Peanut Butter for Your Pupster

Peanut Butter for Dogs

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Today’s recipe is a simple one and the post brief, so, I though I’d take the opportunity to share another Grandpa story. If you’re not interested, just scroll down until you reach the peanut photo. That’s where the recipe begins.

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Grandpa was, by all accounts, a Jack of all Trades. Having owned a contracting business, few maintenance and repair jobs around the old two-flat fell outside of his skill set. At any given time, especially in the Summer, he could usually be found performing any one of a number of jobs around the building: cement work, carpentry, tile setting, painting, roof repair, and the occasional electrical project.

As children, we were often enlisted to help him with these projects. When very little, our main duty was to stay out-of-the-way. We soon graduated to beer fetchers and water bearers. “Go-fer” was the next position and, depending on the project and number of men involved, we could be kept running. Soon we were allowed to water the The Old Wheelbarrowdry ingredients to make cement, under supervision of course. Not long thereafter, we were permitted to use the hoe with 2 holes to mix the cement, as well as a variety of small jobs. You might, for example, fill buckets with cement, haul them, maybe cut a board or two, hammer a few nails, etc. And then, one day, you were deemed old enough and big enough to push a loaded wheelbarrow. That was the pinnacle of success for us laborers, for it meant that you big enough and strong enough to do man’s work. Make no mistake, pushing a wheelbarrow full of cement was certainly man’s work. especially under the watchful eyes of the adults present. You did not want it to tip over and there were plenty of opportunities, for every Summer there was at least one job that involved cement. To be sure, though, not all jobs required cement or even a work crew. For those jobs, Grandpa flew solo, like the time he painted the trim of the house.

Unlike bungalows and ranch-style homes, painting a two-flat’s trim was no easy task. As you can see in the photo below, much of the trim is about 25 feet above the ground, with the peak another 8 or so feet higher. To further complicate matters, there were 2 aluminum awnings attached to the front of the house, a small one over Zia’s living room, while a much larger awning shielded our windows and the entire porch minus the entryway. (The photo is current, the awnings having been removed sometime after we left in 1985.) When Grandpa decided the trim needed painting, he was about 71 years of age. This was long before “70 is the new 50”; 70 was 70. I was about 15.

One Summer afternoon, Grandpa called for me to give him a hand. By the time I got to the front of the house, Grandpa had already started up the ladder and was waiting for me. The ladder, however, was not long enough to reach the top, or even near the top, of the peak. Not only that but the awnings prevented it from resting against the building. Instead, it was on a bit of an incline as it laid across both awnings, its top-end suspended a little more than a foot from the wall.

When he saw me, I was instructed to stand on the bottom of the ladder. Grandpa then began to climb higher. In his hand was a hockey stick with a paint brush lashed to the end. I started pleading with him to stop. He ignored me and further up he went. I The Old Two Flatdidn’t know it but he had already placed a bucket of paint on top of the second awning. When he reached the end of the ladder, and with his left arm acting as a brace against the side of the building, he started painting the building’s peak, dipping his hockey stick brush into the paint can below him and then swinging it over his head. Whether because he heard my voice or just by luck, a neighbor came out and, horrified, ran to help me steady the ladder, all the while yelling, “Bart, get down!” Grandpa, of course, ignored him, as well. There was a job to be done, after all. Within minutes, more neighbors came, all pleading with him to stop. All for naught.

As I’ve mentioned in other posts, the parish school was across the street and at the end of the block. At the time, Mom worked there as the school’s secretary. That day, being it was Summer, Mom left her office at 4:00 pm. She didn’t walk far before she noticed a crowd gathering on our lawn and quickened her pace. When she got close enough, she noticed Grandpa on the ladder, swinging a hockey stick. Now running, and a few doors away, Mom was yelling, “Pa! Get Down!” Unperturbed, Grandpa kept painting.

When he had finished, the entire episode having lasted about 30 minutes, Grandpa calmly came down the ladder, handed his hockey stick to someone, went back up for the paint can, and came back down again for the last time. Mom and the neighbors demanded that he stop painting and he complied. In reality, his compliance was by no means submission. The peak was the last of the trim to be painted. His work was done.

The men helped Grandpa put away the ladder and paint supplies. For that, he invited them back to “see my tomatoes.” The invitation had little to do with tomatoes but that’s better left for another post. For now, there’s peanut butter to make.

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When I first decided to make peanut butter for Max, he was still a puppy. Then, like now, he loved peanut butter over all other treats. Well, when I read the label of a jar of peanut butter, I decided to make my own. It’s easy enough, as you’ll soon see.

I’ve chosen to remove the shells, roast the peanuts, and then remove most of the “paper skins” before making the butter. You must remove the shells but whether you roast and/or remove the skins is up to you, although I did read that roasting peanuts increases their anti-oxidant effects. That’s about all there is to the recipe. Yes, it really is that simple and your pooch can enjoy a treat without any additives whatsoever.

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Roasted Peanut Butter Recipe

Ingredients

yield: 1 pint

  • 3 cups unsalted, raw peanuts, shelled (use organic if you can find them)

Directions

  1. Pre-heat oven to 350˚ F (175˚ C)
  2. Place peanuts, single layer, on a baking sheet and roast for 20 minutes. Stir midway through for even roasting.
  3. Remove from oven and set aside until cool enough to handle.
  4. Once cooled, take the baking sheet & peanuts outdoors. Rub a handful of peanuts between your palms. The clean nuts will drop and their “paper skins” will float away on the breeze. (See Notes)
  5. Once cleaned to your liking, place the nuts in a food processor and run.
  6. The peanuts will go through stages:
    1. The nuts will go from coarse to finely chopped in a couple of minutes.
    2. Soon a “dough ball” will form.
    3. A couple of minutes more and a creamy peanut butter will develop. The longer you process it, the more fluid it will be.
  7. Place in an airtight container and store in the refrigerator.

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Variations

If using peanuts in the shell, roast for 25 minutes. Once cooled, remove shells and as much of the “paper skins” as you prefer.

If your pooch prefers chunky-style peanut butter — very helpful if this is to be used to hide pills — remove up to 1/2 cup of the nuts after they’ve been coarsely chopped. Add them back to the peanut butter once it has reached the preferred consistency. Stir by hand to combine.

To make peanut butter for the two-legged members of your household, follow the same method as dictated above. When the peanuts are first added to the food processor, you may wish to add salt, and/or a sweetener like honey or sugar, to taste. If you prefer your peanut butter to be more smooth, add a teaspoon or two of a neutral-tasting oil.

Notes

I’ve seen no documentation that states the “paper skins” are harmful or should be removed from the peanuts, whether the peanut butter is intended for use by humans or dogs. Nonetheless, I remove the majority of them, though I’m nowhere near having them 100% cleaned.

As I’ve mentioned, Max loves peanut butter. He has 2 hollow bones that I bought him years ago from a pet store. I put a couple of tablespoons of peanut butter in each and put them in the freezer. If I have to crate him, I give him one of these bones and it keeps him occupied.

Dogs do not sweat as we do. They cool themselves by panting, sending cooler air over the tongue. Giving your dog a frozen treat on the hottest of Summer’s days will help him to keep his cool. With that in mind, I reward my puppy with ice cubes. When fully grown and Summer’s heat is at its worst, I give my dog an ice cube “treat”. He loves it and it will cool him off.

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It’s déjà vu all over again …

In my part of the country, the farmers markets are at their peak. Sure, some fruits and A Penne for your Zucchiniberries are gone for the year but the vendor stalls are bursting with many other fruits and vegetables. Judging by what I’ve seen, my use of zucchini blossoms earlier this season didn’t affect their harvest in the slightest. There’s enough zucchini and Summer squash left to go around — and then some. If you’re looking to use some of these squash, while cutting back on carbs, you might wish to check out this recipe for penne with zucchini and Summer squash.

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Coming soon to a monitor near you …

Preview Tomato Jam

Tomato Jam

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184 thoughts on “Peanut Butter for Your Pupster

  1. Great grandpa story — I laughed — and the peanut butter recipe I’ll try for our pups. We can get fresh-picked peanuts down here in the Florida panhandle, right from the farm! 😄

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    • I’m glad you enjoyed the story. Grandpa was quite a character. I think you’ll be surprised at how easy it is to make peanut butter. And my dog loves it every bit as much as store-bought. With peanuts so fresh, make a double batch and keep one for yourself. 🙂
      Thanks for the visit and for taking the time to comment.

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  2. I love your stories about your family! And just the other day I was thinking about my father, a few years after he retired, up on the roof of our two-story brick home…. re-roofing. “What – pay someone to do it? Absolutely not Beatrice”, I remember him saying. (Actually, I believe his words were far “stronger” than that!!)
    He was up there wearing his “pride & joy” – black high-topped sneakers which he’d purchased in Nova Scotia on a camping trip. I well remember him coming out of this old ratty little store with his “purchase” under his arm. And he was so happy that he’d got such a good price. We kids giggled (but not when he could see) ’cause we knew the price was low because NO ONE WAS WEARING HIGH TOPS in 1964 !!

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    • I’m glad you enjoyed this post, Cecile, and that it brought back warm memories of your Father. Grandpa, also, went up on the roof to patch it. I’ve no idea how he got pup there, nor does anyone else for that matter. All we know is that one day some black tar appeared on a small section of the roof over his bedroom.
      You Dad & mine shared the same fashion sense. It wasn’t a question of how bad something looked. It was all about his wallet not looking any thinner after the purchase. 😉

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      • You made me laugh John !! People who lived through the depression – or those who arrived from other countries, like my husband’s family, sure knew how to stretch a penny. They were – and still are – an amazing generation !! The thing about my boys – they would’ve told me immediately how ugly my choice was !! We didn’t dare…. ; o )

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        • Agreed, Cecille. We would never dream of saying something to an adult about their “fashion choices.” Just a roll of the eyes was met with much more than today’s time outs. 🙂

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  3. John, John, John. I didn’t actually read the dog treats section, I read your grandpa story and had to jump straight down here to leave a comment. I’m laughing and shaking my head at the same time, partly because it’s a great story, but also because I know so many older Italian men and they’re as stubborn as nails and I could just imagine your grandfather ignoring everybody and painting the damn awning with his hockey stick paint brush.. 😀 I can imagine the aftermath at dinner that night too, with all the ladies in the family scolding him and “could you imagine what could have happened!” and “he never thinks of the danger!”.. 😀

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    • You’re so right, Celia. Grandpa’s retort was always, “What” Pay someone to do it?” That was high treason in our household. When he enlisted friends to help with a major project, like pour the concrete for the garage, every worker was a retiree. Now that was something to see. Yet, I doubt there was another crew on earth that would have done a better job. 🙂

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  4. So does one dip a toast point into the PB for the pup, or just give him a spoonful? I remember one of my kids giving our dog a spoonful of PB and the poor dog couldn’t stop slurping and trying to open her mouth and get her tongue unstuck.
    I wonder how a PB and tomato jam sandwich would taste.
    Love your grandpa story 🙂

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    • If Max needs to take pills, I stick the pill in a teaspoon of PB on a spoon. He licks it up, with the pill, none the wiser. If the peanut butter isn’t frozen, I’ve seen him clean his tongue on the side of his crate and, once the bone is licked clean, he’ll go back to his “larder” on the side of the crate. That’s my dog! 🙂

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  5. Such a great story. What a determined man he was – especially since “This was long before “70 is the new 50″; 70 was 70” 🙂
    I don’t use that much of peanut butter, but the recipe still made me want to try and make it. I’m thinking sweet and salty.

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    • Thank you. Im glad you enjoyed the story. If you make your won peanut butter, you can make it as sweet or salty that you want. That’ the beauty of it. The end result is up to you and you’ll know exactly what you added. Read the label of a store-bought brand and you’ll see what I mean.

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    • Thanks, Dedy, for the suggestion, I haven’t had that problem when I make peanut butter. Maybe my food processor is more powerful and doesn’t requite running as long as your Mother’s once did. Nevertheless, I will remember this. If the problem should arise, I’ll know what to do. 🙂

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  6. What a man your grandpa was – I can just picture the scene and him “switching” off to all the nagging from the ground.
    My kitties also love peanut butter – it’s the funniest watching them lick at it. Never thought of making my own though – shall have to rectify that.
    Have an awesome day John.
    🙂 Mandy xo

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  7. Pingback: Peanut Butter for Your Pupster | Italian Food &...

  8. Sharing with the canine members of the family. Well, their people!
    Love envisioning your grandfather and the gathering to watch him paint that peak. Your family stories are always good to read, John.

    And I discovered it was my trying to comment via iPad that was preventing the comment from being posted.

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    • I’m glad you enjoy these posts, Ruth. It’s always fun for me to write them because the memories come flooding back. It’s quite an experience. I can vividly recall seeing him swing that hockey stick over his head, painting that peak.
      I’m glad you got to the root of the problem, Ruth. It’s good to see you back! Your comments are always welcome and appreciated. WP quit supporting their iPad version a while back. I’ve pretty much quit accessing WP with my iPad because of it.

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  9. I can hear the voice-over on the Miller commercial: “When Bart and the boys get together for a painting party…”
    Will have to try the peanut butter, and maybe Dedy’s hint along with it. Thanks for what to watch for as the peanuts get processed. We buy pure-peanut peanut butter, which looks pretty disgusting when it arrives home from the store with all that oil floating on top. I pour the oil into a pan to use in a stirfry!

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    • Ha! Good one! I will definitely share your Miller ad with my family. They’re going to love it!
      I’ve not had the problem that Dedy mentioned but I’ve got a heavy duty processor and it makes butter in no time, especially since I only use 3 cups of peanuts at a time. I will definitely keep his tip that in mind, though.

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  10. My gosh, this brought me a ton of memories! My Grandpa was a jack of all trades, but one of his favorite things was laying bricks, and I did help him as a child to mix the cement and even lay some bricks – closing my eyes and thinking about it all, I can feel the smell of the wet cement and hear that unique noise it makes when you slap a little over the brick…

    great post, as to the peanut butter, I always tell Phil I’m going to make some from scratch, but never do (sigh)

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    • I’m so glad this post brought back so many memories of your Grandfather. Mine was a bricklayer and I, also, remember the smell of freshly made cement, the sound it made when placed on the bricks, and the “tap, tap, tap” of the trowel as the brick was leveled. I, also, remember his, “Hand me my beer.” 🙂
      When you do decide to make PB, don’t tell Phil how easy it was to make or you’ll have a devil of a time explaining what took you so long to do it. 😉

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    • I think homemade peanut butter is one of the best kept secrets of the food industry. You’ll be amazed how easy it is and now quickly you can flavor it to your own preferences.
      Thanks for the visit and for taking the time to comment.

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  11. What an absolutely fabulous story. Do you think it’s something to do with their Latin temperaments that make these men in our families so damn stubborn?! I can totally relate to his behaviour and had to chuckle as I think your grandpa and my Big Man share the same name. Love the idea of making peanut butter for the pups and I know Luna and Alfi will salute you when I make it for them when we get back to Spain next week (and our food processor).

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    • I’m glad you enjoyed the tory, Tanya. I don’t know what propels them. Grandpa had a contracting company many years before and he felt that no job was too big for him to handle. Hire someone? You might as well proclaim yourself a devil worshipper for both were equally blasphemous. Max really loves his peanut butter. Being able to make it for him helps me to keep his food “clean”. I wish I could be so successful with my own diet! Safe travels back to your Mountain. Buon viaggio!

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  12. I loved your grandpa’s story! He must have been quite a character 🙂
    As for the peanut butter, before I finished reading your post, I was about to ask you what about humans! I’m glad you didn’t forget about the other “pets” in the family. I will try this recipe very soon, thanks for sharing!

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    • Yes, Giovanna, he was quite a character! We all have a good laugh when we get together and trade our memories of him. I think you’ll be surprised how easy it is to make PB and will be happy that there’s no sugar or oils added. 🙂

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  13. Our dog enjoys peanut butter treats too! I haven’t made it yet and just might have to try it out. I just get the natural PB made of only peanuts and salt, with the three boys we go through a lot!

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    • With 3 boys, you should buy stock in whatever company makes their favorite brand of PB!!! We never could get enough. You. too, will be surprised at how easy this is to make. Try 1 cup of peanuts, salt-free, the first time. If you feel salt is lacking, give that batch to your dogs, and make another cup but with some salt. You’ll soon have the PB of your dreams and your pupsters will have theirs, too. 🙂

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  14. Quite a character. I have a picture in my head of your Grandpa at the top of the ladder, you and your neighbors steadying the ladder and anxiously waiting for Grandpa to finish the painting and get down from that ladder. What a relief it must have been for all when his feet finally touch solid grounds. That’s got to be the longest 30 minutes.
    There is a food market near me where I can go to ground my own freshly made peanut butter from roasted peanut, pricy, but since I do not use much PB it serves my purpose.

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    • Thank you, Norma. The picture in your mind is just about exactly as the scene transpired. I remember it so well.
      Aside from being so easy to make, it is quite cheaper than any you can buy. Considering how expensive dog treats can be, this is a real money saver.

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  15. Yet another great story my friend, your grandad must have been a force to reckon with. I used to really love working with my Dad, he was always so patient letting me learn to do things the right way. These are the life lessons that have made us the people we are today. You were very fortunate to have had your grandfather and although your Mom and Dad may have rolled their eyes more than once or twice at the risks he may have taken, I bet they were down right grateful that they didn’t have to a) hire someone to do it, or worse b) get on that ladder themselves to do it after a long day at work. I bet you had the nicest looking house on the street.

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    • I’m so glad, Eva, that you enjoyed the post and that it reminded you of time spent with your Dad. Grandpas was indeed a force and yes, everyone was thankful for his work around the building. Truth be told, though, we had little choice. There was no way anyone could have hired a repairman of any kind, not with Grandpa around. That was treason of the worst kind! He did keep that two-flat well-maintained, too. Every Summer had a major project and any number of smaller ones. He kept us all jumping. 🙂

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  16. I meant to say a few words about the PB; I’m quite impressed! I had no idea it was so simple! But perhaps I just never thought about it. We always buy the natural stuff from the health food store, but making your own sounds super easy and fun. I really can’t stand the grocery store variety.
    On another note, I was waiting to check out at my local grocery store recently and picked up a container of powdered bouillon, a very well known brand in fact; ingredient #1 was salt and #2 was MSG! Is it even legal to call it chicken bouillon??!

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    • Your experience mirrored mine when I read the peanut butter label. Yes, peanuts were first — how could that bouillon company get away with that? — but it was quickly followed by high fructose corn syrup, salt, sugar, etc. When you see how easy it is to make, why bother with the other stuff? I buy a 4 lb bag at that Indian market for a couple of dollars and it keeps Max in peanut butter heaven for months. You can’t beat that.

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    • Thank, Ken. I’m glad you enjoyed the post. I so make my own peanut butter but it eventually goes to Max. At some point, I’m bound to confuse the jars and he ends up with them both. I’m sure Max knows the difference but he won’t say a word. 😉

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    • Maureen, you don’t know half of the things Grandpa did or was capable of. To this day, the family cannot get together without stories of him being mentioned. He was a “rascal” all right.
      Oh, I do the same with Max. He loves his peanut butter so much and I get a good laugh. 🙂

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  17. Your grandpa sounds like a card, i love how he just ignored everyone! The peanut butter treats sound like just the thing, i have never given my dogs peanut butter, and frozen to chew on sounds like an excellent idea. Maybe I should make some for Boo when we go North on Saturday, he is a bit of a piner when I am not close by.. c

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    • Actually, Celi, you and Grandpa would have gotten along famously. He would admire your “can do” attitude. You two are kindred spirits in more ways than you know.
      Boo is young, Celi, and this is the time to get him hooked on it. It’s a life saver down the road if you need to give him pills and, right now in the heat, frozen peanut butter is a great way to cool him off when you can’t be around to hose him down.

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  18. John, your grandpa sound just the type of person I love. If there is a job to do, then it must be done. We have a joke in Australia about Italian migrants and how much they love cement because the previous generation tended to cement everything in sight. Your peanut butter sounds fantastic, don’t let Max eat it all, save some for yourself.

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    • Thanks, Glenda. (Please pardon my earlier mistake.) You pretty much described Grandpa to a “T”. Every Summer, there was some project, big or little, that involved cement. At one point, Mom even wrote “The End” in some wet cement to signify that there would be no more cement poured in the yard. In the end, it meant nothing.
      I do make peanut butter for myself but, to be honest, I often confuse the containers and Max ends up with it all. That’s OK. I’ve always got peanuts and it’s easy enough to make a batch.

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  19. Great story about your grandpa! Did inspecting the tomatoes involve some liquid refreshment? 😉 I just roasted raw peanuts for the first time this summer. What great flavor! Haven’t made my own peanut butter yet – I’m looking forward to that. Fun post – thanks.

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    • Thank you, John, and yes, much to the chagrin of the wives in the neighborhood, an invitation to see Grandpa’s tomatoes involved copious amounts of liquid refreshment. Stay tuned …
      Although Max certainly doesn’t care if his peanuts are roasted or raw, I very much prefer mine roasted first. Like you said, a great flavor. 🙂

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  20. I love everything about your posts. The stories, the photographs, the gorgeous recipes. Great story about your grandfather. He sounds like such a strong character 🙂 I work with elderly people for a living (you probably know that already) and it is so inspiring to see that determined glint in their eyes, often in complete defiance to their ‘protective’ children! Haha. Re the peanut butter, I had no idea that the roasting process increased the antioxidant effects. Always so much to learn about nutrition! I love making my own peanut butter. It’s so much better than shop bought, both in terms of flavour and health benefits. Love your recipe 🙂

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    • Thanks, Laura. It is really a shame that we do not give the elderly, “old timers” the respect they deserve. Many could be far more productive if we only let them contribute. Granted, painting a peak with a hockey stick may be a bit much …
      I, too, was surprised to learn that roasting peanuts increased their anti-oxidant properties. I do it for flavor and it’s always good to learn there’s a health benefit, as well. Have a great weekend, Laura.

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    • Yes, Kat, as you get to know Grandpa, you’ll see that this story is another classic Grandpa story. There are more to come.
      Your household’s runner will like that the only sugars and salts added to the PB are the ones he adds. And there’s absolutely no high fructose corn syrup. I bet he “converts”. 🙂

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  21. How did you know I was a peanut butter lover? :). I love this and I loved reading this story. I also think taking the shells off was a wonderful idea. This is delicious and the story, priceless 🙂

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    • Thank you, Kay. I’m glad you enjoyed the post. It’s fun for me to share Grandpa with you all.He was quite a character, that’s for sure. If you love peanut butter, you should give this a try. You can add as much — or as little — sugar and salt that you like and the result will be far better than anything you can buy. As a peanut butter lover, you woe it to yourself. 🙂

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  22. I think it’s a secret you find out when you get to 70 that it’s not as old as you thought… and you can still do stuff like climb ladders to roofs and scare the bejesus out of everyone 🙂 I love your recollections of the increments of being called to assist, rising through the hierarchy to the peak of wheelbarrow pushing. I also, like Glenda, laughed about the cement, there are still quite a few concrete front yards here. Love the PB recipe, a reminder to us that there’s no need for the store bought stuff. My Bo loved ice cubes as well, and I often gave her frozen lamb shanks (they were inexpensive way back before they became trendy) in summer too.
    Great post. I love family stories.

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    • Thanks, EllaDee. I’m glad you enjoyed the post. Had he not been stricken by cancer, I think Grandpa would still be here with us, working on something. He was tough as nails. As I told, Glenda, Grandpa poured cement every Summer. Mom even wrote ‘The End” in one patch of wet cement but to no avail. Grandpa kept on mixing and pouring.
      Lamb shanks for dogs? How times have changed! I bet when dogs get together, they talk wistfully about the “good old days’ when dogs feasted on lamb shanks. 🙂

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  23. I can just see your grandfather on his ladder…we all know/knew guys like that 🙂 We had a very patient neighbor when I was a child who would let my brother ‘help’ him with projects. He would give him a flat-head screwdriver to hold in one hand, and a Phillips for the other. This ensured that curious little-boy hands were always occupied and out of the way…Our dad was NOT handy 🙂

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    • Once Grandpa got his mind set on something, the only way to deter him was to do the job yourself. Very often, that wasn’t possible — and he knew it. I certainly cold not have gone up that ladder that afternoon and there was no one else around. Why he chose that particular afternoon when no one was around is a mystery for the ages. Was it planned or was it coincidence? When there was a big job, they gave us little ones hammers, nails, and wood scraps. We “practiced” and not so coincidentally stayed out of the way. I wonder if he knew your neighbor? 🙂

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    • Thank you, Mary Frances, I’m glad you enjoyed this story about Grandpa. I buy the peanuts shelled so that’s one less mess to clean up. As for the paper skins, they do come off easier once the peanuts are roasted. Taking them outdoors, as I suggest in the post, is a great way to remove the skins and keep the mess out of your kitchen/home. And it tastes so good!

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  24. What a lovely story about Grandpa! They don’t make them like that any more. I can’t see my dad painting anything let alone getting up on a ladder to do so! He sounds like a wonderful, no nonsense kind of man, like my grandpa ( him I can see on a ladder!)

    I don’t have any pets, only children and thankfully they like peanut butter! I was thinking to make some actually, esp since I replace my processor, finally. What I can’t wait for is your tomato jam. Looks delicious!

    Nazneen

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    • Thank you, Nazneen. If you can see your Grandfather on a ladder, than the 2 men are quite similar. You’re right. They don’t make ’em like that any more — and that’s a shame.
      It is easy to make this PB and the tomato jam is easy, too. Both taste great. The jam is wonderful with goat cheese on toast or as a glaze for grilled chicken. I really love the stuff. Stay tuned … 🙂

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  25. What a sweet Grandpa story! You had me smiling because that is so typical of Italian men of that generation, no? Nothing would deter them from getting a job done around the house. And god forbid paying someone to do the work! What a luck puppy to have a human who loves him so!

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    • Thank you, Lidia. Yes, men of that generation were a special lot. I can remember Mom secretly hiring a plumber to fix something in our bathroom and swearing us to secrecy. If Grandpa had found out, he would have had a fit! Yes, Max is one lucky dog but I must admit that I feel lucky, too. He is a great companion and gives me something to laugh about at least once a day. We won’t mention the countless times the pendulum has swung in the other direction and laughter is the farthest thing from my mind. 🙂

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  26. Is this the same guy who put bullets through the swimming pool because it was taking up all the space he needed for his tomatoes? What a great story and who would skip past it to get to the peanut butter. I love your stories – you tell them so well and the old two-flat looks so different to how I imagined it. It’s a beautiful old home and with the pitch above the lounge-room and the front door, it’s almost like a church xx

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    • Yes, Charlie, he’s one and the same. That picture is current. I got it from Google Earth. My family moved away in 1985, having lived there just shy of 30 years. Funny you mention it’s church-like appearance. We bought it from the parish. Prior to that, it was the convent for the nuns of the parish. 🙂

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  27. Loved the story and the recipe. I am currently making frozen peanut butter Kongs for Gidget because unfortunately she is not an 11 month old street dog but more like an 8 month old street dog. But since she likes peanut butter she now loves crate time.

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    • I’m glad you enjoyed the post. Max is a 5 year old boxer-mix and he just now is starting to calm down. He’s still wired for play but at least he naps occasionally now. Peanut butter frozen treats have been life-savers, keeping him quiet and occupied. Judging by your comment, I think you can probably say the same for your pupster. 🙂

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  28. What a great story about your grandpa and growing up with his guidance. I had a similar grandpa and the painting story reminded me a lot of him. Thanks for bringing back some nice memories. What a spoiled pup!!!! I don’t even make my husband homemade peanut butter. 🙂

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    • Thanks, MJ, I’m glad you enjoyed the story and that it brought to mind warm memories of your own Granddad. We were lucky to have these men in our lives. It is so easy to make this peanut butter — and so cheap — that it’s a no-brainer for me. Besides, like the rest of Max’s diet, I know exactly what he’s eating. In fact, i wish I monitored my own diet as closely as I do his. 🙂

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    • Thank you, Francesca. Every dog that I have owned has loved peanut butter. Though allergies are possible, none of my dogs have experienced a peanut allergy. When my dog has been allergic to a food, it has been nothing like the human allergic reaction. Max is allergic to a particular brand of dog food and he gets ear infections when he eats it for a while. One feeding will not cause a reaction but, since you must buy dog food by the bag/box, his ear problems appear after about 10 days.

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  29. Fun story about your Grandpa, John. Loved it and we all have done some pretty crazy things in our life because the job needed to be done. Baby Lady is always complaining at me because we live in a 2 story house and there just isn’t enough ladder. So, you have to improvise. Of course, I have never allowed my children to see me do any of these things. They are considerably bigger and stronger than I am and would come get me and tie me up. 🙂 One is in law school now and might try to have me institutionalized. 😮
    Does Max have any idea how lucky he is that his buddy goes to the trouble to make him fresh, homemade peanut butter. We love it. Have you ever made cashew butter? That is probably my favorite.

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    • What a great comment, Richard! Your soon-to-be lawyer Son’s plans for you cracked me up!. Thank you for that.
      I monitor Max’s diet quite closely. Cancer is the humber one killer of dogs and boxers have the highest incidence rate. Being Max is a boxer-mix and having lost my last 2 dogs to cancer about a year apart, I’m determined to give Max the best chance possible for a long, healthy life. Processed foods are not a part of the plan. I should be so careful with my own diet!

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    • Thanks, Anne. Though I’ve no experience baking with my own PB, I would think more salt would be needed when it’s used in place of store-bought PB. Mine has no salt or sugar, unlike the popular brands. I guess it would be like using regular or unsalted butter in a recipe .

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  30. Grandpa sounds fantastic and tenacious John! You’ve reminded me that I haven’t tried to make peanut butter in my new food processor yet! I may try a cashew/peanut blend. I don’t have a dog, but I have 2 boys who love the stuff. I love your bone-stuffed-with-peanut butter idea for Max. If only children could be so easily occupied when crated, I mean when on long-distance road-trips (actually come to think of it, my youngest would probably love a bone filled with peanut butter)…

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    • Thanks, Saskia. Grandpa was quite a character. This peanut butter is so easy to make and there’s not a bit of high fructose corn syrup in it. Your kids will love it and, if you feel it needs sweetening, you can always add a bit of honey with ease. Your crate and PB-filled bone comments were too funny! I think parents who travel with children — be it to a vacation spot or the grocery store — deserve a medal. I remember how we were and don’t know how Mom & Dad did it.

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  31. Bonjourno John, Glad you moved up from a Go-fer to a ladder holder that it is up there in the ranks. Your Grand Papa was quite the little character, kind of sounds like my dad… My dear little Buddy would love your peanut butter and putting it on a toy or bone and then in the freezer is a great idea and slightly less mess well for a minute at least. Have a super weekend. Chow, BAM

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    • Buona notte, BAM. Yes, Grandpa was a card! He kept us all on our toes. A bone or toy filled with peanut butter and frozen solid doesn’t leave the mess you think it might. Of course, if you put so much PB in it that Buddy is fully sated, then you’ve got a problem. I make sure that I put enough in Max’s bones to keep him occupied but not so much that there’s some leftover. It works! 🙂

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  32. Now that’s a funny story, I think I would’ve really liked your grandpa, he was spunky wasn’t he? I liked that he invited everyone to see his tomatoes! We forget about recipes for our 4 legged friends, I think my little Jack Russell, would love this John!

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    • Thanks, Tanya, I’m glad you enjoyed the story. There are more to come, to be sure. If you Jack Russell is at all like the dogs I’ve had, he will certainly love it and you won’t worry about giving him processed foods or high fructose corn syrup.

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  33. I love your family stories, and your grandpa sounds like such a character. His lack of “common sense” in the line of duty and getting a job done to his own satisfaction reminds me of my husband. He does things (at almost 70) that shouldn’t be tackled, but there is no dissuading. And I love the comment, John, that it was when 70 was still just 70, not a decade and a half younger. LOL!

    We are expecting to receive a new dog (older female) into our folds this coming week. Your post is timely, and I must admit I haven’t had a dog for years. So I’m all enthused with taking good care of her and providing treats and love. Homemade peanut butter sounds perfect to me, and I love the frozen bone idea! I was also going to go back through your posts and find the ones you previously wrote about making food for Max during some of that scare when pets were susceptible to some of those toxic mixes that were poisoning dogs. What a great post for me to read today! 🙂

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    • I’m so glad you enjoyed my Grandpas story, Debra. he was a force to be reckoned with, to be sure. I’m glad to read that you’re taking in a rescue. Max and his litter mates were grabbed from a kill shelter where their days were very limited. A toy or sturdy bone with a couple of tablespoons of frozen PB is a great way to keep the pupster occupied and quiet. When max sees that bone in my hand, he heads straight to his crate. I hope you new family member will do the same. Good luck during the “probationary” period. I hope things go smoothly and yours becomes the dog’s forever home. It will be a very rewarding experience. Guaranteed. 🙂

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    • Thank you so much. Grandpa was determined, that’s for sure. Trying to dissuade him from something like this was about as easy as stopping a locomotive with your bare hand. It just couldn’t be done. 🙂

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  34. I just love your stories and they remind me of my husband’s childhood…especially going ’round back to check the tomato plants.
    Ladders scare me & I never understand why my husband thinks that me footing the ladder for him actually makes him feel secure. Every year he’s up over 2 stories cleaning the gutter with the ladder balanced on a jerry rigged platform because it’s on a slope. One year I wasn’t footing the ladder & I heard all kinds of yelling and screaming out back. You see he didn’t tie off the rope & our former Berner saw the dangling rope & thought…”oh pull toy”. So Spirit was yanking of the ladder’s rope while my husband was hanging off the gutter and I was in the kitchen deciding if I should grab the video camera.
    Lola thanks you for the treat recipe.

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    • Thanks, Diane. I bet your Husband and my Grandpa would have gotten along very nicely — I doubt either would have survived their first collaboration but, up until then, they would have been very close. 🙂
      Thank goodness your ladder story ended well. I gather you didn’t grab the camera. That’s probably just as well. It wouldn’t have looked good if you had recorded the video of your husband falling 2 stories. People may have talked. 🙂

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      • My husband remembers Sunday dinner at his grandfather’s house. Always had the jug of homemade wine under his chair & the kids always got a little glass of their own – ‘good for their blood” was what he always said.
        Yes, I did leave the camera & ran to the rescue but I was laughing so hard I’m not sure how much help I was steadying the ladder – first thing was to get the rope out of the dog’s mouth. But he did learn his lesson – when you have a big dog around helping you, TIE OFF THE ROPE!

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        • Gosh, Diane! I’d forgotten all about that jug of wine under the table. It was as much a fixture as were the table legs!
          That must have been quite a sight: your husband hanging on for dear life and your laughing uncontrollably. If it happened today, you both would be the latest YourTube sensations for someone surely would have recorded it on their smartphone. :

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  35. John, what an awesome family story of resolve, ingenuity and a touch of stubbornness! 😉 Thank you for sharing it. I cannot comment on the peanut butter recipe as unfortunately I don’t like peanuts…

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  36. Grandpa stories are the best! Mine would have done the same (and probably did). Didn’t listen to anyone, did as he pleased, but was as generous as could be with garden produce. When he moved into a care center, we took part of his grape vine, so even though he’s long passed, we enjoy a small crops of his grapes every fall. How lovely these memories are 🙂

    DIY peanut butter–rah rah! You could make your “two-legged” tweaks and use it in the recipe I posted just last night 😉

    Enjoyed your prose per usual.

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    • Thanks, Liz, I’m glad you enjoyed the post. They just don’t make ’em like our Grandpas anymore. One of my Cousins has a grape arbor in his yard that he started from cuttings of Grandpa’s vines. I would love to do the same but my place just isn’t big enough for one.
      My memory is so bad that I had to double-check but, you’re right, this PB would be great in your recipe for PB balls. Maybe I’ll split my next batch with Max and treat myself for a change. 🙂

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  37. I love the story about your grandpa…what a classic! We have a family friend who is 89 and still climbs a ladder to clean off his roof! Everyone has given up saying a thing to him because he is so stubborn. When he’s done he goes inside and has a couple of stiff scotches! I had no idea peanut butter was so easy to make. Now I’m going to have to make some because while I don’t have a pup, I do have a peanut butter lover in the house! 🙂

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    • Thanks, Betsy. I’m sure that if Grandpa had lived longer, he never would have slowed down. As it was, he was told to take it easy when health issues arose and he ignored the doctors. In ways that were astounding to all of us. He was a real character. Like you, I was so surprised when I learned how easy it was to make peanut butter — and how much healthier. Believe me, Max couldn’t be happier! SInce you’re dealing with a two-legged member of your household, you may need to add a bit of salt or honey to improve the flavor. My advice would be to make a small batch — say 1 cup of peanuts — and experiment with the flavors. After that, make as much as you want. Good luck!

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  38. Oh I just love this story! Your Grandpa reminds me so much of mine. Stubborn, proud, hard working and determined – especially when it came to something for the good of the family. I can picture the scene too. Brings a smile to my face. And now you’ve peaked my curiosity about the “seeing” the tomatoes story. Although, if he was like my grandpa, I have an idea what that meant. 😉

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    • I’m glad you enjoyed the story, Kristy, and that it brought to mind your own Grandpa. They were part of a vanishing breed, weren’t they. I bet you know exactly what that invitation meant. Not to worry, I’ll tell all within my next post.

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  39. I LOVE THIS! I really like the thought of making my own peanut butter. I am going to be a hero in these parts.

    Fabulous story about your grandfather painting. I like people like that – folks who know what has to be done despite what everyone else says.

    As an aside, I tried Risotto on the weekend but I strayed dramatically from your recipe and it showed. It wasn’t terrible, but it really needed more time & attention than I was able to give it. Am going to try it again, however, and stick a little closer to your instructions.

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    • Glad you like the post and hope you have better luck with the PB recipe than the risotto. Sorry it didn’t go well for you but, then again, my first time didn’t go well either. You will conquer it, though, and be very happy when it does. Talk about self-satisfaction. Good luck! Let me know if you have any questions. 🙂

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  40. I like the sound of your grandpa John – unflappable is a word I think of. I can imagine all the kids running to do his bidding to receive the honour of pushing the wheelbarrow. 🙂

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    • Yes, Colline, “unflappable” definitely could fit Grandpa. When we were little, we were all so eager to help on his projects. As you said, we competed for the right to do his bidding. Then, as we grew older, we began to realize that it wasn’t such a thrill hauling cement or digging ditches. The bloom was off the rose, so to speak. 🙂

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  41. My hands were sweating at the part where you and the neighbors were at the bottom of the ladder and your Grandpa (at 71) was on top – Painting! Wow! When I grow up, I really hope I am like him!
    You are so good to your Max! Bet my dogs would love this peanut butter – I know I would 🙂
    Shashi @ http://runninsrilankan.com

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    • LOL … Don’t try to be like him too early or you may not make it to 71!! You can make this PB really quickly and easily. You’ll be surprised when you make it the first time.
      Thank you for visiting and taking the time to comment. 🙂

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  42. Skip over a Grandpa story? Never! I must say, that man had tenacity (he would have made a good food blogger had there been such a thing then 😊). Loved your line that back then, “70 was 70.” I wonder how it is that we all think of ourselves as so much younger than we really are? Mind you, it’s a good thing, as long as we’re not being ridiculous about it 😊. That peanut butter would be a great treat for a dog, and I think also for a human who likes a peanutty treat (although I think I’d have to add a little salt).

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    • Thanks, Mar, I’m glad you enjoyed this tale. I’ve another one coming so, stay tuned …
      I think today people are in much better shape than ever. In the past, many barely made it to retirement age. It was quite rare to meet someone that had lived into their 80s. Now we think it is too young when someone passes while in their 70s. As for the PB, a bit of salt and maybe a little honey wouldn’t hurt. All you can do it give it a try and find out. Good luck!

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  43. hahahahaha!! You had to give it to the old man – what guts!!! Wow!!! I was laughing at ’70 is new 50’…heheheh! I held my breath through out…..so glad it ended on tomatoes. Well, believe it or not, your grandpa sounds somewhat like the man I married. If he can do it, he will. But I am can be quite forceful and don’t take it lying down, so he sometimes caves in just to avoid a hell he gets afterwards, lol!! I especially hate it when he gets up those tall ladders……and I can feel the fear in my mouth and it’s not pleasant to have sweaty hands..And that’s not fair. I had no clue it was so so easy to make peanut butter, I am like, wow!! But I don’t yet have a food processor, so I am wondering – will blender work?

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    • Thanks, Minnie, I’m glad you found the post enjoyable. Grandpa did have guts. We just seemed to disagree over how to keep those guts where they should be. He was forever taking risks that caused the adults a great deal of worry. I bet you’re a force to be reckoned with and your DH knows when to say “Uncle”. He’s no fool. 🙂
      It is that easy to make PB. That surprised me the first time, too. Yes, you can use your blender, so long it is a powerful one. My KitchenAid can be used. Just be careful not to overfill it and you may have to shut it down to let it cool. If it gets too war, the oil can separate from the butter. Dedy, an earlier commenter, said that his Mother froze the peanuts before making the butter so that the heat wouldn’t be a problem. It sounds like a good solution should you run into the problem. Good luck when you do give it a try. 🙂

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  44. It seems we have stepladder stories in common, only mine was my dad last year.. although he is a grandpa. He’s now 80, 79 when he climbed a ladder to clean the eaves at the cabin by himself. This year I had to talk him out of the two story ladder to carry the surfboards up to the attic. Anyway, last year the ladder actually broke and he gave us a huge scare.. going into shock from the fall scare.. so I’ve told him no more ladders. Yet he defiantly tells us it was the ladder’s fault and not his so he continues to climb in our absence. I hope I’m tough like him at 80:D Sooo glad your Grandpa was casual about his accomplishment and showed everyone what he’s made of! And.. the peanut butter, I’ve been contemplating making it and not done so yet. I will have to make these treats for my mother in law whose dog barks continuously when she leaves.. this would keep him busy and maybe tie up his tongue to the roof of his mouth for a while;) Oh, I wish I still had a pupster.. xx

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    • I’m so glad your Grandpa is all right, Barb. I know he gave you all a fright! He and my Grandpa were very much the same. Even had he fallen, I’m sure Grandpa would have gone back up that ladder the next time it was needed. There just was no stopping him when he saw something needed to be done.
      Giving a dog a toy/bone filled with frozen PB will keep him licking for a good while until the PB melts. Be careful with bones, though. Max has had these 2 bones for years and I know he cannot break them into shards. I never leave him with a new bone. I want to be around if he breaks it so that I can take it away before he injures himself. There are plenty of hard-rubber toys that can be used if you’re not certain about the bones. I bet your MIL knows which are best for her pupster. Good luck!

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    • You’re right. These memories certainly do keep my departed family members close. They live on in my heart and on these “pages.” I’m glad you enjoyed the story and recipe. : )

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  45. I love reading stories about your family. My dad is 77 and when I went over to his house a few days ago, he was on the roof trying to fix his tv antenna! He’s happiest when he’s puttering, I just wish he would stick to puttering on the ground.
    We can grow peanuts in our area. Have never tried making peanut butter though and I’ve never given it to my dog. she would probably love it. thanks for the recipe.

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    • Gosh,do you bring back memories! yes, that is exactly the thing Grandpa would have done, ignoring all of us ground dwellers. THere just wasn’t any way to dissuade him.
      I have yet to have yet to have a dog that didn’t like PB. It really does come in handy when you need to medicate him. It will hide any pill you may have to administer. I’m glad you enjoyed the post. Good luck trying to keep your Dad’s feet on the ground. 🙂

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  46. John, what a wonderful story I could just see him up on that ladder with the hockey stick. Men are funny creatures aren’t they? Oh, perhaps you might not agree falling under that category. As many as I’ve had the pleasure of knowing in one capacity or another over my lifetime, I’ve never really been able to convince any one of them to do anything they had a mind to do if serious about it. Best to just stand back and do damage control I’ve found. The peanut butter recipe, although I’m sure irresistible to Max, probably would probably be less than well received by Boo the Cat.

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    • Thanks, Susie, and from my experience with cats, they never quite got beyond PB’s ‘stick to the roof of your mouth” capacity. Max, on the other hand, will actually use the side of his crate to clean his tongue, going back to this “reserve” once he’s cleaned out the toy or bone. The dog loves his PB.
      As a man, I will gladly say that Grandpa was made from a different cloth. He was as determined as he was fearless. They just don’t make ’em like that anymore, or, if they do, I must have skipped that day when they were handing out those qualities. 🙂

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        • Sorry, Susie, that your Grandfather was taken so early in life. To leave such an impression, he must have been quite a man. Grandpa was the only Grandparent I knew, although Nonna, my Cousins’ Grandmother, was about as close to us as any Grandma could be. Grandpa was such a force that The Fates probably felt that we couldn’t deal with another Grandparent. In this case, less was definitely more 🙂

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  47. I always wanted to make peanut butter, but at this point, my dietician is always on my case when it comes to me enjoying peanuts or any type of nuts. Anyway, I am looking forward to your tomato jam recipe. Have tomatoes–will CAN them!!!

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    • I know what you mean about peanut butter. As much as Max likes it, he only gets a few tablespoons per week. It’s a treat not one of the major food groups. 🙂
      The jam is coming. I made 2 batches and they helped to bring my tomato harvest under control. I hope you’ll be able to say the same.

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  48. I really enjoyed the grandpa story. What a guy! 😀 I adore peanut butter, but never imagined that a dog would enjoy it. I have also never considered making my own. Thanks for the squash recipe. It sounds delicious. Tomato jam is something I haven’t ever had. There’s always a first time, I suppose. 🙂

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    • Thank you. I’m glad that you enjoyed the story and both recipes. Yes, Grandpa was quite a character. All of my dogs have loved peanut butter. It’s my ace in the hole when I need to give them pills. The penne with squash recipe is so easy to make and a great way to get your pasta fix but with half the carbs. And, around here, this is certainly the time year to prepare it. 🙂

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  49. Looks like a great treat for pups and ponytails alike!!! I think the girls would have fun making this and they’d be surprised by just how easy it is! Your grandpa sure had lots of uses for that old hockey stick! A gardening tool and a painting device!

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    • Hey, Barb! Yes, you’re right. I bet your girls would enjoy making PB on their own. I’ve suggested to others to start with a small batch the first time to see if salt & honey/sugar are needed, if the PB is to be eaten by two-legged family members. Once you get the taste you like, you can always go bigger with the next batch. WHen cold weather hit, we boys went on scavenger hunts, looking for our hockey sticks. No telling what Grandpa had done with them and whether any had survived.

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  50. There was so much fun in Ontario over the weekend, there was no way I could have made it until today. Thanks you John, for sharing this hilarious story about your Grandpa. If I was there, I would have preferred never to grow up and just enjoyed the main duty of ‘staying out of the way.’ Your Grandpa was a very talented man, who would have thought of having a ‘hockey-stick-paint brush’ and he was Gutsy, too. I bet some of the female neighbours gathered round the ladder were looking up with their eyes closed, and yelling tops. If I can’t stand looking at something, I just close my eyes, it helps a great deal (thank God we were adorned with eyelids). I always remove the “paper skins” (what a name!), I find them bitter and I love the chunky peanut butter version, with crackers, Marie or Rich tea biscuits or just a slice of bread. Thanks for the ‘ice treat tip’ although I don’t have a pet. My best wishes to Max and thanks again for being so patient and gracious. Have a fabulous week, John.

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    • Thank you, Liz. Yes, keep busy now for it won’t be long before it will be too cold to do much outdoors. Grandpa sure was a force to be reckoned with. Once he set out to perform a job, there was no persuading him otherwise. It was either help him or get out of his way. Peanut butter has been a life saver for me with my dogs. They’ve all loved it and it makes medicating them so much easier. Getting your puppy to think ice cubes are treats is another life saver. They really do help cool the animal down. Max thinks baby carrots are treats, too. It’s a good thing he doesn’t talk to the other dogs in the neighborhood or I’d be in big trouble!
      Thanks, Liz, for your visit and for always leaving such great comments. Have a great week.

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  51. This is one of my all-time favorite John posts. I just love this story. Tell Max, too, that Chase absolutely loves the pupster recipe. It’s better than Pill Pockets and he appreciates having this for the nasty ol’ pills he has to take. Thank you John!

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    • Hi, Sarah! Yeah, this is a good “Grandpa story.” There are more, you know. He was one of kind, that’s for sure. I started to tell Max about Chase and he was interested — until I mentioned “peanut butter.” After that, his eyes got the same look a 5 year-old gets gazing at a birthday cake. I’d “lost” him. I am glad Chase would like this PB. It really is a life saver when it’s pill time. Have a great week, Sarah!

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  52. Your Grandpa and my Mom-in-law belong to the same league, I bet. She was one hell of a ‘care-a-damn’ woman. All her 8 children and their families and offspring (in fact, entire herd of 29 people) live in separate flats but in the same building/apartment 🙂 And how sincerely, joyfully, effortlessly she takes care of the humongous herd singlehandedly with a ‘what the hell’ attitude 🙂

    Enjoyed every single word of your Grandpa memoir.
    Love.

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    • Thank you so much, Nusrat. I’m glad you enjoyed this post. Yes, your Mom-in-law does sound like she had much in common with my Grandpa, although he never fed 29 people. That’s incredible!!! I wish I could find the source for their energy and resolve. I’d be unstoppable!!! 😉

      Like

    • I don’t want anything but peanuts for my dog(s). When I make a separate batch for myself, I’ll spice it up a bit, though not always. Thanks for visiting and taking the time to comment.

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  53. Pingback: My Tomatoes Are In A Jam | from the Bartolini kitchens

    • Hi, Amber! Most sources I read said that homemade PB should be refrigerated and will last months. I use half-pint jam jars to store it and line them up on a refrigerator shelf. I’ve never had it around longer than 4 to 6 weeks and there was never a problem. Hope your Dad’s pupsters love it as much as Max.

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  54. Love reading your stories. Grandpa was a mighty man. I sure he could tell a wonderful story as well. I was really feeling scared for him as well. Thanks for sharing.

    BE ENCOURAGED! BE BLESSED!

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