must have been a teacher in a former life…actually, you are in This one!)

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    • You are so kind, Spree, and I appreciate very much your compliments and encouragement. As I just mentioned to Greg, you can credit Mom for the idea of adding pasta, as well as for my love of frittate. When I was young and it was just her and me for lunch, she’d fix us a frittata and it became our treat. Now, I can’t help but think of her whenever I prepare and serve one. I’ve not used fish in one, though, but that’s because there just is never any leftover. I usually buy fish fillets or steaks, one per person. It’s one of the few dinner items that I don’t make enough to feed the Marines. 🙂

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  30. I say, let’s eat! Simply delicious. And beautifully photographed, too. Recently I saw a movie on Netflix (must have gone straight to DVD) and Harrison Ford, a grumpy newscaster guy makes a Frittata on TV to save the show. Sorry I forgot the name of the movie. Morning Glory, that’s it.
    Not as nice as yours but this dish had a starring role in the flick.

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    • You’re always so encouraging, Ruth, about my photography. Thank you, I do appreciate it. I’ve not seen that movie but will look for it. Here I am, preparing Hollywood food for years, and never even knew it! I could have had a career … 🙂

      Like

  31. I love these kinds of meals. Let me mix everything together throw it in a skillet or bank in an oven and I’m set. Quick, easy, fun and delicious. Good ones here!

    BE ENCOURAGED! BE BLESSED!

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  32. We love leftovers around here as well. In fact tonight’s meal was a salad with leftover steak and some black beans. You’ve made two awesome frittate’s with your leftovers! Love all of the vegetables with the touch of ham. Fabulous leftover dishes!

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    • Thanks, MJ. Mom taught me well. You don’t waste food. As a result, I’ve put just about any and every thing into a frittata over the years. You mentioned black beans. I don’t think I’ve ever tried beans in a frittata. Hmm… 🙂

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  33. In this always over-egged household, frittate make regular appearances. Yours looks wonderful! But I can’t believe it has escaped mention that leftover slices make great sandwich fillings.

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    • Good gravy, Michelle! A frittata sandwich is genius!!! As often as I make sandwiches and with such a wide assortment of ingredients, how did I miss this? I can guarantee that a portion of my next frittata is destined for sandwiches. Thanks for the heads-up!

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    • Thanks, Ken, that’s very kind of you to say and worthy of a good chuckle. Trust me. You and everyone else, for that matter, have very little to worry about from my corner of the blogosphere. 🙂

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    • We are certainly in agreement about frittatas, Kat. I love ’em. I don;t cooke them for long on the stove top. Just a couple minutes until the first signs of the eggs setting.

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  34. It’s been awhile since I’ve made a frittata. Tomato or tom-a-toe. Let’s work the whole thing out. Now I’ve got the song in my head. What musical was that from? In any case, I love the smoked mozzarella. Now you’ve got me thinking about what’s in my fridge. Might have to do a Mexican frittata, frittate. Eggs are always around in my house. Thanks, John!

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    • Thanks, Abbe, and I’ve had the durn song in my head for over a week now! It’s from a Rogers/Astaire film, “Shall We Dance”, and was written by Gershwin.
      That mozzarella was an impulse buy at the market and it sure came in handy. I think I should just buy a cheese like that more often. It sure worked out OK this time.

      Like

  35. Great looking frittata, John. I’m sure it was delicious! Love it with the side salad, a lovely combination. All you need now is a glass of champagne or a nice oaky chardonnay.

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  36. Pingback: Leaving Home Leftovers, or Fridge Foraging | Chica Andaluza

  37. Do you think the guys in hubby’s office will care if I make both of these for their lunch tomorrow? As it is, I’m supposed to make steak and also chicken quesadillas, and quite frankly, these sound and look soooooooo much better. And a lot easier to cook in the office than the quesas. Screw it, I’m doing it. If they don’t like it, they can cook their own lunches, right? 🙂 Ha!

    I’m a huge frittata fan and I love having these two new combos in my arsenal 🙂 Thanks John!

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    • I’m so far behind in my blogging duties that I missed your lunch dilemma. Well, by now you were either a success of I was a failure. That’s right. Blame it on me. If one posts recipes, one must take responsibility when things go afoul. 🙂
      I’m a frittata lover, too, Sarah. Because mine are made from mostly leftovers, no two are ever alike. Little chance of tiring of them this way. Have a great weekend, Sarah!

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  38. This is going to make my family very happy. We eat breakfast for dinner a lot!! My kids love eggs and they love pasta. I never combined them in a frittata! I hate left over myself, this is a great way to repurpose them!

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  39. You’re frittata looks delicious and a perfect way to use up left overs. I’ve only made frittata a couple of times and they have not quite turned out to my taste…I think I will be trying it again using some of your tips!

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  40. Aren’t they the best? Perfect for breakfast lunch or dinner. I loved the varieties you shared with us here. I hope you are having a wonderful day!

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    • Yes, frittate are the best! THey’re even good left-over, too.
      I enjoy your blog, Monet, and wonder if there is a way to subscribe to it other than through FaceBook or Twitter? I’m not at all current on those 2 platforms and would likely miss notifications of your new posts. I’ve checked your blog but haven’t found the means to subscribe. Did I miss it?
      Thanks for visiting and taking the time to comment. Have a great weekend!

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  41. Mmm this is very interesting, I must make myself a Frittata, I have lots of left over ham (we had a huge ham sale in our local store) and loads of vegetables of all shapes and sizes. Frittata it will be over the weekend. Thanks for sharing this. I actually wanted to say thank you because you always like my posts. Please note that your presence is always noticed and appreciated even though I have never stopped here. So every time you click that button just know that I appreciate your kind gesture, always. Enjoy the rest of the week.

    Like

    • Sorry I’m so late getting back to you. By now you either love or hate frittate. We all love frittate and can only hope you find them enjoyable, too.
      I’ve enjoyed discovering you through your blog and cannot wait to read more of it. Have a great week!

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  42. John, I’ve made frittata before, but I’ve never thought to put leftover pasta in it! What a great idea, thank you! Oh, and I was craving your grandpa’s tuna salad the other day, so I thought I’d try to track down some tuna while I was at Costco. All I could find were tins of tuna in springwater! Darn it, don’t they know that’s cat food? I’m going to have to visit my Italian supermarket instead.. 🙂

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    • Pasta in frittata works very well, Celia. I’m sure you’re going to love it! Yes, Costco is nice but, as big as the store is, the selection in limited. If they have what you need, you are in luck, but, if you want something a little off the beaten path — like olive oil packed tuna fish — you’re on your own.

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  43. Fabulous! I also have never thought to put leftover pasta in a frittata. Beautiful photos, and great frittata how-to. I love the Spanish variant, the tortilla, in which the vegs soak in the spiced eggs until they release some juices, and the tortilla is cooked just long enough to brown it, but leave some liquid within.

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    • Thank you so much, Susan. I’ve seen tortilla recipes a number of times but never tried to make one. I’m a bit addicted to frittata and when I get the urge to try making a tortilla, by the time I get started, I’ve changed course and have started making a frittata. I’m weak. 🙂

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  44. I love fritattas because they taste good, use left overs and even teenagers can cook them. Your photos really called me in………..

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  45. Well now, see you just helped me out. Now that I’m back able to look at food blogs, I checked this one out & thought “that’s just what I can handle right now”. I went easy on the fixin’s but made this for a lunch that was just perfect. Thank you yet again.

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    • Well, that’s good news! It’s always good to hear that someone tried and liked a dish. Now that you know what to do, you can really get creative. There really is no limit to the ingredients.
      Thanks for coming back, Diane, to let me know that you enjoyed the dish. 🙂

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  46. Fritate, patate … love your humour, so whatever you do, don’t call the whole thing off! Love these ideas for fritate. I’m a latecomer to this dish and a convert. Not only is it versatile, but one very important thing it has in its favour compared to a quiche is that you don’t need to fuss about with pastry. There’s a cafe up the road in the Village (I’m lucky to live near an honest-to-goodness village within the city) where they serve a vegetable fritata loaded with sliced potatoes, broccoli, cheese, eggs and other good stuff. A wonderful lunch indeed. I may try to replicate it at home!

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    • I agree with every word you wrote, Mar … well, except being a latecomer. I’ve been enjoying frittate for most of my life. Lucky me! Once you get the hang of it — not that it’s hard — you’ll be amazed at what you’ll put into one. You’ll see … 🙂

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  47. Woo-hoo! This post has made me very excited for two reasons:
    1. It has been a looooong time since I’ve made frittatas, and I’m wondering why that is. Today my favourite husband bought me a fab new skillet which would be perfect for the recipes you’ve posted. This is gonna be dee-lish!
    2. I volunteer at our local food bank and we have BOXES of dried split peas. We can’t give them away (we’ve tried), so we’re forcing them on our volunteers. I’ve been too busy to look for a Split Pea Soup recipe, so I’m really looking forward to your post.

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    • With the right pan, you’ll b making frittatas every week! I volunteered at a food pantry for years and I was surprised at some of the things that just wouldn’t “move.” No one wanted beans — and I include split peas — for some unknown reason. I tried to convince the client about their benefits but no one cared. We need to do a better job about educating our young about food so that when they grow up they can make better choices.

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  48. I knew that gorgeous ham would be making a reappearance. This is one of the many reasons to look forward to leftovers. Your eggs look so fluffy and that green asparagus, yum!

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  49. I also seem to make loads of food, not because I’m not good with portion sizes (which I’m not!) but because I grew up in a household who made sure there was enough food not just for us, but for anyone else who might decide to drop in! I love frittate but it’s not something I do often. Great idea with using up whatever is left over in your fridge! I especially love your frittata with that melted cheese on top!! Frittata and melted cheese… Oh yeah!

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    • Sometimes, Lidia, I swear you were seated at our table. We always had guests at the dinner table. Mom kept sauce frozen in her tiny freezer atop the refrigerator just for those occasions. When the unexpected guest(s) arrived, she’d have a platter of pasta on the table, as well as the dinner she had planned, in no time. 🙂
      And yeah! If you’re going to grate cheese for your frittata, reserve some for sprinkling onto the frittata after “the flip”. Yum!

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  50. Bonjourno John! We both must be telepathic as we are both cleaning out our refrigerators on the same day. You made two beautiful frittatas. I love them both and will have to give them a try. I also have a hard time with portions as my boys eat me out of house and home. When I serve guests, I just assume they must eat as much as hungry teenage boys and that is never the case.

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    • Buongiorno, BAM! This is really something. It really does depend on how one is raised and where one lives as to how one “sees” the ingredients. You have leftovers and “see” fried rice. Another blogging friend, Nazneen, looked at her fridge and panty and “saw” pulao. I have those ingredients, here, just as I have the ingredients to make your fried rice. I’d no thought of making fried rice and didn’t even know what pulao was. I always “see” frittata. If nothing else, blogging helps to give us all a chance to view things a little differently.

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  51. I love frittatas and it so happens that I prepared mine from scratch (I mean with raw vegetables, not leftovers) to serve along with roasted lamb and potatoes on Easter Sunday. (Orthodox Christian Easter was yesterday). I used zucchini, spring onions, cheese and fresh herbs (mint and dill).

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    • Your frittata sounds wonderful and fitting for an Easter feast. Like you, I wouldn’t use leftovers for such a celebration but I might make another frittata on Tuesday or Wednesday with leftovers from the feast. 🙂
      I hope you had a wonderful Easter. Thanks for visiting and taking the time to comment.

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    • Thanks, Jasline. If you’ve got eggs and a couple leftovers, you’re about 30 minutes away from a frittata. Do give one a try. You’ll never look at leftovers the same way again.

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  52. You reminded me of the one and only time I made a frittata. I made it for Mike on his 30th birthday. Not sure why I haven’t made one since. I know we enjoyed it. And I just so happen to be hosting breakfast at our house this Sunday…perhaps it’s time again for another frittata. Thank you for offering up two different variations too! I loved all the pictures. 🙂

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    • Mike’s 30th birthday? Considering that it was but a few weeks/months ago, you guys must’ve gotten married in high school! 😉
      I hope you do get back into frittata making again. Kristy. THey’re still as tasty as they always were. 🙂

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          • It was a hit John! We even topped ours with a little burrata before putting it in the oven. And I have to tell you, Miss A was sitting at the table not eating. Mr. N was even trying to do the airplane into the mouth food trick with her (he of course had already finished his!) and she was having none of it. Then I said, that’s too bad because it’s a Chicago John recipe and you know how good those are. I kid you not, she looked at me, and then picked up a bite and put it in her mouth. Then she said, “Huh. Not bad.” And then she ate the rest!!! 🙂

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          • Your comment made my weekend, Kristy! I always feel honored when someone prepares one of our recipes and you guys have done so a number of times. And then there’s the Sous Chefs. How nice of Mr N to try to entice his Sister with the “Airplane flying into the hangar” trick! And what a surprise to know that my name carries such weight with her. I had better not slip up now. One bad recipe from me and my name will be Mudd in her mind. 🙂
            I’m very glad that you all enjoyed your frittata, Kristy. Putting burrata on top was a fantastic idea and I’m surely going to give it a try myself. Actually, I’m always looking for an excuse to buy more of that cheese. It’s just soo good! Thanks for coming back to tell me about your frittata and the Sous Chefs. Enjoy your Sunday evening!

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  53. This has always been one of my go-to “light” meals (and a little bacon grease doesn’t hurt). I need to try baking them – I always broil (which sets off all of the smoke alarms in my kitchen).

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    • Thank you, Claudia. Yeah, a little bacon grease ia a very good thing. I can so identify with your smoke alarm comment. Here, that alarm is considered the dinner bell. When it sounds, head to the table. I’ll be serving in minutes. 🙂

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  54. Now I know what I’m making for dinner tonight! Thanks for the inspiration, John. I love frittata and haven’t made one in a while, but have lots of leftovers to make a good one. Plus they are generally pretty easy to make. And as always, I learned something…I didn’t know you could put pasta in one! I’ve always used potatoes and sometimes made them without a starch entirely. Great post, and sorry I’m so late commenting. Last week and this week I’ve been overwhelmed with deadlines. Hope you’ve had a good week! 🙂

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    • Thank you, Betsy, and don’t worry about commenting anytime. Just last night, I finally got everything dealing with the blog caught up for the 1st time in weeks. Of course, I’ll post a new recipe late tonight and will fall hopelessly behind by morning but, for now, I’m sitting pretty!
      ANd, yes, pasta works fine in a frittata. In fact, pretty much anything does. I don’t recall using fish in one but, then again, I so rarely have leftover fish. It’s usually a fillet or steak per person. Now that kind of apportioning I can handle!

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  55. Dang, that’s one serious frittata right there!! Just look at the big pieces of ham and asparagus…my mouth is watering. I did the demos when I worked at Williams-Sonoma and made frittatas all the time (didn’t look as good as yours!), but haven’t made one since. Thanks for the reminder–I’m gonna need to make one asap!

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    • Forgive me, Caroline, but I don’t recall reading that you once worked at Williams-Sonoma. And doing cooking demos, no less! I don’t know what kind of employer it was but I hope you got a healthy employee discount. You know all about frittate, then, so I think it’s time for you to re-acquaint yourself with these tasty dishes. 🙂

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  56. Never thought of putting precooked pasta in a frittata, great idea. I too avoid the broiler for the same reason as you, because even though I set the timer I frequently do not hear the “ring”, and there goes the dish..

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  57. Pingback: Cooking with Ms. M.: Frittata and a fried brain | Mom the Obscure

  58. Pingback: Garden Tour Number 1, a Frittata and Some Mighty Tasty Green Beans | bits and breadcrumbs

  59. Love it, love it, love it. This is such a brilliant blog – delicious creations as well as glimpses of a few kitchen mishaps to which I am prone. I don’t know why we British don’t do frittata – an all round wonderful meal in one pan.

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  60. Pingback: That’s a Gouda Frittata! | feasting with friends

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