Pistachio Gelato

Gelato di Pistacchio

Pistachio Gelato 3Those of you that have followed this blog for a while will know that August means 2 things around here. First, it’s a birthday month for quite a few Bartolini (Mom would have been 90 on the 15th), as well as for many of the tasters and friends of the Kitchens.  Second, I normally schedule a visit with Zia sometime during the month but more about that later.

Mom really enjoyed ice cream and so, every August, I post at least one recipe in her honor and that of the rest of the August babies. Now, with so many memories of strolling about Florence, gelato in-hand, still-fresh in my mind, I decided that this month’s frozen treat would be a gelato, and, since Mom loved pistachio ice cream, deciding to make pistachio gelato was a no-brainer. Once I’d settled on the flavor, I knew exactly where to go for the recipe.

Last year, while in the middle of my moratorium on buying cookbooks, a blogging friend posted an ice cream recipe and referred me to a great book, Linda Tubby’s “Ices Italia.” I love this book but there is a problem. Although I remembered the book through the remainder of the moratorium, I’d completely forgotten the person who recommended it to me. Please identify yourself so that I might credit — and thank you — for leading me to the book and today’s recipe. The book is fantastic and the recipe a keeper, as you’ll soon see.

ETA: Since this recipe was posted, my friend and long-time supporter of this blog, Elaine, Le Petit Potager, has reminded me that it was she who introduced me to “Ices Italai”. We pistachio gelato lovers all thank you.

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As for my visit with Zia, I had intended to leave in the next day or two but my car had other plans. I will not bore you with the details but suffice it to say that my departure has been postponed until some time next week. The kitchens will be closed for the duration, reopening on Wednesday, August 27th.

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Pistachio Nuts

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Pistachio Gelato Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1 heaping cup (160 g) pistachios, unsalted, roasted, skins removed  (see Notes)
  • 3/4 cup castor sugar (see Notes)
  • 1.5 cups (350 ml) whole, full-fat milk
  • 1.25 cups (300 ml) heavy cream
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla
  • pinch of salt
  • additional pistachios, crushed, for garnish — optional

Directions

  1. Place shelled, roasted pistachios into a large food processor and grind until sand-like.
  2. Add sugar and continue to grind until very fine.
  3. Place milk and heavy cream into a medium saucepan and heat slowly until just before boiling. Small bubbles will appear where the dairy meets the pan’s side.
  4. Add some of the hot milk to the ground nuts and process until smooth.
  5. Continue to gradually add hot milk to the bowl, processing after each addition, until no more milk remains (see Notes).
  6. Add vanilla and salt, process to combine, and then add mixture to a large bowl
  7. Refrigerate until chilled, at least 4 hours.
  8. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for preparing ice cream.
  9. Place gelato in a freezer-proof container and store in the freezer. Ms. Tubby recommends waiting for 3 hours before serving.
  10. Garnish servings with optional crushed pistachios.

Recipe may be found in Linda Tubby’s excellent book “Ices Italia“.

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Pistachio Gelato 1*     *     *

Notes

According to Ms. Tubby, unlike ice cream, gelato isn’t meant to be served when frozen solid. Once frozen, place the opened container in your fridge for about 30 minutes before serving. This will result in a gelato just like those served in your favorite gelateria.

I was unable to find raw pistachio nuts and had to resort to using those that were already roasted. I found that a 12 oz (340 g) bag provided me with a little more than I needed for the recipe, once I shelled them and rubbed off the skins. I used the excess for garnish.

For this recipe, you want to use a finer sugar so that your gelato isn’t grainy, as may be the case if regular, white sugar is used. Castor sugar is that finer sugar but there’s no need to buy it if you haven’t any. Just place white sugar in your food processor and grind it until it is fine, like castor.

This recipe will produce a very smooth gelato. If you prefer a little more texture, just process the nut and sugar mixture for less time (Step 1) and/or add all the heated dairy to the processor bowl at once and process only until the mixture is combined.

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Variations

Raspberries*     *     *

Raspberries PureedI’ve a friend was recently released from hospital and faces some mighty tough dietary restrictions, while being told that he shouldn’t lose any more weight. Now, in the past, I would have delivered a tray of lasagna and a loaf of garlic bread to my friend, and that would have gone a long way towards at least maintaining his weight. Well, as incredible as it may sound, lasagna and garlic bread are not permitted on his diet. (I told you the restrictions were “mighty tough”.) He can eat ice cream, however, and that’s all I needed to know.

His favorite gelato flavor is raspberry, lampone, so, I took 12 oz (340 g) of raspberries, blitzed them in a food processor until broken down, and then strained the purée through a sieve to remove the seeds. For the dairy portion of the recipe, I reduced the quantity of whole milk to 3/4 cup (175 ml) and increased the amount of heavy cream to 2 cups Raspberry Gelato(475 ml). (There shall be no weight loss on my watch!) With no nuts to grind, I just added the heated dairy mixture to the sugar in the food processor, blitzed it long enough to melt the sugar, and then added the sieved raspberry purée, processing until blended. The mixture was chilled for 4 hours before my ice cream machine took over.

All who have taste it agree: this is one very good gelato.

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Piazza della Signoria, Florence

Like cities and towns throughout Europe, Florence’s cityscape is peppered with public squares, piazze. Some are so small as to be little more than some free space at the intersection of 2 minor streets. Others, Like the Piazza dell Republicca, are relatively vast spaces, lined on all 4 sides with cafes and trattorie. As a tourist, though the prices are high, there’s no better place to people watch than at one of these “ringside” establishments. Of all the piazze in Florence, however, the Piazza della Signoria is the grand dame of them all.

The city’s heart since Roman times, the Piazza serves as Florence’s civic center and political hub. When Zia and I visited Florence 12 years ago, there was a transit strike on the day of our departure from Florence. The Piazza was jammed with people carrying banners, placards, and bull horns. I thought we’d never get through the throng. This visit, things were quite a bit different, though there were more tourists about than I’ve ever seen in Florence. It seemed whenever I stopped to take a photo, suddenly an umbrella, pennant, or hat would appear in front of my lens, as a tour guide gathered his/her charges to explain one of the Piazza’s many features — and there are many features.

When you enter the Piazza, you cannot help but notice the massive structure and tower near a corner. This is the Palazzo della Signoria but is known as the Palazzo Vecchio, Old Palace. As if it’s not impressive enough in its own right, the entrance is flanked with 2 larger-than-life statues. This is the site where Michelangelo’s “David” originally stood and where a replica now stands guard. Joining him is a statue of Hercules. Moving around the Piazza, you’ll see a bronze statue of “Cosmo I” de Medici atop his steed. To Cosmo’s side, you’ll find the bronze and marble fountain of Neptune. (Sorry, I couldn’t get close enough to get a photo worth publishing.)

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To my eye, the most praiseworthy section of the Piazza is the Loggia dei Lanzi, so beautifully designed and constructed that Michelangelo urged the city to repeat the facade on all the Piazza’s buildings. (Be sure to take the link to see the entire structure.) It is home to some stunning pieces of sculpture, though be prepared for some obstructed viewing – and not just because of the crowds. In all the times I’ve been to the Loggia, I’ve yet to enjoy a completely scaffolding-free view. Even so, the Loggia dei Lanza is one site that you must see if you find yourself in Florence. Here is some of the statuary on display there. To begin, there are the Medici Lions on either side of the steps leading into the Loggia – now a restricted area, by the way.

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That concludes our tour of Florence. When I return, we’ll do a little touring in Rome

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It’s déjà vu all over again …

La BombaSince I shared a gelato recipe today, I thought it best to send you back to the Granddaddy of all of my ice cream recipes, the Spumoni Bomba. Yes, it’s spumoni but so much more. You can see step-by-step instructions for making this show stopping dessert simply by clicking HERE.

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Coming not too soon to a monitor near you …

Roast Duck PreviewRoast Duck

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120 thoughts on “Pistachio Gelato

  1. Lovely shot of the ice cream. It’s extraordinary, but I know Linda Tubby. I haven’t seen here for 20 years or so, but she was a food stylist who worked with me often. She was married to English photographer, Gerry Tubby. I’ve just googled here and am going to get in touch….nice post, John:)

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Love that first glorious green photo John! Your ice cream looks superb, and your mum would surely have been proud that you made it in her honour. Hope your friend loved his ice cream gift – anything containing heavy cream is a perfect pep-me-up in my book and that raspberry gelato looks so good. Cannot wait for the sun to come out over here…
    PS. Have been living vicariously through your amazing Italy updates!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Saskia. I can assure you that both flavors were very well-received, with each one being declared the favorite at some point. 🙂 To tell you the truth, I’d be hard-pressed to name a favorite. I thought the pistachio was the best ever — and then I made the raspberry. You really cannot go wrong with either one.
      I’m glad you’ve enjoyed the holiday photos. I’m sorting through the pics of Rome now.

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  3. I absolutely love your first shot John – stunning! Your mom and my Pete would have got on very well – Pete’s favourite, favourite, favourite are pistachios! August always has to sharing special stories and fabulous family recipes – looking forward to them all.
    Florence is so beautiful with all the statues – can’t wait to see Rome!
    Have a wonderful week.
    🙂 Mandy xo

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    • Thanks, Mandy. Yes, Mom would have gotten along famously with your Pete. I can see them both now, sitting at a table, with a bowl of pistachio ice cream/gelato in front of them and each wearing a broad smile. She sure loved her ice cream.
      Florence is such a beautiful city, Mandy. I hope you get a chance to see it. There’s no place like it on Earth and I’d go back there in a heartbeat.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Another great post, John. I brought some pistacchio verde di Bronte D.O.P. from Italy and Kees loves gelato di pistacchio so the future is not hard to predict 😉 I make ice cream on a regular basis, but have never made pistacchio. What surprised me is that your (Ms Tubby’s) recipe does not include egg yolks. Especially for the raspberry ice cream I’d expect egg yolks. Interesting!

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    • That’s the thing, Stefan. She states that there are 2 forms of gelato, with and without eggs. This one, without the eggs and resultant custard, is so much easier to prepare — and it’s been very well-received. VERY well-received. The raspberry gelato is pretty much the same recipe but I increased the heavy cream content to help my buddy maintain his weight. Trust me, Stefan, it is a fantastic gelato. Just be sure to have a defibrillator on hand for the faint of heart. 🙂

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      • I have been wondering why my gelati are different from some of the ones I’ve had in Italy. This must be it. Some experimenting is in order. What a pity 😉
        The only thing that puzzles me now is why the milk has to be heated up if not to make a custard. Does she say anything about that? I’ve found a recipe online for gelato di pistacchio that uses cold milk.

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        • I searched the book’s index and skimmed other recipes and never found an answer for your question, Stefan. I’ll have to read the book thoroughly to find it, if it’s there. My guess is that warm milk will ensure that the sugar is melted. She wants a texture that’s as smooth as possible. That’s why she recommends castor sugar rather than white. If I do come across her reason, rest assured I’ll let you know.

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          • For a similar reason many Italian recipes for desserts use icing sugar instead of regular sugar. Not having to heat up the milk would make the recipe a lot quicker and easier, so I’ll dig into that. The only ice cream I make without heating the milk is banana (which is banana + cream + sugar + a bit of lemon juice, food processor, ice cream maker, done! and the best banana ice cream you have ever tasted)

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      • I feel it may be the case because you sometimes find vanilla ice cream, dyed green, with pistachios stirred through, rather than the custard base made from ground pistachios. I guess the extra effort taken is the sign of quality gelato.

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  5. Pistachio is my favourite gelato. We are fortunate to have a wonderful gelateria just a couple of hundred metres from our front door. There product is smooth, rich and creamy and contains no egg. Earlier today I bought a new ice cream machine. Guess what I’ll be making first……it’s been 17 yrs since I was in Florence, too long, thanks for the tour and the reminder of the incredible sculptures.

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    • You are so welcome. I don’t feel like I’m in Florence until I get a seat in that piazza and watch the parade pass in front of the statues. There really is no place like it — that’s not in a museum — on Earth. Congratulations on your new baby. I can’t wait to see the recipes you’ll create. I do hope you’ll enjoy this gelato. I can say that both flavors were very well-received. Now I’ve got to make more. 🙂

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  6. Your dear mom had very good taste in Gelato, John. After double chocolate, pistachio is my second favourite. 🙂 Shelling and skinning 12oz of those nuts must have been a real labour of love! Well done to you. I hope your friend is well on the way to recovery after eating your Raspberry Lampone gelato. Very tasty medicine indeed. Thanks for the lovely memories you sparked for me with your gorgeous pics of Florence. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Mom was an ice cream lover without equal. Many a Sunday supper was served in our back yard. After dinner, she’d look at Dad and, the next thing we knew, we were in the car heading to get some sort of ice cream confection. At the time, I thought the trip was for our benefit. It was only much later, as an adult, that I realized just how much Mom loved ice cream. Those Sunday night ice creams were as much for her, if not more, than for anyone else in that car. 🙂
      Yeah, shelling and skinning those nuts was the worst part of the job. I have to admit, though, the gelato is so worth it — and that’s the problem. I’ve got to make more. 🙂

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  7. I know what you mean about scaffolding – I’ve just been to New York! No matter the scaffolding – you do make me want to pack a bag and head to Florence. I would love to see everything that involved Michaelangelo – what an incredible talent and such a gift to Italy. Your ice cream is stunning but even better is how you are helping your friend through a trying situation. That ice cream bombe looks amazing and would grace our Christmas Eve table beautifully – I must check out the recipe xx

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    • One night, as we stood on front of Il Duomo, my friend commented that it was the first time she’d seen it without scaffolding. We all agreed. It almost seemed unnatural. I do hope you find yourself strolling about Florence one day, Charlie. It will surpass your wildest imaginings, as will Rome. Michelangelo left his mark on both cities and they are so much the better for it.
      That bomba would be perfect for your tropical Christmas. If you prefer, you can make it with sorbet instead of ice cream, or, a combination of both. No matter what it’s made of, you’re sure to get quite a reaction from your dinner guests when you cut into it. Guaranteed. 🙂

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    • Thanks, MD. It seems like Summer hasn’t really gotten off the ground here. It’s been warm but those really hot days have missed us and it’s getting less and less likely that they’ll get here. That’s OK. One of the things being fixed on my car is the air conditioning. If the high temps ever do get here, I’ll be ready. 🙂

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  8. You really do have a heart of gold John. I love reading your posts… gives me such a boost of faith in humanity!
    Your two flavours of ice-creams both sound amazing – I’m imagining myself holding onto a rather large spoon and digging into a bowl piled high with several scoops of each. 🙂 So greedy!
    Hope all goes well with your car repairs and that you find yourself in Zia’s company before you know it. Enjoy your time together.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much, Margot. I moved away from home decades ago. This friend, like his wife and a few others, are my family here. I’d do anything for him, just as he would for me.
      I think you’re psychic, Margot. Not 30 minutes ago, I was finishing off the last bit of raspberry gelato with a big spoon.You didn’t happen to imagine any lottery numbers, too, did you? 🙂 I have to remember to pack my ice cream maker so that Zia and I can enjoy some gelato. As for the car, it’s fate is in the hands of the mechanic. I’ll know better after tomorrow. Fingers crossed.

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  9. Looks so YUM! What can be better on a hot summer day than an absolutely delicious home-made gelato… A secret – I have never tried to make one before but have tasted quite a bit…maybe the time has come to get my act together! 🙂

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    • So, true, and it is especially nice when the gift is so appreciated, as was the case with my friend and his wife. I must admit, though, I’m a bit surprised by how popular pistachio is and wonder why it’s no longer to be found at the grocer’s. There sure seems to be a market for it.

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  10. That gelato! Pistachio! And such a lovely green! Oh, a scoop of that would be perfect for breakfast this morning. Your friend is lucky indeed to have a friend such as you who makes raspberry gelato for him – what a treat! I’m thinking your mother might have enjoyed a scoop of each, and no doubt would be touched by your annual ice cream tribute to her (I know I am).

    Good luck with the car (I’ve had my own adventures in that department lately), and then have a wonderful visit with Zia. Give her a hug for me please!

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    • Thanks, Mar. I really worked at getting the skins off those pistachio nuts, knowing that they’d discolor the green. I was very pleased to see that the gelato was a nice pistachio green. And that raspberry gelato is really good! Together they made quite the pair. Mom would have absolutely loved them.
      I’ll be sure to mention you to Zia. Who knows? If there’s a strong westerly wind, we may yet make the swim to your side of the Lake. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Culprit? No, Elaine. I am in your debt. “Ices Italia” is a wonderful book and one of the first I bought when I ended my cookbook buying moratorium. Stupid moratorium. Without it, I would have been enjoying this gelato last Summer. 🙂
      I’ve changed the post to give you credit for pointing me in the direction of “Ices Italia”. Thanks again.

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  11. When we were in Italy we ate gelato every day, sometimes twice if the mood struck or if we needed an excuse like “we have to buy something to use the restroom”. We would sit and watch the older folks who were sitting watching the tourists. It was the pistachio and stracciatella I loved the most, so I cannot wait to try your pistachio recipe! Ah, Florence. That is a place I could get lost in for a long, long while. Thanks for the reminder.

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    • You’re so welcome, Judy. I, too, loved the stracciatella gelato. Well, let’s be honest. I loved all that I tasted — and we tasted quite a few. I think you’ll like these 2 recipes. Just don’t serve them rock hard from the freezer. Gelato isn’t meant to be served frozen solid. Once frozen, open the container and leave it in the fridge for about 30 minutes before serving. That’s about as close to the real thing as you’re going to get. 🙂

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  12. That looks absolutely amazng John and I love that you made it in honour of your Mamma! August is a great month indeed in your clan and how lovely that you’re helping your pal too with his recovery. Hope the car behaves when you travel or else you’ll have to get out and push while Max steers 😉 Gorgeous shots of Florence – lots of lovely memories there. PS. My favourite ice cream in Italy was always Nocciola (hazlenut) and my birthday is in January….just thought it was worth a mention!!!

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    • Thanks, Tanya. Mom was such a lover of ice cream that it seems only natural to celebrate her memory with ice cream or gelato. Today’s recipes are really special and were very much enjoyed. I took my car in for some minor work and things have gone so wrong. Thankfully, though, when I do get it back, I won’t worry about it breaking down along the way. Traveling with a dog and parrot, if my car breaks down, all I can do is wait for help to arrive. Although I’ve got a smart phone, the coverage up there is spotty and I could easily find myself in an area without service. You see, I’m not just traveling back home but back in time, too. 🙂
      Hmm hazelnut, eh? That book has a recipe for hazelnut gelato. Stay tuned.
      And yes, you’re birthday is the 21st, isn’t it?

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  13. I too am an August baby, but I stopped having birthday’s years ago lol. Thank you for the lovely tour of Florence and I look forward to Rome. Hmm, since I love hazelnuts/filberts I wonder how that gelato might turn out using those instead of pistachios 🙂

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    • I tried to stop having birthdays, or at least counting the years, Ingrid, but I’ve too many in my life who are more than willing to remind me. I bet they could tell me the number of minutes if I asked. 🙂
      This recipe is a good one and I bet hazelnuts would work very well, though that recipe book has a hazelnut gelato that I want to try. It’s custard-based, though, and they can be a bit tricky. I’ve curdled a few custards in my time. 😉

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  14. What kind of diet doesn’t permit lasagna and garlic bread? Your friend’s doctor must be a quack. 😀 Seriously, though, delivery gelato was a great idea. You can deliver some to me anytime! Great recipe, and I loved reading about Florence. Never been there, and so much to see (and eat!). Sorry about your car, but those things happen. Alas. Anyway, enjoy your trip to Michigan!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Obviously, this doctor is not Italian. The nerve!
      I’ve been ill, John, and by the time I cooked my meal, I’d lost my appetite. Having food on hand that could be quickly reheated — like lasagna — was a god-send. ‘ll send what I can to help my friend through this. Right now, it’s gelato. I’ll get him on some sort of pasta yet. 🙂
      You really must take Mrs. Riffs to Florence. There’s no city like it and, no matter how long you stay, you’ll wish it was longer. And then there’s Venice, Rome, Milan, Naples, all of Sicily. See all the sights and eat very well while doing so. Bliss.

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  15. I love gelato and pistachio sounds wonderfully. The boys were just asking for pistachio pudding today, of course that is more because of the color. Or maybe because of the Cars reference of pistachio ice cream vs. wasabi! I will have to try this sometime soon.

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    • At their age, I think you’re better off not knowing what they find so appealing about that shade of green. The good thing about these recipes is that there’s no custard involved, making them a relative breeze to prepare. And both taste very good. 🙂

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  16. What a lovely post John. And thank you so much for sharing the pics of Florence, they are gorgeous! Between you and my dear friend Barb (Profiteroles and Ponytails) I’m green with envy! Barb is in Italy with her family right now and her pics are spectacular!
    Good luck with your car troubles, but I’m glad that it happened before your big trip and not during!
    The gelatos are beautiful, with the humidity it would be so incredibly refreshing. My favourite is the pistachio. It’s so nice of you to make it for your friend.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Barb’s in Italy? I know she’s having a wonderful time and I bet her ponytails are having a great time, too. I’d go back in a heartbeat.
      I have to take my car back to the mechanic tomorrow morning and to another on Monday. With luck, I’ll be on the road Tuesday … or Wednesday … or … You’re right, though. Better now than in the middle of nowhere in Michigan, with a parrot and dog in the car.
      Both gelati are really good, Eva, but there’s nothing the least but fat-free about them. They’re not supposed to be, however, and they’re doing there job: helping my friend maintain his weight. I’ll work on slipping some pasta into his diet next. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • I hope your car was fixed without too much trouble for the pocket book! Barb started posting ‘usies’ (selfies of the entire family) with great backgrounds on facebook! It was a blast to be included on they momentous vacation!

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  17. Both of your gelati look wonderful, John, but especially the pistachio! What a fitting birthday tribute and Happy Birthday to all of your August celebrants. I remember the spumoni bomba well. I could dive into that shot and eat the whole thing. 🙂 Hope your friend’s recovery is quick and smooth, and may you and Max have a great trip and visit with Zia. Happy August!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Betsy. This pistachio gelato, like the cookbook, is really wonderful. I hope you give it a try. The raspberry isn’t bad, either.
      With the car repaired, we’ll be on the road soon enough and Max will be romping in the water once again. This time, I’m bringing both my stand mixer and ice cream machine. Well make pasta in the morning and gelato in the afternoon. We’ll need a defibrillator by the end of my visit. 🙂

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  18. Your gelato (both flavors) look fantastic but I think the pistachio would be my favorite…I have always loved a good scoop of pistachio ice cream just like you Zia. Have a great time visiting!

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  19. I really wished I could’ve clicked ‘LIKE twice for this post – that’s how great it is. (Of course, all your posts are great.) I usually make ice cream which includes custard… and it takes longer, as you know. I really love this recipe – delicious results, minus having to make the custard. And – your food photos and travel photos were especially great ! Here – I’m giving you 5 ‘stars’ ***** And I, too, am an August birthday !!

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  20. Another great post, John. You really do take us to Italy for sightseeing and a delicious experience. For the future, you should be able to buy quality raw (un-roasted, un-salted) pistachios at Persian grocery stores. I have to go and get myself an ice-cream maker.

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  21. I too love that first gelato shot. Good enough to enter a photo contest, thinking you should.
    Love gelato. there is a store in Chelsea Market, NYC that has the most amazing gelato, get double scoop whenever I visit.
    Saving your recipe and going to try to make it sometime, the only problem is I am trying to lose weight or at least maintain it and not continue to grow side ways.
    Have a pleasant trip and a fabulous visit with Zia, sending her best wishes.

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  22. Ha! ms. Tubby recommends waiting 3 hrs? I think my first serving would be immediately…I mean you have to taste test right? Absolutely love pistachio which is one of my favorites but I have to say it’s now a toss up after reading about the raspberry. Sometimes you just post so many ideas I need to fan myself.
    I love the Florence shots and I’m laughing because I know exactly what you mean about having an umbrella pop into the carefully framed shot after waiting for people to clear away. Enjoy your visit with Zia and I hope your car is behaving itself now.

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  23. I raise my glass to your mom’s birthday. Tomorrow is my mom’s birthday. Very special people are born in August. It is such an amazing month in Italy when everyone is on vacation enjoying life. I adore pistachio ice-cream. One of my favorites and yours looks fantastic. I wish you a wonderful visit. Enjoy your time with your zia.
    F. Xx

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  24. I haven’t thought about pistachio ice cream in years! I used to love it when I was young, so good. Now I’m sad to say, pistachios give me a rash and make me itch. The ridiculousness of food allergies…so annoying! Both your pistachio gelato and the raspberry look mouth watering! I hope your friend feels well soon and I’m sure there will be no losing weight as long as he takes your daily prescription of gelato!

    Beautiful pictures of Florence, I’d say you did very well taking photographs with the crowds in your way!

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  25. You are such a good son and a nice friend! A wonderful looking pistachio gelato for mom and raspberry for your friend. Both look quite awesome John. At first I figured the pistachio would have a lot of texture, but you say it’s smooth. I really need to try it! Thanks!

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  26. Deliciousness! I doubt quite frankly that I would ever make gelato, but I will get me to the grocer’s to find the most decadent store bought can buy tomorrow, because you’ve sent off an explosion in my mind. I spent my days in Italy (years ago) with gelato in hand most of the time. I’m so glad your trip to see Zia coincides with my move, so I won’t miss any of your posts. And I’m so glad I’ve found another wonderful food blog to follow via your comments section, Food, Photography, and France. Have a great trip!

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  27. Need a “love” button to click for this post! Definitely FIVE stars. Sweet. Your green gelato photo is worthy of a food magazine cover for sure. Really excellent.
    Have a wonderful time away. We’ll miss you, John.
    What a lovely tribute to your dear mother.
    Enjoyed all of your Italy pics but Florence is special.

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  28. The pistachio gelato looks wonderful but I’m a sucker for all things [fresh] raspberry. I love how the gelato process makes for the best colours. And a travelogue of Florence. If I can’t be travelling myself, the next best thing is hearing the best bits of someone elses 🙂

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  31. I’m sorry to hear that your car delayed your travel, but you’ll have a wonderful visit when you get there, I’m quite sure! I refer to your previous August birthday ice cream recipes all the time, John, so now this will go with the collection. I’m really happy to see pistachio. We have a lovely family-owned ice cream shop nearby and I went the other night and brought pistachio ice cream home to my father–it’s his favorite. SO, guess what I’ll be making this weekend? Yum! I’ve enjoyed the tour of Florence, and I’m very eager to see Rome! 🙂

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  32. Happy birthday month to all the August birthdays! I always love your ice cream treats. This one will especially delight Mike. He is a HUGE fan of pistachio flavored ice cream/gelato. In fact that’s the only flavor I’ve seen him eat all summer. Good luck with your car! I hope you get up to Zia’s safe and sound (and sooner rather than later).

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  33. Pingback: Gelato al Pistacchio Recipe | Italia | Scoop.it

  34. TWO ice-cream/gelato recipes in one post? This is a treat!

    Last week, we made chocolate-covered ice cream bars for the first time. Well, I actually conned my sister into it, but she did a marvelous job. I might have to “suggest” the pistachio gelato to her.

    And I’m very much enjoying the virtual Italian tour. It’s quite a good way to travel. 🙂

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  35. Wonderful gelato! My husband is addicted to fresh fig gelato and I might try your variation using a fig puree rather than raspberries. However, there is nothing better than sampling gelato in Italy – tastes better in place! And, so many flavours.

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  36. John, I have two August birthdays in my group, my son, and my second oldest granddaughter. They would both love this gelato. Definitely going to look for the book you mentioned.

    I go to Italy through your posts. Sounds wonderful. When we were in England we visited over May Day. Seems that is a big happening over there. We woke up to picketers and people mobbing the streets. Crazy.

    The Bomba looks amazing. We often served spumoni in the restaurant. I love it. Was just looking at it in the ice cream section of the market yesterday thinking I should buy some. Yum.

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  37. Good thing Michelangelo lived in Italy instead of Saint John. He would’ve gotten really bored sculpting the goose bumps onto all those nude statues.

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  38. Perfect flavour gelato John.
    I have to agree that that particular Piazza in Florence is awe inspirering. It seems that everyone in the world is on the move these days in one way or another and most especially in Italy. Looking forward to Roma

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  39. Don’t have favorites of anything – really no favorites. We’ll…. maybe except for gelato where pistachio is my absolute favorite. Or maybe it’s raspberry. Never sure. Saving this for later this month. (For an August birthday gathering.) Loved the vicarious trip to Florence. There is no such thing as too much Florence!

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  40. This post is bursting with so much flavor and fond travel memories! The pistachio gelato would be one I would select for sure — met our Italian gelato criteria of not being fluorescent and therefore suggesting a wonderful blend of natural flavors, undiminished by artificial add-ins. I will have to return to Florence some day as we only did a day trip during the peak of summer and I was overwhelmed by rude tourists and gypsies — including the one who called me a witch-with-a-B as she approached me right after I caught my tumbling gelato scoop before it touched the ground and ungracefully deposited it back on the cone, as the gelato dripped down my arm. …. she approached me, softly pleading in Italian with her hand out, got in my space and I barked “go away” (usually I am more firmly pleasant than this … ) and she glared at me and said clearly in English “#itch” — I think that was one of my boys’ favorite travel memories of Florence. *sigh* Good to catch up with you, John, enjoy these last weeks of summer as Fall already is in the air up north!

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  41. Pistachio gelato is an absolute favorite of mine, John! Thanks for sharing your delicious recipe. I’m adding this to my “must try” list before summer slips away. Hope you have a wonderful visit in Michigan with delicious meals too! In the meantime, I will catch up on all I’ve missed at your blog during my absence.

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  42. The ice cream photo is food porn at its best! John, I am not getting notifications of new posts from you, this is KILLING ME!

    anyway, sorry for your car troubles, and have a wonderful trip when it finally happens…. tell Zia I said hello, huge fan of her, and of you!

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  43. Pingback: Homemade Pistachio Ice Cream | Stefan's Gourmet Blog

  44. Bonjourno John, I love pistachio gelato and I must admit I ate my share whilst in Florence. How can you not as there is a shop at every street corner and they were hosting a gelato festival when I was there last. It has taken me a couple of years to recoup from the over indulgence but now I am ready to begin again and I will start with your gorgeous recipe. I love that photo, it is stunning. Take Care, BAM

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    • Buona notte, BAM! I know what you mean. When it Italy, why not indulge on gelato? You’re on vacation, right? In fact, pistachio and banana gelato is my “test” to see if the place is a good gelateria. If the pistachio is too green, or, the banana too yellow, it means that food coloring has been used and I go elsewhere. I don’t know how accurate my criteria are but, with so much gelati available, I can afford to be picky. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • It’s August, Kathryn. I’ve got to post at least one frozen dessert recipe in Mom’s memory. As for the duck, that recipe was posted last week. i think you’ll like it. 🙂

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