See Quince? Make Jam First Then Jelly

OK. I’ll admit it. I didn’t know a thing about quince. I certainly didn’t hear about them while growing up, let alone see any of them. When I finally did see one, not all that long ago, I thought it to be a very odd-looking apple — and expensive, at that.

Things began to change, however, once I started blogging. Every Fall, quince jelly recipes began to circulate. Then, last August, my friend Celia posted her recipe for making quince jelly on her wonderful blog Fig Jam And Lime Cordial. (If you’re not familiar with her posts, this is your chance. Celia’s blog is one that has a little something for everyone and all of it good.) At the time, I told her that I wanted to make some and would let her know when I did. So, “Hey, Celia! I made quince jam & jelly!”

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Quince 1

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Once I purchased the quince, I searched for a recipe. Since quince has a high level of pectin within it, I decided to go without adding any more. This, unfortunately, ruled out Celia’s recipe. (Sorry, Celia.) I soon learned that the web is full of quince recipes, all pretty much the same. Quince, sugar, lemon juice, and water combine to eventually produce jelly. Well, I like jelly but I prefer jam. Looking a little further, I came upon a recipe that suited my needs. I settled on a Greek recipe for quince jam called Marmalatha Kythoni. Unlike all others, this one had 2 things going for it.

In the first place, the recipe gave a ratio of quince to sugar (2:1). This is so much more convenient than stating that 1 quart of quince is required. Just how many quince does it take to make a quart? With this ratio, you just buy the quince, peel, core, chop, and then weigh them. Whatever the weight, you’ll need half that amount in sugar. (You’ll note that in the recipe, I stated the quince amount in ounces (grams) to make the math easier.)

Secondly, water used to boil the quince in this recipe may be used to make quince jelly. Granted, you won’t be making a lot but you will get a little over a cup for your efforts. The same ratio (2:1) applies when making jelly, too. The difference being in this case, you use measures and not weight. So, I had 4 cups of quince liquid and used 2 cups of sugar to make a pint of jelly. It could not be easier.

The amount of lemon juice to be used is up to you. I like things a little tart, so, I added both lemon juice and zest when making the jam. For the jelly, I used lemon juice only. It’s my “control” and I’ll taste the jelly to determine whether I overdid the lemon when making the jam.

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Quince Jam 3

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Quince Jam Recipe

Ingredients

  • 52 oz (1474 g) quince, peeled, cored, and chopped (see Notes)
  • 26 oz (737 g) sugar
  • 1.25 cups (300 ml) water, divided
  • zest of 1 lemon
  • juice of 1/2 lemon

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Quince Jam 2

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Directions

  1. Place chopped quince in a large pot with a lid and add enough water to cover (see Notes). Place the lid on the pot and bring to a hard boil over high heat. Reduce to medium heat and continue to simmer for 30 minutes. Keep covered, shut off the heat, and let sit for another 30 minutes.
  2. Strain, reserving the liquid for the Quince Jelly Recipe, and place the chunks in a food processor, along with 1/4 cup (60 ml) of water.  Process until the quince is the consistency you prefer.
  3. Place the now-processed quince in a thick bottomed sauce pan along with the sugar, lemon juice, and lemon zest. Bring to a boil over med-high heat before reducing to medium and simmer, stirring almost constantly to prevent scorching.
  4. Continue to simmer and stir until the jam is the consistency you prefer, from 30 to 60 minutes, maybe longer.
  5. Place jam in still hot, sterilized jars, place lids and seal — though not quite as tight as you can.
  6. Place jars on a rack in a boiling water bath deep enough so that there’s at least 1 inch of water over the top of the tallest jar. When the boil returns, process for 10 minutes.
  7. Remove jars from the pot and place on a baking sheet or counter, out of drafts. Be sure to cover the surface with a cloth to prevent the hot jars from shattering when they touch a cold surface. Do not move for at least 12 hours, though 24 is best, to give the jars a chance to seal and the jam to fully set.
  8. Preserved quince jam will keep for one year, though some degradation of taste and color may begin to occur after 6 months.  Best to enjoy your jam before that. (Source: Pick Your Own)

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Quince Jelly 3

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Quince Jelly Recipe

Ingredients

  • 4 cups (1000 ml) quince water reserved when making quince jam, recipe above.
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice

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Quince Jelly 1

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Directions

  1. Place the reserved liquid, sugar, and lemon juice in a medium saucepan over high heat.
  2. Stir constantly until the liquid reduces by about 2/3, developing a syrupy consistency. (it took mine about 40 minutes.)
  3. Use a large spoon to quickly remove any foam before filling the still-hot, sterile jars to 1/4 inch from the top. Follow canning instructions listed in the Quince Jam Recipe above, processing this jelly for 5 minutes in the hot water bath.
  4. Store jelly on a cool, dark shelf.

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Quince & Queso Manchego

Crostini with Quince Jam & Queso Manchego

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Notes

It took 8 quince that, after peeling, coring, and chopping, rendered the 26 oz used in the Jam recipe.

It is best to use ripe quince for this recipe. To check for ripeness, sniff either end of the fruit. Ripe quince will have a floral scent.

When cut, quince will brown. To prevent this, place the pieces in a large bowl of water. When ready to start cooking the quince, I used this water to cover the pieces in the pot, as indicated in step 1 of the Jam recipe.

If you plan to make jelly using the cooking liquid, you will need to strain it through a few layers of cheesecloth or, if none is available, muslin or coffee filters will work, too.

As you can see in the pictures, my jam is lighter than most. Granted, it darkened a bit as it cooked but never reached the deep color that I associate with quince jam. I was a bit concerned until I compared mine to the photos accompanying the original recipe. In that light, mine is quite similar to the original. Whew! My guess is that this jam recipe doesn’t cook the quince as long as the others, and that deep pink color needs a long cooking time to develop. As it was, my jam was thick enough that I had no choice but to pull it off the heat.

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It’s déjà vu all over again …

Baccalà

With Christmas approaching fast, for the next few weeks I’ll devote this section to some of our favorite holiday recipes. To kick things off, I thought we’d take a look back to our traditional Christmas Eve dish, Baccalà alla Marchigianna. In this preparation baccalà, once rinsed and rehydrated, is cooked in a tomato sauce with potatoes. Serve it with a chunk of bread and you’ll forget all about Santa’s coming in a few hours — well, at least until you’ve cleaned your plate. You can learn how to make this flavorful dish just by clicking  HERE

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Coming soon to a monitor near you …

Uova da Raviolo - Preview

Uova da Raviolo

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190 thoughts on “See Quince? Make Jam First Then Jelly

  1. John, this looks like the perfect gift-in-a-jar for Christmas! I love quince jelly, especially when coupled with a lovely stinky blue cheese. Heaven! I can imagine how good it would be with manchego too – excellent suggestion. I’ve never made quince jelly myself, having access to a lovely local version made by the amazing Maggie Beer; but I absolutely plan to rectify that now. Love your addition of a whole lemon’s worth of zest!

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    • Thank’s Saskia. I’m way ahead of you on the gift concept. 😉
      I had never seen quince anything except on a number of blogs. Now that I’ve made some jam & jelly, I’ve seen them both in a couple of markets. It never fails! I over-did the lemon in a batch of strawberry jam a few years ago and everyone loved it. I now add it to many of the jams I make. Love that tart edge it gives things, especially when they are as sweet as jam.

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  2. John, thank you for much for your kind words and linky, I LOVE that you made quince jelly and jam (and am not the least bit concerned that you didn’t use our recipe :)). The last batch of quince paste I made was quite pale too, not sure why, but our jellies are usually dark red. I *think* quite a lot of the colour is dependent upon the variety of quinces you use. And can I just say, your quince jelly is clear as crystal and looks like a shining jewel… x

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    • Thank you so much, Celia. You do have a great blog and I’m more than happy to share it with as many as I can. Thank you, too, for the encouragement. I was pretty discouraged when I saw the jam’s final color. Seeing the color of the original recipe’s jam put me at ease. I’ve not tasted the jelly yet — there’s not much of it. I do like the jam, though. It’s nice and chunky, just the way I like it. 🙂

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  3. Mmmmh … I love your recipes, John – and Quitte/Quince Jelly too. 🙂 Your presentation is once more outstanding and most inspiring, thanks a lot!
    Big hug
    Dina

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  4. My Italian mother- and sisters in law make “marmellata di melo cotogne”, which is quince jam… It is considered very traditional, and it is wonderfully tasty. I use it in cakes (especially crostata) and as spread on biscuits and bread. In Spain they use a very dense sort of jam/jelly called “membrillo” with cheese. Again, it is sooo tasty. I think quince is an overlooked fruit, and I am really happy you write about it!

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  5. The quince jelly looks amazing. I smiled at the first part of your post where you note that quinces are pricey! I couldn’t agree with you more. That’s why I yearn to find a friend who has a tree in their garden with no use for the fruit. Each year I usually only have enough for one recipe your post fits the bill perfectly.

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    • Thank you, Maria. I’ve never heard of anyone around here growing quince. I had better do some investigative work. A number of people have given me ideas for using quince and I”d like to give them a try. First, though, I’ll start at the market and see if they still have quince. That would be so much quicker than waiting for next Summer. 🙂

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  6. I’m looking forward to your Christmas recipes. I was very fortunate to be given a jar of Celia’s quince jelly. We’ve only just finished it. It was absolutely terrific with roast meats. I served it very often with roast lamb. I will remember your quantities and ratios – 2:1 is very easy to remember xx

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    • Thanks, Charlie, for the compliment and tips for serving this jam and jelly. I’ve really no experience with it, though it really is tasty with that Manchego cheese. You wouldn’t believe how many recipes I looked at before I came across this one using ratios. It made the whole process so much easier.

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  7. Beautiful!! I love the fragrance of quince. When they are in season, I slowly roast them in heavy syrup until they are deep crimson, then eat them with yoghurt for breakfast. I buy commercial quince paste from a good source to serve with cheese, it’s such a labour intensive preserve, I only ever made it once!

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    • Thanks. I was unprepared for the strength of the aroma. I bought them 2 days before I used them and my kitchen smelled like I had a bouquet on the table. Very nice. There are quite a few who are offering suggestions for cooking and serving quince I’d really no idea and this is great. Thank you for contributing. You won’t find this recipe to be as labor intensive as most but, then again, the jam doesn’t have that deep pink color, either. For me, it’s the taste that matters and I’m quite satisfied.

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  8. Great furry quinces and that gorgeous jelly were always on Ma’s preserving list when I was a kid. At the start, I think because it was an old fashioned fruit the farmers had trouble selling but later, of course because we all loved it so. Your jelly looks like crystal – just beautiful. I’m off to look at the Bartolini’s Christmas baccala a recipe … 🙂

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    • Hello, Meredith. We had no such traditions with quince when I was a boy. With these recipes, I’m taking the Bartolini Clan into unchartered waters. It’s been a voyage of discovery, all right, because I do enjoy both very much. I hope you’ll enjoy the sausage recipe. 🙂

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  9. Occasionally I see quince in the market and promised myself to learn more about them but never got around to doing so, one of these days. Yes they are pricey. Clever how you got both jam and jelly from the same batch of fruit.

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    • For a long time, like you, Norma, I saw quince but didn’t know what to do with them. Celia’s post last August convinced me to give them a try — and I’m very glad that I did. Others, too, have been so kind, offering other ways to cook quince. If you’ve the time, read some of them for some suggestions other than jam and jelly. I know I’ll be buying more quince in the future.

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    • Quince is still available in some markets here, unbelievably. Jam making is really quite simple, Ayesha. If you do not wish to can it, you can always place the cooled jars of jam and jelly into your freezer. They will keep there for a year. Just remember that, once you defrost them, you must eat them within about 2 weeks. Still, it the jam is good, it will be gone long before that. Good luck. 🙂

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  10. Well I can hardly profess to be either a foodie or a wannabe chef, but your Recipe seems doable and worth a try. In my part of the world, I am not sure where I can get Quince though.

    Cheers

    Shakti

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    • Thank you. Yes, this recipe is easy but you do need quince. The blogging World is a wonderful thing. We can learn so much about each other’s cuisine. Unfortunately, we cannot always get the ingredients to make the dishes. 🙂
      Have a wonderful week!

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    • Thanks, Lisa. Sorry your first attempt went bad. I’ve done the same and, aside from the wasted fruit/berries, it’s pretty discouraging. I hope you’ll find this recipe to be easy to follow and with good results. Please let me know if I can improve it. Good luck! 🙂

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    • I saw quince just last week, Angie. Now, seeing the wonderful suggestions people have left for preparing and serving quince, I’m going looking for more. You’re so right about the scent. I’d read about it but didn’t realize it was so strong. Very nice, actually. The uova da raviolo recipe will be here before you know it. 🙂

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  11. Totally agree on the evaluation of Celia’s blog! I learn so much from her, but I must say I learn a lot from you too!

    I don’t think I’ll ever venture into the jam and jelly road, but if I ever do, you will be my virtual master!

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    • Thank, Sally, that was such a nice thing to say.
      I held back from making jam because of the canning. Now, though, I don’t always can what I make. I just wait for the jars to cool and put them all in the freezer. The jam will keep for a year in there. It’s so much easier than breaking out the canning kettle and other supplies. C’mon, Sally. Give it a try! You’ll like it. 🙂

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      • Interesting… I am not at all willing to go through the canning process. You see, for me working with an autoclave almost daily in the lab, it would be much easier to simply sterilize my jars in the lab and take them home, so the idea of painfully “sterilizing” them with the large pans,, and the tongues and all that… leaves me tired just thinking about it… I like the idea of sticking it all in the freezer instead, but then you have to consume it quickly once you open it, right?

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        • According to the National Center for Home Food Preservation, jams will keep one year in the freezer and, once defrosted, should be used within 3 weeks. I use small jars for freezer jam and it’s sure to b use up by then. Sometimes, a jar will go through the canning process and not seal properly. Once cooled, I just stick them in the freezer, too. I’ve got quite an assortment of jams, jellies, and even apple sauce in my freezer, Sally. It’s a great way to take advantage of fresh fruit and berries without the hassle of canning kettles. I hope this helps. 🙂

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  12. Do you know, a quince is something I’ve never seen nor tasted yet? I’m fascinated by your recipe and this pretty fruit. Does it have an apple texture? But then if it’s boiled first that wouldn’t make sense? I’m glad yours turned out sparkly bright, that would be such a pretty jam to smear over a scone on Christmas morning! xx

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    • I was new to quince, too, Barb. Quince looks like an oddly shaped, bright golden delicious apple. It’s more firm than an apple with a similar core. In fact, I broke my melon baller on one of the cores. When ripe, their scent is wonderful, like roses, and will perfume your kitchen. They are really bitter when raw and have a mild flavor when cooked, sort of a cross between an apple and a pear. There are quite a few ways to cook with quince. A number of commenters have stated how they cook with them. Looks like I’ve a lot to learn. 🙂

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  13. I was just thinking how popular quince jelly is with cheese in Spain and you already got that in there! From a little Googling I also see that hard set jelly (membrillo) is a very popular dish in Italy (cotognata) as well as Spain 😉
    I’d love to cook that baccalà dish on Christmas eve – I’ll have to look at the price of salt cod in Portobello Road on Friday…

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  14. Gorgeous – I do miss making my huge annual batch of quince paste to eat with cheese over the coming months. Where we are in Spain we get given kilos of them (lucky us)! Yours looks gorgeous and that jelyl i so clear and beautiful….impressively imressive! Big Man i off to Spain next week for 10 days and one of the first things I wrote on his list of things to bring back was quince paste for Christmas! Here’s how we do it in our village
    http://chicaandaluza.com/2011/11/14/dulce-de-membrillo-quince-jelly/
    And now you’ve got me thinking about Christmas Eve dinner…. 🙂

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    • Thank you so much, Tanya, for the compliments and link to your membrillo recipe. I’ve already pinned it for next year. I cannot imagine buying quince by the kilo here. I buy them individually. We just don’t have many who grow them, I imagine. I thought of you, though, when I served the jam with the Queso Manchego. That was very tasty and I couldn’t wait to get the photo taken so that I could eat it all. Very good!
      Safe travels to Big Man and I hope he brings you the membrillo. 🙂

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  15. ‘See quince’- took me too long to get that… Need more coffee. I’ve never actually tried quince jam/jelly, but this post has made me think that might be an oversight. Can’t wait for the holiday goodness!

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    • Finally, someone noticed. I was beginning to think I’d made a mistake. 🙂
      This was my first experience working with quince and not only do I like the jam & jelly but commenters have been leaving great suggestions for cooking/roasting the fruit. I’ll be re-visiting quince, without a doubt.

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    • Thank you. This was my first time preparing quince and the scent was stronger than I thought it would be, How nice it was! I hope to make cotognata next year. From what I’ve been told, it’s delicious.

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  16. I cannot wait to make this. I’ve been wanting to make Spanish membrillo for a long time. Your jelly turned out gorgeous. I just need to find the quinces. I’ve seen them on and off in the market. Yum!

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    • Thanks, Amanda. The last I saw of them was the days preceding Thanksgiving. I’ve not been back to those markets since and don’t know if quince is still available. I hope so because this jam & jelly would make great Christmas gifts. Good luck with the hunt! 🙂

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  17. Wornderful, nice pictures! I love quinces and I prepare jelly, pastries (as well as dulce de membrillo) and much more.
    There are delicious meat recipes with quinces. I love them with lamb and with chicken.
    I learned that there are different kind of them. Mine cook fast and can used them to prepare pies.

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    • Thank you for the compliments and for today’s lesson. You’ve taught me so much in this one comment. I’d no idea that they could be used to make pies or to serve them with lamb. I need to look for more recipes. 🙂

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  18. Oh John, this takes me back. My maternal grandmother, “Mamaw”, was a fine self taught cook and she made the most lovely, delicate quince jelly. I had forgotten about that until just now. And now looking at the simplicity of your recipe, it really makes me want to find some quince and make some! I love the looks of the jam, too, especially when paired with the manchego. Thanks for the recipes and for the warm memories. Am pinning to try asap!

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    • Thanks, Betsy, for sharing your memories. I’m so glad this post helped to bring them to mind. I’m new to quince but did like this jam and jelly. The pairing with Manchego cheese was very good. I could hardly wait to take the pictures. Now, though, so many have left ways to prepare quince that I, too, am on the lookout for more. There’s more to quince than jam, apparently. Who knew? 🙂

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  19. Hi, John! I am glad that you have discovered quince through your blogging food adventures. I have only had quince in the form of jam/membrillo (also with aged manchego on baguette!). I will have to try the fruit on its own and expand my culinary horizons. Maybe get a punch and try these two recipes. I am intimidated by canning – I should overcome this fear! 🙂 You give great instructions, so it seems doable. And, of course, delicious. The light hue you mention is very enticing. Thank you for sharing with all of us. Warmly, Shanna

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    • Hello, Shanna! I’ve been surprised that there are so many ways to cook with quince. Mor than a fw have left suggestions for cooking/roasting them. Canning can be intimidating and I only started a couple of years ago. The good thing about making jam is that it can be frozen instead of canned. It will keep a year in the freezer and you can use canning jars in the freezer. It could not be easier and there are some very good “quick” or “refrigerator” jam recipes out there. C’mon, Shanna. Give one a try! 🙂
      I hope you’re having a great week.

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      • Hi, John,
        Thank you for your warm response. I have often made quick jams and have frozen them… taking care not to fill the glass mason jars too high. I will take on the canning challenge, once I find a friend who wants to can with me. It sounds like something that must be done with a pal. 🙂 A fun afternoon!
        I shall keep you posted. Thank you for the encouragement. And, yes, cooking/roasting sounds like a great flavor maker.
        Take good care!
        Best,
        Shanna

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  20. Quince is one of those things I don’t do much with. And if I did, it’d probably be a jam or jelly (once I get around to making jams and jellies, that is!). And I much prefer jam to jelly. So glad you’re using weights and ratios – I wish the US would move more to using weight measurements rather than volume. It’s much more convenient, and makes the math so much easier. Anyway, good stuff. Trade you some cookies for some jam? 😉

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    • Thanks, Joh. This is my first foray into quince territory and I like the results. I’ve been surprised by all of the suggestions for quince uses. I really had no idea and cannot wait to give them a try. I am in total agreement with you about using weights in the kitchen. It’s not just easier but so much more precise. As poor a baker as I am, the last thing I need worry about is whether I’ve measured the correct amount of an ingredient.
      I’ll definitely make that trade. It’s pre-Christmas and this place is filling up with soon-to-be gifts of filled jars. 🙂

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    • Quince is a funny fruit. It’s really bitter when ripe but, once cooked, it tastes like a cross between apple and pear. Others have said they roast them with meats and some use them in baked goods, like pie. I need to experiment more. 🙂

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    • Thanks, Stefano. If you’ve time, read some of the others’ comments. Quince can be roasted alone or with meats — like fowl, pork, or lamb. Someone uses it in pies, too. i really had no idea but now I’ve plenty of ideas to try. All I need is some quince. 🙂

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  21. I was asking Celia about quince too. I’d never heard of it until I saw that on her blog & it just sounds so good. My husband also prefers jams to jelly but it’s been quite some time since I’ve done either (probably that last 14 lb box of blackberries that went bad during a hurricane when we lost our power for a week).

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    • I remember that tale of fruit flies. I’d think twice about making jam, too.
      I do like quince jam and jelly but the biggest surprise has been in the Comments here. Quite a few have mentioned other ways for preparing quince. I’d no idea but now I’ve got plenty to google. 🙂

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  22. I love this recipe! I don’t think I’ve ever had quince, but because I never met a piece of fruit that I didn’t really enjoy, I’m positive I’d love this. And I tend to think in terms of doing something a little different if I’m going to go the distance! The jam must taste really good, but I love the look of the jelly. It’s really quite beautiful in color and clarity. I will need to really pay attention to the markets/farmer’s markets for quince, as I’m really not at all familiar. And the pairing of jam with the manchego and crostini is just the perfect appetizer. Now off to meet Celia. She gets mentioned often enough that I think it’s time to pay her a visit! 🙂

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    • You will love quince, Debra. Just don’t taste it raw. It is not at all palatable. Once cooked, though, it will remind you of a cross between as apple and pear. It’s very nice, as is the jam and jelly. During Thanksgiving week, I saw quince at the Greek market but have no idea it they still have them. It may be worth my checking again. A number of commenters have offered suggestions for preparing quince and I’d really like to try a couple. I’m glad you paid Celia a visit. She and her blog are truly special.

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  23. In my last post on currant scones I talked about homemade jam and here you are posting a timely recipe. The recipe is so simple and straightforward, so I’ve been challenged to make one too! I’ve never had quince jam, but I think it can be good for freshly baked scones too. Thanks John for sharing this timely recipe. Hope your renovation went on as planned. Hugs to Max.

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    • Thanks, Liz. Most of the jam/jelly recipes I’ve used are pretty straight forward. I’m not one for overly complicated recipes. This one for quince is rally nice because I got both jam & jelly out of the same batch of quince. That’s a first for me.
      The renovation is compete and everything passed inspections. I’m glad, too. With a terrible cold wave moving through here, those workers would have had a tough time of it. Most importantly, Max is very happy to have his yard to patrol again. Peace reigns once again! 🙂

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  24. I’m thinking great little holiday gifts!! Since I don’t can (or feel I just can’t!) being on the receiving end of those who do makes me a lucky, happy girl!! I love the appetizer of the jam and cheese – it reminds me of guava and gouda. As always, I’m so impressed with your cooking, patience and research that you just know every recipe you post will turn out just right.

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    • Thanks, Linda. You can make a “quick” or “refrigerator” jam that doesn’t need canning or preserving. Make the jam as you would normally and place it in sterile jars. Place a lid on each jar and, once cooled, place them into the freezer. They’ll keep for a year when frozen. Do keep in mind that they’re not preserved, however, and once thawed, they must be kept refrigerated and should be eaten within 2 weeks. I’ve quite a few jars in my freezer right now. Yes, some might be gifts but I can’t say for sure. 😉

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    • Talk about an education, Conor, the commenters have taught me a few things. Quince can be roasted, alone or with meats, and used in baked goods. I’ve never hear of any of this, let alone a quince pie. Roasting them with pork, lamb, and fowl were all mentioned. Now it makes more sense. I thought it odd so much attention being paid to the fruit just for the sake of jam or jelly — not that both aren’t good. Now I need to find more quince and try roasting them. 🙂

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  25. – Absolutely marvelous post on Quince jam & jelly. 😛 I need to study it, definitely.
    – Quince and Persians have a very long and affectionate history. 😀 Call it ‘beh’, jam being the main use of it and Persians make great oness at that.(Persians don’t make jellys, really). It is also used in stews and sweets. With regret, I have not learned to use this aromatic fruit in any of those categories. Azita of Figs & Quince has some recipes posted. Now you have encouraged me to learn and apply. 😀

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    • Thanks, Faye. I wish I knew more about the fruit. People here have been very helpful, leaving suggestions for preparing the fruit. I’m new to Azita’s blog and like what I’ve seen. I need to go back again and search for her quince recipes. Roast lamb or pork with quince sounds like a great Winter-time dish, doesn’t it? 🙂

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  26. I’ll be honest. I’m not sure I’ve ever had a quince, but the photo of the quince jam with cheese makes me want one. My son had planned on bringing some back from CA but was too rushed to remember. They are hard to find, but when I do, i will surely buy one now! Like the snow!

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    • Thanks, Abbe. I know that I never had tasted quince before making this jam and jelly. Since, in these comments, I’ve learned a number of different ways to prepare them. I’ve also learned that although they were never as popular as, say, apples, they were more plentiful here than currently. Some sort of disease has attacked the trees and many of ours have died as a result. Many of those quince in our shops are imported from South America. Locally, their season is from October through December so you still may be able to find some. I hope I can. I want to try some of these other ways to prepare them that people have suggested. I hope you find them, too. 🙂

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    • Thanks, Stefan. Jam and jelly are just the tip of the ice berg, apparently. Judging byt the comments, there are quite a few more methods of preparation. I’m looking forward to trying some of them.

      Like

  27. Looking forward to those ravioli! Your jam looks beautiful John. You are so brave in the kitchen -jams, cheeses, whole fish! 😉 I especially love the thought of this jam on crostini with cheese. That would be a great appetizer; although I no doubt could easily make it a meal too! Yum! I think we cooked with quinces once before. I’ll have to look back at my recipes. Regardless we should work with them again; although I doubt I’ll be brave enough for jam!

    Like

    • Thanks, Kristy, but brave? Hardly. I’ve seen enough quince jellies to know I wanted to try some. And anything that comes with Celia’s recommendation is worth a try. Now, though, I want to get more quince and try some of the suggestions people have left in these comments. I had no idea that quince was so versatile and I aim to find out.
      The ravioli are in the works. I just need to write the post. 🙂

      Like

  28. This looks quite tasty. I’m with you, I prefer jam over jelly. My kids eat peanut butter and jam, my husband gets frustrated when he can’t find any jelly in the house! And I noticed the Manchego you served with it, one of my favorite cheeses! Thanks for sharing and looking forward to Christmas recipes.

    Like

    • Thank you so much. I don’t dislike jelly but I do prefer jam because of the texture. I really like it when I see a large bit of strawberry or cherry or, in this case, quince atop my toast or cheese. If you follow this recipe, you can make your jam and some jelly for your DH, too. How’s that for convenience? 🙂

      Like

  29. First: your jelly looks perfect and very appetizing! Second: Mhh? Even tho’ that is a sacrilege in Oz, don’t necessarily reach for quinces and leave jam and jelly making to others!!!! Well, perhaps not – do want to try yours 🙂 ! Looking forwards to your Yule recipes and have been a convert to visiting Celia for a long time, as you would well know 🙂 ! Hmm: the knowledge you get from others ~ have always been a Maggie Beer gal too . . . .but hug and thanks . . .

    Like

    • Thanks, Eha. This was more of an experiment than anything else. Having read about quince jelly and reading Celia’s post, I wanted to check it out for myself. Now, reading all of the suggestion in these comments, I want to get more of the fruit and try a few other methods of cooking with them. Meats roasted with quince sound delicious, as do the pastries. I hope you’re having a great weekend!

      Like

  30. I’m so impressed with both your jam and jelly John – such a gorgeous colour is that jelly! I’m sure they’ll be enjoyed with a such a variety of meals, especially over the holiday season! Can’t wait for the Uova da Raviolo! Cheers, Margot 🙂

    Like

    • Thank you so much, Margot. I’m still very new to quince and the commenter have surprised me with some of its may uses. The trick will now be to find more quince so that I can try a few of them. Have a great week. The ravioli recipe will be coming right up! 🙂

      Like

    • You may have walked right by them, Kat, thinking they were some ugly golden delicious apples. Though their flesh looks like an apple’s, it is really quite firm. I broke a melon baller trying to scoop out one’s core. It’s got a mild taste, much like a mix of both apple and pear. People have left a number of other ways to cook/roast quince and I’m looking forward to trying a couple of them. The hard part will be finding quince this time of year. 🙂

      Like

  31. Like you, John, I didn’t grow up eating quince or even heard of it until a few years ago. My interest in food things made me try all fruit at the store I wasn’t familiar with. Still, I don’t do much with them. I love how floral they are and have such a lovely fragrance. I do make jams and jellies so this might be a good way to start using quince more. And thank you for a proper recipe! I wish we could do way with this silly cup business and use weights like in Europe, it’s so much more accurate.
    I love the colour of the quince jelly and the jam looks fantastic too. I’ll have to make some soon to have with my cheese and bread. Though Mr Riffs has a good idea, hmmmm,….what can I trade you for a pot…..

    Nazneen

    Like

    • Hello, Nazneen, and thank you. I’m glad you liked today’s recipe and hope you’ll find it useful. You are so right about ridding ourselves of cups in favor of weighted measurements. Why must we complicate things?
      You and Mr Riffs bring up a good point. Could you imagine if we all lived in a real, rather than virtual, community? We could start up a barter night where everyone would meet, bringing a selection of goodies, and swap the items. Not only would we all return home with bags of great tasting things but we’d have a great time in the process. 🙂

      Like

  32. “…And they dined on mince
    And slices of quince
    Which they ate with a runcible spoon” your post reminds me of a favorite childhood poem.
    What lovely jam and jelly, too. I like the romance of it, and hope one of my jelly making friends is inspired!
    Appreciate all your blog comments, John. Especially the one about different couch, different dog…
    Will ask my brother if they are growing quince out in Okanogan. My mother and father would have lapped your jam right up!! Perhaps not grammatically correct but you get the gist.

    Like

    • I’ve not heard that poem, Ruth, but am glad this post brought it to mind. I’ve learned much since posting this entry. So many have offered suggestions for doing more with quince than just making jam or jelly. I had no idea that it could be baked in a pie, for example, or roasted along with pork, lamb, or fowl. I hope I can still find some because I really would like to experiment with them and there’s nothing like a roast in the oven on a cold Winter’s day.
      Yours is one of the blogs on my “must read” list, Ruth. I really do enjoy your view of the World and the photography that results. It’s a talent I very much respect but, sadly, don’t have. 🙂

      Like

  33. we had a quince tree that grew on the beach when we were kids. Dad made quince jelly and apple jelly every year. (he did the two for one too!) i did not know that you could make quince jam though, that looks very interesting and probably quite versatile too.. I think quinces are a gorgeous fruit to look at. Now John, I am going to go back up and unfollow and refollow you again. I seem to be missing out on your posts (though because you very cleverly post on the same day I come looking anyway.) Have a lovely evening.. c

    Like

    • Hey, Celi! I bet combining quince with apple would make a a fantastic jam/jelly. A number of commenters have spoken of roasting quince alone or with meats — lamb, pork, an fowl were mentioned. Doesn’t that sound good? I need to find more quince and then seek out a good recipe. I saw that you subscribed again. I hope that works this time. It can be so frustrating. If it doesn’t, let me know and I’ll let Support know about it. Have a great weekend, Celi. Stay warm. It’s going to be a cold one. 🙂

      Like

  34. Hello my friend, again I missed your post yesterday, but I’m here now. I’ve been crazy busy with my new ‘career’ and I’m still trying to figure out a balance, thank you for your continued support, I really appreciate your kind and lovely words.
    Quince Jam is something my Mom used to make but I never had the taste for it as a child (her strawberry preserves, all runny and lovely were my absolute favourite) but I’m intrigued doubly so by your recipe that makes TWO varieties. I love the jam but I’m in love with the jelly because it makes something of the liquid you would normally discard (?). I’m still a bit scared of canning but one of these days it will come and I will post my first canning recipe. I never thought I’d make cheese before your blog, so never say never.
    I’m excited and intrigued by your teaser photo at the end, the Uova da Raviolo! I can hardly wait to see what you’ve done with those beauties.

    Like

    • Hello, Eva. Never worry about arriving late or missing my posts altogether, especially now. You’re starting a new career and it’s the holidays. That’s plenty enough to do for anyone. I’ll be here when you have the time. In the meantime, knock ’em dead at work. 🙂
      I ever had quince as a child, though, in an earlier comment, I learned that Italians use it in mostarda. Others have said they roast it alone or with meats. I need to do some more research — and find more quince. You needn’t can/preserve jam, Eva. You can make the jam, put it in sterile jars, cover them, and allow them to cool before placing them in the freezer. They’ll keep a year in there, just as they would on a dark shelf in the pantry. They must go from the freezer to the fridge, however, where they will remain good for about 2 weeks. This is much easier than canning and I’ve got a nice assortment in my freezer, as proof.
      The ravioli are coming! The ravioli are coming! 🙂

      Like

  35. Mmmm…that jam looks gorgeous.

    Until this post, I have never seen the point of quince. I’d see it in the store, sometimes, and would pity the fools who bought them. Now I see they’re onto something!

    Thanks for including the 2:1 ratio instead of just sticking with the quart measurement. Very handy for folks like myself.

    Like

    • Thanks, Ruth. That ratio is handy for my kind of folk, too. It really does take the guesswork out of the recipes. Like you, I didn’t think much of quince, even after making the jam & jelly. Having read the comments, though, I see them much differently. Quince are used in baked goods as well as in savory dishes. Some roast them alone and others roast them with meat, like pork, lamb, or even fowl. They’re even used in an Italian condiment called mostarda. I had no idea of any of this but now I want to get more quince and get back into the kitchen. 🙂

      Like

    • Thanks, Francesca. I’ve learned that quince are in season from October to December, so, you may still be able to find them. I myself am hoping to find more, Some commenters have mentioned other ways to prepare quince and I’m looking forward to experimenting. I hope you find some, too.

      Like

  36. ciao John! come stai?… from November to march, I always have quinces in my cellar… very popular here and in Spain – next door neighbor… But I’ve the Spaniards eat Manchego cheese with black cherry jam like the French & Spanish basque people… 🙂 I serve brown-sugared quince slices with any white meat… really yummy! 🙂

    Like

    • Quince are coming to the end of their season and they aren’t all that popular, to begin with. I’m going to start looking for them next September in the farmers markets. I’ve got some more recipes to try. Those dishes are on the way! 😉

      Like

    • You made some really good jam this Fall, Greg. It’s easy to see why you’d be running out, especially if you give some of it away. I’ve found I can never make enough. I treat those last couple jars like they’re gold. 🙂

      Like

  37. What I love most about your blog (besides your interesting and fun family stories) is the fact that I am almost always guaranteed to see something that I have either never tried or sometimes have never even heard of. I love that! 🙂 I have heard of Quince and about all knew is that it was a type of fruit. The Quince jam on top of the cheese and bread…oh that looked heavenly!

    Like

    • Thanks for the nice compliment, April. That was a very nice thing to say. I have to admit that I didn’t know much about quince either. Now, though, having read the comments, I’ve learned that there are many ways to prepare quince. All I need now is to find more quince. I’d hate to have to wait until next September before I can try any of them.

      Like

  38. Like you, I have never cooked with or even seen quince until this fall. Mine turns a bright coral color after 30 minutes of simmering and a dark coral/red after another 30 minutes. I use the very thick quince paste (after 60 minutes of simmering with sugar) to naturally thicken and add a layer of complexity to my spiced apple pie butter and spiced pear butter.

    Like

    • Thank you for commenting. Celia, from whom I got the idea of making quince jam, mentioned that a batch of her jelly didn’t deepen in color, too. She feels it might be due to our using a different variety of quince or, perhaps, they weren’t fully ripe. Considering that the color of my jam equaled the jam in the photo of the original recipe, I’m not concerned. I’d like to make quince paste and will, hopefully, next year. I’ve put away my canning kettle for the year! 🙂

      Like

  39. Hi John
    I am a quince addict. I just love them. I rarely make jam but I always cook some up and keep them in the fridge in their syrup during their season. I use them in cakes and tarts . I usually go straight to cheese with quince jam or jelly and Manchego is definitely the go. I am just about to take a lovely creamy blue to a friends house with a jar of Quince jelly Celia gave me ( well they can have a but of it, the rest will be coming home with me.) It’s nice to share 🙂

    Like

    • I am such a quince neophyte, Tania. I’ve learned so much from today’s comments. The thought of keeping some, cooked and in syrup, in the fridge is a great one! Celia’s jelly looks so good. It’s what got me interested in the fruit in the first place. Serving some with blue cheese must be fantastic. What a great combination of flavors!

      Like

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  41. Pingback: Duck Legs with Orange and Quince | Tasty Eats

  42. I too do not have any experience with quince, but now I am intrigued as I always like to try new things. When I saw your photo with the bread and cheese, I was hooked as so often a little sweet is just what is needed for a cheese platter. Great details on the buying/making of this, too often recipes assume you already know what you’re doing (I’m guilty of that too), but you’ve done a great job helping out the quince novice like me.

    Like

    • You’re so welcome, Judy, and thank you for the compliment. If I had any prior experience with quince, I probably would have perpetuated the measurement problem. As it was, my problems were too fresh in my mind to ignore. A number of commenters mentioned using quince in savory dishes, like roasted meats. This post has been quite the learning experience. The trick now is to find quince. Its season has just about ended.

      Like

    • You are so kind, Anna, thank you. I’m new to quince, too, and was very pleasantly surprised by this jam & jelly. I’d like to find more quince to experiment with it. It’s nearing the end of their season and I don’t want to wait 10 months! ::)

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  43. Nice! You”re a quince maniac, John 🙂 Both the jam and jelly look fantastic, and your walk-through of how you selected your recipes was fun to read. Looking forward (er, make that backward) to the deja-vu and (forward to the) coming soon!

    Like

    • I don’t lnow about maniac, Liz, but I have found a new treat to experiment with. Commenters are leaving suggestions for cooking quince, both savory and sweet. I really had no idea it was such a versatile fruit when I penned this. Now I hope I can find more of them. 😉

      Like

    • Thank you for taking the time to come here and suggest a recipe. I know so little about quince and welcome any suggestions for preparing them. This post has been a real learning experience. Again, thanks for contributing. 🙂

      Like

  44. Finally, I got it. “See Quince”. Sequence. You’re so clever, CJ! I’m sending this one to my daughter since she and her husband have been on an apple canning kick this year… applesauce (smooth and chunky), apple pie filling, apple butter and, of course, apple jam. I’m looking forward to your holiday offerings.

    Like

    • Thanks, Kathleen. Glad you enjoyed my feeble attempt at humor. I hoe your daughter and SIL enjoy the post. I’ve made apple sauce and butter but never jam. Maybe I should give it a try next year. I’m through canning/pickling for this year. The canning kettle and supplies have been put away.

      Like

  45. I laughed at See Quince straight up days ago when I first saw the email notification… very clever…. and I’ve been looking forward to seeing what you’d done.
    I love quince anything. Your jam (ooh with Manchego), and especially the golden jelly are tantalising the tastebuds of my imagination. And your post brought out comments on other cooking methods. When I get my hands on some I’ll be roasting them, as a start.
    When I was a kid in the country everyone had quinces, you couldn’t give them away 🙂

    Like

    • Thanks, EllaDee. You’re only the 3rd person to notice the post’s title. Well, the 3rd person brave enough to mention it. This post has been a real education. So many great suggestions, from baked goods to savory dishes. I really had no idea and now look forward to trying a few. Problem is, quince season is ending here and I’ll have to wait until next September before I can try any of them.
      From what I’ve read, quince trees here in the States have been suffering from some sort of disease and the crop has really suffered. Most of our quince now comes from South America. Just when I discover them, they disappear. 🙂

      Like

    • Thanks, Brandi. I guess quince is one of those fruits from yesteryear. Reading the comments, though, there are a lot of things that can be done with them and I’m anxious to give a few of them a try. And, yes, tart is the only way to go! 🙂

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  46. Bueno Sera John! It is time to get my Jam on! Wow not one but two things I have never seen, eaten or made. I am usually a jam girl usually but in this case I just love the beautiful crystal clear jelly and with some strong cheese on crusty bread that would be amazing. I can’t believe the holidays has come and snuck up on us again. I can’t wait to see the Bartolini Christmas meal plans for days to come. Did you get a x-mas sock for your dogs biscuits? I guess I need to get one for “Buddy” too. Take care and have a safe and happy holiday. BAM

    Like

    • Buona notte, BAM! Consider this post a “Thank You!” for your Bammer’s Jammers. I love that jam and have made 2 batches, giving all but a jar away. I’ve Christmas stockings for both Max & Lucy and will be going to the pet shop to get the stuffers by end of week. You “guess”? You know you’re going to get Buddy his Christmas treats. 🙂
      I hope you and your family have a wonderful holiday, too, BAM!

      Like

    • You’re very welcome, Minnie. I’m glad you enjoyed the post. I’ve received so many other serving suggestions for quince. I really had no idea. I can’t wait to give a few of them a try!

      Like

  47. A delicious way to spice up the holidays. Thank you for sharing so much yummy goodies for 2013. You made so any dinner tables bursting with flavors. Wishing you and your family all the blessings of the holidays.

    Like

  48. I love it – Two for one!! I remember my mother making quince jelly, but I don’t believe she ever made jam. The 2 to 1 ratio is the one I always use for my non-pectin jam. It works every time, but then I don’t make big batches. Just one or two jars at a time. Now you have me wanting to go out and find some quince. It’s been years (decades) since I’ve had quince jelly and now I want to try both of these. Love how you turned the cooking water into jelly.

    Like

    • Thanks, MJ. You echoed my response when I found that the jam recipe contained a link for the jelly. A real two-fer! I make larger batches of jam, usually, but it’s because I give most of it away. In fact, I often joke that if all of my friends return the jars at the same time, I won’t be able to get them home. So many have mentioned other ways to cook with quince that I’m on the lookout for it, too. I’d love to experiment with it before their season ends.

      Like

  49. How lovely they both look, the jam and that gorgeous amber coloured jelly! I finally did have a taste of that quince I purchased. Very much like an apple, only drier and not as sweet. I am in the midst of preparing foods for gift baskets and this quince jam seems simple enough. There’s a Persian shop just minutes from my home and they are filled with quince. I think it’s quite popular in their culture. I might just make a batch and add them to my gift baskets. But not without having a taste for myself first!

    Like

    • Thanks, Lidia. I, too, plan on including some of this jam in this year’s gift baskets, though I may need to find more quince. I would suggest going light on the lemon juice and zest initially. You can always add more at the end if you want it more tart. I like it tart but you may not. 🙂

      Like

  50. Yes, using the whole fruit, yes, yes! Good for you for searching out the recipe.

    No such thing as manchego cheese around here. How does it taste? The photo makes it look dry and sharp, like something midway between a parmesan and an old cheddar.

    Like

    • I was very glad to find recipes that gave me both jam and jelly from the same fruit. I’m not aware of that being the case with any other fruit or berry.
      2 kinds of Manchego are usually available. One is aged, viejo, and one is younger, curado. I bought viejo. It was more firm and I thought it tasted similar to parmesan. It went very well with the quince jam.

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  51. Pingback: Membrillo Paste | Prim and Primal

  52. Hi John, I see you are as busy as ever in the kitchen! Quince Jam and Jelly is a favourite of mine, eaten as you do with Manchego or added to soups, stews and gravies to well, quincify it 🙂 I see Quince here in the shops mid to late autumn, and luckily for me a friend’s mum makes it and passes some onto me! My favourite kind of friend’s mum you note. Now it’s not everyday I talk of love John, but here’s an ode to Quince and love I posted a while ago http://promenadeplantings.com/2011/09/22/the-fruit-of-love-quince/ 🙂

    Like

    • Thanks, Claire, and that was some poem you wrote. I thoroughly enjoyed it. I need to delve into more uses for quince. I’m really a neophyte when it comes to using it and, judging by comments like yours, I’ve been missing out! 🙂

      Like

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