Eggplant Parmesan

Order the cannoli! Put the biscotti in the oven! Chill the prosecco! St. Joseph’s Feast Day is just around the corner! Across Italy and certainly throughout Sicily, as well as in many Italian-American households and communities around our own country, next Monday, St. Joseph’s Feast Day, will be marked by special religious services, street fairs, parades, and celebratory dinners. There’s even a special pastry (zeppola) and dish (fava beans) to be served in this Saint’s honor. So, why all the hoopla?

To start, and to eliminate any possible confusion with the many other St. Josephs, I’m speaking about Joseph, the carpenter who, along with Mary, raised the Christ Child, according to Christian beliefs. Perhaps because of its close proximity and relationship with the Vatican for so many centuries, the Church has exercised considerable control over Italy. Each town, village, city, district, in fact every community of any size, has at least one patron saint. And Saint Joseph is one very popular patron saint. Today, he is the Patron Saint of Sicily and that is the reason for the celebrations on Monday — but it wasn’t always that way.

The Holy Family - Michelangelo

According to legend, sometime during the Middles Ages, Sicily was struck by drought. As the earth dried and crops withered, famine became a very real possibility. Fava beans alone are all that kept the people from starvation. They prayed to St. Joseph, beseeching him to intercede on their behalf and to ask his “Son” to end the drought. In return, the people promised to hold a feast every year in his honor. The rains came, the drought ended, and mass starvation was averted. The grateful Sicilians proclaimed Saint Joseph their Patron Saint and his Feast Day is marked by celebrations to this very day.

Now, lacking both fava beans and the skills of a pasty chef, I decided to take a different path to honor this Saint. Since eggplant is used so often in Sicilian cuisine, I thought an eggplant dish would be appropriate. So, today’s recipe is eggplant parmesan, parmigiana di melanzane.

In recent years, the 3 most common parmigiana dishes — veal, chicken, and eggplant — have come under fire somewhat. Let’s face it, they aren’t exactly low-cal, by any measure. And, to be honest, it is only in the past few years that I’ve attempted to make them a bit lighter. In this case, where I used to fry the breaded slices of eggplant, I now bake them. In place of a meat sauce, I now use a marinara. Granted, you still won’t see this dish listed on any menu as the “Dieter’s Special”, but you will enjoy a lighter dish that is every bit as enjoyable as the more traditional preparations.

One further note deserves mention. During a recent post in which I shared instructions for making goat cheese, I asked if anyone knew of a nearby buffalo herd, implying that I’d use their milk to make mozzarella. Bufala mozzarella, by the way, is the most prized of all mozzarella cheeses. Judy@Savoring Today left a comment stating that bufala mozzarella, made in Italy, was available at, get this, Costco, of all places! Within days, I was at Costco and the parmigiana di melanzane pictured in today’s post is the result. Thank you, Judy!

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Eggplant Parmesan Recipe

Ingredients

  • 6 – 8 cups marinara sauce (recipe below)
  • 2 eggplant, about 2 1/2 lbs. total
  • 3/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 4 – 5 cups bread crumbs, more may be required
  • 3 tbsp fresh parsley, chopped
  • 1 tbsp Italian seasoning
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 3 eggs
  • 2 tbsp milk
  • 1 lb. fresh mozzarella, thinly sliced or shredded
  • 1 cup freshly grated parmesan cheese, pecorino romano may be substituted
  • salt & pepper

Directions

To prepare the eggplant

  1. Create a breading station.  In a large dish or flat-bottomed container, add the flour. Add the eggs and mild to a second such container and mix until well-combined.  Add to the 3rd container the bread crumbs, parsley, Italian seasoning, and garlic powder. Mix to thoroughly combine.
  2. Pre-heat oven to 400˚.
  3. Slice the eggplant, lengthwise, into 1/2 inch slices.
  4. Coat each eggplant slice with flour, shake off excess, and dip into egg wash. Allow excess to drip off before dipping into the bread crumb mixture to completely coat each slice. Place on a cooking rack that has been sprayed with cooking spray. Continue until all slices are breaded. You will need to use 2 racks or to bake 2 batches.
  5. Place eggplant-filled cooling rack on top of a large baking sheet and bake in pre-heated, 400˚ oven for 15 minutes or until very lightly browned.

Assembly & cooking instructions – family style

  1. Use a few ladles of sauce to coat the bottom of a large baking dish.
  2. Add eggplant slices to form a layer in the baking dish. Place a few ladles of sauce evenly across the breaded slices. Apply 1/3 of the mozzarella in an even layer across the eggplant. Finish the layer by sprinkling 1/3 of the parmesan cheese on top.
  3. Repeat step 2 twice, creating 3 layers in all and alternating the direction of each layer’s slices.
  4. Bake in 400˚ oven for 30 to 40 minutes, until the dish is bubbly and the cheese has cooked/browned to your liking.

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Variations

If prepared as indicated — and pictured — above, the result is more suitable for a “family style” dinner and resembles a tray of lasagna. If you like, you can easily “build” individual servings using 3 slices of eggplant and covering each layer with the sauce and cheese as above but keeping each serving separate from the others. Similarly, you can slice the eggplant into 1/2 inch disks, rather than lengthwise, and create smaller sized portions, perfect for use as primi piatti.

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Marinara Sauce

This marinara isn’t meant to be simmered for hours. The resulting, fresh-tasting sauce adds another flavor element to this vegetarian dish.

  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • 1/2 – 1 tsp red pepper flakes (optional)
  • 1 large onion, coarsely chopped
  • 2 carrots, coarsely chopped
  • 2 celery stalks, coarsely chopped
  • 6 garlic cloves, smashed
  • 2 – 3 tbsp tomato paste
  • 1 can (28 oz) diced tomatoes
  • 1 can (28 oz) crushed tomatoes
  • 1/2 cup dry red wine (optional)
  • 3 tbsp fresh parsley, chopped fine
  • 1 tbsp dried marjoram
  • salt & pepper

Directions

  1. Place onion, carrots, celery, and garlic into a food processor and process until finely chopped. Alternately, finely chop the vegetables and garlic by hand.
  2. Heat oil in a sauce pan over med-high heat. Add the optional red pepper flakes and sauté for about a minute.
  3. Add the finely chopped ingredients, season with salt & pepper, and cook until liquid has evaporated and they start to caramelize.
  4. Add the tomato paste and continue to cook for about 2 more minutes.
  5. Add the tomatoes, wine, parsley, marjoram, and stir to combine. Season with salt & pepper, bring to a boil, and reduce to a simmer.
  6. Continue to simmer until sauce has thickened and deepened in color,  about 60 minutes, on average. Check for seasoning and reserve for use in your recipe.

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101 thoughts on “Eggplant Parmesan

  1. That looks absolutely delicious. We actually have a farmer with a herd of water buffalo not too far away from us and they make a wonderful mozzarella which is sometimes available in the local supermarket who deliver. So I am lucky enough to get door to door fresh buffalo mozzarella!! Must order some in and make your dish now!

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    • How i envy your for your fresh bufala mozzarella! I’ve made cow’s milk mozzarella here at home and, though good, it just cannot measure up to bufala. Finding a store nearby that carries it was heaven-sent! Thanks for stopping by and taking the time to comment.

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  2. John are you sure we are not related…I thought I was the only Italian that doesn’t fry the meatballs or the eggplant for the parmigiana….I make my eggplant very similar but we don’t use the bread crumbs, just the flour and egg, and then I line my cookie sheets with Reynolds release foil and spray with olive oil in my Misto sprayer…so much better than all that frying…eggplant is one of our favorite dishes, yours looks very good, so much better the next day, isn’t it?

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    • Hello, Maria! Who knows? Maybe we are related. All I know is that I enjoy all of the parmigiana recipes and if I don’t try to lighten them up a bit, I’ll never eat them. Eggplant, in particular, acts like a sponge and soaks up the oil when fried. I am going to try your method of using just flour and egg. If I can get away with not using bread crumbs, all the better! And yes, it really is much better the next day! 🙂

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  3. My father, son and grandson all share the middle name of Joseph and my dad used to send St. Joseph greeting cards he bought in a little card shop. Your post honoring St. Joseph evokes good memories. Somewhere I have a yellowed newspaper page my sister sent to me from the NYT all about the pastries, street fairs you mention and even had a soup recipe which may have had lava beans but I don’t remember. Will look in my binder for that article when I get home from school.
    Now to your enticing photos and recipe after my digression. Wow! Your version looks perfect! I will send it on to my family who love Eggplant Parmesan. And I will seek out the buffalo mozzarella, too. Looks like a good dish to prepare for guests no matter which food plan they adhere to!

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    • In my family, the boys’ middle names are the names of the granddads’. The girls’ have the names of the grandmothers. Your comment make me think. I’m working on our family’s tree and there isn’t a Joseph or Giuseppe to be found. My Dad’s brother married a wonderful woman with the Italian equivalent of Josephine as her name and that’s as close as it gets.

      You’re right, Ruth. This dish can be served to vegetarian & carnivore alike without any problem. Thanks for sharing your family memories, Ruth.

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  4. John, thank you, thank you, thank you. We have made many a parmigiana, but hadn’t coated the aubergines like you have. In truth I’m saying thank you on behalf of my partner, it’s a favourite dish of his, obviously I just tag along for the ride 🙂

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  5. John, this is one of my favorites as well and yours is beautiful! Thank you for thei shistorical background, I had no idea. You fed my eyes and my brain – all before breakfast!

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    • Thanks, David, It’a a favorite of mine, too. 🙂

      Now, going way off topic. I broke down and bought a small smoker. I assembled it yesterday and will be seasoning it later today. I took your advice and bought an eCopy of “Charcuterie”. I’ll be smoking by the weekend!

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  6. I did not know about St. Joseph’ Feast Day, Thanks for the history lesson.
    Like your version of the eggplant parm. Will it freeze well? Printed recipe to make when I have company.

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    • Good morning, Norma. Being that the eggplant is already partially cooked, I think the dish will freeze very well. And, yes, it is a very good dish to serve company. 🙂

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    • Thanks, Greg! And you’re right. This is a lotta food for two — or one! Blame it on the bufala mozzarella! Once Judy told me there was some available nearby, I had no choice.

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  7. Wow! We were just discussing what could you do with eggplant the other day too! Look yummy!!! But I will admit that I cannot see the words “Fava Beans” without thinking about the movie Silence of the Lambs – hehehe. Shall I bring the Chianti over for dinner?

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    • The poor, much-maligned fava bean. Funny what a movie can do to a food’s reputation. And this dish is about as good a use for eggplant as there is. Oh! Bring 2 bottles. In case we get thirsty. 🙂

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  8. I’ve never thought of eggplant parmesan for breakfast until right now…should probably eat before my morning reading. This dish is mouthwatering! I have been looking for a new marinara sauce to try and I just found it, the ingredient list looks prefect. So glad you found and enjoyed the mozzarella–we foodies have to stick together!

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    • Ah, Judy! Welcome to my world. I could eat this dish anytime of day or night. Once you mentioned that bufala mozzarella was so readily available, I couldn’t wait to get there and buy some. Of all the things that Costco stocks, this is the one item that will keep me coming back, again and again. I cannot thank you enough!

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  9. Crazy for eggplant parm! This looks outstanding John! I love that you’ve lightened it and offered different ways of serving it (especially like the primi piatti —- that and a good salad would be just right for us. OK, who am I kidding? 2 of those and a good salad.) And I can’t wait to try your Marinara! And Judy, for the Bufalo mozzarella, grazie mille (I know I butchered that but had to try!) Thank you John! Another fabulous post, and recipes added to my musts! (By the way, I just started a pinterest bulletin board, and this is the first recipe being thumb-tacked up!) 😉

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    • Thank you, Spree, for leaving so wonderful a comment. Judy’s telling me that bufalo mozzarella was available at Costco changed my life! I cannot wait for tomato season! Insalata Caprese for every one! And thank you for the honor of having this recipe the first to be pinned on your bulletin board. I’ve yet to join that site but know that it’s only a matter of time before I do. 🙂

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  10. Oh yum John!! You make this exactly as I’d like it!! I’m so glad you bake your eggplant – that was something my father started doing, my mother had always fried her meatballs and eggplant. So as I agree this is not a “diet” recipe, the baking of the eggplant does help! Also, I’m excited to get your marinara sauce recipe! I’ve not posted my mother’s sauce recipe as it’s always been a “family secret”!

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    • Thanks, Linda. I love my fried foods but, for a dish like this, frying isn’t really necessary. I’ll save my frying for chicken! I hope you like this marinara sauce as much as I do. Being it’s not simmered for hours, it really does maintain a fresh taste, just perfect for a vegetarian dish. I’ve not posted a meat sauce recipe yet and haven’t decided whether I’m going to post Mom’s recipe. She had a secret ingredient and although I’m sure she wouldn’t mind, I don’t know how my siblings would feel about it. Regardless. I’ve still got 2 meat sauce recipes to share. Mom’s can wait until I get dispensation!

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  11. If it’s a holiday, then calories don’t count, right?? Wow, does that look absolutely mouth watering. And worth every calorie, I’d think. And thanks for explaining St. Joseph’s Day to those of us non-Italians. 😉

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  12. I would make this, John, because I adore egg plant, and because it is a slightly lighter version! And I love the story you have woven into it. I have bought the Costco bufala mozzarella many times, it is very good quality (I find that with a lot of Costco products). What a great little history lesson too; and it looks like we’ll celebrate St. Patrick’s Day on Saturday and roll right into the Sicilian celebrations. Life is tough, what can I say.
    I played the Virgin Mary in a Sunday School play when I was 8, it was one of the few times my Dad came to Church with us (he was disillusioned by his experiences as a Roman Catholic in Budapest). Fortunately for me, it was a line-less roll, so all I had to do was sit and look pretty.
    We just booked our flight to Chicago in June but sadly will be whisked away to our friend’s new Lake House; I have no idea where it is otherwise I would have suggested we meet for a coffee somewhere down town!

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    • Well, I’ve never been one to go to Costco all that much. The place really isn’t meant for 1 member households. Now, though, I’m quickly becoming a regular. I don’t know what else I’ll find but I won’t miss out on the mozzarella!
      I wonder how many Indulgences you earned for participating in that play? 😉
      So sad we won’t get to meet in June. I remember you mentioned that your spice shop here had closed. Depending upon where you’ll be staying, you may be able to go to The Spice Shop in Evanston. I’ve seen a few bloggers mention that they’ve ordered from them and I’ve been to that store. They have another in Old Town, too.
      We may not meet up this time, Eva, but there’ll be a next time. I’ll be waiting. 🙂

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      • I’ve never thought of it that way, John, but in retrospect, I would say I’ve earned MANY indulgences!!
        Costco used to be one of those places that only large families shop…but then we realized there are some things that will last and are indeed great value. I can email you a list of what we usually buy for the two of us…probably still good value for one, particularly since you entertain!
        Apparently my friend’s Lake House is in Wisconsin – I think it’s Delevan Lake…I am going to miss my Windy City fix!

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        • Thank you so much, Eva. I could definitely use some help in that place. And judging by their response when they’ve accompanied me, so could a few of my friends! 🙂
          When you get a chance, and there’s certainly no rush, please jot down a few items that you’ve found to be of great value.

          Wisconsin, eh? Well, if you find yourself in Milwaukee there’s are 3 Spice Houses in that area.

          Thanks again for your thoughtfulness, Eva. The next time I cross Costco’s threshold, I’ll have a plan! Look out!

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    • Thanks, MD. Go to Sicily for St. Joe’s but stick around and tour the island. I spent a couple weeks there and really loved it! Took a ferry from Naples to Palermo and then drove along the West and Southern coast back to Syracuse, where we crossed into The Toe. I would love to go back and hope you get to see it someday.

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  13. John, your Eggplant Parmigiana looks so cheesy, golden and fabulous! It’s my all-time favorite Italian dish and I am so glad that you lightened it up a tad. I am also so happy for you that you found your beloved Buffalo Mozzarella. Three cheers for Judy! Blogging is so cool when we can help each other out…like your GF bread recommendation. A HUGE “Thank you” for that John. I really appreciated the recipe link and am starting to roll out the GF baked goods Geni style. Haven’t posted yet, but definitely will.

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    • Thank you so much, Geni, and I’m glad I could be of some help. The gluten free zen blog is a good one and April has shared many great recipes. It’s an unfortunate sign of the times but it is becoming more and more necessary for all cooks to have at least a few good, gluten-free recipes in their back pocket. I can’t wait to see what you’ve come up with. Given your track record, I bet they’ll be delicious!

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  14. Man John that looks like gooey Italian goodness and I’m typically on the fence about eggplant. I’ll take two servings as well as two of your best Italian reds to wash em down.

    Also thank for the background on St. Joseph. Otherwise I would have had to pester Liz about what you were talking about.

    cheers!

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    • Thanks, Jed. With all that cheese, you’d really have to detest eggplant not to get into this dish. And remember, this is the “light” version, so, go ahead and have a 3rd helping.

      As great a legend as this one might be, I cannot help but wonder if the real reason for the celebration is that the peasants needed a reason to party in the middle of Lent. Who would say know to a feast in honor of Christ’s Guardian? 🙂

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  15. This looks wonderful and a worthy celebration of the day. Parmigiana di melanzane is one of my favourites, but I’m afraid you won’t persuade me to stop frying the aubergine in olive oil to make it! Here St Joseph’s day is the time to sow haricot beans – maybe that’s connected with the idea of drought and famine, but it’s also a time when spring is definitely on its way here.

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    • Don’t think that I’m through frying the eggplant altogether. No, not at all. I’ll just be more selective when I do. This way, I’ll be able to have this dish — a fave of mine, too — more often. Remember: I just found a source for bufala mozzarella!
      As for Spring, we were over 70˚ F today and should remain there for at least the next 3 days. We’re lucky to have days like this in May, let alone March. I hope no one wakes up Old Man Winter or we’re in for it. The last recoded snowfall in Chicago was May 4th. We still have much to fear!

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  16. Perfecto! You have no idea how much I really enjoy eggplant parmesan. Okay, when I was little it took me some time to warm up to eggplant. I just didn’t like it for some reason. But now, I LOVE it and this dish is such a classic. Saving your recipe

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    • Thanks, Kay. Apparently, you are not alone with your love of this dish. I’d no idea that so many felt as you do. It’s a favorite of mine, too, and every time I make it, I always wonder why I don’t make it more often. I’m sure that I will, now that I know where to get bufala mozzarella!

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  17. Yum, yum, yum! I love everything about this dish. I can never get enough of eggplants but I know what you mean about it not being very diet friendly. I can’t resist dishes though, and it must count towards one of your five a day?!!? 🙂

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    • I like how you think. Yeah, it does count towards one of the five. And by baking the eggplant rather than frying it, I’m sure I’ve saved, like, a gazillion calories. Why, I bet that one burns more calories eating this than are in the actual dish. Yeah, that’s it! 😉

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  18. I’ll bring the prosecco! But seriously…if it means I get a slice of this beautiful lasagna. Sounds and looks delicious, John! Sometimes I even prefer eggplant Parmesan to regular. Look at the oozing cheese in the first photo–can you say yum?!

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    • It’s a deal! Normally, I make this dish in Summer and early Fall, when eggplant is in season. I was so excited to find bufalo mozzarella that I wasn’t about to wait a minute longer than necessary to make some. Now that was a good decision! 🙂

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  19. I’m so late getting around to posts…! The first thing I noticed in the picture was that bufala mozzarella peeking out of that slice with it’s “come hither” look! What a fantastic looking dish…I could eat that whole family casserole of it…not in one sitting, but still. And as I read the recipe I got almost as excited about your easy marinara sauce as the completed dish. Like a few others, I was clueless about St. Joseph’s Feast Day and enjoyed, as always, learning something new here. Well done, John!

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    • Thank you so much, Betsy! If it weren’t for that bufala mozzarella, this dish would have waited until Summer to be made. Thanks to Judy, I now have a steady supply of this heaven-sent wonder and I intend to take full advantage. 🙂

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  20. This is my favorite, favorite Italian dish of all time. Hands-down. I don’t care how many calories this has, I can eat half the pan I swear! This looks fantastic!!!! I’m definitely going to try out your recipe. And as always – love the stories you share. 🙂

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    • Thanks, Kristy! Apparently, you’re not alone. Quite a few of our community feel the same way about this dish, which surprised me a bit. I’d no idea that eggplant was so popular. Thankfully, we aren’t an actual community or else there’d be fights at the local Costco in the refrigerated cheese display. “Gimme my bufalo mozzarella!” “Yours? I saw it first!”

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  21. I think I’ll just pretend that since it has a vegetable in it, it’s got to be “light” and I will just enjoy! This is one of my favorite dishes! I really like the idea of just making a huge pan and serving “family style” like lasagna. I didn’t know that the 19th was St. Joseph’s Feast Day, and didn’t really know a thing about the story behind it. Since that’s the day before my birthday, I ought to seriously consider rolling one into the other. I’m really fixated on all that cheese…it just looks wonderful! What a delicious post! 🙂 Debra

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    • Thanks, Debra. And you’re right. If a dish has so many vegetables, it just has to be low-cal, no doubt about it! As a recovering Catholic, I remember the nuns stressing St. Pat’s. Most of them were of Irish descent and St Joe’s just wasn’t a big deal for them. We did have one priest, though, an Italian from NYC, who was like the lone voice in the dessert, telling us Italian kids to remember St Joe. 🙂

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  22. How did you know this was one of my ultimate favorite dishes! Can you make for my family tonight? J/K! It’s only morning and I could eat this about now! I will have to try your version esp. with the sauce. I like that it’s quick and easy! Have a great day!

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    • Judging by the responses, you’re definitely not alone! I’d no idea it was so popular. Although I managed to cut a few calories, this is certainly not for Weight Watchers. I’d be interested to see what you could do with a dish like this. 😉

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  23. Well, timing is everything!! I was making a dish that required a marinara sauce and couldn’t find one on your blog so I made (a rather disappointing) one from a cookbook. I knew you would have the perfect recipe and here it is! Thank you! Thank Joseph! Thank goodness for fava beans and rain! I love that you’ve baked instead of fried the eggplant, I hadn’t thought of that!! xo Smidge

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    • And thank you, Smidge, for leaving your smile-inducing comment. 🙂 I debated writing a separate post for the marinara sauce and now I think I will. It would make things easier for people searching my site. Sorry I didn’t get it out there for you sooner! Have a great day!

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  24. Dear John!
    This recipe looks absolutely perfect. We celebrate Saint Joseph on monday too, we also celebrate Father’s day (very appropriate) and is also the 200 anniversary of Spain’s first constitution, called “La Pepa” (José=Pepe. Josefa=Pepa), so I am planning something special for next monday. Stay tune 😉

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    • Thank you, Giovanna. I didn’t realize that Spain had so many reasons to celebrate on Monday! I learn so much through these blogs, and yours is always teaching me something. I look forward to seeing what you’ll present on Monday. I bet it will be fantastic!

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  25. This looks so good! I’ve almost never used eggplant and I definitely need to expand my horizons. Your marinara recipe sounds wonderful and I’ll be making it one of these days. As for the upcoming feast day, I may not get the cannoli and biscotti, but I certainly can manage to pick up a bottle of Prosecco and raise a glass in a toast!

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    • This is a great dish a it is but, if you’re aren’t that sure about eggplant, you can make it with zucchini, instead. I wouldn’t bake it as long, maybe 10 minutes instead of 15 but I think it would work very well. And so long as you’ve got a bottle of Prosecco, everything else will work out. Guaranteed! 🙂

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  26. I am back and came straight across, I read your pages while i was in coventry, (b ut could not comment) and as you know this meal is a favourite of myself and my italian housekeeper of old. i have a beautiful very old figurine of st joseph. it was my mothers. I meant to get this shot to you before this post and then everything turned to custard and so i shall put it up on my page tomorrow for you. he is so beautiful with his baby in his arms and I have carted it about to more countries than I can count.. He always sits on the window sill in whatever kitchen i am in at that time.. so this post was special to me for more than one reason!! love love john honey, missed you.. c

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    • Welcome back! I missed you, too, and I daresay I’m not the only one. We need our daily fix of you, your wit, and, of course, the farmy!
      I remember a time when there was a St Joseph statuette in every home. I think it’s great that you have your Mum’s and I can’t wait to see it!
      I am so glad, Celi, that you enjoyed this post. I so enjoy yours and it’s great that I can repay the favor, at least once in a while.

      Again, welcome back!

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    • You’re right. This dish would be great for a potluck — but I’m way too selfish! I’ll bring a salad and leave this at home for an after-the-potluck snack. 🙂
      Thanks for stopping by and commenting!

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  27. Hi John, yes, you were right. All I had to do to fix the problem was log back in to WP. Somehow, I’d become logged out. Who knew! Happy St Joseph’s Day! I know eggplant parmiagana isn’t the most healthy of meals but I serve mine with a green salad and wash down all the cheese with plenty of red wine and after that, it’s really a meal the Heart Foundation could promote! Have a lovely weekend xx

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    • Well, this was sweet of you to come back a 2nd time! Thank you, Charlie Louie. I cannot figure out why that happens, only that when it does I have to sign back in.

      This may not be the most healthy dish but moderation is the key. It will be a few months before I make it again. Well, unless I get more bufala mozzarella! 🙂

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  28. Pingback: Winter left without goodbye.. no manners | thekitchensgarden

  29. Second week in a row, and your post didn’t show up in my feed…Bad WordPress! Bad!
    I’m going to unsubscribe, and re-subscribe to straighten it out….
    Enough of that – this is one wonderful recipe. I love eggplant parm, but hate frying most anything. I’ll be trying this later in the year, for sure.
    Now, where shall we put the eggplant in the garden?

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    • I sympathize with your WP probs. Lately, Gmail has decided to send some of the blog post emails to spam. I’ve no idea why but if i don’t check my spam folder, I miss a posting or 2 every few days..

      Yeah, I love fried foods but, if there’s a way to get around it without sacrificing taste, I’ll do it. In this case, baking the eggplant even helps to dry the strips a bit. It works out well. How I wish I had the space for some eggplant in the garden! Have a great weekend, Marie!

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  30. When my dad and I are together at an Italian restaurant we both always order this – it´s a huge favourite! I too prefer it without meat and I love the idea of baking the melanzane. I bought two gorgeous melanzane today so if I can find some good mozzarella tomorrow I´ll make it this weekend in his honour (even though he´s not here) as St Jospeh´s Day in Spain is Father´s Day…which I think is lovely!

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    • Tanya! You’re back! Welcome home! WordPress wasn’t the same without news from Up on the Mountain! I hope your trip went well and that you enjoyed the time with your family.

      Giovanna mentioned that Father’s Day is celebrated in Spain on the same day as St. Joe’s. It is a great idea! This dish sure is a favorite of many who comment here. I didn’t expect so many to love it like they do. Glad to have you back and can’t wait to hear about your trip. 🙂

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      • Thanks John – it´s good to travel, but wonderful to be home! It was so good to see my parents as my dad has been a little unwell, so I pleased to see him with my own eyes looking like my old fit dad 🙂

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  31. How did I miss this post?! I get your posts in my email so I can’t imagine how I didn’t see this one… Good thing I was reading Cecelia’s post this morning and she mentioned you. I thought, now wait a minute…when did he post that? I didn’t see that! Anyhoo…

    Your eggplant parmesan looks gorgeous, even if you have lightened it up a bit it still looks rich and filling. I love traditions and I really love traditions that include special food! And are you telling me that buffalo mozzarella is really made from buffalo milk? I thought that was just the “type” of mozzarella. If I can find mozzarella made from buffalo milk that is dairy free, I will be SO happy!!

    Hope you have a wonderful day ~ April

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    • You aren’t the only person having this problem. I use Gmail and noticed a few emails in the Spam folder. How & why they got there, I’ve no idea. Now I check it a couple times a week just to make sure that I’ve not missed anything.

      Glad you liked this recipe and yes, bufala mozzarella is made from water buffalo milk (bufala in Italian). Surprisingly, there are quite a few herds of water buffalo in southern Italy. Who knew? Wouldn’t it be great if you could eat this mozzarella without any problems resulting? I certainly hope so! 🙂

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        • Costco does carry it, packed in whey, in the refrigerated cheese display/aisle. If you’ve a good Italian market, one with plenty of imports, they too might stock it. It would be great if you could eat this cheese. Fingers crossed …

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          • Dangit, why do they pack it in whey…I’ll do a little research first. We have an a couple of excellent Italian markets that I will try first before going to Costco. Have to support local small business you know! 🙂

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          • I said whey because it is the liquid given off when the mozzarella curds are separated from the milk. I’m unaware of there being a special name for the liquid that results from bufala mozzarella being made. I assumed it, too, would be called whey. I hope this doesn’t affect your chances of enjoying mozzarella cheese again.

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  32. For some unknown reason, this entry did not show up in my mailbox — but it should have! I am not a calorie-counter, but I appreciate the way you have lightened the Parmigianna. I rarely make meat sauce, generally preferring marinara. I pity those poor Sicilians, subsisting on fava beans, and am glad their feast day rectified the problem.

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    • It seems to be a recurring problem, Sharyn. I’ve been finding some of these emails in my spam folder. It’s a hit or miss thing and now I check my spam folder periodically just to make sure it hasn’t happened again. Depending upon the dish, you can’t beat a marinara sauce, but, I do love a good meat sauce every now and then. 🙂

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    • Thanks, Christina. I haven’t bought sauce in years. In fact, I rarely buy canned tomatoes. End of August i buy plum tomatoes and peel, chop, and freeze them by the quart. You just can’t beat the flavor of fresh tomatoes in a sauce. 🙂

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  33. I really enjoy eggplant parmesan…a true comfort food as far as I’m concerned. You make your parmesan just the way my husband likes it. I like to make mine without the breadcrumbs, just the egg wash and flour. Just chalk it up to me being Irish.

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    • Thank you, Karen. It’s funny, I never thought of skipping the breading. It’s a hold-over from when I used to fry the eggplant. You’re the 2nd commenter who only flours the eggplant. I just might give that a shot next time. I’m all in favor of streamlining, especially if it means less of a mess to clean up! 🙂

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  34. a wonderful meal, I too try to lower calories and I make this dish with grilled melanzane, a little bit more rustic in flavour and yes, I agree the best is buffalo mozzarella… x

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    • Gee, Yvette, I like the idea of grilling the eggplant. I must give it a try sometime. I had my first taste of bufala mozzarella in Naples and it was love, love, love. If I see it in a store, I have to buy it. I’ll figure out something to do with it but that’s a great predicament to be in. “Well, I’ve got this bufala mozzarella and don’t know what to do with it.” How often will that happen? 🙂

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  35. Pingback: The Incredible Edible Eggplant | from the Bartolini kitchens

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