Fig Preserves with Balsamic Vinegar and Black Pepper

Argh! “The best laid schemes o’ Mice an’ Men”. It’s happened again. I have a schedule for these posts. I really do. Today’s entry, for example, was to have been an instructional post detailing how to make Italian mozzarella. The Fates, however, intervened. In the days preceding my trip to Michigan, I failed twice to make the cheese.  I thought I’d be able to try again once I returned home but soon there were peppers to pickle, figs to preserve, olives to cure, and a seemingly endless stream of posts to read and comments to write. So — and by stating my plans I’m taking a big risk with those pesky Fates —  I decided to schedule Italian mozzarella for October 10th.

Now, pushing mozzarella off into the future left me in a bind.  I had no post for today. Earlier I mentioned I had figs to preserve. Well, that recipe suddenly became today’s post, meaning I had some writing to do. As you can see, I got it done but, as for the backlog of posts & comments, I’m still working on them. Sorry for the delay.

 *     *     *

 *     *     *

A few weeks ago, chaiselongue1 posted Jamming, an entry about making fig jam. (If you’re not familiar with this beautiful blog, olivesandartichokes, now is as good a time as any to check it out.) I thought that jam sounded delicious but that’s about as far as it went — until a market last week had crates of Mission figs for half the price I’d previously seen. Next thing you know, I’ve got 2 crates (about 3 lbs) of figs in my cart. Once I got home, I checked the Jamming post again, as well as the Pick Your Own website, as I always do before I preserve anything. Once there, a sentence caught my eye. “If you like strawberry jam, you’ll love fig jam.” That got me to thinking. I went back to the recipe I’d shared for strawberry jam with balsamic vinegar (thanks, Sarah!) and decided to use it as a guide for these preserves.

Unlike the strawberry recipe – but like Jamming — this recipe doesn’t use pectin. It takes a bit longer to prepare but if you take your time, the preserves will set as nicely as if you used pectin. Just like the strawberry jam, however, I included cracked black pepper. I really enjoyed the “bite” it brought to the strawberries. Lastly, these figs were sweet enough, allowing me to use less sugar than was used with the strawberries. Besides, I’ve got plans for these preserves that don’t involve toast. Stay tuned …

 *     *     *

*     *     *

Fig Preserves with Balsamic Vinegar and Black Pepper Recipe 

yield: 5 – 6 cups

Ingredients

  • 4 – 5 cups fresh Mission figs, prepped & chopped (about 3 lbs.)
  • 3 cups sugar
  • ½ cup water
  • 1 tsp butter (optional)
  • pinch of salt
  • ⅔ cup balsamic vinegar
  • ¼ cup lemon juice
  • 1 tbsp cracked black pepper

Directions

To Prepare

  1. Sterilize the jars and wash the jar lids and rings in hot, soapy water. Place lids and rings in a deep bowl and pour near-boiling water over them.
  2. Start bringing to boil a large, deep canning kettle of water to be used for the canning process and a second, smaller pot of water to be used to replenish water that may boil away during the canning process.
  3. Trim stem and bottom of each fig before chopping. When finished, use a potato masher to smash them.

To Make the Jam

  1. Place a small plate in the freezer. Place the figs, sugar, and water into a sauce pan over high heat and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium, add the salt, optional butter, and stir occasionally until a rolling boil is achieved. (A rolling boil is one that cannot be stirred away. Using a candy thermometer, that’s about 220˚F (104˚ C).)
  2. Once a rolling boil has been achieved, place a small amount of the fig mixture on the now frozen plate. Once the cooked figs have returned to room temperature, check to see if it is jam-like. If too runny, continue cooking for 10 minutes and test again. When the right consistency is achieved, remove from heat and continue to the next step.
  3. With a large spoon, carefully skim the surface to remove any foam.
  4. Add the balsamic, black pepper, and  lemon juice. Stir well to thoroughly combine.

To Preserve

  1. Using a funnel and large ladle, fill each jar to ¼ inch from the rim. Wipe the rim to make sure no jam has spilt, place a lid on each jar, and then the ring, tightening until “finger tight” but not as tight as you can make it. Act quickly, filling and capping all the jars.
  2. Jars placed directly on the kettle’s bottom might burst, so, a rack of some sort must be put into the canning kettle to cover the bottom. Many large pots have one, as do many pressure cookers.
  3. Keep each jar level as you place them, one by one, into the canning kettle filled with now boiling water. The jars should not touch each other, nor should they be allowed to tip over. Depending upon the size of the kettle and number of jars, you may need to work in batches.
  4. Once the jars are in the kettle, make sure that there is at least one inch of water over the top of the tallest jar(s). If not, add boiling water from the smaller pot mentioned in Step 2 of  To Prepare.
  5. Cover the pot and begin timing when the water returns to the boil. The jars must be boiled, “processed”, for 5 to 10 minutes, depending upon the size of jar used.
  6. Meanwhile, place a baking sheet on a level surface and line it with a clean kitchen towel.
  7. Once the time has passed, carefully remove each jar and place it on to the towel-lined baking sheet. Leave about an inch separating the jars.
  8. Once all the jars have been processed and placed on the baking sheet, remove the baking sheet & jars to a place that is draft-free and where they will remain undisturbed for 24 hours.
  9. After 24 hours have passed, check each jar to insure it’s sealed and then store on a shelf in a cool, dark place, where it will stay fresh for months.

*     *     *

Notes

Once opened, the preserves should be refrigerated and fully used within a month.

*     *     *

Coming soon to a monitor near you …

Pancetta-Topped Roast Loin of Pork with Fig Preserves

*     *     *

It’s déjà vu all over again …

It’s that time of year again. Concord grape time, that is. In our farmers markets, groceries, and vegetable/fruit stands, the grapes are on full display. Although a sure sign of Summer’s end, they do mean that it’s time to start making some jelly — and I’ve got a few pounds of the blue beauties just waiting to be transformed.  I’ll be following a recipe that I used last year. If you’re interested in doing the same or just want to check it out, you can do so by clicking HERE.

*     *     *

Advertisements

107 thoughts on “Fig Preserves with Balsamic Vinegar and Black Pepper

  1. First problem I would have with making this fabulous recipe is not eating too many of the figs before I getting to the stove – I have been known to be a bit of a piggy when it comes to eating figs.
    I’m loving the look of the pork – waiting excitedly for the recipe.
    🙂 Mandy

    Like

    • I’m with ya, Mandy. I’d already been buying figs for weeks (at inflated prices, no less!) and enjoying them so using these for preserves wasn’t as hard as it might have been. Still, it isn’t an easy task cleaning and trimming 5 dozen figs without sampling at least a few. And not to worry. The roast pork recipe is coming. 🙂

      Like

  2. I can imagine how the balsamic vinegar fits, but the black pepper sounds very interesting! Do you actually feel the spice in the jam? I love figs and the pancetta looks divine!

    Like

    • Thanks, Villy! I “discovered” the pepper with a strawberry jam recipe from a fellow blogger. The pepper lends a little bit of a bite to the “finish”. It takes jam/preserves to an adult level. I’m a big fan of pepper, using it as a final garnish to virtually every pasta dish I prepare. Using it in jam is just a natural progression. 🙂

      Like

  3. Nice shot of the tray of figs. Much as I admire you, I just can’t get into too much jam making or preserving. We don’t eat enough jam ( and it seems our friends don’t either) and even though I live in the wilds, I can get preserves from the markets. Well, John, there’s my excuse for total laziness. I get all the pleasure that jam making provides from reading your posts:)

    Like

    • Thanks, Roger. I wouldn’t call it laziness, only common sense. I give much of these preserves and jams to my friends; there’s only so much jam one person can eat in a year. I happen to enjoy preparing them and my tasters enjoy eating them. True symbiosis.

      Like

  4. I love all this vicarious preserving, and that you tend towards grown up tastes of balsamic & pepper. I’m not fond of overly sweet tastes, for instance HATE normal manufactured strawberry jam. I could imagine eating this version of fig preserves with cheese… but what I’m really hanging out for is the pig & fig… that, I will try out in my own kitchen 🙂

    Like

    • Oh, I do have a sweet tooth. No doubt about it. I’m just not a breakfast person, so, my jams are used with cheese and the like and tHey don’t need to be all that sweet. Finding Sarah’s recipe for strawberry jam with balsamic was heaven-sent. “Grown up” is right.
      “Pig and fig”. Why didn’t I think of that?

      Like

  5. I love those little babies, I saw them yesterday at the produce stand, but didn’t get them, the sugar/carb count is way to high for me right now, but someday I hope to pop one or two or a few into my mouth!! Nice recipe John, the jars look great!!

    Like

    • You are doing so well, Maria. Don’t let a few figs get in your way. 🙂
      I myself could go without figs, it’s the “no pasta” thingee that I’d never be able to do. Continued success to you!

      Like

  6. Now that you’re a canner….. This is great looking, I might have to look about for more figs. I see this with cheese, but with pork sounds wonderful as well. Must add to the pantry!

    Like

    • Yeah, David, y’all converted me. 🙂
      I’m heading back to that market in a short while but I’m avoiding the cherry bomb peppers and the figs. I’ve got plenty of both now and have to move on. I’ve got grapes waiting to be made into jelly and haven’t bought an apple yet. 🙂

      Like

  7. Fresh figs are so expensive here I’ve never made fig jam. But gee it looks good! I love your jam jars. And I think the balsamic is a great addition as it would really help to cut through the sweetness. And your pork looks amazing and I’m sure the flavours are incredible xx

    Like

    • I’d no idea that figs were so expensive Down Under, Charlie. With your climate, I would have thought they’d be growing all over. You need more Italians in your country. 🙂
      ANd you’re right. The balsamic works well with the figs and both went well with the pork roast.

      Like

  8. Gorgeous preserves!!!!! I can’t wait to see how you use the preserves!!!!! I’ve never made my own jam, I’m a little intimidated, but clearly I’m missing out!! I do like the pepper and the balsamic, I love recipes that have that spicy/sweet combo.

    Like

    • I know what you mean, Tanya. I only started making jam last year and have been making it ever since. It really isn’t as hard as I always thought it would be. And if you don’t wish to can/presserve it, there are plenty of recipes for “freezer jam.” I started with that before I had the courage to start canning. Now I can all sorts of things. Once you try it, you’ll wonder why you were hesitant. Seriously.

      Like

  9. Been years since I made jam. Love the balsamic idea, not sure about the black pepper. Looking forward to the pork recipe.
    That is a grogeous try of figs. I have a few immature figs on my tree (don’t think they will mature) but will look for figs when I go shopping sometime later today.

    Like

    • Hello, Norma. I’m somewhat of a fanatic when it comes to pepper. I really like it and adding it to these jam recipes is just fine with me. Sorry that your figs won’t ripen this year. That’s disappointing. I hope you have better luck at the market. 🙂

      Like

      • I meant to say “That is a gorgeous tray of figs”.
        Most, if not all, of my figs ripened, I harvested a number of quarts, Those remaining few are unexpected latecomers, I noticed they are changing color so may ripened after all. Hope we have a late, late, late first frost.

        Like

  10. I suspected the use of the jam would involve pork… and my heart missed a beat when I saw that gorgeous picture, I am already anticipating your post about it.

    the first photo of the figs is magnificent (love this word: magnificent, so perfect to pronounce, no matter the accent.. 😉

    I take this chance to thank you for stopping by my blog even when you are so far behind your duties and commitments – but, don;t feel like you have to comment, I know that you will pop up again if you disappear for a while, and the Bewitching will be there waiting

    Like

    • Thank you, Sally. I think you’ll like the pork recipe. First I’ve got some Italian dishes to share before we get there.
      It’s not everyday the word “magnificent” gets used around here. (Heck! I refreshed the page to make sure the word was really there.) That was the 1st photo I shot that afternoon, followed by some 30 others. I had figs in the crate, on the table, in a dish. a bowl, you name it. No matter what I tried, I kept coming back to that first one. Imagine doing this with film!
      As for the blogs, I’m getting caught up. It won’t be much longer now. Thank you, though, for being so gracious. Relatively speaking, I’ve just “found” you, as well as a few others. I don’t want any of you to think that I’ve abandoned you. 🙂

      Like

  11. It is definitely fig jam making time but I have never done it like this and (am home for a week as of a few hours ago) if we have any figs left on our tree am going to give it a go as it looks amazing! And don´t worry or stress about changing plans…that´s life 😉

    Like

    • You’re home? Good for you. It must be nice to cook in your own kitchen and sleep in your own bed, if even for a week. I hope you’ve still got figs on your tree whether or not you make jam with them. Fresh figs are such a treat! I won’t let this scheduing stuff stress me out, Tanya, don’t worry. Trying to get those curds to stretch and form Italian mozzarella will stress me out first long before that! 🙂

      Like

  12. Ok, I honestly prefer fig preserves to the actual fruit so right off the bat I’m cool with this post. But then you include a teaser about what is still to come. Geez…you know you can’t post a pic of pork or pork stuffed with jam and not make this glutton happy/unhappy. I’m expecting a second post this week, ASAP! 🙂

    Like

    • Thanks, Jed. If you like fig preserves, you’re gonna love these.
      Now, about that roast. Right now, it’s ready but on the bench. If the Italian mozzarella continues to disappoint, I’ll give the pig the nod and put it on the roster. Otherwise, this pork, no matter how tasty, will just have to wait its turn. Welcome to the Big Leagues, Jed. 😉

      Like

  13. My best laid plans always go awry… and if this is the consequence (a great new jam recipe), then I think we all can forgive you, John! 🙂 And I cannot wait to see the pork loin post!! (Also, Hubs and I finally made our very own pasta this weekend – it was SO good – I was definitely thinking of you while I was cranking out the noodles.)

    Like

    • Oh, Courtney. Your comment has me smiling about as broad as I can. There are no dishes better tasting than that first dish of your own freshly made pasta. And I do not care how easy or difficult it was, it will get easier, to the point of routine, every time you make some. Thanks for the day brightener!

      Like

    • Thanks, Sharyn. These preserves did turn out nice. I cut the sugar by about a third and didn’t miss it one bit. I bet you’d really enjoy them.
      I’d no idea that Concords weren’t available in California. I know that Michigan is one of the major producers but always assumed California grew them, too, just like everything else we eat. I learned something new today. Thanks, Sharyn.

      Like

  14. I really like figs, and fig preserves are wonderful. And with balsamic vinegar? Sign me up! Sounds super, and I’m really looking forward to the pork post. Speaking of posts, I usually have something photographed and ready as an “emergency” post (not written up, but if I apply seat of pants to seat of chair I can do that in an hour or two). But juggling what I want to eat vs. what I want to post about – and finding time to do both – can be a challenge. Looking forward to that mozzarella post. I’ve never made my own cheese (and yes, I know it’s pretty easy) so I’m hoping your post will be the one that finally gets me doing it!

    Like

    • Thank you so much, John. I, too, have a couple posts riding the bench. Right now, though, I’ve a couple recipes whose ingredients’ seasons are ending. I’m in a rush to get them out and mozzarella refuses to play nice!
      If you’re intent on making cheese, please don’t start with Italian mozzarella. I’ve demonstrated how to make 6 other cheeses, including American mozzarella, and each is easier to make than Italian mozzarella. I suggest you start with the ricotta recipe. It isn’t the traditional method but the cheese is fantastic and the recipe almost failure-proof. No matter what you decide, I’ll be here to offer whatever assistance I can. Good luck.

      Like

  15. I LOVE fig preserves (or any preserves for that matter) 🙂 The addition of the balsamic and especially the black pepper sounds delicious! Thanks! Can’t wait for the pork loin recipe!

    Like

    • I have to admit, using balsamic and pepper in the strawberry jam recipe was a revelation. That peppery bite is just incredible and takes these jams into another realm completely. And the figs and pork are a match made in heaven. I hope you get a chance to try them both.

      Like

    • Thanks, Richard, and yes, these preserves were seemingly meant to ge served with pork. In fact, just yesterday my neighborhood grocery had a huge sale on whole pork loins. I bought one and now I’m wondering whether I should have made a double batch of preserves. It really was that good.

      Like

  16. It seems I WILL never learn. Every time I visit you John, I wind up STARVING. I should learn to eat, and eat a LOT, before stopping by. Not that it would help….
    Sigh. This jam is nothing short of amazing. I am SO crazy about figs and I love the balsamic vinegar and pepper in the recipe. I am imagining how absolutely perfect this must be. Sigh again.

    And that pork! Are you kidding me? 🙂
    There is not one thing to eat in this house right now that will satisfy the hunger your post has created. Ugh!
    xx 🙂

    Like

    • You crack me up, Sarah! This is really all your fault. You introduced me to strawberry jam with balsamic and black pepper. Since then, I’ve added balsamic to peach preserves and now to figs. I’ve goy Concord grapes to make jelly and I refuse to add balsamic to them. That’s right. I’m making plain, old, Welch’s-type jelly. So, your safe for a spell.
      That pork, on the other hand, was really something. Figs and pig were meant for each other. I’m anxious to play with the recipe some more. Stay tuned …

      Like

    • You poor dear. Such a deprived life! Figs are, for me, a sweet late Summer treat. Using them to make preserves is a great way to have a little Summer in the dead of Winter. If you happen to see some in a market, remember that green ones are better eaten fresh and the black ones are better in cooking and preserves. I really hope you get a chance to try one. You’re in for a treat.

      Like

  17. That photo of the figs is simply stunning; the colour took my breath away. One of the things I like about cooking is simply how beautiful most of the ingredients are. And your jam transformed the figs’ natural beauty into such an intensely coloured jam – so appealing! Really, I have to make some jam. Can you believe I never have? Nice, though, to have such a long list of things I want to learn, and it’s great to have blogs like yours to turn to for assistance when the time comes.

    Like

    • Thanks you, Mar, for your encouraging words. I was at a market today and, at one point, I just stopped and looked at all of the fruits and veggies, aligned in sections going down the aisles of their mammoth produce department. It really is a beautiful thing to see and a sight I too often take for granted.
      I started making jam only last year — and never looked back. It is far easier than I thought it would be and I love controlling the sugar content. Surprisingly, you can cut the sugar for a “normal” recipe in half and not notice any difference in taste. Do give it a try sometime, You won’t be disappointed. Rest assured. 🙂

      Like

  18. Oh what a tease! That photo of the pork with fig preserves has me absolutely salivating right now! That looks fabulous and is no doubt something I would LOVE. I can’t believe you found that many figs. The only time I saw that many was when “figgy lady” cleaned them out before we could get our hands on any.

    Like

    • Thanks, Kristy. I was surprised to find them, too. And the price! That tray cost $5.99. Prior to that I had paid $3.00 for a pint-sized container. How could I not buy them? Today I went back to that market and they were gone, replaced by fresh green olives. After tasting that pork roast, I wish I had made a double batch of the preserves. I’m going to run out, to be sure. Yes, the roast was that good. 🙂

      Like

  19. Figs are divine. Your photo of them waiting to be preserved is wonderful repetition and light on their skins. Mmmmm. I bake a split second cookie recipe with either raspberry, apricot or fig preserves down the middle. I think this recipe with the kick would go well with the sweet shortbread. I will pass your post on to my canning preserving friends and to those I know adore all things fig. No rush on the cheese post. (I know I am more likely to make the jam than the cheese) Sounds like a fabulous combination.

    Like

    • Thanks, Ruth, for the great compliment. You’re right. Using this jam would be great in a shortbread cookie, as would the strawberry/balsamic jam. The pepper gives both an adult edge that would make your cookies standout. I hope your friends like the recipe and, more importantly, they share a couple jars with you. 😉
      I’ll be trying the mozzarella recipe again this weekend. It can be so discouraging when it doesn’t go as planned. Although I’ve made this cheese in the past, this is my 3rd current attempt. Fingers crossed.

      Like

  20. I do understand how plans get thwarted! I am a planner and organizer…and lately, I can’t stick to it! But it’s so nice to read the flexibility in your scheduled plans, because I think that’s what cooking and creating is really all about. I love figs, and I think your recipe sounds so delicious, John. I’ve used balsamic in a salad with figs, but it strikes me as really an unexpected ingredient in the jam. Great! And thank you for wonderfully complete instructions. I need the details! 🙂 Debra

    Like

    • Thanks, Debra for the encouragement. The scheduling problems don’t normally matter much. This time of year, though, with the seasons changing, some of the ingredients will no longer be available in the weeks ahead. I’m trying to get these recipes out so that people can easily make them. And, of course, I have to have something special for Columbus day. A schedule problem now would not only affect my blog but could impact the World as we know it! Luckily, that catastrophe was avoided. Whew! 🙂
      I do think you’d enjoy this jam, Debra, especially if you already like to combine figs with balsamic. As for the instructions, I want to make sure that any new reader to this or any of my recipes will not have to go elsewhere for critical info. Sure, it can be redundant but people in the know will just skip those parts — I hope!

      Like

  21. I just went to a jamming class this weekend given by a local artisanal jammer. The fig jam was my favorite that i had tasted that day and can’t wait to try and make this one. This looks magnificent John and that roast with the jam is inviting me to dinner I believe. Heavenly. Glad to have you back.

    Like

    • Thanks, Geni, and I’d love to attend a class like the one you’ve just attended. It sounds like a good one to take. I’ve been back now for a week, Geni. With all of the WP problems people are having, you may have missed the post about my trip. You can read it HERE.
      Still, it is good to be back and I’m just about caught up with the backlog of posts to read. I hope you have a great day!

      Like

  22. I’m a little obsessed with your photo of the figs. Love the contrast of blues in the photo–so pretty! And this recipe sounds spectacular. I can’t wait for you to post that pork loin recipe. Oye, my mouth is watering.

    Like

  23. Pingback: When Life Gives You Grapes, Make Jam! | Brooklyn Locavore

    • Thanks, Christina. Luckily (I guess), I’d been eating figs for a couple weeks already. I still sampled a couple but nothing like I would have without the others. And that pork roast has me wishing I’d made a double batch of preserves. Next year, for sure.

      Like

  24. Mmmmm this sounds delicious, John. All the figs have now finished on our trees, but I´ll print this recipe out for next summer. I absolutely love your photo of the purple figs 🙂

    Like

    • Thank you, Marianne. I went back to that market and their figs were all gone, having been replaced by a display of freshly picked green olives. I wish I had bought enough to male a double batch of preserves. I’m very pleased the first one.

      Like

  25. Hi John, your tray of figs has me drooling, admittedly not such a pretty sight as your figs! I admit to relying on friends in France to make the jam , I’m happy to eat it with a good hard cheese:)
    Like you the jam doesn’t need the extra sugar

    Like

    • Oh, Claire. You sweet talker, you! Although I’ve always enjoyed figs, this is the first time I’ve used them to make preserves, I’ll be doing this every year. These were too good to be true.

      Like

  26. Hi John, our cooking class in Lyon with Chef Villard had a gorgeous fig tree in his back yard, we pulled ripe figs off the tree and ate them. They were so succulent and sweet, such a treat. Norma over at Garden to Wok has a potted fig tree that she rolls into her garage in winter; Im going to try that in the spring.
    The balsamic and pepper would add a lovely bite to the sweetness of the figs. Such a gorgeous recipe.
    We’re just waiting on our flight home at Charles De Gaulle airport in Paris. Just a few more hours and our whirl-wind holiday will be a distant memory.

    Like

    • Figs straight form the tree while taking a cooking class in Lyon. Such a delight on so many levels! Good for you! I hope you 2 had a very memorable holiday, Eva, and that your trip home is uneventful. I really appreciate that you’ve taken valuable time to comment here, especially when you coud be in the duty-free shops. 🙂

      Like

  27. Mmmm, I think I’m going to try this recipe. I say “think” because I know I have to set aside, I’m terrible when it comes to canning, I just get so nervous when it comes to boiling the jars. Last time I helped my mom with canning was when my grandpa was alive, over 20 years ago! We haven’t done it since! Look forward to your pork recipe, mmmm!

    Like

    • I, too, was afraid of the entire process, Lisa, often commenting that I didn’t wish to give my friends botulism along with their jelly. I made my first jam, strawberry, last year and that was it. I’ve been canning & pickling things ever since. I’m just very deliberate. Not only is spoilt food a danger but you can get some pretty bad burns. So, I take my time, follow the recipes, and reap the benefits all winter long. In a few minutes, I’ll be making grape jelly and, hopefully, tomato jam tomorrow. You’re a great cook, Lisa, and shouldn’t have any problem with any of this. Really. 🙂

      Like

  28. I tried fresh figs for the first time about two years ago. Now I love them! What’s not to love? Your fig jam not only looks delicious but the the picture of the figs in the pot is such a lovely color! Made my mouth water. Yum! I have fig jam in the fridge from Trader Joe’s…but I can tell that yours is leaps and bounds above whatever TJ’s could hope to accomplish.

    The pork loin with the fig preserves looks divine! ~ April 🙂

    Like

  29. Aren’t they the best? My Grandfather gave me my first fig when I was a boy. He always had a tray of them in his patio this time of year. This was my first batch of preserves and seeing how good the pork roast was, I’m regretting that I didn’t make more. I will next year, that’s for sure.
    Thanks, April, for leaving so nice a comment.

    Like

    • Hello, Karen, and thanks for leaving such a nice comment. The jam did turn out very good and now I’m finding ways to use it other than with goat cheese crostini. The roast worked out very well.

      Like

    • Thank you, Ambrosiana! I showed my Zia you daughter’s picture during my visit home. She thought it cute that you gave her an internet name of “Ambrosina” and loved the picture. 🙂

      Like

  30. John, I need to start a board on pinterest called John’s recipes that I want to make!
    I know I say this every time but almost each and every recipe you post makes me wish I had all the ingredients to try it at once!
    Thank you for being such a wonderful inspiration John

    Like

    • Thank you, Sawsan, for your kind words. I should start up a similar board called “Sawsan’s Lessons”. You teach me something just about every time I go to your blog. Cooking, culture, even archeology. It’s always a surprise, one that I never fail to enjoy. Thank you for making my world a little larger with every post.

      Like

  31. dear darling john, i am popping in today .. i know I am late, but the internet is holding up slightly longer that usual this morning and while your page loaded I was able to make the bed and sort the laundry and then it actually loaded.. yay.. so all good! I have no figs, i love your jam but most of all i LOVE the shot of the figs in their box. just imagine that as wall paper and NOW i am zooming down to see Zia’s place, I may not be able to leave a comment but i am thrilled to be able to get on here today! take care.. hopefully we get a good internet day on wednesday and i get to read your post in a more timely fashion! Sometimes i think it would be faster and more expedient to jump on the train and come up to Taste the jam!! Your Friend Celi

    Like

    • Not to worry, Celi. I myself haven’t been around much, having had a busy weekend and another hectic day today. And tomorrow is our last Cubs game of the season. It can’t come soon enough. Earlier today, for the first time since 1966, the Cubs lost 100 games in a single season. Tomorrow night, if it looks like they’re heading for number 101, I’m leaving early to go to a bar, have a nightcap, and catching the train for home. As we fans have said for 104 years, “Wait ’til next year!”
      I hope you enjoyed the Zia post. We spoke on Saturday and she asked about you and Daisy. She’s fascinated and wants you to write a book. I need to put a link on her desktop to your blog so she can read it daily. Who knows? One day you may see a comment from her. 🙂

      Like

    • Thank you for visiting and leaving a comment. Figs are out of season here and I wish I’d bought more. This jam is so good that I should have made a double batch. I won’t make that mistake net year!

      Like

  32. I’m late to this post…didn’t see it in the deluge of catching up after leaving town last Thursday, but I have come to adore fig jam, and this one with the pepper sounds perfect for pairing with roasted pork! We were camping last weekend and used up the rest of my drunken fig jam and I was pining for more fresh figs to make jam, though I have used dried ones…just not the same. Another great idea…and now I’m craving a pork roast, too!

    Like

    • Yes, it has taken me over a week to catch up since my visit home. I thought I’d never catch up. I went back to the market looking for more figs but they’re gone. I’ll try again tomorrow but I doubt I’ll find any. Drat! These preserves and pork are meant for each other!
      Glad you’re back, Betsy, and don’t worry about commenting here on my blog. See? That’s one less blog to worry about. 🙂

      Like

  33. Not one, but two posts for me to enjoy this morning over my cuppa joe! Figs are one of those foods I always find mysterious, I’m not sure why.. just enchanting. The idea of smearing some figgy jam over a slice of toast is just altogether heavenly sounding. Except my kitchen is devoid of jam.. I have a huge loaf of fresh bread idling on the counter and if I just had a jar of figgy jam all would be right with the world! I haven’t seen beautifully fresh figs here in, well, forever. Lucky you!! Talented you!!

    Like

  34. Figs for me were quite literally forbidden fruit. Grandpa bought them by the case and kept them in the patio. We weren’t allowed to have any unless he offered. Now, I love ’em and cannot wait for them to come into season.
    You may not have any jam and I’ve got more than I ever had. I just made a batch of grape jelly and will be making some strawberry preserves this Saturday. Max and I need to make some deliveries this weekend or I’ll have no room on my dining room table. (That’s my jam’s temporary home.)
    I saw a storm in the Northwest and wondered if it had affected you. So sorry. I don’t know if this helps any but we won’t be far behind and this will be one year where I won’t complain about the snow — well, not very much. It’s been so dry that any precipitation is good! 🙂

    Like

  35. Pingback: Roast Loin of Pork with Fig Preserves | from the Bartolini kitchens

  36. Pingback: Pork Loin Stuffed with Fig Preserves and Goats Cheese « Kitcheninspirations

  37. Pingback: My Tomatoes Are In A Jam | from the Bartolini kitchens

  38. Pingback: Ground Cherry Jam | from the Bartolini kitchens

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s