Burrata Returns and This Time It’s Packin’ Fusilli

Fusilli Corti Bucati alla Bolognese con Burrata

These days, I never know from where my next recipe idea will come.  Beyond my family’s treasure trove, there’s the Cooking Channel & Food Network; Saturday afternoons on PBS are Must See TV; mustn’t forget Julia, Lidia, Mary Ann, Biba, and Mario, whether new episodes or rebroadcasts I’ve seen a dozen times; and most recently The Chew — and that’s only television sources. What about cookbooks, magazines, newspapers, and foodie websites? And where would we be without WordPress, Blogger, Pinterest, Facebook, Twitter, and, StumbleUpon? I must admit that some days — like when I’m on my 5th attempt at remembering a password — I wonder if all of this is really necessary. Yes, there are those days but there are, also, days when I’m rewarded with a gift like today’s recipe.

Back in January I posted a pasta recipe featuring spinach, lemon, and burrata cheese. The recipe was well-received and a number of you have since tried and liked it. In the Comments Section, Celia, whose wonderful blog Fig Jam and Lime Cordial is what I hope mine will become when it grows up, mentioned that Down Under burrata is served atop pasta, broken open to allow the cream and stracciatelle (torn curds) to soak into the pasta, and served. Well, that’s all I needed to hear. I got right on it!

My first attempt was just as Celia has said. I dressed the pasta with my tomato sauce with meat, placed the burrata on top, and served myself a portion. That plate was just incredible and I couldn’t wait to have a 2nd helping. And that’s when it happened. You see, leaving the burrata on top of the pasta, though great for the first servings, isn’t so great for a 2nd helping. WIth the cream now soaked into the pasta, the burrata sitting atop the cooling pasta also cools. Soon, instead of being a warm, gooey cheese, it’s more like a block of lumpy cheese –still very tasty but a hardened block nonetheless. Leftovers were no better because by then the cheese was more pasta death mask than gooey delight. How does one re-heat this?  I eventually did reheat it in a covered pan with a bit of water and butter over a low heat. This was not what I had expected. Undaunted, I bought more burrata,

Cheese issues aside, I realized that this is no normal pasta dish and I needed to step it up. That’s why last week my Sugo alla Bolognese was posted. I had planned to share the recipe this Fall but I wanted everyone to have the recipe should they decide to make today’s pasta. So, when I made this dish for the 2nd time, I used my Sugo all Bolognese and did everything the same, save one big exception. In the first test, I served the burrata right after I spread it atop the pasta. Not this time. Since I was again dining alone, once it was spread, I used two large spoons to stir the cheese and cream into the pasta, garnished it with grated cheese, and served. Though the presentation wasn’t as impressive as having a chunk of burrata on each plate being served, by mixing the bowl’s contents, each serving had an even amount of burrata within, and most importantly, the cheese and pasta left in the serving bowl remained warm and manageable. Second helpings were a delight as were leftovers.

So, my advice for preparing this dish depends upon the number of dinner mates being served. If dining alone or serving one other, you can break the burrata and spread it across the top of the pasta. Then you can either serve the pasta first and then mix the cheese into the remainder in the pasta bowl, or, just go ahead and mix the cheese before serving. If you’re serving a number of guests, then just spread the burrata across the top of the pasta and serve. Once everyone has been served, you may wish to mix the remaining burrata into the remaining pasta to avoid the hardened blob of cheese.

Since that first burrata post, I’ve been asked several times whether I plan to make burrata. The answer is an unequivocal no. Making mozzarella is difficult enough. Forming it into a pouch, stuffing it with shredded curds, and then filling it with cream is a bit much for me to handle. Still, some of you may wish to try making burrata at home. Here, then, is a video of burrata being made. Enjoy!

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The last thing worth mentioning is the pasta I chose Fusilli Corti Bucati for the dish . The word fusilli means “little spindles” and it’s a twisted pasta. Corti in the name means small or short, as opposed to lunghi which means long. Bucati refers to the fact that each fusillo has a hollow center. I chose them because their shape would hold onto both the sauce and the cheese very well. Feel free to use whatever pasta you like.

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Fusilli Corti Bucati with Burrata Cheese Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1 lb (453 g) fusilli corti bucati — maccheroni molle (pasta springs) may be substituted
  • 1 quart tomato sauce with meat — vegetarians may substitute meatless sauce
  • 1 lb (453 g) Burrata “pouch”
  • grated/shaved Pecorino Romano cheese — Parmigiano Reggiano may be substituted

Directions

  1. Cook pasta following package directions.
  2. Heat tomato sauce in a sauce pan.
  3. Drain pasta, return to pan, and mix with 2/3 of the heated tomato sauce.
  4. Place the dressed pasta in serving bowl.
  5. Place remaining 1/3 sauce on top of pasta.
  6. Place burrata pouch on top of pasta with sauce.
  7. Use 2 knives to slice through the pouch, releasing the curds & cream.
  8. Continue slicing until the burrata is evenly spread.
  9. At this point you can:
    1. Garnish with grated and/or shaved cheese
    2. Serve immediately.

                                      —  or  —

    1. Thoroughly combine the burrata & cream with the pasta & sauce.
    2. Garnish with grated/and or shaved cheese.
    3. Serve immediately

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This slideshow requires JavaScript.

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Notes … 

Whether the sauce you use is bought, homemade, and with or without meat, make sure it is your favorite. This is no ordinary pasta and deserves no less than your best.

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It’s déjà vu all over again … 

I first shared the recipe for Cherry Cheesecake Pizza 2 years ago, in the days leading up to Easter. The recipe was given to Mom by the wonderful woman who lived across the street from us. A great little dessert, this “pie” has also been served, in some form, at countless parties and barbecues,  Easy to prepare, you’ll quickly see why this remains a family favorite. Click HERE to see the recipe.

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Coming soon to a monitor near you …

Old Meets New

Old Meets New

Grandpa’s Tuna Salad Gets A Makeover

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139 thoughts on “Burrata Returns and This Time It’s Packin’ Fusilli

  1. Oh my goodness! Look at that cheese! I have never tried burrata but I should be able to find it here, we have a few nice Italian delis. I can just imagine what this cheese would be like on a plate of pasta!! I am so looking for this cheese.
    Do you feel overwhelmed with all the recipes and cooking shows out there? I want to try so many blogger recipes, cook book recipes, TV recipes, food magazines and on and on. I just don’t have that much time!!! And you are right about all those passwords! I get so overwhelmed that I just forget it all and cook my comfort food 🙂
    Have a good week John.

    Nazneen

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    • I hope you do find burrata, Nazneen. It is a one-of-a-kind cheese and it’s too bad the photo didn’t capture the cream spilling out into the pasta. 🙂
      I agree that there are many food-related sites and sources and I’m adjusting my relationship with them. For some time, it’s been, “Look, a new site. Where do I sign up?” Well, I did sign up and now I cannot keep up. And the passwords? It’s becoming a joke as the rules for creating them are getting more and more complicated — and less likely to be remembered. Pretty soon I’ll just say I’ve forgotten them and get a new one every time I access the sites. 🙂
      Thanks for dropping by, Nazneen, and commiserating.

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  2. Love your post! Love fusilli! Will NOT promise to make the burrata! Methinks I would rather buy 🙂 ! Fascinating recipe for those far more brave than I !! [OK, I am chickening out!!] Sorry, John !! Huh! What has happened to the world clock? Methinks you should be asleep or I should!! But it is rather nice that our on-line periods just sometimes coincide!! And I cannot wait for your Grandpa’s tuna salad!

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    • I’m glad you like the post, Eha, and I agree about making burrata. It’s fascinating to watch but there is no way I would attempt that. All of that water and whey is pretty hot for the mozzarella to remain so pliable. I do not have asbestos fingers! And that’s OK. I know where to buy it and that’s good enough for me! I hope it’s good enough for you, too.
      All caught up and heading to bed very shortly. 😉

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  3. Bonjourno John! This is an amazingly interesting dish. I have never heard or tasted burrata before and it looks so rich and delicious. I really enjoyed the video as it was really interesting to see him make the cheese. I can’t wait for one day to be watching your video cooking lessons instead. I also really like your slide show with your step by step picture as that is really helpful to understand your steps for making your beautiful delicious pasta. This would be a real fun make ahead dish for a gathering and then cut the burrata at the table and mix-the guests would love this.
    I feel the same way about all of the social media I love it and love seeing all the delightful dishes everyone is making, but sometimes it can be so overwhelming. Thanks so much for pinning my recipe. I think your pasta dish is destined to be pinned on recipes I want to try… Now where do I get my hands on burrata in Hong Kong? hmmm…

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    • Buona Notte, BAM! Burrata is a relatively new cheese, having been “created” in Puglia about 1920. It is something else! When I find myself in Italy again, I’m going to find it. I can only imagine how good it would be if made with bufalo mozzarella. YUM! Yes, this dish is made to be served to guests. There’s a level of showmanship when bursting the pouch and watching the cream spill forth. A definite crowd pleaser!
      Yes, I think more than a few of us are starting to question the need for all of the social media outlets. There are so many and I think we’ve reached critical mass. People will begin to scale back now, causing a few of the sites to whither and disappear. That recipe of yours was a very good one and definitely worth pinning for later use. Thank you for that one!

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  4. Congrats on another great post, John! I’d say your blog is well beyond its puberty 😉
    I like the story about the burrata conundrum.
    I’ll look for fusilli bucati – never seen those before. Now I only have to find burrata to be able to make this!

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    • Thanks, Stefan, though the thought of a blog, any blog, reaching puberty is both funny and terrifying — just like the real thing. 🙂
      Fusilli corti bucati is also made by Barilla but, if you cannot find it, maybe you can find maccheroni molle. Like the fusilli, they are round tight but the pasta is thin, like linguine, rather than thick and hollow like bucatini. Then again, you are so well-versed in Italian cuisine and pasta that I doubt you’ll have any problem finding a suitable pasta. You’re right, though. Finding buratta will be the difficult part. Good luck!

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  6. I love the slideshow – it’s a feast for the eyes. I think for a homey-style meal I would prefer the burrata mixed through the pasta and sauce but I’m sure I’d be happy to sample it both ways, particularly if there are a number of guests, to savour the texture and flavour tastes of the burrata next to the pasta and sauce… and of course it looks impressive. I can see it taking centre place on a table with crusty bread and salad… I’m dreaming at the moment but it could happen 😉

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    • Thank you, EllaDee. I think you nailed it better than I stated in the post. There’s the homestyle version and then there’s the “It’s Show TIme!” version for guests. And considering how relatively unknown buratta is, there’s a lot to be said about its Wow Factor.
      By the way, I like how you dream. 🙂

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    • Thanks, Sam. Unlike your fantastic posts, I’ve no beach in the background and have to rely on something fantastic to hold people’s interest. Buratta is just the thing! 🙂

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  7. Wonderful! I’ve never had burrata with pasta, just drizzled gloriously with olive oil, coarse salt, and pepper, and gobbled deliriously on bread. This sounds rich and delicious and fun to eat.

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    • Oh, yeah! Your buratta dish is a real treat, too! Let’s face it. You would really have to try — and try very hard — to come up with a bad way to serve this wonderful cheese. It’s a cheese and a show, all in one.

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  8. Great post and headline John. Love the slideshow! It made me SO hungry – I’m sitting here at work with a sad little bowl of nuts. God that pasta with the exploding bag of cheesy goodness on top looks incredible. I’m familiar with burrata, but have never actually bought it before. I’m absolutely putting it on the shopping list. I’m with you on the social media/print media blitz – us food-lovers surely suffer the most from visual overload syndrome. I don’t know where I’d be without it all though, particularly blogs and Pinterest, both addictions of the nicest kind.

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    • I’m so glad you like the post and hope you get a chance to prepare the recipe. It truly is a unique dish, one that’s guaranteed to get you a few oohs and aahs when you bring it to the table. Yes, the social media can be addictive. As much as I enjoy it, a better balance must be struck. I haven’t figured that out yet, but I will. 🙂

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  9. Omg, you have to stop, you’re killing me! It’s only 10:30am here and I’m dying to eat that plate of goodness up there with that huge ball of burrata sitting on top, and every bit of it! Your slide show has me mesmerized, I must find this cheese!

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    • Thank you so much. I hope you do find some, Laura, because it is one special pasta. Your dinner companions — family or guests — will be mesmerized as you cut into the cheese. It just doesn’t get much better than this.

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    • It does make quite an impression, as you just pointed out. And as for the trial testing, this was a labour of love. I only wish I could have come up with a few more reasons for tests. 🙂

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  10. A friend introduced me to Burrata last year and I haven’t made anything with it yet. This recipe is sure to change all of that. I am with you in not wanting to make this cheese — unless of course I was in Italy taking an amazing cooking course looking out over the rolling hills and drinking large volumes of wine…maybe then. How likely is that to happen?

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    • Thanks, Barb. I make mozzarella and even if in Italy, I’d leave this one to the professionals. Now, drinking the large volumes of wine is more my style. I hope you do make this and I cannot wait to hear what the Ponytails have to say when you cut into the burrata pouch. 🙂

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  11. Was at food show recently and had the opportunity to sample burrata. It was spread on a piece of bread, so good, decided to not be bashful and asked for a second helping. Was tempted to ask for a third, but decided not to push my luck. Forgot to pick up a business card, but am sure I will have the opportunity to bump into the gentleman again. Fusilli is one of my favorite pasta shapes but cannot recall if it is “bucati”, need to pay attention. Thanks for the info.

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    • Yo’re most welcome, Norma. I don;t know if I would have had the restraint to not ask for a 3rd sampling of the burrata. It is good, isn’t it? Barilla makes this same pasta. You should be able to find it in your grocer’s ethnic/Italian section. Good luck!

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  12. That video makes me long to be in Italy. I need to book a European vacation. I love the look of the pasta and could clearly ask for a second serving. I love Celia’s blog too xx

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    • Thanks, Charlie The video’s opening scenes affected me in the same way. I have to get back there! It is so hard not to have a second serving of this pasta. And with Arabella and Archie on such strict diets, you, Carl, and Alfie will just have to pick up the slack. Second servings for everyone! 🙂

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    • Thank you for commiserating. I cannot tell you often I’ve had to change passwords within 24 hours because I couldn’t remember the “new” one I had to create at 2:00 am the night before. 🙂

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  13. I sometimes wonder if all this is necessary… we know the answer… 🙂 But we still cave to the temptation to look, and search, and find something else to tempt our palate, our eyes, our minds.

    thanks to the virtual world and its endless possibilities, I found your website, so count me as a lucky lady! 😉

    I love burrata, but I will be looking forward to the tuna adventure you set me up for… I’ve never used canned tuna, so that could be interesting to read about and learn

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    • I agree, Sally, and speaking for myself, I need to find a better balance now that the weather is changing. Where I have plenty of time in the WInter months, Summer is a different story. I'll figure it out. There are far worse "problems" to have. And you're also, correct. I cannot believe all of the wonderful people, yourself included, that I've met through this "thing." When looked at under that light, it ain't so bad, after all. 🙂

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  14. John, you are always very kind, and I’m so happy that a passing comment from the woman serving at our local cheese shop in Sydney could turn into such an amazing dish in your Chicago kitchen! The internet really is amazing! Your pasta looks delicious, and I love that you’ve figured out how to serve it without the cheese hardening up. And please don’t tell me you’re on twitter and I haven’t found you! What’s your username?

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    • Well, Celia, if you hadn’t passed along that comment, I would be missing out on very special pasta. I’ll be making this for my family when I visit next. It really is a great dish. Yes, I’m on Twitter and I see that you’re already following me and I you. Thanks you, Celia, for always being so encouraging and for the inspiration for this dish. 🙂

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  15. OH! MY! GOD! Or as I would say in Italian… Santa Cleopatra! I don’t even know where to begin. Fusili, especially bucati, because of their thicker texture, I just love. Your bolognese, beautiful! The burrata sitting on top of that amazing pasta dish just makes me swoon! Then mixed all together with shavings of grated cheese… I am in heaven!!! Bravo John! Sei veramente bravo!

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    • Grazie mille, Lidia! When Celia told me how they prepare it in Australia, I could not wait to try it. And I was not disappointed in the least. Make this pasta with your favorite sauce and I guarantee you’re in for a very special dinner. It is incredible and be sure to look at the faces of those seated at your table. The whole experience is remarkable. 🙂

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  16. So happy to hear you tried again! I don’t normally do second helpings, but this would break my rule. Seriously John I need to come to your house for dinner! That cherry pizza needs to be dessert!

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  17. ‘pasta death mask’ made me laugh! ~thanks, a good laugh is always a great way to start the day. Meat sauce, cheese, and pasta is a magical combination, but the idea of the burrata (which is still on my must-try-soon list) spilling over the meaty sauce and being mixed in for a velvety finish is simply perfect. I think I will try burrata for the first time when I make bolognese again — instead of finishing the bolognese with cream as usual, I will finish it with the burrata. Can’t wait!

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    • I should have asked you to describe the mixing of burrata with pasta, Judy. You did a far better job of it than I did. I can’t wait for you to try it and to hear your impressions. As I mentioned in another comment, be sure to look at your dinner companions’ faces as the platter is brought to the table and again as you cut into the pouch. Priceless!

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  18. Great video – now I’m going to have to go and buy some Burrata! Luckily there are quite a few italian delis in London. Excellent tips on serving for different numbers of people – thanks John 🙂

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  19. Ha! “…pasta death mask” – love it. I don’t know why it never occurred to me to dollop some burrata atop a pasta with tomato sauce, but it sure sounds like a great idea. I think you may be worrying a bit much about the spread/not spread dilemma. Frankly if someone handed me a bowl of this, with a big spoonful of fresh burrata on top I’d be happy to stir it myself. And I’d appreciate the option to repeat the process during seconds – or not – depending on how I felt, especially if the pasta already had your great homemade sauce on it. Great dish, great idea. Ken

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    • Thank you, Ken, I’m glad you enjoyed the post. Thank heavens for Cela for I never would have gone down this path. Now, I can’t think of serving burrata any other way and I think my friends would have a problem if I tried. In retrospect, some of the problems with the second serving had more to do with my photography than the dish itself. In the 10 or 15 minutes it took me to get a good photo and then eat, the serving platter had cooled considerably. My “problem” may be nonexistent in the real world. Hmmm. Maybe I should make it again to test this out. Science is a cruel master. 😉

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  20. Really interesting dish! And a preparation that’s new to me. Love the idea of this. And your revised method definitely has me in mind – no doubt I’d be want seconds on this! Terrific recipe – thank you.

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    • Thanks, John. to be honest, unless that first serving is huge, I don’t know many who will leave the table after only one serving. A dish like this one is the reason I watch everything else that I eat. When something special comes along, I there’s no need to deprive myself. 😉

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  21. Oh my goodness. Can I just come visit you indefinitely? I’ll just set aside the gluten and dairy allergies. I’ve never tried Burrata and the way it was spread out on top of the pasta before you mixed it in? HEAVEN. Another amazing meal, John. I love your posts! 🙂

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    • Thanks, April, you’re very kind. You’re also welcome here anytime. Burrata is a relatively new cheese, having been made for the first time in Puglia around 1920. I doubt if there’s been many attempts to make it with dairy products other than cow. Wouldn’t it be great if they made a goats milk version? I’d buy it just for the taste. Believe me, if I ever see some, you’ll be the first I tell. 🙂

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  22. My husband and I love the creamy taste of burrata and order it when we find it on a menu. Unfortunately burrata isn’t sold in our markets, but that sounds like a decadently delicious pasta dish.

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    • Thanks you, Karen, for always being so complimentary. With your culinary skills and experience, I knew that you’d be familiar with this cheese. It really is a treat to use and to serve to guests. There’s a “Wow Factor” that’s hard to beat.

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  23. Burrata is certainly one to try. I thought the video was lovely to watch, the chap making the burratas was so calm, nothing seemed to faze him. He made it look easy but I think that in the home kitchen it would be another story.

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    • I agree 100%, Maria. I’ve watched other cheese making videos and it never goes as easily at home as it does in the video. Never! And there’s no telling how hot that cream is to keep the mozzarella pliable enough to make a pouch or to keep the stracciatelle separate. No, I’ll buy my burrata and be thankful. 🙂

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  24. I really need to track this cheese down John. I am sure I’ll have more luck in the UK than in Spain. Your action photos of the sauce then the cheese are driving me crazy with hunger…just about to prepare dinner but if I had that cheese to hand I know what I’d be eating. Don’t know if I’d be able to resist diving into it before the pasta was even cooked 🙂

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    • Thanks, Tanya! It really is something and so easy, too. Just fix a big bowl of pasta with sugo and put the burrata on top. Cut into it and watch the magic. What could be easier? I do hope you can find it because I’d love to hear your opinion — as well as the other ways you’ll think of preparing it. 🙂

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  25. This looks great! I don’t know why I always stop by your blog when I’m stuck at work, far far away from my kitchen. It just makes me want things that I am unable to cook at the moment.

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  26. It seems that there is another shopping trip in my future if I am to keep up. I did not doo the last cheese justice at all. But i am all for trying again with this recipe under my wing! Have a lovely week, cold, cold here today, but wet so good for the grass. In fact it is pasta making weather!! c

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    • Chi-town is ready and waiting for you, Celi! Just say the word and a chariot will meet your train.
      I wish I’d explained the dish better to you. Next time will be much better. Not much pasta being made here for now. I’m in the middle of a major SPring cleaning. Between that and getting the yards ship-shape, I’ve little time for pasta making. That’s OK. It’s not like I’m going to starve in the interim. I hope you’re getting some of this rain. It’s been thundering overhead for some time and tomorrow is supposed to be a wet one. I’m off to bed now. Have a great morning!

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  27. The first reply I read, Angeline’s, made me smile, because her chosen words were also what came first to me: “I can do this!” There is an Italian family market I haven’t visited in awhile, and I’m thinking it’s time to go and begin to make friends with “the best” ingredients I can find. You’ve inspired me to really do that. When my kids were at home and I did more “bulk cooking” I went all the time to purchase unique pasta shapes and fresh cheese. This special fusilli dish has brought Claro’s Family Market to the forefront, and I’m looking forward to visiting again. And I may need to begin cooking for others…if I eat all this, and I’m a bit afraid I will…oh boy! hahaha!

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    • You can do this, Debra. It is very simple. Make your pasta like you normally would but reserve some of the sauce. Put the reserved sauce on top of the pasta and the burrata on top of that. Bring it to the table and listen to the oohs and aahs of everyone as you cut into the pouch releasing the cream and curds. It is that simple and oh, so very good. Of course, if you don’t believe me, you could try a test run all by your lonesome. Yes, be afraid. 🙂

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    • Thank you. I make a few cheeses, mozzarella being one, and I wouldn’t try this at home. That cream and whey must be pretty pretty warm to keep the mozzarella pliable enough to make a pouch. That man in the video is a pro and that kitchen is far better equipped than I’ll ever have. I hope you can find some burrata and, if you do choose to make some, please come back and tell me how it went.

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  28. That’s a tempting pasta dish John!! I would love to try a serving of that. My challenge is cheese….I can find it hard to eat cooked cheese, it overwhelms me. But this looks just the right kind of blend.
    I so totally hear you on the password. I get overwhelmed frequently by the amount of food info and temptations out there.Still, without them, life would not be same.

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    • If you can eat raw mozzarella, Minnie, you should have no problems with burrata. Just leave it on top of the pasta and don’t mix it so that it doesn’t melt as much. At least I hope so. Yes, remembering all of these passwords will be the death of me. Their requirements keep getting more and more complex as my memory grows worse and worse. This is a disaster waiting to happen! 🙂

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  29. This looks so good, even the puck o’ cheese was probably tasty though the texture may not have been right. But broken and melted into the pasta sounds so delicious and rich.

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    • Thanks, Dave. This is such a great dish, both to serve and eat. Your dinner mates will ooh and aah when you set the serving bowl on the table. It is a crowd pleaser, that’s for sure.

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  30. I like how you explain everything so thoroughly, John. And that you cull recipes from the multitude and present them here is great! Test them, challenge yourself, remedy whatever doesn’t please you and then share on your blog. Which, by the way, looks fairly grown up to me.
    Love your descriptions. Even though I am not hungry before I read your writing, I am usually thinking to come up with a little something after I am finished!

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    • Thanks, Ruth. You’re always so encouraging and kind with your comments. I must admit that these “tests” were probably the best to conduct ever! That cheese is something else and I was happy to make this dish again and again — in the name of Science, of course. I do hope you give it a try, Ruth. You will not be disappointed.

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  31. I’m speechless! I’ve never seen anything like this. What a fun meal to put together not to mention the deliciousness of it. Eating this would be the ultimate dining experience! Thanks for the recipe, the pictures and the video!

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    • You’re very welcome, MJ. One of the best things about this dish is the look on the faces of those seated at your table. Few, if any, have seen anything like this. 🙂

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  32. Oh my goodness, that looks outstanding! I love how you cut the burrata on top of the warm fusilli & meat sauce and that gooey cheesy goodness just spewed out. Brilliant and it’s making me drool!!!!! Can you send some my way? 😉

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  33. Again, you kill me with the last photo. Fresh tuna is another weakness of mine. If it wasn’t so mercury laden, I would eat much more of it. I probably eat too much as it is! And back to this burrata. Since your last burrata post I sought out another restaurant that serves it and made my way there for lunch last week. I was not disappointed. I should stop off and get some for home. Serving it over pasta sounds like heaven! 🙂

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    • Well, Kristy, you’ve been so patient in the face of a few meat-laden recipes that I thought a fish post would be a welcome change for you. If I want a good table at the SousChefs’ future restaurant, I had better treat you well now. 🙂
      I’ve not seen burrata on a menu here, though I don’t often go to Italian restaurants. I have to change that. I’d like to see how others serve it. Celia’s idea, though, was a very good one.

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      • The one I had the other day was served on flat bread with a tomato sauce and radish sprouts. It was delicious! I’ve also had it served with tomato chutney. 🙂 It’s funny, I don’t much go out for Italian either, unless it’s for lunch. Dinner…we prefer to make our own and usually end up going out for sushi because it’s just too time consuming to make and let’s face it – the masters do a much better job at it! And you can post as much meat as you want…you’ll always have a VIP seat at the sous chefs kitchen! 🙂

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  34. I’m sad to say that it’s very unlikely for me to obtain burrata here, but watching the process of making it is really amazing. I wish I can have a plate of your pasta now!

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    • I fear you’re right, Jasline, and that’s a shame. Not only would you enjoy it but I’d be very interested to see the dishes you’d create using burrata. Still, it’s not like you’re living in a gastronomic wasteland. There are many fantastic foods at your disposal that I’ll get no closer to than a photo you’ve shared. These things have a way of balancing out. 🙂

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  35. I’m speechless (no easy feat), what an incredible dish and yet again, your relentless experimentation to get the absolute best does not go unnoticed, John. I’ve only had the burrata at room temperature in a salad so combining it in a meat sauce and pasta dish sounds incredibly decadent. I can just imagine how wonderful the flavour the burrata imparts to the dish. I also adore the curly pasta, reminds me of a telephone cord!

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    • “Decadent” That’s it! There’s no better way to describe it and if your dinner guests are not at all familiar with buratta, the look on their faces when they first see that pasta with a pouch of cheese on top is priceless. Not to mention their eyes when te pouch is burst, releasing the cream and stracciatelle. It is a definite crowd pleaser.
      I’ve wanted to do another instructional post on making fusilli. Like the earlier postas, fusilli is very easy to make — just repetitive. I guess it would be like knitting for some, a stress reliever. Anyway, thank you so much for your gracious comments following every post I write. I’m always smiling when I finish reading them and I very much appreciate that.

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      • Making fusilli would be an incredible post John, and appreciated. I would definitely choose to make pasta over store bought since reading how easy it is on your blog.
        I’m flattered and happy that my comments make you smile; you make it easy to comment on your blog, it’s so lovely and friendly and delicious, and it’s my pleasure.

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  36. Hi john
    At last I visit your little home. I do think you probably have achieved what Celia has, just judging by the interaction in your comments. I have never had burrata with pasta. I have only been very boring in my eating of it’s creamy goodness., Although I really really like it with figs and crispy pancetta. Love your pictorial display and obvious grasp of the digital world regardless of remembering nasty passwords

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    • Welcome, Tania! Thank you for your kind words. What’s this about burrata with figs & pancetta? There’s nothing boring about that combo and I’d love it! Have you posted the recipe? Early on, I had a convention for creating passwords, one that gave each site a unique code. Then I realized that if anyone ever stole my password, they could easily figure out my “system” and all would be lost. And so began my torment. I have yet to devise a new system and my memory is nothing like it used to be. One day they’ll devise a system that won’t require passcodes and we’ll all be the happier for it.
      Thanks for visiting, Tania, and taking the time to comment. I look forward to spending some time browsing about your archives.

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  37. I love how you give me a lesson on Italian cooking. I’ve never heard of fusilli before at all, but it definitely sounds interesting and I would love to try it. My friend, you are an amazing cook 🙂

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    • Glad to oblige, Kay. You continue to show me some of the World’s best places and art work, and I’ll show you a thing or tow about pasta. For example, click HERE to see another use for fusilli.

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  38. Look at you with that fantastic little slide show of how exactly to use and incorporate the burrata! I love it! Now I must confess that when I saw the teaser picture for this post that had that huge ball of burrata on top of what appeared to be a single serving of pasta, I thought wow, that’s a lotta cheese! It makes more sense to me now that you might have extra helpings out of it, although I’m not sure if I’m interpreting the scale of things correctly AND I do love lotsa cheese. 🙂 Anyway, it looks really amazing and truly delicious, John. And I also can’t wait to hear about your reinterpreted tuna salad! Have a great weekend!

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    • Thank you so much, Betsy. I wish I could take credit for the slideshow but it’s made possible with the new theme I’m using. The fact is, I’m having a problem with the collage-type photo display and switched to the slideshow in the 11th hour because I couldn’t wait for WP support to get back to me.
      This is such a great way to serve burrata — but so very rich, too. I would not have been able to eat a single serving with that amount of burrata on top — unless there was a defibrillator table-side. Still, I’d “go out” wearing a smile! 🙂

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    • Yes, Celia and her blog are fantastic. I do hope you try burrata with your favorite pasta and sauce. Just remember to work fast and you’ll be rewarded with one decadent serving of pasta. 🙂

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    • Unless you can locate a good Italian market, I doubt that you’ll be able to find burrata. It took me years to find it here. I bet you could simulate this recipe if you were to take grated mozzarella, add it to a bit of heavy cream, and then add both to the top of your pasta as if it were a pouch of burrata. It may not be exactly the same but it would give you that gooey, creamy tasty of burrata. It’s definitely worth a try. If you do attempt this, please let me know how you like it. Thanks!

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    • .The outer pouch of burrata is mozzarella, Dedy. It’s what is inside the pouch that makes burrata so special. It’s filled with torn curds, called stracciatelle, and cream. The stracciatelle do taste like mozzarella but they are much lighter in texture. And of course, the heavy cream gives it all a wonderful, decadent flavor.

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  39. That video is fascinating. He makes it look so easy! If we lived near a cheese-making shop, my husband would never be home. … Who am I kidding? I’d never be home, either!

    This is very good advice: “This is no ordinary pasta and deserves no less than your best.” I always take your advice seriously.

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    • Thank you, that’s very kind of you to say. That video is a trap! I’ve made mozzarella. It is never as easy as the videos portray and this is so much more than just making mozzarella. You’ve got to shred the curds and form the pouch, neither step a breeze. Remember, too, that mozzarella is hot when made. That guy must have asbestos fingers to do what he’s doing without showing the least bit of discomfort. In Italy, the women keep a large glass of ice water nearby so that they can dip their hands in it when they make mozzarella. I use rubber gloves and it still gets a bit hot. I’ll continue to buy it, thank you very much, and I advise you do the same! 🙂

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  40. Must find a source of burrata in PDXville. This looks amazing. When you describe the creamy pops of cheese I can almost taste them coating a tangy tomatoey sauce … and the cheesy death mask LOL

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    • Thanks, Cam. Look for an Italian market, go to where they sell mozzarella, and hope The Fates are with you that day. As you saw in the video, it is not a run-of-the-mill cheese. And if you ever see it on a menu, ask where they get it from. You never know. There may be a place somewhere close that you knew nothing about. Believe me. It is worth the effort finding it.

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  41. I have had the loveliest dishes with burrata cheese melted in, under and over but I just can’t seem to get my hands on a little bundle of burrata these days! I don’t know why, but my local italian grocer hasn’t had any in for a very long time. I’m going through burrata withdrawal.. and seeing a new way to serve it isn’t going to help with the hunger pangs one bit:) But.. there is hope in sight, I’m off to Italy on Wednesday and the minute we touch down in Florence, I’ll be on the look out for it! Though it won’t be nearly as tasty as a Bartolini recipe, it will have to do! xx

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    • I cannot believe that I’m about to say this … Forget the burrata! Have a wonderful time in Florence, Barb. It is my favorite city to visit. There are so many things to see from so many vantage points. Part of the fun, though, is discovering them — and you will. It’s not like walking around New York or London. This is a small town, one that you can easily tour on foot. I don’t know where else you’re going to visit but, with Florence in your itinerary, you’re sure to have a wonderful trip. I cannot wait to hear all about it. Buon viaggio!

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  42. Ah John, you just keep adding things to my must find shopping list – burrata is on there now for my next trip to the North End. If it’s there I will find it. This dish looks like something I would love to sit down with a glass of wine & good company. It has that “sit around and socialize while eating” feel to it.
    I think I’ve ended up with more than my share of pasta death masks & knew exactly what you meant when you wrote that one.

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    • You’re so very correct, Diane. This is something to surprise your guests. It makes one heckuva presentation! They’ll be amazed when you break open the pouch and the cream runs out. If they’ve never seen burrata before, you’ll make a lasting impression, to be sure! Yes, beware the death mask! 🙂
      Thanks for commenting, Diane, The next couple recipes will go easy on your grocery list. Promise!

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  43. John, I am certain you are trying to kill us all with desire. I am certain I am not the only one who just may pass out from just imagining the amazingness of this pasta along with the incredible looking Burrata. Burrata should have poems written about it and so should any of your pasta dishes. My dream is to one day travel to Chicago and insist on you inviting me to dinner for John’s famous pasta and maybe some of your home made mozzarella as well. Heck, I can get Burrata at our local Italian market but your signature cheese, I’m sure cannot be replicated.

    Maybe you need to open a little restaurant?!

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    • You are so kind, Geni. Thank you. You’ll always be welcome for dinner, Geni, though we’ll spend an hour beforehand sipping wine while we make pasta. Believe me. You’re not leaving here unless you can make at least 1 kind of pasta. 🙂
      Dad was in the restaurant business, Geni. I remember how hard he worked and the long hours. That’s close enough for me.

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  44. John, what a great recipe! Pasta, ragu’ sauce and burrata! I have never had it but just the thought of it makes me hungry and longing for a dish of your pasta! And, the idea of mixing it all up together sounds like a great one. On top of that, I just love burrata: so deliciously decadent! 🙂 Thank you, John, for yet another treat!

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    • Thanks, Abbe. Do you know of any good Italian markets in your area? If you do, look in the area where they have fresh mozzarella. I hope you find some for it’s the cream that sets burrata apart. Although it is still good when pre-sliced and served, someone else is having your cream! What an outrage! Good luck!

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  45. Mmmmmm, burrata! I had the tastiest burrata salad last week when in the Twin Cities for work — burrata marinated with creamy mint pesto, snap peas and radish at the Union Restaurant. But, I have never had a “pouch” of burrata!

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    • What a coincidence! I hope you watched the video. All burrata is a pouch at some point. If you can find some, gather your friends together and treat them to this pasta dinner. Make a show of it. You’ll all enjoy yourselves and have a fantastic meal in the process. Guaranteed!

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  46. Just wow, John, simply wow! I have never had burrata (and how pathetic is this? I hadn’t even heard of it until that recent post of yours!) Clearly I need to find a really fine Italian restaurant and be treated! Then, with those tasty memories lodged squarely in my heart, venture to bring it home! Thanks, always, for such inspiration!

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    • Oh, Spree, are you in for a tasty treat! In restaurants, burrata may be found any where from bruschette to pasta. If you don’t see it on the menu, ask the waitstaff. It is a creamy delight! If you see it in an Italian market, by all means buy it and use it at home like you would a very creamy mozzarella. I’m sure no matter how you prepare it, it will be wonderful. 🙂

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  47. John – You really should write an Italian cookbook (perhaps you are?). Your depth of understanding reflects both your heritage and that of a professional chef (although I don’t know if you are one). Sign me up when you are ready.

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  48. And here I thought the Sugo on its own looked rich! Adding the burrata takes it over the top! I can just imagine how delicious this must be. By the way, I had my first taste of burrata at a oooking class a few weeks ago. What an impressive cheese!

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    • Thanks, Mar. I don;t know of any cheese as decadent as burrata. That creamy center is just too much. Prepare this and watch the faces of your dinner mates as your pierce the pouch and the cream out runs into the pasta. Disbelief is the look. 🙂

      Like

  49. Pingback: Fusilli with Bolognese Ragù and Burrata | Stefan's Gourmet Blog

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