Panettone Pain Perdu and Bread Pudding

Panettone

Panettone is a sweetened bread from the Milan area that Italians enjoy throughout the holidays. Containing candied citrus and raisins/sultanas, a piece of panettone served with un caffè makes a great afternoon snack. Later, a slice of panettone with a glass of prosecco – or limoncello – is the perfect ending to any meal during this festive season. That’s not the only way to serve this tasty bread, however.

Over the years, I’ve used day-old panettone to make bread pudding and pain perdu (aka French toast, aka eggy bread). In fact, very often I’ll buy a couple of the loaves and place them directly into the freezer. Weeks later, I’ll retrieve one and treat myself to pain perdu on one morning, with some bread pudding on the next. I’m not much of a breakfast person but I really do enjoy “Panettone Week”. What’s not to love? Anyway, since I so often prepare the dishes back-to-back, and the pain perdu recipe is really quite simple, I’m going to share both in one post. I’ll start with Panettone Pain Perdu — for no other reason than I’m a sucker for recipes with an alliterative title.

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Panettone Pain Perdu

This recipe is pretty straight forward. I would caution you, however, from just slicing a panettone and diving in. Always cut and taste a slice before using it as the base for another recipe. First off, it’s delicious, so, why not? Secondly, not all panettone are created equal. Best to learn what flavors you’re dealing with before adding seasonings of any kind.

We’ve all made variations of this dish, so, there’s really no need to give it the “full recipe treatment.”  This dish is very much dependent upon your own taste.

Pre-heat your oven to 200˚ F (95˚ C).

First off, get your egg mixture together. I usually plan 1 large egg per slice of panettone. To that, I’ll add a couple of tablespoons of sour cream or Greek yogurt or cream or milk. Too Pain Perdu on the Griddlecomplicated? Grab that container of left-over eggnog and use it in place of some or all the egg mixture just described. Next, spice it up a bit. I like to grate a little nutmeg into the eggs/nog but have been known to add a little cinnamon, as well. Just be sure to taste the eggnog before adding any more spices. Depending upon how sweet your panettone is, you may want to add a little sugar to the mix, too. Now, give it a good whisk and set aside.

Place equal amounts of sliced strawberries – I’ve also used blueberries but any berry will do – and maple syrup in a small pan and heat over a medium heat. Once it begins to boil, reduce heat to a soft simmer and cook for about 5 minutes before turning the heat to very low to keep warm.

Now, for the panettone. You want thick slices, at least an inch-and-a-half (4 cm) thick. Panettone is filled with bits of candied fruit and they may cause thinner slices to fall apart during or after soaking.

PPP_ServedWhile you heat the griddle, frying or cast iron pan, or whatever cooking surface you intend to use, dip each piece of panettone into the eggs/nog. Be sure to evenly coat each side of every slice.  Melt a bit of butter on the cooking surface and reduce heat to medium before placing the now egg-soaked panettone into the pan. Cook until golden brown — about 5 to 8 minutes — before flipping to cook the other side. Cook for about 5 minutes more. Place on a platter and keep warm in the pre-heated oven while you cook the rest.

Serve garnished with powdered sugar (optional) and accompanied by a gravy boat filled with the warmed berry-laden syrup.

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For a different take on Panettone Pain Perdu, check out the recipes presented by blogging buddies BAM, of Bam’s Kitchen, and/or David, of Cocoa and Lavender. If you can, take a few minutes to check out each of these 2 wonderful blogs — but eat before you do. You’re gonna be mighty hungry if you don’t.

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Panettone Bread Pudding

Panettone Bread Pudding Preview

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Admittedly, this dish is a little more involved to prepare but don’t let that stop you, Panettone makes a wonderful bread pudding and who doesn’t love to start the day with a bit arancello-flavored sauce?

Ingredients

for the bread pudding

  • 16 oz (450 g) panettone, cut into 1 inch (2.5 cm) cubes
  • ½ c (100 g) dried cranberries
  • ½ c arancello + 1 additional tbsp — Grand Marnier may be substituted
  • 4 whole eggs
  • 3 egg yolks
  • ⅓ cup sugar
  • 2 cups heavy cream
  • 1 cup half-and-half
  • pinch of salt
  • ¼ tsp nutmeg
  • zest of 1 orange
  • butter cut into chunks

for the orange sauce

  • 1 stick (½ cup, 113 g) butter
  • ⅓ c sugar
  • arancello reserved after soaking the dried cranberries in Step 1 — ¼ to ⅓ cup
  • juice of 1 orange
  • ⅛ tsp salt
  • 1 egg, beaten

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panettone bread pudding pics

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Directions

  1. At least 30 minutes before you begin, combine the dried cranberries in a bowl with 1/2 cup of arancello. Once fully soaked and needed in the recipe, drain and be sure to reserve the excess arancello for use in the orange sauce – Step 15.
  2. Liberally butter a 9 X 13″ (23 X 33 cm) baking dish.
  3. In a large mixing bowl, add 1 tbsp arancello, the eggs, and sugar. Whisk to dissolve the sugar.
  4. To the same bowl, add the heavy cream, half-and-half, salt, nutmeg, and orange zest. Mix until fully combined.
  5. Spread an even layer of the cubed panettone into the prepared banking dish.
  6. Drain the cranberries, reserving the liquid for use in the orange sauce. Sprinkle the cranberries over the top of the bread cubes in the baking dish.
  7. Give the custard mixture one last whisking before pouring it over the contents of the baking dish.
  8. Cover the dish with foil and refrigerate for at least a couple of hours or overnight.
  9. Once the dish has rested, pre-heat the oven to 350˚ F (175˚ C).
  10. Remove the foil cover and place the baking dish in an even larger pan on the oven’s center rack.
  11. Pour hot water into the larger pan until it reaches halfway up the side of the baking dish. Do not allow any water to get into the baking dish.
  12. Tent the larger pan with foil. Cut a few holes in the foil to vent any steam that may develop.
  13. After 30 minutes, remove the foil tent.
  14. Continue to bake the pudding until the custard is set and the top is browned — about 30 to 45 minutes.
  15. Pull from the oven, remove from the water bath, cover with foil, and allow to rest for 15 minutes.
  16. While the pudding rests, prepare the orange sauce.
    1. In a small sauce pan over medium heat, add the butter, sugar, arancello, orange juice, and salt. Stir and heat until the sugar is melted and the sauce fully heated.
    2. In the bowl containing the beaten egg, stir the egg as a few tablespoons of the heated sauce is added. (This will temper the egg.)
    3. Once tempered, add the eggy mixture to the sauce, whisking all the while to prevent the egg becoming scrambled.
    4. Once fully incorporated, continue to whisk the sauce until it thickens — 2 to 3 minutes. Do not allow to boil.
  17. Bring the bread pudding to the table and drizzle a little of the orange sauce atop each serving.

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Panettone Bread Pudding 4

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Notes

As mentioned earlier, no need to make a batch of arancello. Grand Marnier, an orange-flavored liqueur, may be substituted. For those with children or avoiding alcohol, substitute fresh orange juice for the liquor.

Add 1/4 tsp almond extract if using dried cherries instead of the cranberries

Cooking times may vary depending upon the depth and overall size of the baking dish.

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It’s déjà vu all over again …

Eggs in Purgatory X

If you liked today’s eggy dishes, how about another? Although we call it Eggs in Purgatory, Uova in Purgatorio, a number of nationalities have their own version and name for the dish. In its simplest form, eggs are cooked in tomato sauce and served. Sound easy? That’s because it is. You can read all about it when you click HERE.

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Coming soon to a monitor near you …

Eggplant Lasagna - Preview

This Year’s Birthday Dinner: Eggplant Lasagna

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123 thoughts on “Panettone Pain Perdu and Bread Pudding

  1. Happy New Year ! This is indeed a great way of dealing with panettone, thank you for the recipe. My sister in law used some panettone to make a tiramisu and it was much appreciated by guests on new year’s eve, so much so that I didn’t get to taste any of it ! (it was a buffet dinner). Anyway, thought you might like to know. She has called it a “panettonamisu”.

    Liked by 1 person

    • And the happiest of New Years to you, too!
      “Panettonamisu”?!?!?! Sounds wonderful! I think I need to get out tomorrow and find me more panettone. Also sounds like you need to brush up on you buffet dining skills. One always keeps a space on the plate open and an eye on the desserts. If you see a dessert disappearing faster than the rest, jump the line and get yourself some of that. Fellow (knowledgeable) diners will understand. 😀

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  2. Happy 2017 John. Trust you are going to have a beautiful and happy year.
    I have a weakness for bread and butter pudding and using panettone is even better, not to mention the orange sauce! SCRUMPTIOUS!
    Have a wonderful day.
    🙂 Mandy xo

    Liked by 1 person

    • Happy New Year, to you, too, Mandy. I ope it brings you both joy and peace — and a bunch of visits together!
      I’m glad you like today’s recipes. I now buy panettone just to prepare them like this, as well as to serve sliced. Thank heavens it’s only available around CHristmas or Id be big as a house! 🙂

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  3. Great minds, indeed, think alike, John! The best part about these so-called “great minds” is that each great mind thinks alike, but differently!

    Will try your panettone pain perdu, AND the bread pudding!

    Thanks for the shout out in your post – when I get home to my computer, I will do the same!

    Happy New Year, dear friend!
    David

    Liked by 1 person

    • Happy New Year to you both, David. I wrote these recipes as 2 separate posts last Christmas but never got around to posting them. When I saw my recipe line-up, it was either post them now or wait another year. I definitely plan to prepare your recipe, as well as BAM’s. After all, I’ve got 3 panettone in my freezer. I’m going to need some variety.
      Buon anno!

      Liked by 1 person

    • I rarely have leftovers myself, Tania. That’s why I buy at least one just after Christmas and put it right into the freezer. No chance of cutting into it. I may have gone a tad bit overboard this year I fear. I’ve got 3 panettone down there. 🙂
      A very happy and healthy New year to you, Toli, your families, and all the good people on your mountain.

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  4. Panettone is good stuff. One of those things I usually buy, though. Never made my own. Like using the leftovers (are leftovers of it even legal?) in bread pudding. Or Pan Perdu (sounds so much better than “French Toast,” doesn’t it?). Fun stuff. Happy New Year!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hello, John. I have a family recipe for panettone but never got around to preparing it. I do have the paper “pans” though, so, I’m almost there. 🙂
      It was always called French toast and Mom & Zia would have thought I was putting on airs if I said Pain Perdu. Blame it on alliteration. I can’t resist it.

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    • Thanks, Bruce. Yeah, powdered sugar is a must here, too. I don’t use it very often but there are some dishes that I won’t serve without it. If you cannot powder your French toast over the holidays, when can you?
      Enjoy your weekend.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Than you, Gerlinde. I rarely prepare breakfast for myself, preferring to split some fruit with my parrot. So, when I do decide a breakfast is in order, I tend to go all out. Either of these options, especially when accompanied by the syrup or sauce, definitely falls into that category. They’re a great way to start a day.
      Hope 2017 is a kind and generous year for you and yours.

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  5. Perfect, John! I was gifted a panettone and was thinking about making it into a bread pudding… and here you are, obliging as always 😉

    Hope that you had a good holiday season and that 2017 is off to a wonderful start for you!

    Liked by 1 person

    • So good to see you, Cole. I hope all is well in your world.
      You’re going to love bread pudding made wth panettone. Just taste it first because some loaves are seasoned and you don’t want to over do it. Last night I went out to buy another one for my freezer. Lo and behold! They had a 2-for-1 sale! I bit and now have 3 panettone in my freezer. Overkill? Maybe but I”m loving the thought of all that bread pudding and French toast in my future. 2017 is looking pretty good — at least on that front. 😉
      I hope you enjoyed wonderful holidays, Cole, and that 2017 brings you and yours much happiness and good health.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ah, Bella! So good to see you here! You are so right! A nice slice, toasted with a drizzle of honey, is sooo good. Hope you’re enjoying 2017 and please give my love to Zia. Tanti baci!

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  6. happy new year everyone + it’s gonna be a … well we will see… finger crossed…

    + here in the uk the panettone pudding is called “panettone bread and butter pudding” and came into prominence in the 1980s… my early versions also have some apricot jam or marmalade in between the layers – really rich and fab.
    Tere is beautiful version by Italian-British food writer Anna del Conte where mascarpone is being used instead of the custard: the mascarpone is whisked with eggs and citrus juice and zest and then the whole is assembled in the usual way ….here it is: http://tinyurl.com/hqdckvg
    it is really splendid and I do encourage u to give it a go, for a different panettone pudding.

    oddly enough, we do not have panettone pudding in Italy (even if we do have many bread puddings) and it is a shame… because it is truly delicious. My only problem with this pudding… is the cost: here in London, except the ones u can find in some supermarkets, panettone is pretty expensive: in the region of 12-15 pounds for a 750g/1kg – decent ones,the super fancy stuff one can buy in Italy do not even reach these shores. In Milano I used to pay 24 euros per kg from one of the oldest patisseries in town (Marchesi – check it out if u go to Milano), but that is a true artisanal panettone. On the 26th December most supermarket used to sell panettone at a massively discounted price: I once paid 2 euros each – I used to stock up…. because it is a Milanese custom to have a slice of panettone on the 3rd of February, San Biagio day – it is said that this should protect your throat from the last of the winter cold… one of those lovely Italian rituals….
    & also because a sliced of lightly toasted panettone makes the most gorgeous afternoon tea break

    Liked by 1 person

    • Buon anno, Stefano!
      I have thought of using mascarpone in the custard but never got the chance to try it. You’ve given me 2 good-sounding recipes to check. As I’ve mentioned above, I went out last night to buy a 2nd panettone for the freezer. Well, there was a 2-for-1 sale. I now have 3 panettone in my freezer, so, I’ve plenty with which to try new recipes. YAY!
      Panettoni prices vary greatly here, too. If I’m serving them sliced to guests, I’ll get the higher quality ones. For these recipes, I’m not as particular. In these, the custard or egg bath will make or break the dish.
      We, too, celebrate “St. Blaise” feast day though not nearly so deliciously. Here, we got to church to have our throats blessed by the priest holding 2 candles crossed and held under our chin. It is said to protect us from choking as it commemorates the Saint’s life and work as a healer.
      And YES, a bit of panettone in the afternoon is a very good thing!

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    • Thanks, Conor. I may not put up a Christmas tree. There are no lights in my windows. I can guarantee, however, that there will be at least one panettone in this house at Yuletide, with another destined for the freezer,

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    • Oh, Kathryn. Poor, deprived Katheryn! If you lived nearby, I’d bring 2 to your home. If you’ve an Italian market or a grocer with an international flair, run don’t walk to it. Right now, after the holidays, panettone is on sale. They may not be the highest quality but they are certainly good enough to use here. IMO, in these 2 dishes, it’s the custard (bread pudding) or egg bath (French toast) that makes the dish. And when you do buy one and make either dish, I bet you’ll wish you had bought more. I do it every year. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • Oh John, lol! An Italian market in the middle of nowhere in Central Oregon? Besides the fact that I’m currently buried under about a foot and a half of snow. Daughter had to take my SUV to school today as her car can’t get through it. The closest thing we have to an international market is Trader Joe’s or Whole Foods.Unless you count Food4Less, which has a large Mexican section.

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        • I keep forgetting where you live, Kathryn, It reminds me very much of rural Michigan. I would bring flat leaf parsley with me since none could be found there. Well, if ever you absolutely must have some panettone, you can order one from the Eataly online store. If nothing else, it would be entertaining to watch the delivery man attempt to get the package to your front door. A foot and a half !?!?

          Liked by 1 person

  7. I’d never thought to use Panettone for French Toast – what is WRONG with me?? You may remember I posted a recipe for Bread Pudding using Panettone… that was a few Christmases ago
    Don’t know why i knew thought of French toast… Well – ‘And now I know”.
    I happen to have some Panettone right now… just sitting…. all lonely and sad… on my kitchen counter. I’m gonna make it ‘happy’ & prepare this awesome looking bread pudding!! ; o )

    Liked by 1 person

    • I just copied the recipe so I can print it and make it either today or tomorrow – and I noticed (as my dear Japanese friend used to say) that this bread pudding is ‘reech, reech, reech’!! ; o )

      Liked by 1 person

      • Oh, yeah. There’s nothing low-cal about either dish but that’ why they should be served around the holidays. Calories don’t count during the holidays. It’s true. I read it on the internet, Cecile.
        I’m eager to hear your critique and will gladly accept any suggestions you may have.
        All this talk of French toast and bread pudding is making hungry. It’s a good thing I’m leaving shortly to see LaLa Land otherwise I’d be pulling a panettone out of the freezer. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  8. I buy my panettone on sale at the end of the holidays, and I usually make the bread pudding which is usually better with day old bread! My recipe soaks overnight. I slice the panettone and freeze individual slices to make in the near future! I’ve never had Pain Perdu but I’m certain that from your photos, I would love it!
    Eggs in purgatory is one of my absolute favourites, I make the make the Middle Eastern version but it’s virtually the same.
    Eggplant lasagna is something I have recently grown to love; I made one for Boxing Day games but mine was gluten free and vegetarian (used GF noodles and a lentil béchamel) it was delicious!
    Hope your tooth problems are a distant memory. We’re in the midst of plumbing issues! You’ll see my grumblings on FB soon.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I, too, take advantage of the post-holiday sales. In fact, I went out last night to buy 1 for the freezer and came upon a 2-rot-1 sale. Yippee! You and another commenter have given me the idea to cut each loaf prior to freezing. An entire loaf for me is too much, no matter how I use it. Half-loaves, though, would be fine.
      Every time I’ve tried GF pasta I’ve been disappointed. What brand did you use for you lasagna. If it’s a good one, I’ll pass the brand along to my GF family members and friends. Thanks, Eva. Lentil béchemel???? Ooooh, that does sound good!
      As for the dental issues, everything is on hold while the healing continues. I’ll return in a couple of weeks for final fitting and then again a couple weeks later. That last visit will see the permanent solution put in place and, most importantly, the end of this “soft” diet. I’ve already bought the prime rib roast for that celebratory dinner! As I told a friend, too bad corn on the cob is not in season. I’d love to tear into one. 🙂

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  9. Pingback: ‘Recipe Roundup’ – Sharing Recipes from Some of the Wonderful Bloggers I Follow ++ A new idea I hope you enjoy!! – My Yellow Farmhouse

  10. Nice, John. Bread putting and French toast revisited. I love the idea. Not sure what carancello is. I did a google translate and it didn’t help, but I’m okay with Grand Marnier. 🙂
    I do have a question. I tried Panettone once, some time ago. It was pre-packed and imported from Italy. I wonder if you got it fresh from the bakery whether it would be different. The illustration on the packet was luscious looking but it was quite dry and the fruit was hard to find.. Sadly, I didn’t think of using it as pudding or French (Italian) toast.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Your comment sent back to the recipe again. It’s “arancello”, Mary. There’s no “C”. Arancello is made from oranges, just as limoncello is made from lemons. The blog post to which I referred use blood oranges to make the liqueur.
      Panettone comes in a variety of prices. I usually buy the higher priced loaves from an Italian market if I’ll be serving it sliced to guests. For these recipes, I’ll get the less expensive loaves because I feel the egg bath and custard will be the primary vehicles for imparting flavor. After all, bread pudding recipes usually suggest using day-old bread. Like you, I have a hard time deciding which brand to buy when presented with a wall of boxed panettone at the market, as I was last night. I plan to keep the package top so that I can either buy it again — or avoid it — next year.

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  11. Hi John – the other day I got the idea to post a ‘recipe roundup’ once a week. I just posted my very first roundup – and these two recipes of yours are the first ever. I included three more recipes – on from Mom on Timeout, The Southern Lady Cooks & also from Brooklyn Farm Girl. ; o )

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Hmmm! Appetizing reading for sure and I DO love panettone . . . but, being the proverbial wet blanket have also a number of New Year Resolutions in place [and it’s only 5 January here: I can’t be that weak-willed!] – one of the main ones does say something about losing a couple of dress sizes by my birthday 🙂 ! So if I may I’ll read and daydream once more and then take the advice of your cousin Emanuela and have my remaining slices toasted with honey . . .

    Liked by 1 person

    • You can’t do much better than to follow my cousin’s advice. She’s someone really special. Why not buy a panettone, slice it, and freeze the portions? That way you can cook what you want without feeling the need to finish the rest of the loaf. (I make a good panettone enabler, don’t I?)
      No matter what, Eha, good luck with those resolutions. 🙂

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      • Yes, I know you don’t think I’ll keep to them, kind Sir 🙂 ! All the more reason for me to try – perchance you are a weight loss enabler as well !!! Meanwhile methinks January 6 is too late to find post-Yule Italian holiday bread here, but one can try!! Especially should I find some at four dollars as Francesca did . . .

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  13. That panettone pain perdu (PPP) makes me want to turn the griddle on right now! And the bread pudding sounds like a lusciously rich and flavourful treat! I’ve made many a slice of French toast or bread pudding, but I’ve never started with a flavoured, fruited bread. Of course now I’m asking, WHY NOT? These recipes sound delicious! (And just the thing for my January back-to-pared-down eating style, lol — then again, my birthday is this month. And I’ll be posting my own Chocolate Raspberry Bread Pudding recipe soon, so I’m a fine one to talk!).

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, I do love both but, sadly, once the post was photographed, I put away the panettone. 2016 was my year for weight loss and I was fairly successful. Unfortunately, 2017 started out reversing the trend. Too many opportunities like “I know I shouldn’t be eating this cake but I can only eat soft foods … ” And there’s chocolate raspberry bread pudding on the horizon AND my birthday next week? I’m in trouble.

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  14. Panettone never has a chance to get stale in our house. Traditionally we cut it to have for breakfast on Christmas Day with strong espresso and usually by the time the 12 days of Christmas have passed (that’s tomorrow) the panettone is gone. I’m considering buying another as you suggested and freezing it in chunks to make pudding

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    • Oh, yes, Sandra, putting one directly into the freezer is the only way for me to ensure that I have one for either of today’s dishes. It’s far to easy to keep snacking on one when it’s just sitting on a counter top.

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  15. And here I am trying to move toward a healthier diet. 🙂 I love Panettone and buy at least one every holiday. Love the idea of turning one into bread pudding. Reminds me of my mother saving leftover biscuits and sweet rolls and turning them in bread pudding. Great idea!

    Happy New Year!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I am, too, MJ, and had some success. These past holidays were tough. I used the dental problems as my excuse to eat more of the things I’ve been avoiding. Do you know how many Christmas treats are soft? And those that aren’t often taste really good dipped in coffee. Back on the wagon now but all bets are off for next week. My birthday is Tuesday. 🙂

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  16. Great timing John. I’m about to crack open the pannetone to make a summer trifle. I usually freeze the other half for winter puddings. But this time I’ll leave a slice or two for this Pannetone Perdu. Did you know that I really don’t like Pannetone, but buy it after Christmas for $3.99 just to freeze for puddings. Your pick of the eggy toasted pannetone with strawberries is an instant winner.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Francesca. I usually buy a higher quality panettone for guests, and at least one more for the freezer. Never thought to slice them, however. That’s a great idea. Of course, I’ll lose my excuse for making bread pudding twice that week. “I know I shouldn’t but that panettone will go stale if I don’t use it … “

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  17. I am back to read just the right recipe, John! I absolutely love panettone. We were given one at Christmas and I am pretty sure I ate the whole thing myself, one slice at a time! And bread pudding is possibly my favorite dessert out of almost anything offered. I think panettone is still in the stores and I’d better go get at least one! The Pannetore Perdu is heavenly as well. I think I have one piece left and can at least have one serving! I wish I had the bread pudding right now! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • I had the same thought last week, Debra, and went to buy a “reserve” panettone. Well, they had a 2-fer sale. Now, I’ve got 2 in my freezer. There are some pretty fabulous breakfasts/brunches in my future!

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  18. I love pain perdu, too, but unsurprisingly the Bartolini kitchens introduce me to another variation of this wonderfully comforting classic. I have to try this! Bread & butter pudding is something I remember my mum making for me when I was totally heartbroken: it worked, at least for the length of a meal I stopped crying 🙂

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  19. John, the pain perdu is great but the bread pudding is amazing! That sauce… I have to try that recipe! I was going to make panettone from scratch for Christmas, but because it was on a Sunday this year it didn’t work out. If I see leftover panettone for sale at the market Saturday, I’ll definitely buy some just to make the pudding.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Again, we think alike, Stefan. It had been my intention to prepare a panettone one week and share these recipes the next. Numerous trips to the dentist overloaded an already full schedule. There’s always next year, eh? 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  20. Everything about this looks delicious, and totally worth it! I’m sure I could talk someone into making this for me on the weekend.

    The idea of using leftover eggnog for the egg coating/French toast is BRILL-I-ANT. I want to rush out and buy eggnog right now just to try it. I’m serious!

    And that orange sauce!! I can think of several things it could be poured on top of. Thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

    • You’re very welcome, Ruth. That egg nog was a last minute fix to discovering that didn’t have enough eggs. That will teach me to check for ingredients before beginning to cook. And the orange sauce resulted when I found a bottle of arancello buried in my basement freezer. Thought cooking with it was a better idea than grabbing a glass. 🙂

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  21. John this is one thing I absolutely look forward to at Christmas time. I get a fresh panettone and make it straight into bread pudding, what could be more delicious. I am so hungry now!!

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    • A kindred spirit! I feel much the same way and when I come upon a panettone display at the market, I immediately think, “Bread pudding!” Now, with 2 in a freezer in the basement, I smile every time I open its door and see them waiting for me. 🙂

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    • I was astonished to see how many different versions of panettone that were available over the holidays. They must have heard you, Abbe, because some lacked fruit. Check them out next year. If all else fails, take a look at the Eataly website. He had several panettone for sale.

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  22. Great recipes. I’ve made panettone into French toast – more like a casserole for when I had company. Works so well with stale bread, too. I never got one this past Christmas. But if you happen to have old croissants laying around – those work fabulously for bread pudding as well. I think it was a Nigella recipe that inspired me. In any case I hope you have a wonderful New Year’s!

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  23. When I was growing up we had Italian friends and every Christmas they would give us a panettone in a very pretty cardboard box. When they first started giving us a panettone, we had no idea what it was! I agree with you that it makes a fantastic bread and butter pudding. Yours looks very yummy. Happy New Year to you and all your family and friends xx

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Charlie. I hope you’re enjoying your time away from the classrooms. My memories of panettone stretch back as far as I remember Christmas. It was never used for either of today’s dishes mainly because we kids ate it as if we’d been starved. I swear we were part locust when the holidays rolled around. 🙂

      Hope 2017 proves to be a very good year for you and yours, Charlie.

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  24. Funny, I had bread pudding just yesterday for the first time, believe it or not. I thought it tasted a lot like French toast, and now I know why! They’re really cousins, aren’t they? Both delicious, especially made with panettone. Or so I have to imagine—the stuff never lasts long enough around here for leftovers!

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    • They are cousins, Frank, but I find the pain perdu easier to prepare and serve to guests. You can “build” it the night before, refrigerate it overnight, and pop it in the oven as the guests arrive. Why stay in the kitchen working a griddle when there are mimosas to be drunk? 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Now, wouldn’t that be something? They’d probably eat me out of house and home but I’d have a good time trying to fill them up. On the other hand, as active as they are, they’d also run me ragged. Sure would be fun, though. 😀

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  25. My mom always shook her head at my ‘italian-ness.” I’m not a fan of panettone, and to make it worse – I don’t drink coffee. Although, it’s really the candied fruit that I’m not a fan of and these days there are a lot of different options out there. Making french toast and bread pudding with it sounds amazing!

    Liked by 1 person

    • “Italian-ness” Love it! You’re right. I was surprised when I took a closer look at the panettone display at a market a few weeks again. I’d no idea there were so many options. It was too late for the holidays just passed but I’m branching out next year! There were a couple with chocolate I cannot wait to try. 🙂

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    • Welcome, Cecilia! Both of these recipes are just fancy enough to serve at brunch — but so very easy to prepare.
      Thanks for stopping by and for taking the time to leave such a nice comment.

      Like

  26. ciao Gianni, comé stai! 🙂 all looks sooo yummy, as usually… ❤ unfortunately, I can't have gluten, sugar and cow lactose!!!
    * * *
    @"Panettone Pain Perdu" – lost bread panettone… 🙂
    * * *
    le pain perdu(lost bread!) has been very popular in France for centuries… but made only with old dry bread, milk, eggs, sugar… bon appétit! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hello, Melanie! Yes, pain perdu is usually made with regular, day old bread, although people are now using challah and, in my home, panettone. I enjoy serving it for Sunday brunch.
      I didn’t realize that you had a restricted diet. Sorry to read that. At least there are more foods available for you now than there were just a few years ago. Let’s hope the trend continues for you all.

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  27. Hi Dear John🌞I haven’t still saw your Panettoneeeeeee😋 I usually fill Panettone with Nutella😆but there are many ways to prepare different delicious slices 😉expecially for people like us who love cooking and eating, isn’t it? Hug u🎈🌼🌸

    Like

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