No baloney, it’s Mascarpone!

Hard to believe that this is already the 4th cheese of the series. We’re in the home stretch now but there’ll be no sprint to the finish line. No, I’ll continue to go slow so that any who want to jump on this cheesy bandwagon will have plenty of time to do so. If you’re thinking of giving it a go, I’ll repeat what I’ve said in the comments following each cheese post: start with the ricotta cheese recipe. It’s the easiest, there’s less chance for error, and the ricotta is the best you’ve ever tasted. Not only that, but working with ricotta gets you experience with handling curds, a must when making cheese. So, get yourself a couple quarts of whole milk, some white vinegar, and make a batch of ricotta. Once you do, you’ll realize that none of the cheeses I’ve covered thus far are at all difficult to prepare.

Those who have followed this series may notice the similarities between today’s recipe and that of my ricotta. The main difference between the 2 recipes is the amount of milk fat in the dairy products used. In the case of ricotta, warmed whole milk separates into ricotta & whey with the addition of white vinegar. To make mascarpone, combine equal amounts of heavy cream with half-and-half, warm, and use lemon juice to separate the mascarpone from the whey. In both instances, the curds are strained and the resulting cheeses are ready for use in your favorite recipes. Yes, it is that simple and those of you have made the ricotta know exactly what I mean. Best of all, it is far cheaper to make mascarpone at home than it is to purchase it from your grocer. For example, the dairy products I used cost about $4.50 and resulted in 16 oz. of cheese. An 8 oz. container of mascarpone costs about $7.00 at the same store. Needless to say, since coming across this recipe on the Fankenhauser Cheese Page, I’ve not bought a bit of mascarpone from any store.

So, what can you do with all of that homemade mascarpone in your refrigerator? Well, add a little confectioner’s sugar and heavy cream, whip it, and the result may be served with berries in a variety of ways or used as a luscious topping for your favorite dessert. Use mascarpone as the creamy base for a number of delicious pasta dishes, perfect as primi or secondi piatti. Combine it with your favorite cheeses (cheddar, Monterey Jack, Asiago, etc.) and use the mixture to stuff jalapeños to make poppers.  And of course, use it to prepare tiramisu, the quintessential Italian dessert. Given mascarpone’s creamy texture and relatively mild flavor, the only limit to its uses is your own imagination.

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Hand-Cut Pappardelle with Spinach, Pecorino Romano, and Mascarpone

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Before beginning, please refer to my Cheesy Stuff page. Chock full of cheesy details, it provides information about ingredients, cleaning/sterilizing equipment, spices & seasonings, a few tips, and sources for supplies and information.

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Home-Made Mascarpone Cheese Recipe

yield: slightly more than 1 lb. (485g)

Ingredients

  • 1 pint heavy whipping cream
  • 1 pint half-and-half
  • 2 tbsp fresh lemon juice

Directions

  1. Place the cream and half-and-half into a clean, sterile pot with a lid and heat over low to med-low heat until it reaches 185˚. Stir frequently to prevent cream from scorching on the pot’s bottom. A double-boiler works fine, too.
  2. Add lemon juice and stir until thoroughly combined.
  3. Cover and maintain 185˚ temperature for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Mixture should show signs of thickening.
  4. Remove from heat and place covered pot into the refrigerator overnight.
  5. The next morning, the mixture should have thickened more and you should see traces of the whey beginning to separate from the curds. .
  6. Cover a large strainer with a clean, sterile handkerchief.
  7. Gently pour the curds into the handkerchief.
  8. Grab the handkerchief’s 4 corners, tie them, and use them to hang like a sack over the sink or a large pot. If your kitchen is exceptionally warm or if it has drained a few hours and still not to your liking, place everything into the fridge to drain.
  9. Drain until the mascarpone is the consistency you prefer. To hurry the process, carefully twist the “sack” to force the whey out of the cheese.
  10. Place cheese into container(s) and refrigerate. The mascarpone will remain fresh for about 1 week but is best when used immediately.

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Notes

Unlike some of the other cheeses, you can use ultra-pasteurized dairy products to make mascarpone — but I would avoid them if possible. You’ll get the best tasting cheese if you use raw dairy but it is illegal to sell raw milk in many States, including Illinois. With raw dairy products off of the table, you’re left with pasteurized and ultra-pasteurized products. Although both processes negatively affect the mascarpone’s taste, it’s worse with ultra-pasteurization. So, I only use ultra-pasteurized products when I’ve no choice.

Some sites and cheese recipes call for using tartaric acid instead of lemon juice to separate the curds from the whey when making mascarpone. This additive can be bought online and is available at a couple of the resources I’ve listed on my Cheesy Stuff page. I have never used it and am perfectly happy with the mascarpone that results from using lemon juice.

Coming Attractions

Here is the recipe for the Pappardelle with Spinach, Mascarpone and Pecorino Romano Cheeses dish pictured above. Recipes for the remaining pictured dishes, as well as Aunt Lil’s tiramisu, are forthcoming.

Feta cheese is next in this cheesy series.

*     *     *

Inspired by the Fankhauser Making Mascarpone At Home webpage.

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132 thoughts on “No baloney, it’s Mascarpone!

  1. There seems to be a pattern here.. I’m copying and saving it under recipes to try:) I can’t wait to start on some cheese-making. But I’ll take your advice and start with the ricotta! I love that you’re going slow enough that we can catch up with you along the way! xo Smidge

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    • Smidge, you’re going to love the ricotta! Everyone I’ve convinced to try it is amazed and you will be, too. It is just so easy! Then, with a batch of ricotta under your belt, you’ll be emboldened to try these other cheeses. The experience will come in handy when we make feta and mozzarella. And I’m here to answer any of your questions along the way. 🙂

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    • I totally agree with John, Barbara, you MUST try the ricotta. It makes quite a lot, so I cut the recipe in half with much success. It really was such a treat.

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  2. This sent me back to your ricotta recipe, too, and I hope to try my hand at making cheese soon. Funnily, getting raw milk here is no problem at all, but cream is another matter. The only cream is UHT. I guess I’ll just have to try and skim enough cream myself to do it. These cheese recipes are so simple, yet no less exciting for having demystified the process. Thank you!

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  3. And it’s all so easy, John, at least when I read your clear instructions. I just worry that I might just end up with so much ricotta or mascarpone that I may grow to hate it. One of my luxuries will be buying small quantities when I need it. I have a feeling that making your own cheese in France may be a capital crime.

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  4. I fully understand what it’s like having an excess of cheese around here, Roger. I can only give so much away and I am not one to waste food. Luckily, I use the excess ricotta to stuff shells which I freeze individually on baking sheets before bagging and storing them in the freezer. I think you can avoid problems with la Police Fromage if you let it be known that you’re only making Fromage Américain. No self-respecting Frenchman will come within miles of your home, although your standing within the community will surely fall a bit. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  5. John – it’s dinner time here in Sydney and I’m about to ‘frock up’ for the Year 2 parents’ bowling night. Lawn bowls at that; a game I have never understood. And it will be pass-around food only and a lot of mingling with absolute whacky strangers and Carl of course is at a seminar leaving me solo so HOW MUCH WOULD I RATHER STAY HOME AND DINE ON YOUR DELICIOUS LOOKING PASTA! So cruel that I saw this post just before I had to rush out the door. I’ll be ‘borrowing’ this recipe for sure as long as I can get in before that Eva from Kitchen Inspirations – she beat me to your short ribs recipe and I won’t have it happen to me again! xx

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    • You are quite funny Charlie, and I do apologize if I beat you to John’s amazing recipes. The short ribs are definitely on my list of recipes to try, but it won’t be for a while, so please do, I’d love to see your take on it.
      Lawn Bowling? Why that sounds almost as much fun as Curling (yes, I did try that years ago, very very chilly feet). Good luck with that 😉

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    • Thanks, Charlie Louie! The pasta recipe is an easy one but you’ll find that mascarpone works in many dishes. I use it in place, or along with, heavy cream in recipes and it works just fine. It’s so mild tasting that it won’t mask other flavors in the dish but it adds a nice creaminess.

      Is your lawn bowl bocce? Now, that’s something we Bartolinis know a little about. It was played in our back yard practically every Sunday during the Summers of my youth. Thanks for the Blast from the Past!

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  6. Ooh John…I´ve been waiting for this one! We´re actually just off to the Big Town for some shopping, so if I can work out what equates to half and half I´ll be trying this. We only get Long Life Cream though…I´m wondering if it will still work. Still, you know me, I´ll be giving this my best shot!

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    • You need about 25% butterfat to make mascarpone. If your Long life Cream is the equivalent of our heavy cream, mixing it with whole milk will work. I’m guessing 1 part whole milk to 3 parts Long life Cream will do. This is such a simple, inexpensive recipe that experimentation is easy. I don’t think you’ll have any problem at all, Tanya. Good luck!

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    • Life comes with few guarantees, Mandy, but I will guarantee that you’ll love the ricotta and find it incredibly easy to make. Not one new ricotta maker has ever come back to me with anything but praise. You’ll see … 🙂

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  7. I too was worried about ending up with too much cheese and not knowing what to do with it. Glad to know I can use excess ricotta to stuff shells and freeze individually. I am always on the look out for food for my freezer.

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    • Oh, yeah, Norma. Use the extra ricotta to stuff shells and you’ve got a great dinner in your freezer anytime you need one. Just be aware that ricotta by itself doesn’t freeze well. So, you’l need to combine it with a few other ingredients before stuffing the shells. Here’s my family’s recipe for stuffed shells that you can modify to suit your own family’s palate. Good luck!

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      • John, Thanks for the stuffed shells recipe, Copied and in the “to make file”. My spinach seeds are in the ground so as soon as I can harvest I will be making this recipe, I know my kids will love it. Will have to double the recipe. I cook for their freezer also.

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        • Like your kids, the boys that live above me love stuffed shells and the oldest is after me to make more cheese so that they’ll get some shells. I hope you enjoy this ricotta as much as we do.

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  8. That’s it….I’m in love!! You have no idea how much I LOVE mascarpone – I replace cream cheese with it any time I can. It’s the cost that drives me crazy. BUT no more, thanks to you!! I’m so excited to try this. I’ll probably have to wait till my life settles down a bit, but I know like you, I’ll never buy it again!! Thank you, thank you from my heart and tummy!!

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    • You are most welcome! I know you’re hyper-busy, Linda, and I really appreciate your stopping to comment. Just like the ricotta, you’re going to be amazed at how incredibly easy this is to make. You are going to love this!

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  9. Heavy cream and half & half — okay, I’m in! I use mascarpone in a butternut squash lasagna and I know what you mean about the price, $7 for 6 or 8 oz!!! I love the idea of making it at home if it is as easy as ricotta (there is no substitute for homemade ricotta-YUM), and using it for desserts too. Thanks for the inspiration and recipe. 🙂

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    • Thanks, Judy. The ricotta and mascarpone recipes are very similar and the results are fantastic. If you’ve successfully made one, you’ll have no trouble making the other. And then, if you’re at all like me, you’ll grin every time you see the price of those tiny containers of mascarpone at your grocer’s. 🙂

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  10. I love this homemade recipe! I’ve actually didn’t know it was fairly easy to make, well minimal ingredients I should say. 🙂 I will definitely give this a try. I’m addicted to all forms of cheese, I don’t discriminate EVER! Cheers!

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    • The few ingredients and relative ease of preparation really did surprise me and spurred me onto trying others. If you try one, I’m sure it will amaze you, too! 🙂

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  11. Nothing, absolutely nothing, gets me as excited as your cheese posts, John. As you know, I’ve been admiring making cheese at home from afar for quite some time, until recently you gave me the tools and courage to try the ricotta, and boy, were you spot on, it is honestly the best I’ve ever had! The marscapone looks tempting, but sadly everything I would make from it would result directly on my hips (whether I partake or not, I’m just lucky that way), so I doubt I’ll make it (having said that, I will have quite a bit of difficulty resisting when I see your Tiramisu!
    Yet again, your post took me back to my childhood, and those lovely parfait glasses; my dear Mom had some just like the one’s in your photo — remember the long spoons? That photo could well have been taken in my Mom’s kitchen, except her plates would have had red polka dots rather than stripes!
    I do hope you’re not teasing about making feta, John, that would simply be cruel, very very cruel! 😉
    I am very much looking forward to that recipe…please post it as soon as possible!

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    • There she is, my blog’s Official Cheese Crier! I can say it’s easy over and over again but having a talented chef like you say, “He’s right!” or “It is easy!” really helps get the message across and I thank you for that, Eva.

      Creating this post was especially fun; I do love mascarpone! And I ate a lot of mascarpone once I got those pics made. I had to draw the line at tiramisu. As much as I love it, enough was enough. I’ll come back to it when I’m having people over for dinner.

      Feta is definitely coming, Eva. I just want to give people a chance to try 1 of these first 4 cheeses before making feta. Freshly made feta needs to be brined and, in effect, pickled before it can be eaten and that can prove tricky for a first-time cheese maker. I want everyone to have the same kind of success that you had with ricotta. They’ll be much more likely to attempt another recipe if their first attempt goes smoothly. We’ll get there! 🙂

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    • Thanks, Kristy, your kids will love this. It’s somewhat of a science experiment, separating milk into curds & whey. And it’s easy enough that you needn’t worry about a failure. Making ricotta is about as fool-proof a process as there is. Good luck!

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  12. John, this series of yours has been Fantastic, and your ricotta is awesome, I’ll confirm! I’m so excited to make your mascarpone!! Has to be one of the most delectable treats on earth. Can’t wait to see the recipe for the strawberries, mascarpone and basil (or so it seems from that luscious photo.) Way to tease us! and pasta with mascarpone, oooo be still my heart! We all can’t thank you enough for such clearly laid out tutorials on cheeses-makin’s! 😉
    (here’s another one for my pinterest board!)

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    • Thanks, Spree, I’m glad you like these posts. The recipes are all straight-forward and I’ll get right on them for you. And thanks for “pinning” the recipe. I’m so far behind the times — I still need to figure out what I’m doing on Facebook before I expand to Pinterest. All in due time …

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  13. Oh my goodness, your entire page made my mouth water!! I’m going to start praying for one day (just ONE day, Lord!) off the dairy wagon so I can consume all things cheesy without any ill effects!

    ~April 🙂

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    • Do you have problems with goat’s milk, too, April? If not, then you may be interested in the up-and-coming feta cheese recipe. I’ve got my fingers crossed for ya!

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      • Yes, I can eat goat’s milk cheese and sheep’s milk cheese. Have yet to search for the buffalo mozzarella that we spoke about earlier. As long as I don’t eat the goat/sheep’s milk cheese more than once or twice a week I’m usually OK. I will look forward to your upcoming feta cheese recipe!! 🙂

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  14. What a beautiful post. The pictures make me want to rush to the kitchen and get started. But, I think I’ll start with the ricotta too. Just to practice for this fabulous mascarpone. I love it! Thank you for this series, I’m excited to try making cheese like this!

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    • Thanks, Sarah. You can easily make both cheeses. You’ll see. And it’s nice knowing you can have fresh ricotta or mascarpone anytime you want. If you’ve any questions, just let me know. Good luck!

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  15. I was all prepared to make your ricotta when I was sidelined from cooking with the family health issues, but reading this has given me renewed vigor to pursue it, because not only do I want the ricotta…I want the mascarpone! Can’t wait to see the recipes for using this, but meanwhile, is that balsamic with your berries and mascarpone? It looks amazing, John!

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    • Hello, Betsy, and it is good to have you back! Yes, I used balsamic for the parfaits. A friend gave me a bottle of aged balsamic for Christmas and I’ve really enjoyed finding ways to use it. The recipes for both ricotta and mascarpone are really quite similar. If you can do one, you certainly can do the other. No problem! 🙂

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  16. Bravo, John. I suspect that using good-quality milk from the closest dairy would set me back more than $10.00, but I imagine the quality of homemade ricotta or mascarpone might be worth it. Can’t wait for the feta, which is one of my favorite cheeses.

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    • Yeah, Karen, paying that much for the dairy will run your costs up but, then again, I bet the cheese you get will taste amazing! I wouldn’t be able to afford to use it all of the time but, once in a while, say around the holidays, it would be great to splurge and get the good stuff.

      Times sure have changed when I use “good stuff” in reference to dairy products. 🙂

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  17. Laughing at Roger’s comment. There’s so much cheese so easily available, even here in the south where there are no cows, although the goats’ and sheep’s cheeses are fantastic, that I’m not sure I’ll be making it myself. That papardelle dish looks delicious!

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    • I must admit, you and Roger are in a rather unique — and enviable — situation. These cheeses here are really no comparison for what’s so readily available to you. But, who knows? Maybe one day you’ll find a stray cow and find yourself wondering what to do with the milk. Well, look no further than these recipes. 🙂

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  18. Making this recipe will have to wait until my better half has finished with her WW goals, but it’s great to have on file for future enjoyment!

    btw-I really think your title should have been “No baloney, it’s Mascarponey!” Well at least that is what keeps on repeating itself in my head. I hate my brain sometimes.

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    • Yeah, I’m not sure how many gazillion points these cheeses are in WW. Better to wait than be shunned by WW because she asked about it.

      As for baloney/mascarponey, Jed, isn’t it enough that I’ve already upset the Italian processed meat industry — not to mention the Oscar Mayer Co. — by using baloney instead of bologna? Must I also upset their Dairy Council, as well? We still have people over there, you know! 🙂

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  19. John, you have converted me! When I get home I’m going to get myself a pasta machine and also make your cheese. The pictures you post, the way you write it up all makes it sound approachable and oh so tasty. And yes please to desert – I’m imagining raspberries and strawberries picked fresh from the allotment…… 🙂

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    • Ding, ding, ding! That’s the correct answer! Go to the head of the class, my Dear!

      I realize, Claire, that you’ll have plenty to do once you get back home. Making pasta or cheese may not be too high on your priority list. Still, when you’re ready to start, I’m here to help you in whatever way I can, although I doubt you’ll need any. You’ll do fine. You’ll see.

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  20. Believe it or not John, my daughter who’s 13, has made cheese and I have not. What’s wrong with me?! She made Ricotta with her cousin and told me how easy it was. They did it on their own for fun and it truly was the best Ricotta I have ever had so I am thoroughly convinced. I just need to dive in I guess. Your Pappardelle is reason alone. Holy moly that looks delish!

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    • It seems to me, Geni, that it’s a done deal. You’ve no choice but to start making cheese, preferably mascarpone since your daughter is already skilled in the making of ricotta. As for the pappardelle, if you’ve got the dough, it’s very easy to hand cut the pasta and I’ll be here to guide you through all of it. 🙂

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    • I was just as surprised to learn that as you are now, Courtney. These cheeses are very easy to make. I hope you do try it for yourself. Strawberry season is just getting underway!

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    • Thanks, Kay. I think today’s recipe struck a chord with a number of people. Mascarpone is such a favorite of so many because it can be used in both sweet and savory dishes. I certainly had a great time cooking with it these last couple weeks. I had to do it, though, “for the blog.” 🙂

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  21. I love fankhauser (sp?) too, he is quite delightfully batty and uses things that you already have in your kitchen. I always make my ricotta from the whey after making cheese like he does. Which i really should do soon. but I have never made marscapone, i don’t think i have even eaten it. I am going to remedy this poste haste.. Sorry about my spelling tonight, i have just finished the farmy for the night (fingers crossed) and i am just so tired from being battered by that wind all day.. c

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    • Yeah, Fankhauser is great! I used to make ricotta from whey but I like this version so much better. It seems creamier to me. Mascarpone is like cream cheese, although much milder in taste. Some compare it to a mild neufchâtel. It’s a great “building block” cheese. Very creamy, you can use it in sweet and savory dishes. I’m hooked on it!

      Get some rest and don’t worry about things like spelling. Never sweat the small stuff, especially when among friends. 🙂

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    • But it is easy, Giovanna! It was a surprise for me to learn just how simple a process it is. I’m sure you, too,would be surprised if you ever get the time to make some. 🙂

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  22. A wonderful post John in your continuing series…so informative. I do believe that there will be a run on white handkerchiefs as I can see everyone will be making cheese soon.

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    • Thank you, Karen. One can always use cheese cloth but I’ve found it can fray, especially if it has to be cut or trimmed. A box of cheap hankies can be easily laundered, last a long time, and I never have to worry about someone finding a thread on their bagel with a schmear of my cream cheese. So, are you going to join us in cheese making? 🙂

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    • My pleasure, Lisa! These recipes are great for kids. They’re like edible science experiments. Ricotta is especially good for this because the milk curdles within about 20 minutes. It’s amazingly fast. I’ve promised the boys that live above me that this Summer we’re going to make ricotta and use it to stuff shells, one of their favorite dinners. These boys may not be Italian but they’re going to cook like one when they go off to college! 🙂 I hope you have a great week, too.

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  23. How great you are! My daughter and grandchildren are gonna love me for cooking some of your selections. I don’t cook very often, let my daughter do it, but you have inspired me to cook more. With receipies like these I can’t go wrong. Thanks for sharing.

    BE ENCOURAGED! BE BLESSED!

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  24. I still can’t wrap my head around making homemade cheese…scares me…a lot. But, with you as my guide, how could I not succeed, right!? That mascarpone looks incredible. Don’t even get me started on that pasta. Ohhh my.

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    • Caroline, you make so many recipes that are far more complicated than these cheeses that it isn’t funny. Seriously, you can easily make any of these. Make yourself some ricotta and you’ll see exactly what I mean. Not one person has come back with anything other than praise for the cheese they made. You’ll see…

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  26. BRAVO! I really need to get with the program. I have visons of ricotta, home made pasta and whatever I can lay my hands on from the garden, I’m thinking some truly homemade veggie lagsagna…

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    • THanks, David. Your lasagna idea sounds really delicious! You make so many complicated dishes, be they home-cured, smoked, or just plain cooked, that you’re going to make ridotta and exclaim WTF (What The Formaggio)! There is nothing to making any of these cheeses. You’ll see …

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    • Yes, Sawsan, and having made the ricotta, you know exactly how simple this is. And just like ricotta, mascarpone can be used in a number of dishes, from sweet to savory. Do give it a go and please let me know how you do. Good luck! 🙂

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  27. You make cheese making sound so easy, not to mention worthwhile! I’ve been curious to try mascarpone (gasp, I haven’t used it before) but have been put off by the price tag! Yours looks delicious, and so versatile.

    By the way, just had the thrill of noticing my mention on your blogroll. Thank you for that! One of these days I’ll set my blogroll up, and From the Bartolini Kitchens will definitely be on it!

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    • Certainly, not all cheeses are easy to make. The hard cheeses, especially those with bacteria and mold, are rather involved and, frankly, way out of my league. The cheeses I make are on the easy side of the scale and, believe me, if I can make them, anyone can. If I can get someone to make just one of them, I know that they’ll see what I’ve been saying all along. It really is that easy! Mascarpone has been called the Italian cream cheese and, yes, there are similarities, to a point. I find mascarpone to be much milder in taste and creamier than cream cheese. Because of that, I feel you can do much more with it.

      I’ve listed your blog within my blogroll, Mar, because, quite simply, I enjoy it. Your recipes are straight forward and tasty, your photos are all well-shot, and your posts are well-written. What’s not to love? 🙂

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  28. John, this is a wonderful post. I’m so glad to find a recipe for this.I am new to your blog, so I spent some time browsing through your earlier posts. I’m so glad I did that. You’ve created an interesting spot to visit and I’ll definitely be back. I hope you have a great day. Blessings…Mary

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  29. John I have to admit I have not tried making my own cheese yet. However I better learn quick as your Hand-Cut Pappardelle with Spinach, Pecorino Romano, and Mascarpone looks to die for and I am hoping that recipe is around the corner soon. Take care, BAM

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    • Give it a shot, BAM. It is far easier than one would think. I know I was surprised when I first started, The pappardelle recipe is coming. Unfortunately, I forgot about Easter (Yikes!) and it messed up my posting schedule a bit. Stay tuned … 🙂

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  30. Love Cheeses and it’s my downfall, put a loaf of crunchy bread and some cheese in front of me, I’m in heaven. I love love marscapone cheese, but some how always get the guilts on…I’m going to make my cheats way tiramisu for Easter, I’m sure it won’t be as decadent as yours looking at this home made marscarpone. x Beautiful!

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    • I’m with you, Yvette. Give me the heel of a loaf of bread, a hunk of cheese, and I am one happy snacker. I’m rather glad that I do not make any of the hard cheeses. I can see myself raiding each wheel nightly. I’d be big as a house in no time. 🙂

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    • You’re most welcome, Kathryn. This is just about as easy as the ricotta recipe and every bit as good. If you make either, you’ll be very pleased with the cheese.

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  35. Well done John, I love the hand-cut Pappardelle meal!! This all looks and sounds amazing. I feel like taking a spoon and just eating it out of the first picture 🙂

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    • Thank you so much, Judy, for your kind words. I’m always happy to see you’ve visited.
      Since I’ve started hand-cutting my pasta, I’ve really grown to love pappardelle — and I was always a thin noodle guy. In fact, I’ve a baking sheet covered with dried pappardelle that I made just yesterday. The dough was left-over from this week’s post. Stay tuned … 🙂

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      • John, I cannot wait. I priced pappardelle at the Fresh Market near me and it was a little high price for a small amount. For 2 small packages I believe it would be close to eight dollars. That only for the pasta! Possibly you could add how much the cost is of your homemade pasta; especially the pappardelle. Because that is a rarity. You cannot find it at a local supermarket. It is only carried at specialty markets. I hope you don’t mind the friendly suggestion?

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        • Sorry, Judy. I’m afraid the pappardelle are merely a biproduct and not the recipe. I do show, in a photo, how to cut them. It will make more sense once you see the post on Wednesday. As for the cost, I use my Mom’s Pasta Dough recipe. It creates about 24 oz of dough and requires about 3 cups of AP flour (more or less depending upon the humidity, flour company, etc), 4 large eggs, a small amount of olive oil, and a pinch of salt. Because of your baking, you can probably come up with a better approximate cost than I can. The cost will vary depending upon where one lives. I know I pay more for flour and eggs here than I do when I’m back in rural Michigan visiting my family.

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  36. Pingback: lady finger mascarpone orange dessert | Chef in disguise

  37. Pingback: Grandpa’s Tuna Salad gets a Makeover | from the Bartolini kitchens

  38. Cheese (and yogurt) are definitely on my list of stuff to make! I love all of your cheese posts, and take huge inspiration from them. I know that once i start making my own cheese I’ll never turn back because it’s easy. Just have to make it a habit. 😉 You enabler, you! Really super post – thanks.

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    • I know. You meant “enabler” in the best way possible. 🙂
      You’re right about one thing, though, John. Once you get started, it’s hard to stop. Not having a facility to age cheese brought an end to my cheese making — and I’m not complaining. As nice as it would be to have wheels of parmesan and cheddar aging in the cellar, what would I do with all of that cheese? Even so, do try to make mascarpone or ricotta. You will be very pleased with the results. No doubt about it.

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    • Thank you. I’d be honored. Mascarpone is such great cheese and works well in many dishes, as well as desserts. ANd it’s so easy — and cheaper — to make! Whether you use any of the recipes, I hope you enjoy the holiday.

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  39. Oh no! I’m in trouble now! I don’t often buy mascarpone because it’s quite pricey. But now that I can make it, it will be dangerous! I’ll have it for breakfast on my toasted bread with some orange marmalade… in my pasta… a spoonful every time I open my fridge… Oh John! What have you done! 🙂

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  40. JOHN! I had no idea that one could make their own mascarpone with such few ingredients and equipment. As you may have noticed: I. Love. Cheese. Thank you so much for sharing. I will try it, now if only I could make pappardelle like you. The plate with the Pecorino Romano and spinach is tear-worthy (in the best way). Thanks for sharing!

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    • I’ve got a few cheese recipes for you to check out, Shanna. My suggestion would be to start with ricotta. It is so easy to make and the cheese better than any you’ll buy. After that, mascarpone or cream cheese are the ones to try. They’re a shade more difficult than ricotta but still very easy, as you saw for yourself. Next I’d try feta. It’s a bit more difficult but the cheese is great! Last, and by now you should be confident, make American mozzarella. It’s not easy to do but the reward is a wonderful tasting mozzarella. Last, is Italian mozzarella. Of all the cheeses I make, this is the most difficult but, wow!, is it good!
      I taught my now 90 year-old Aunt how to make this ricotta about 3 years ago and she hasn’t bought any since. It really is that good.
      And if you’ve any questions, I’m here to help, whether it be making cheese or homemade pastas. 🙂

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  41. Had no idea mascarpone would be as easy as ricotta. Definitely have to try this, as well as checking out your other cheesy stuff. I should also look for a source of unpasteurized milk.
    Great post John, thanks for sharing as well as pointing out such gems on your blasts from the past.

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    • Thank you, Stefan. I was every bit as surprised as you are. It tastes wonderfully, too. Non-pasteurized milk will result in cheese that tastes so much better. If you can get “raw” goat’s milk, by all menas do and make cheese with it. Wonderful. It’s an even better cheese if you can get raw sheep milk. None of that can be sold here in Illinois. I hope you can.

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    • I’m glad you’ve enjoyed these posts. These cheeses are far easier to make than I had thought. When you’re ready, let me know if you have questions.
      Thanks for stopping by and taking the time to comment.

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  42. Ok… i am going to try it! (Which is, going to try to persuade my mom to make it for me, she’s way more skilled with diary products ;)) I hope it turns out right, i love Mascarpone and over here it’s not widely available (and it’s quite pricey when it is available)… Btw, i must confess i LOVE seeing the flag of my country on the map of visitors, that’s too cool! 🙂

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    • It is very easy to make, Ruth. I’m sure you could do it on your own. Ricotta and mascarpone are the 2 easiest cheeses to make — and both are so very good! I’ll be here to answer any questions that may come up. Good luck!
      I installed that flag map for my Zia. We started this blog not knowing if our family would follow. To see we’ve visitors from across the globe is quite astonishing. I’m glad you enjoy it, too.

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  43. Pingback: Smothered Pork Chops | from the Bartolini kitchens

  44. How did I miss your cheese series? I had no idea you could make marscapone at home, although I currently have labneh made from yoghurt draining in the fridge. Very inspiring and useful series of posts, thanks John. Lx

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    • You are most welcome, Linda. If you’re going to make cheese at home, I’d advise starting with an easy one, like ricotta or mascarpone. They will introduce you to working with curds, experience you’ll need when you make feta or mozzarella cheeses. If you make labneh, you should have no problem making mascarpone. It is only slightly more complicated and the reward is a tasty dish of mascarpone. Good luck! I’m here if you have any questions.

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