New York Style Cheesecake

Zia gets her book

No caption needed

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I can almost hear you already. “You said you don’t bake!” Well, I still say that, today’s dish being the exception that proves the rule. I have been preparing this cheesecake for well over 30 years. Its origins have long since been forgotten. At one time, this was my go-to dessert or potluck contribution. It was definitely a crowd pleaser. After all, who doesn’t like cheesecake?

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NYC Cheesecake 4

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Over the years, potlucks fell out of favor within my group and this recipe was prepared fewer and fewer times. Of course, my want to offer something other than cheesecake for dessert had something to do with it, too. The truth is, I cannot tell you the last time I made the cake. Now, that’s a shame because it is a great cheesecake, dense and heavy like the best New York style cheesecakes.

NYC CheesecakeWhen I first prepared the cake, I would arrange sliced kiwi fruit on top, the perfect camouflage for an unsightly crack. Soon the kiwi were joined by a raspberry sauce. Little did I know that the sauce was a “coulis”. That revelation would come several years and many TV cooking shows later.

If there is a complaint about the recipe is that there is no crust. My favorite cheesecakes all have a crust of some sort. Every time I bake this cake, I tell myself that the next time I’ll experiment and make a crust. Then, when it comes time to make the thing, I read over the instructions and realize that a bad crust could ruin an afternoon’s efforts — and I put it off the experiment until next time. As you’ll soon see, the cheesecake I prepared for this post is crustless but I really do think I’ll make a crust next time. Really.

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NYC Cheesecake 2

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New York Style Cheesecake Recipe

Ingredients

  • 16 oz (453 g) cream cheese, softened
  • 1 lb (453 g) cottage cheese, creamed
  • 1½ c (330 g) sugar
  • 4 eggs, slightly beaten
  • 3 tbsp cornstarch
  • 3 tbsp four
  • 1½ tbsp lemon juice
  • 1 tsp lemon zest
  • 1 tsp pure vanilla extract
  • ½ c (113 g) butter, melted
  • 16 oz (453 g) sour cream

Directions

  1. Pre-heat oven to 325˚ F (160˚ C). Thoroughly grease a 9 inch (23 cm) springform pan.
  2. Using a stand mixer, beat together the cream cheese and cottage cheese at high speed until well combined and smooth.
  3. Gradually add the sugar and then the eggs.
  4. Reduce the speed to low before adding the corn starch, flour, lemon juice, lemon zest, and vanilla.
  5. When well-mixed, add the melted butter and sour cream and beat until combined.
  6. Pour the batter into the greased pan and place on the center rack of the pre-heated oven. Bake for 70 minutes or until cake is firm around the edges.
  7. Turn off the oven and let the cake stand in the oven for 2 hours.
  8. Remove from the oven and allow to cool on a counter for at least 2 hours more.
  9. Refrigerate at least 3 hours before serving.
  10. Garnish with fresh berries or sauce of your choice.

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Fresh Raspberries

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Raspberry Coulis Recipe

  • 12 oz (340 g) fresh raspberries
  • 3 oz (85 g) sugar
  • 2 tbsp water
  • splash of Framboise (optional)
  • pinch of salt

Place the ingredients in a small sauce pan over med-low heat. Cook until the sugar is melted and the berries have dissolved somewhat. Place mixture into a food processor or blender and process until smooth. Strain mixture through a fine sieve. Discard solids and refrigerate the covered coulis before use. Should keep in the fridge for 3 or 4 days, 30 days if frozen.

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NYC Cheesecake Whole

What crack?

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Notes

Do not rush combining the cream and cottage cheeses (Step 2). The more time you take, the creamier the cheesecake.

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It’s déjà vu all over again …

Pappa al Pomodoro

Summer’s late start in this area meant that my tomatoes seemed to take forever to ripen. When September rolled around, I had a glut of tomatoes to contend with. One of my favorite ways to deal with this “problem” is to make Tomato with Bread Soup, Pappa al Pomodoro. Using little more than some day-old bread and the ripest of tomatoes, this soup is a wonderful way to celebrate the tomato harvest. This simple recipe can be found HERE.

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Coming soon to a monitor near you …

Salsa Preview

Ground Cherry Salsa

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By any other name …

Double Delight

The last two winters have been hard on my girls. “Helen Hayes”, “Marilyn Monroe”, and “Judy Garland” didn’t make it. Luckily I was able to locate their twins and each is doing quite well. No such luck with “Elizabeth Taylor”, however, and in a move reminiscent of All About Eve, “Double Delight”, a hybrid tea rose, has taken her spot.

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112 thoughts on “New York Style Cheesecake

    • I do think you right but I’ve seen so many tasty crusts that I’m really tempted to try one. My only concern is that this cake is in the oven a long time and I wonder what affect that would have on a crust. Hmmm …

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      • It’s never been a problem for my cheesecakes but then I’ve never baked one without a crust. In fact, I think you pre-bake the graham cracker crust slightly. The other tasty crust is those crushed up Famous Chocolate Wafers. Either way, you melt butter or marg (lots of it), add powdered sugar and then mix in the crumbs till they’re pretty sodden. Press them into a buttered and/or parchment-lined spring form pan (otherwise you’ll never get the cake out) and bake slightly before pouring in the batter and making it. I don’t ever, ever remember a crust burning no matter what. I can’t tell you why! Do it!

        Liked by 1 person

        • So many have said that they prefer a crustless cake that I was going to forget about testing a crust. Then, a commenter double-dog dared me to make a crust. Well, back in the day, a double-dog dare means that you must do it or live a life of shame. Next time, I’ll try my luck with a crust. Thanks for the helpful hints. I’m going to need them. 🙂

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  1. Hi John, what a pleasure to read a post of yours on the train to work. I’ve missed that! The photo of Zia indeed does not need a caption.
    Great idea to cover the cracks with fruit 🙂
    PS in the ingredient list, there is a typo in f(l)our and 1/2 cup of butter is 113 grams rather than 227 (a full cup).

    Liked by 1 person

    • Not to worry, Linda. All opinions are welcome on this blog. Cheesecakes with crusts are so common here that I’m a bit surprised to learn how many commenters prefer their cakes crustless. I learn something new here everyday.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Hang on there just a moment young man!
    Have you just quietly slipped in a photo of your NEW BOOK? How did I miss that post???
    That is SO exciting John and I’m most definitely buying it for myself (for my birthday in 2 weeks). Congratulations! Can’t wait to see it.
    I’ve never tried a cheesecake sans crust, nor have I tried one with cottage cheese (I usually use ricotta and creamed cheese) but having baked your cakes before, I know it’ll be GOOD!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Hello, Saskia. Good to see you again. Yes, last week I returned to WP bearing cookbooks. I n doing so, I fulfilled Zia’s long-standing request that I write one. She was quite surprised, to say the least, and I hope you’ll enjoy it.
      I once tried a cheesecake with ricotta but I wasn’t pleased with it. I bet yours would be far better. Have you shared the recipe? One can never have enough good cheesecake recipes. 🙂

      Like

    • Thank you so much, Mandy. It was a special day for us.
      I must say I’m a bit surprised by all the crustless people among the commenters. I expected the opposite. Maybe I’ll skip experimenting with crusts and leave well enough alone. 🙂

      Like

    • Yes, Ruth, one couldn’t say she has a poker face, that’s for sure. I am so glad to hear that you like the book, There were plenty of times that I had my doubts about it and I’m still amazed that it’s complete. Who’da thunk? 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Whata man!

    Your book is going to be the best Christmas gift to my brother-in-law who lived in Lugano for years. He became quite the Italian cook. He’ll love it, I’m sure. Thank you!!
    Food. Flowers. Momma?
    Whata man!

    Ciao Ciao
    Teri
    Portland, Oregon

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Teri. How I would have loved to live in Italy for a few years. I’m sure your brother had a wonderful time of it. I hope he enjoys our recipes. They all come with my ZIa’s seal of approval. 🙂

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  4. I love Zia. She looks a little like my beloved mamma: same beautiful white hair, glasses, delicate jewels and a sweet smile. My mother left us before I begin my writer and food blogger “career”. I am sure she would like to read about our family recipes. Did Zia appreciate your surprise? Her wonderful smile tell me so!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Your dear Mamma sounds like a lovely woman, Sylva. My Mom also passed before I started blogging. I’m sure she would be thrilled to see her recipes so well-received. You’re right, too. Zia was quite surprised and loves the cookbook. As you said, her smiles says it all.

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  5. Oh look at lovely, lovely Zia looking so beautiful and so very proud of her “nipotino”!! That’s a very sexy shot too of that slice of cheesecake. Am not a desserty person usually but you can always tempt me (and usually to a second portion too) if it’s cheesecake. I don’t think I’ve ever made one without a crust (but as an Anglo/Italian with Spanish influences I’m not sure I am allowed to comment!). Mine is made with digestive biscuit crumbs (I suppose that’s what you call Graham Crackers?) mixed with melted butter, pressed into a tin and either left in the fridge for a while or pre baked for a short time before adding the filling. Perhaps if I leave the crust off I can kid myself it’s low fat and have THREE servings instead of two?! Lovely to have you back in fighting form and the rose is stunning x

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Tanya. Yes, that was a proud moment for the both of us, to be sure. She was so very surprised!
      This is the only cheesecake recipe that I know of that doesn’t have a crust. Most are very much like the crust you described, while others use a variety of crushed cookies (biscuits). This cake is in the oven for so long that I’ve feared that the crust would burn or at least grow too firm. To be honest, this cake really doesn’t need anything else and, as you pointed out, it’s low-calorie without a crust. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  6. That Zia…such a cutie! I make a cheesecake quite similar to this one and it also has no crust. I actually don’t mind it with this type of cake. It’s so delicious that I don’t need a crust. And how did you bake this without it producing any cracks??? Not only does mine resemble as if an earthquake hit, it even sinks in a little in the middle!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m repeating myself but I really am surprised to learn so many prefer a crustless cheesecake. I’d no idea. Now, about that crack. It’s there but that’s why there’s a pile of raspberries on top. They were all strategically placed, especially for the photos. Strawberries, blueberries or even a glob of whipped cream will work, too. 😉

      Liked by 1 person

    • Hello, Barb. Good to see you! I do hope you’ll enjoy the book.
      Once, about a dozen years ago, I was visiting friends on the West Coast. They were having a party and I offered to make this cake. It’s the one and only time it failed me. WIth time running out, I told them I was running to the store for more ingredients. I went to a bakery instead. No one but the hosts and I knew that the cheesecake everyone praised was store-bought. 😉

      Like

  7. I have a hard time resisting gazing at that cheesecake, yum! And crust is overrated… I prefer just good cheesecake… But the photo of Zia present your book is equally irresistible… I’ve been checking Amazon.com.au but if not, I’ll resort to an OS option 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sorry to say, EllaDee, that I do not think Amazon will offer the book in Oz. Worse, I really have no say in the matter.

      Everyone has taken Zia to heart and I wanted to share a photo of her shortly after receiving the book. I’ve said it before, it was a very good day. 🙂

      Like

  8. Love the intro photo John, Zia must be so proud! I’m not a cheesecake fan, but I’m tempted by the look of your cake. Good luck with your roses, “double delight” is one of my faves, love the heady scent. I haven’t had much luck with it sadly, I think it’s a fickle cultivar….

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much. Yes, the lady is one very proud Zia, especially seeing how well-received the book has been. And, yes, “Double Delight” is a beauty but we’re heading into its first winter. I don’t consider any rose to be a permanent boarder until it survives that first winter. I just never know until it starts to bud in spring.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. A double delight of a post John! What a pleasure to see Zia’s beaming face holding your new cookbook and then a fabulous cheesecake (one of my favourite desserts) to follow! Absolutely beautiful and I look forward to trying it, with no base and all! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much, Margot. Zia was so happy that I wanted to share her with you all.
      I’m with you about cheesecake. I’m not one for desserts but I just can’t say no to cheesecake. I do hope you like this one. I no longer make any other kind.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. John, by cream cheese, do you mean a soft spreadable cheese? We have something here called Philadelphia Cheese. I’m hoping to have a go, minus the coulis this weekend.mon the other hand, strawberries are cheap at the moment. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, Mary, I do think they’re the same. Here, in the US, the most popular brand is “Philadelphia Cream Cheese”. It is soft, spreadable, and with a bit of tangy taste. It’s a main ingredient for many cheesecakes. I’ve used raspberries, blueberries, strawberries, and a dollop of whipped cream with chocolate shavings to top off the cake. Well, that’s the official reason. In actuality, I’ll use whatever I can to cover the inevitable crack in the center of the cake. 🙂

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  11. Funny, I didn’t like cheesecake until I was in my 20s. I couldn’t stand it growing up except for some mini cheesecakes my mom made. Now I love it. I just made josh one for his birthday cake and used the leftover for cheesecake balls for Sean’s birthday! This looks fantastic, especially with the raspberry coulis.

    Liked by 1 person

    • That is such a great idea, Gretchen! I have to keep it in mind the next time I make this cake. Thank goodness our tastes mature as we grow. Imagine our diets if we still ate only the foods we liked at 6 years of age. 🙂

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  12. Zia and the cheesecake are equally beautiful. I love cheesecake and my husband could live happily never taking another bite. We don’t have it often.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. I love Zia’s expression holding your book. Priceless. Ours arrived this week (and one for a gift too!). I can’t wait to delve into it. Well you know this cheesecake is a winner for us. I personally like it without the crust. I’m all for crust in most cases, but with cheesecake I just want more of the cheesy goodness. 🙂 This is perfect in my book John.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Okay the looks of your cheesecake is enough to make me finally want to make one! And the fact that it is crust less? Even more so. I just got your cookbook in the mail today and I hope this recipe is in there. But no matter, I will make so I can taste. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Betsy, for your kind words and for ordering the book. Yes, this recipe is in the book despite it not being a true Bartolini recipe. Still, both Mom and Zia have made it plenty of times over the years so it kinda qualifies. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  15. It’s great to see what you’ve been up to, John! I know I would enjoy your cookbook as I’ve bookmarked and saved so many of them through the years. Congratulations, and you chose a very sweet and happy model to show your work. I have never had cheesecake without a crust, but the graham cracker crusts aren’t all that special to me–it’s the delicious filling that calls my name. This truly looks delicious and what a marvelous and tasty way to cover up the sometimes uneven bake. It’s good to see you’re back with us! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Debra. It’s good to be back and I do hope you’ll enjoy the book at least well enough to get rid of those bookmarks. 🙂 I’m surprised how many prefer their cheesecake without a crust. I really had no idea. I still would like to experiment with one but I had better be a bit more careful to whom I serve it. It always disappears but what a shock it would be if people refused a slice.

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  16. I just loved the photo you sent me John, it really shows how surprised she really was! It’s amazing that with so many hands in the pit (pardon the pun) that no one spilled the beans (yikes, that one was uncalled for!).
    I hadn’t noticed that this cheesecake has no crust! I love it! Why add the extra calories and take away from the absolute awesomeness of this cake? There is no reason to. My cheesecake expert suggests to bake the cake in a Bain Marie and it won’t crack, mind you it take a lot longer to bake but it would be worth it. Cooling slowly as you did also does the trick. The creamed cottage cheese sounds lovely in this recipe and I suspect gives it that beautiful texture.
    Congratulations again on the completion of the cookbook, still need to make my way over and snag a copy.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hey, Eva. I’ve not forgotten ya! Yes, that’s a great photo, Her son, the Max Whisperer snapped it. You’re right, too, about everyone keeping quiet. A couple people kept asking if it was okay to post it on Facebook but, in the end, they all waited for my OK.
      A bain Marie has been suggested before but I’m not so sure about the timing. Yes, it would take longer to bake but this cake sits in the hot oven for another 2 hours after the bake. I’ll have to experiment — or just keep piling on the fruit in the middle. Still, there’s a certain appeal in baking cheesecakes for experimentation. There are worse ways to spend an afternoon and the rewards are so tasty. 🙂
      Thanks, too, about the book. No need to rush out and buy one. They’re not going anywhere and Amazon has discounted the price. In this case, it pays to wait a bit.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Great picture of Zia! And what a lovely cheesecake. I’m not a fan of graham cracker crusts (which are typical on cheesecakes) so I’d much rather not have a crust at all. Really good stuff! Thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, John, Unbeknownst to me, your opinion about crusts is not at all uncommon. I guess I can quit thinking about experimenting with crusts and just enjoy the darn thing. 🙂

      Like

  18. That first photo is beautiful. You’re right – no caption needed.

    You’ve inspired me to try a lot of things for the first time, and cheesecake is next on the list. I know lots of people who make excellent cheesecake, so I’ve never felt the need to try. However, your photos (as usual) have inspired me to give this a go. Thanks for the tip re: blending the cheeses.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much, Ruth. If you’re going to re-enter the cheesecake arena, this is the cake to take on. There’s nothing quick about it but the reward is worth every minute. It is my favorite cheesecake recipe. Serve it and watch it disappear.
      I tried rushing the blending step and each time, although the taste was fine, the texture wasn’t quite as smooth as it should be. Now, I start the mixer and use the time to gather the remaining ingredients. Good luck!

      Liked by 1 person

  19. I guess that’s Zia? Beautiful smile. I can tell she’s happy about the book. 😀
    And, my favorite cheesecake! Ooh…sounds and look delicious! If I ever bake cheesecake again, I will surely try your recipe, John. Thanks for sharing. Have a great weekend. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, Anna, that’s my Zia, and she was very happy about the book. We shared a wonderful moment. This cheesecake recipe may be a bit more involved than most but, trust me, it is worth every minute of work. It is definitely a crowd pleaser. 🙂
      You, too, have a great weekend.

      Like

      • I would be happy too. It’s quite an accomplishment to have your cookbook published.
        Of all the cheesecake out there, NY cheesecake is my favorite. It was the first cheesecake flavor I’ve tasted. I will definitely try your recipe next time I bake a cheesecake.
        Thanks, John.

        Liked by 1 person

  20. I’m so thrilled you’re back in your visible groove, but even more so that you’ve accomplished such a fantastic publication in your ‘alternate reality’!!! Congratulations, my friend! The cheesecake *is* going to get made here—Richard’s not a big fan, but I have plenty of lunch-friends who are, and I am learning I do far better without wheat in my diet, so a no-crust cheesecake is absolutely perfect, in my book. And, apparently, in your new book! So pleased for you, and impressed. But not shocked. You’ve been on this path for a long time, and it’s great to see it come to such a fabulous landing. Knowing you, the beauty of the journey will continue. Hurray!!

    xo,
    Kathryn

    Liked by 1 person

    • It’s good to be back, Kathryn, altho I’ll be leaving again shortly. Zia’s coming, you know. I want to warn you. This recipe calls for 3 tbsp flour. It could pose a problem for you, depending upon how sensitive you are to gluten. I’m sure you’re aware of a suitable gluten-free flour mix to use. I think you’ll find it is a very good cheesecake. My friends and family love it!
      Thanks for the kind words regarding the book, Kathryn. My original concept was far, far different from the final cookbook. It served its purpose, though. Zia knows that our family recipes have been saved and, more importantly, a bit of our family history has been recorded, as well. She is one happy Zia..

      Liked by 1 person

  21. Love the photo of your beloved Zia holding your cookbook. She has to be so very proud of you! Just last night I was perusing your wonderful cookbook – it’s so well done John! I was an English Lit. Major and worked for a short time in book publishing, so I know GOOD when I see it – and your book is excellent. As always, I love reading your stories. You’re a born story teller. Guess what – I just got back from eight days in Italy. We toured Rome, Florence and Venice. When we lived in Malta we often went to Italy for both business and pleasure but this trip was ‘partially’ guided and, wow, did my friend and I learn a lot!! It was my third trip to Venice and, at least to me, Venice has lost some of it’s charm. Twenty years ago there were more actual residents than there are now, as many people have moved to Mestre – on the mainland. That’s where our hotel was and it was a bit of a pain having to take a train over to Venice proper each time. There’s waaay more tourists than 20 years ago and waaay more tourists than the last time I was there. I don’t like the kiosks selling ‘bits and bobs’ (as the Brits say) and I was very, very disappointed to see that the new ‘water bus station’ blocks the lovely view of the world-famous Ponte Vecchio. That being said – we had a simply fabulous time!! THE FOOD, THE WINE – THE PEOPLE!! As you know, there’s nothing quite like Italy and nothing – even here in the States – nothing like Italian-Americans!

    Liked by 1 person

    • What a gracious comment to leave for me, Cecile! Thank you so much! Knowing your background, I was anxious to hear your thoughts and I’m very grateful.
      How wonderful that you went back to Italy! Things certainly have changed, though. When I was there last year in May, Florence and Rome were already packed with tourists. It was all so unexpected and we were not at all prepared for them. I had heard that most of the Venetians had left the city. I’ve not been there in a dozen years but would love to return. Speaking of which, about the time you penned this comment I was making reservations for my return to San Marino next spring. My nephew will be joining me. I cannot wait to show him our ancestral home. He hasn’t much vacation time so we’ll be visiting relatives and then go on to Rome for a few days. He doesn’t care what we see just so long as he can eat well. No problem! That is the least of our worries.
      I hope you had a wonderful Thanksgiving, Cecile, and thank you again for your kind words about the book. Welcome home!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Just found this my dear friend… I’m really hard to prepare for our Roy Christmas this Saturday, when one of my twins sons comes up with his family from the Philly area. As always, I need JUST ONE MORE DAY!! But somehow it all comes out right and we have such fun!! ++ How exciting that you’re making plans to return to Italy. I can’t wait to hear all about that trip!! ; o )

        Liked by 1 person

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