Roasted Mackerel with Potatoes and Tomatoes

Scombro Arrostito con Patate e Pomodori

Mackerel ServedI’m back and the Kitchens are open! Thank you all for the birthday and well-wishes. I had a wonderful birthday and, though there’s more to come, I’ll leave that reveal for a later date. As for my much neglected projects, though not all are done, I’ve made good progress and am very pleased.

Some of you may be interested to learn that I’ve added a “Translation” page to the blog. You can find it listed above, between the “Home” and “Welcome” pages, or, if you’re on my blog’s homepage, there’s a translate button on the right. Click on either link and you’ll go to a page that will offer you a translation of my blog in your choice of 52 languages. Note that less than perfect results my be returned, especially when colloquialisms and slang are encountered, as is the case with most universal-type translators. Considering that I am barely fluent in English, I’ve no way of knowing whether an individual translator is working properly. Should you find that a particular language isn’t translated clearly, please let me know and, if need be, I’ll remove that translator from the list.

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Today’s recipe is another that resulted from a walk around the Italian market. My walk started at the fish counter, as it always does, where the monger pointed out his “very fresh” mackerel. That’s code for “buy it” and I did without a second thought. While he cleaned my fish, I walked over to the produce area and bought some potatoes and tomatoes. A few minutes later, having grabbed some olive salad and herbs, my dinner for that night was all set. Unfortunately, I still had a full shopping list to buy but a fresh mackerel is one impulse buy that I don’t mind purchasing.

This dish couldn’t be easier to prepare. Stick some potatoes on a baking sheet, roast them for a spell, add some vegetables, put the fish on top, and bake until done. In the meantime, prepare a salad, slice some bread, and open a bottle of wine — if you haven’t already. Not many dinners are easier to prepare than this one.

*     *     *

Raw Mackerel*     *     *

Roasted Mackerel with Potatoes and Tomatoes Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1.5 lbs (680 g) mackerel, cleaned and scaled
  • 1.5 lbs (680 g) new potatoes, halved or quartered for uniform size
  • olive oil
  • 1 red onion, cut into eighths
  • 1 lb (455 g) cherry tomatoes
  • 6 oz (170 g) olive salad (misc olives, carrots, celery, peperoncini), roughly chopped
  • 1 sprig of fresh rosemary
  • 2 to 3 sprigs of fresh thyme
  • salt & pepper, to taste

*     *     *

M - Veggies 2*     *     *

Directions

  1. Pre-heat oven to 450˚ F (230˚ C).
  2. Place potatoes and onions in a large bowl, sprinkle with olive oil, and gently mix till evenly coated.
  3. Place on baking sheet, season with salt & pepper, and roast on center rack in pre-heated oven for 20 minutes.
  4. Meanwhile place tomatoes and olive salad into same bowl used for potatoes and onions. Drizzle with a little more olive oil and season with salt & pepper.
  5. Place rosemary and thyme into the fish’s cavity.
  6. After 20 minutes, reduce oven to 375˚ F (190˚ C). Remove potatoes from oven, stir, and add tomatoes & olive salad to the tray. Place mackerel on top of vegetables, drizzle with olive oil, season with salt & pepper, and place in oven.
  7. Roast until fish is cooked, 20 to 30 minutes depending upon the thickness of the fish. When done, fish flesh should flake and be opaque when cut.

*     *     *

Baked Mackerel *     *     *

Notes

I had originally intended to use lain olives in this recipe but that marinated olive salad looked too good to pass up. You may prefer to use just the olives or, for that matter, neither option.

I like my tomatoes to be a little firm when served. If you like them cooked more fully, add them to the roasting pan earlier.

I’ve prepared this dish using one, two, or three dressed mackerel. Although the preparation is the same, cooking times may vary and will usually be a few minutes less for the smaller fish.

*     *     *

It’s déjà vu all over again …

Nonna2

Mine wasn’t the only birthday celebrated at the end of last month. My Cousin shared her birthday, the 26th, with our dear Nonna. Although we all have wonderful memories of her, one of my most favorite involves her in the kitchen — imagine that! — preparing me something very special. The dish was tripe, trippa, and you can learn how to prepare and serve it, as well as a little bit about this dear woman, by clicking HERE.

*     *     *

Coming soon to a monitor near you …

Quail PreviewStewed Quail

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194 thoughts on “Roasted Mackerel with Potatoes and Tomatoes

  1. Welcome back to the blogosphere, John! Glad to hear you had a happy birthday and that there are more of them to come.

    This fish dish looks and sounds great. It should work with a different species of the same size? I haven’t seen mackerel around here except in little tins imported from Portugal.

    Like

    • Thanks for the warm welcome. I would use this preparation for a number of fish — whole sea bass, whiting (merluzzo), and red snapper immediately come to mind and I bet trout would work, too. Just be careful of the cooking times if you use fillets rather than whole fish. The fillets will surely cook more quickly.

      Like

  2. We misssed you! Great to have you back and I’m so glad you had a wonderful birthday 🙂 Lovely recipe – mackerel is such a beautiful looking fish both raw and cooked and all those gorgeous mediterranean veggies…perfect! We get great mackerel both in Spain and England, it’s often a bit of a forgotten fish as it’s not expensive, time to revisit mackerel I think!

    Like

    • Thanks, Tanya! It’s good to be back! i really do enjoy mackerel and hope that it never “catches on” here. It is relatively inexpensive and I take full advantage of it. All we need is for the cooking shows to feature mackerel and it will be as expensive as lobster in no time.

      Like

  3. Yay you are back. 🙂 Happy belated birthday John and what an outstanding recipe – mackerel is going on my shopping list right away!
    Have a beautiful day,
    🙂 Mandy xo
    PS. You may just be very proud of me but I am not sure yet, we will know tomorrow.

    Like

  4. Welcome back John. Really glad you had a wonderful birthday and break. I love a good tray-baked dish, and yours looks awesome. I’ve been experimenting with the Spanish recipe Bacalhau à gomes de sá; similar to this one but more of a casserole, with garlic and sliced boiled eggs on top. I’m yet to find bacalhau though, and have been experimenting with smoked trout! Really need to source some one day so I can try some of your bacala recipes! Love the look of that tasty whole mackerel; a fish that’s plentiful in Northern Australia but very tricky to come by in Melbourne (I adore it – so lovely and oily).
    The mixed olive salad sounds like a fab combo too. PS. Looking forward to your quail recipe. I’ve never cooked with quail!

    Like

      • No need to apologize, Saskia. Post as much or as little as you like.
        We share a love for mackerel and it’s too bad you cannot find it in Melbourne. If you ever see it on a restaurant’s menu, ask the staff where they purchase it. Chicago is at least 1000 miles (1600 km) from the nearest coast, yet I can find fresh mackerel at a couple of the fish markets. Maybe you’ll have the same luck.
        As for the baccalà, do you have many ethnic markets? You may be able to find it at a good Italian, Greek, or Spanish market, especially near Christmas. Being it’s dried and salted, you won’t find it in the fish display case and may have to ask the fishmonger if he has some. One of my markets has it stacked on a pallet near a corner. How pedestrian for such a fine fish! 🙂

        Like

    • Thank you, Siobhan. I’m glad you like the post and, if you do try it, please let me know your thoughts or changes. I love to cook mackerel and welcome any new ways of preparing it.

      Like

  5. Hi John! Welcome back and Happy belated birthday!!!
    I went to see the Spanish translation of your post and it’s fine, when there was a weird expresion, I knew it was because google translator isn’t always that accurate 😉 One fun fact: it translated monger into traficante, wich in Spanish could be interpreted as trafficker or dealer, as in drugs and weapons… 😉
    Is good to have you back 🙂
    G

    Like

    • Thanks, Giovanna. I knew the translator would yield some less than accurate results but, on the whole, I think they’re helpful. If you’ve ever seen me at the fishmonger, you’d probably think that “trafficker” is a good term. I do enjoy my seafood. 🙂

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  6. Buona Sera John, Happy belated B-day. It looks like your trip to the Italian market was a good start for the new year. Your mackerel looks so fresh and delicious and such a lovely way to prepare this dish. Missed you dearly and glad your back. A little respite from blogging is a good thing. Take Care, BAM

    Like

    • Buongiorno, BAM! Thanks for the birthday wishes and warm welcome. Yes, a bit of a break in any routine is a good thing. I sure enjoyed mine. It was so nice to go to my Italian market and just shop, with little thought of whether this or that would be blog-worthy. 🙂

      Like

  7. What a lovely surprise to log on and see a post from you John! and a beautiful post at that! Hope the time away from blogging has been both productive and enjoyable for you.
    Such a wonderful way of cooking and serving the fish… love that it sits on top of the veggies, imparting even more flavour while they finish off roasting together! A beautiful recipe full of colour!

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    • Thanks, Margot, it’s good to be back. I needed a break in my routine and things could not have worked out better. I’ve made this dish before, using multi-colored new potatoes, as well. Now that is one colorful dish that makes a great presentation.

      Like

    • Thanks, Maureen, and you’re so right. I sometimes wonder if one of the people working outdoors rings a bell, signaling “There’s a live one coming!” My fishmonger always seems to appear just as I near the display case. 🙂

      Like

  8. Nice to see you back again! I’m glad you enjoyed your respite from blogging and got some things checked off your to do list. Love the colorful photos of all the veggies accompanying the fish in today’s post!

    Like

  9. Belated happy birthday! I love fish cooked like that but the addition of the olive salad is a stroke of genius. Not having a fabulous market like yours, is there a way I could prepare it myself? I’d be glad of any hints. Thanks!

    Like

    • Thaks, Colline, and you’re right. This is a very easy dish to prepare. I think you could use whole sea bass, whiting (merluzzo/hake), red snapper, or even trout. Frankly, I’d try any whole fish with it. I don’t think you can go wrong. 🙂

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  10. Oh, so glad you’re back my friend! And what a beautiful fish you’ve presented us with. That silver skin is gorgeous! Actually, it’s all gorgeous! Did you get a new camera for your birthday John! Your photos have a different look… Anyway, it’s beautiful and I’m sure quite delicious! Glad you got some stuff accomplished. Oh, and congrats on that translator. What a fantastic way to make your yumminess accessibe all around the world! Ciao! xox

    Like

    • Thank you so much, Lidia, for your gracious comments. I really do enjoy mackerel and this is one post that I couldn’t wait to “research.” I may have to revisit it just to make sure I got it right. 🙂
      I did get a new camera last Summer. Only now, though, have I had time to sit with it and experiment with the settings. I’ve still plenty to learn and your comment is just the motivation I need. Thank you for that.

      Like

    • Thanks, it’s good to be back. How I would love to see that fishing trip! I once took my nephews to a fishing “rodeo” and what a day that was! All these kids with their lines in the water and hope was in the air. Honestly, most would have been scared to death if they’d actually caught something. It was a lot of fun.

      Like

  11. Glad you are back and the kitchen is open. Joining the others to wish you a belated happy birthday. Great way to prepare mackerel, wish we could get fresh ones where I am. Lining the sheet pan makes clean up fast and easy too, love it.

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  12. Welcome back, I was looking forward to your return! Glad to hear you had a great birthday. This dish sounds delicious, a great way to celebrate the reopening of the Bartolini Kitchens.

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    • Thank you. Like you, I love roasting tomatoes with potatoes. Even this time of the year, when most of our tomatoes are shipped in and barely edible, roasting them really does improve their flavor.

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  14. So happy to have you back, John, and also glad that your birthday a great one and the celebration will go on and on! I saw the translator page earlier yesterday and was envious as I know Charles at 5 Euro Food and a few others have this feature. I thought it had been up there for a while and I’d missed it….a great idea. What an easy, beautiful and colorful fish dish today…my favorite kind. 🙂

    Like

    • Thanks, Betsy, for leaving such a nice comment — as you always do. I really do love this dish. It’s so easy to prepare and the mackerel is very flavorful. It makes a very tasty meal.
      The translator is not at all hard to install. If you like, I can help you install it. Just let me know.

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  17. *Blinks*….*Rubs her eyes*, *Rubs again*……is this true?*Refreshes wordpress dashboard*, It is true, Mr Bartolini is back, …that too with a bang! And just when I was thinking of going the seafood way. This will be soon on my table Mr Bartolini,thankyou for sharin’. Glad you came back(I’d actually given up the hope of seeing more of your amazing recipes :P)… Anyway, Welcome Back. A belated Happy Birthday. Have wonderful years ahead!! 😉

    Like

    • Thanks, Ayesha. Your comment certainly brought a smile to my face. I had a nice break and wonderful birthday. I hope you do try this dish and enjoy it as much as I do. It’s a great dish!

      Like

  18. Welcome back! Delighted you had a wonderful birthday, and eager to hear the mysterious news you have yet to reveal. 😉 Lovely recipe — so simple and tasty. My kind of food! I rarely use mackerel at home (more of a restaurant dish for me). Next time I see a good one, I know what I’m going to do with it! Really good stuff — thanks so much.

    Like

    • Thanks, John. For the longest time, the only mackerel I had was at a sushi bar. Now I can buy it fresh just about whenever I like and, believe me, I’m taking full advantage. It’s such a flavorful fish that you really don’t need to do much. THis is definitely a case of simple being best.

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  19. Oh fresh fish! Fantastic. I have begun cooking using the baking sheets now, thank you for encouraging me to do so. This meal looks perfect, just perfect. I am getting the snow shoes back out today and will shuffle around to feed the birds.. MY this winter has been jolly with snow.. wonderful to have The Kitchens open again! c

    Like

    • Thanks, Celi. It’s good to be back. Now that I’ve found a restaurant supply house that sells baking sheets relatively inexpensively, I use them all of the time. None are non-stick but cleanup-up is still easy. We’re in mid-February and still no thaw of any kind. I’m beginning to doubt that I’ll see my crocuses this Spring. As it is, I’ll be glad just to see my lawn again. 🙂

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  20. Welcome back John! We all need a little break time-to-time. And, now that you are back, you started the year with a beautifully baked fish.
    These translators are not perfect, but with a little patience from the reader, they are good enough to know what is being said. It is an cordial expression of including everyone.

    Like

    • Thanks, Fae. yes, I did need a break and this one was quite nice, though the weather could have been a bit more cooperative. I spent a lot of time pushing the snowblower. 🙂
      I realize that the translator isn’t perfect but it will be a help to some of my readers who struggle with English. If my experience is at all common, it may give them a laugh or two when a word is translated so badly that it is comical. 🙂

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  21. I didn’t know you were coming back today, lost track of time I think, that and since I keep in touch with you, doesn’t feel that long that you’ve been gone 🙂
    So, I got a chuckle out of your translator story. Sometimes I like to go to a French blog where I can understand what they’ve written and just for giggles, I use the translator in English. Oh my gosh, it’s hilarious.
    I hardly think of buying mackerel, in fact I don’t usually see it at my shops. I keep with my safety net of cod, sole and salmon 🙂
    I love how it’s prepared though, that olive salad….yum!
    It’s good to have you back cooking and writing. I read your old post on Nonna, what a lovely lady she was. Take care John, I will see you around.

    Nazneen

    Like

    • Thanks, Nazneen. It is good to be back. Our Nonna was a very special woman and we kids adored her.
      Yes, these universal translators are nice but they’re far from perfect. I have a Greek cookbook that was obviously translated by some sort of translator. In one recipe, “headlights” are listed among the ingredients. I’ve not made that recipe yet because I’ve no idea where I’d find headlights in my supermarket. 🙂

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  22. belated birthday greetings are in order, then! Hope it was a lovely day on your end. Stunning photos–what a shiny fish and those veggies are glistening for sure. And once again you’ve left me hanging with your Deja Vu. Stewed quail you say? Hmmmm…. Looks tasty.

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    • Thanks, Liz. The break was nice and my birthday was wonderful. Truly a win-win. Mackerel is a good-looking dish, isn’t it? They almost call to me from the display case and weak-willed seafood lover that I am, I cannot resist. The quail post will be published in a couple of hours. Stay tuned … 🙂

      Like

  23. Hi John,
    Glad to see you back, and with such a simple yet such exquisite recipe!
    I love all these Mediterranean flavors, and actually posted a fish dish along these lines not long ago.
    Looking forward to your next posts. 🙂
    Ronit

    Like

    • Thanks, Ronit. When a fish is so flavorful, there’s no need to complicate matters. Simple works best. I’m not familiar with your recipe but, given those recipes of yours that I have seen, I’m sure it was a well-prepared and presented dish.

      Like

  24. Welcome back my dear friend, you have been missed. I’m glad your birthday went well and that celebrations are still on join, as they should be, it’s not called birthday month for nothing! 😉
    Great that you’ve done at least some of your projects, I’ve had one on my list for two weeks now and I haven’t touched it, but it might be because it’s to do with cleaning…need I say more?
    What a delightful recipe, and I so love it when an ingredient such as the Mackerel inspires you and it is outstanding! I’ve not had Mackerel before, is it a firm white fish? Like cod or tilapia? Your roasted veg look absolutely mouth watering.
    What a coincidence, I too was trying to figure out how to add a translator to my blog, but without success, I may have to ask you about it.

    Like

    • It’s good to be back, Eva. Thank you for the warm welcome.
      Cleaning is one of those projects that I’ve yet to complete — but I have made progress and that’s the main thing. I have to get this place organized again.
      Mackerel is a very flavorful fish. It’s flesh is oily and somewhat firm. The oil content makes it a healthy choice and and it’s in no danger of bing over-fished. That and the fact that it is so flavorful are probably the reasons why it is relatively inexpensive. All the better for me!
      Adding the translator is not that difficult at all — I say having already done it. If you’d like help, just let me know. We’ll get it done in no time. 🙂

      Like

  25. Welcome back John! I am on an Olympics/other things to do blog break myself but just had to tell you I am laughing myself to bits being able to translate your posts into my native Estonian of all languages!!!! Not bad grammar either!!!!! Luvverly recipe . . . See you in March!!!!

    Like

    • Hello, teach! Just so you know: used your translator for ‘mackerel’ ~ yes I knew I had eaten it but was not aware it was ‘skumbria’ – again one of my childhood favourites and easily available in NE Europe – actually the usual way was to ‘pickle’ it: ie flour, fry and then put it into a kind’of ‘sweet/sour’ marinade for service on a smorgasbord or as a first course! . . . [oops!]

      Like

      • Once I saw that the translator could be used for Italian, I checked to see if Estonian was in the mix. I wouldn’t want you to be disappointed. 🙂 You call mackerel “skumbira” and we call it “scombro”. It’s not exactly the same thing but close enough.
        I’m watching the Olympics now and am enjoying every minute of it. I always do. Enjoy your break. I sure did. 🙂

        Like

  26. Great to have you back John & you can always finish of the projects a little later. Gosh I haven’t had mackerel in ages since we caught them ourselves off the coast of Maine. I don’t think I’ve ever seen them in the market here and I’m not sure why. It’s funny catching them since they hang out in schools. We were sitting in the dinghy most of the morning just catching sun & the next thing you know, we must have been right in the middle of the school – they were practically jumping into the boat. Ended up wrapping them in foil with vegetables and putting them on the barbeque but had so many the neighborhood cats showed up to share the feast.
    A very nice medley of flavors you’ve got in this recipe.
    Oh – happy belated birthday!

    Like

    • Thanks, Diane. How I envy you that fishing trip! What a fantastic afternoon and that night’s dinner must have been incredible! I never have had any luck, no matter where I cast my line. Thank heavens I’ve found a couple of good fishmongers or I would surely have to go without — or take you out fishing with me the next time. 🙂

      Like

  27. You’ve been missed! So glad your projects are well progressed, at least. This is an exciting addition to the lexicon – and so versatile, even when we can’t find lovely fresh mackerel. I always love to have vegetable leftovers in the fridge for snacks – these would be extra special. 🙂

    Like

    • Thank you. It’s good to be back. You’re right about the roasted vegetables. As you can see in the photos, I roasted far too many for 1 meal and they sure were tasty as leftovers — and a tasty snack around midnight. 🙂

      Like

  28. Welcome back! It must feel wonderful to have your projects at a point that you’re happy with. I’ll be looking forward to your reveal. This recipe looks wonderful, but tonight I am actually making your recipe for baked haddock with that wonderful breading.

    Like

    • Thank you so much and for the vote of confidence. I feel I must warn you, though, given you’re not a big fish lover, that mackerel has a strong flavor. You might be better off preparing sea bass or whiting like this. 🙂

      Like

  29. Welcome back to the blogosphere! It’s good to see your terrific blog again.

    Thanks for posting this recipe. I often make potatoes this way, but NEVER thought to add tomatoes or olives…or fish. What a great idea!

    Like

    • Thanks, Ruth. I find that I’m roasting more and more veggies this way — and like them all. You may want to try roasting cherry tomatoes with a couple cloves of garlic and then using them to dress pasta. You can either use them as is or give them a whirl in a food processor. It’s quick, easy, and very good!

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  30. This is just what I am looking for. Fish and vegetables. How did you know? I have never made mackerel and this will be a nice change. I am always upping the ante on vegetables and increasing the number of fish dinners that go to the table. Love simplicity. Glad you had a lovely birthday!

    Like

    • Thank you so much, Claudia. Like you, I’m preparing more fish these days — and enjoying them all. Now, in the dead of winter, there aren’t many fresh vegetables available. I find that roasting those that I do buy increases their flavor. When put together with a fish as flavorful as mackerel, a reat tasting dinner results and with very little effort. I hope that if you do try this dish, that you like it as much as we do.

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  31. Welcome back, John. You’ve been missed. I love the image of your tray-roasted vegetables – so much colour. I’m super-impressed you’ve worked out how to translate your blog – I just hope everyone who comes to mine speaks English! xx

    Like

    • Thanks, Charlie. I’m glad to be back. This dish is so easy to make and you needn’t worry if mackerel isn’t available. I think sea bass or whiting would work, too. It’s really not that difficult to install the translator and I can give you hand if you’re interested. Just let me know. 🙂

      Like

  32. Holy mackerel, that is one good looking fish. Seriously though nothing but roasted goodness for me to enjoy here and obviously a dish that leads to nothing but happy faces.

    Welcome back and belated Happy Birthday too!

    btw i’m going to have to check out the German translate button for ya. 😉

    Like

    • Hey, Jed. Good to see you around again. I’m sure you’d love this fish and it’s very easy to prepare. Open a bottle of wine, stick the fish in the oven, make a salad, and enjoy. It really can’t get much easier. As for the translator, a few have mentioned that it’s not perfect but, then again, what is? 🙂

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  33. Welcome back, John! Happy belated birthday and congratulations on your blog’s translating capabilities; oh, my, you have quite the international following. 🙂 This recipe looks delicious. Whole fish, roasted vegetables, fresh herbs and olives are some of my favorite things (and, like you, I would not have passed up the marinated olives!). Stay warm up North – and happy cooking. Best, Shanna

    Like

    • Thanks, Shanna, for the nice welcome. It’s good to be back after what was a great break and birthday. This is a great dish and so easy to prepare. It’s a definite favorite of mine. I could do with a little less snow and a few more degrees in the temperature but, then again, it is Winter. I’ll just appreciate Spring all the more — if it ever gets here. 🙂

      Like

    • Thanks! I had a great birthday and enjoyed my time off. It was nice to sit down to a nice meal without taking a dozen photos first. I had read that there were a number of types of mackerels swimming about. I’d love it if my fishmonger had a few of them for us to sample.

      Like

  34. What a good looking fish! Lovely to have you back, Wednesdays are not the same unless I have an email of your new post. I have been behind in my reading of late so forgive me for commenting late. I do have news to relay to you and that is finally, finally I have managed to get hold of some beautiful from Italy Burrata cheese and it was worth the weight. Had I not read your earlier post I might have passed it by, and as much as I tried to get the credit for sourcing it and it being my idea, it was already guessed that the tip off came from you!!

    Like

    • Thanks, Maria, for such a nice welcoming. I am so glad that you found and tried burrata. Isn’t it something? It seems to be “catching on” in popularity because I’m seeing it in more stores and on more menus. Good! Now we can have some whenever we want. 😉

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  36. Welcome back John! WE missed you! Glad you had a wonderful birthday and some well deserved time off. You certainly now how to come back with a bang. What a delicious looking dish! I haven’t seen a mackerel in a long time. What a beautiful fish!

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    • Thank you so much, MJ. I had a great time and am glad to be back. Mackerel is fairly easy to find here and I’m very happy about that. Though some may say it’s too fishy, I don’t feel that way at all. If anything, that’s what I like about it. It can certainly stand up to the roasted veggies and the olive salad.

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  37. The mackerel looks like it is made of the best silver and the vegetables are like jewels – who could resist such riches? Not me. I commented to the G.O. during the week that much of what we eat is simply baked – that case in point being pumpkin, pink & white striped beetroot, onion (red & white) salad – all baked, drizzled with oil & balsamic served with rocket and crumbled goats cheese. It is such an easy, colourful, healthy way to prepare food, authentic and with respect & honour.
    And here you go and post a meal that explifies that perfectly 🙂

    Like

    • Thanks, EllaDee. Given your recent posts, I thought that you might find this post appealing. You cannot get much simpler than this preparation and it has such a great mix of flavors. And it’s ready in minutes! It’s a real winner for me.

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  38. Afternoon John, and lovely to hear you had a great break and birthday! Yes we’ve missed you!
    And considering how plentiful Mackerel are around here (and cheap) why have I never thought to roast one with veggies like you have? Time to move here John, open a kitchen and start teaching me how to use and cook my locally caught fish!!

    Like

    • Good morning, Claire. I enjoyed the break and am glad to be back. Mackerel is cheap here, too, and I’ve no problem finding it. Best of all, isn’t it great to have a fish that is in no danger of being over-fished and at a price that we all can afford? It’s such a rarity these days.

      Like

  39. The tomatoes, rosemary and thyme sound so wonderful and I love that they are the fresh herbs John. Honestly, I think rosemary would work on almost anything! I really love it in soups and in beans…it is just divine. I find it crazy that so many people don’t even like rosemary!

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    • Thanks, Brandi. We share a common love for rosemary. I use it on everything I can and really like how it scents my kitchen when I’m cooking with it. Not like rosemary? That’s one less person to invite to dinner. 🙂

      Like

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  41. What a way to be back with a bang! This dish did just that; healthy and colorful. Welcome back, John. Funny, I just got done making salsa using brown, orange, and red cherry tomatoes and here I see them. 🙂 By the way, belated happy birthday. Enjoy the rest of your weekend.

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  42. Welcome back, CJ. That fish-eye look is making me a bit nervous, especially next to those sharp little teeth, but if you guarantee it won’t come to life… I really thought this was going to be a rather bland dish until you added the olive salad and the colors popped up and my saliva started flowing. Sounds scrumptious.

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    • Hello, Kathleen, and thank you. Yes, mackerel can look a tad threatening but, thankfully, I didn’t use a large fish so the fear factor is kept to a minimum. 🙂 You’re right, though, that this is a flavorful dish. Mackerel is quite tasty and the herbs and olive salad really take this dish to another level. I hope you try it some time.

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  43. Hooray, he’s back! We missed you, John, hope it was a great January! It flew past here, and now we’re already midway through February! Your mackerel looks incredibly fresh, and what a beautiful and colourful dish you’ve created with it! Hope the weather hasn’t been too cold, and you’ve managed to catch up a bit on things, and that your birthday was grand! xxx

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    • Aw, gee thanks, Celia. It’s great to be back and thanks for the warm welcome. January really did fly by. I spent a bit too much time behind the snowblower, for my tastes, but what can be done? This is a winter for the record books. I have been baking a lot of bread, thank you very much. Priscilla’s kids sure are hard workers! 🙂

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  44. Welcome back and Happy (belated) Birthday! Great recipe!–I love the simplicity of it. Dinner for four coming up. I just wanted to be sure I follow it correctly. When you say to remove the potatoes from the oven and stir, then add the olive salad and tomatoes to the pan–you simply mean to stir the potatoes around on the tray, right? You don’t mean remove them from the oven and set aside, do you? I’m assuming they’re only half-cooked after the first 20 minutes. Thanks.
    Ken

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    • Thank you, Ken, for the well wishes and encouraging comment. You’re right about the spuds. Give them a good shake or stir so that they won’t be glued to the baking sheet by the time the fish is cooked. I’ve been there and thank the gods the fish was so pretty that no one noticed the mangled potatoes — or were too kind to mention them. 🙂

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  45. Welcome back John! I hope you had a fabulous birthday and a wonderful time “away.” You’ve come back with a bang too – that whole fish that always gets me. I just have to get over the fear! It looks too delicious to not at least try at some point. I’m sorry your basket did not win at our chopped this year. The four of us voted for you. The kids were especially pulling for your basket. They thought your ingredients were fabulous! Perhaps we’ll take them on anyway, just because. 😉

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    • Thanks, Kristy. I did have a great birthday and enjoyed my time off. You are so brave in the kitchen, trying foods from all over the world, that I’m surprised you’d let a little fishy get the best of you. 🙂 You can always have the fishmonger remove the head for you. Love that you all voted for my choices but it’s not like the winning baskets left something to be desired. Each was a true challenge and your two teams did very well. I love your yearly challenge and it’s fascinating to go back and see how much the Sous Chefs have grown. Frankly, I think you’re feeding them too much and they’re growing too fast, as a result. A little less food and a lot more coffee should put an end to this growth business. 🙂

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  46. Hi, John! So glad you had a good birthday break, and may it lead to many, many further fabulous b’days! That mackerel was one handsome fish. No doubt a spectacularly delish fish, when it’s that fresh and good looking. Yay!

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    • Thanks, Kathryn. It was a great birthday and the time away just flew by. I did enjoy myself, even if we did have a bit too much cold and snow. What a winter! I’m glad you enjoyed today’s post and you’re right. Fresh fish is the best!

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  47. Happy Birthday again and I can’t wait to see the projects in completion! This would be an impressive birthday dinner for guests! What a beautifully shaped fish to bake whole like that and with this recipe, there’s time to have more than one glass of wine while it’s simmering in the oven:) Nice to have you back!! xx

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  48. Pingback: THE VERY INSPIRING BLOGGER AWARD | Words We Women Write

  49. I’ve made Jamie Oliver’s fettucini dish with spring vegetables and smoked mackerel as the kicker. I’ve never cooked it fresh. I will most definitely have to try your recipe, John.

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  50. Pingback: Roasted Mackerel (Sgombro al Forno) | Stefan's Gourmet Blog

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